Alliance, OH, United States
Alliance, OH, United States

The University of Mount Union is a 4-year private, coeducational, liberal arts college in Alliance, Ohio. For more than a century the college has been officially connected with the Methodist Church. It is now affiliated with the East Ohio, West Ohio and Western Pennsylvania Conferences of the United Methodist Church. Mount Union has been ranked for 14 consecutive years as a top college in the Midwest and is also ranked as a "Best Buy" for regional liberal arts colleges in the Midwest.Mount Union has an enrollment of 2,209 undergraduate students, divided approximately equally between men and women. Students represent more than 22 states and 13 countries. Mount Union has an alumni base of more than 13,000 graduates located around the world. Wikipedia.


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News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has ranked the best two- and four-year colleges with online programs in the state of Ohio for 2017. Among four-year schools a total of 41 made the list, with University of Akron, University of Toledo, University of Cincinnati, Ohio University and Ashland University coming in as the top five schools. The state’s top 18 two-year schools were also honored, with Sinclair College, Cincinnati State Technical and Community College, Belmont College, Edison State Community College and Columbus State Community College taking the top five spots. Schools were ranked based on over a dozen different data points. “Student enrollment in schools within the University System of Ohio has grown 8 percent over the past decade,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. “As more students pursue post-secondary degrees, the schools on our list are providing more flexible, high-quality learning opportunities outside the traditional classroom.” To be included on the Best Online Schools list, colleges must meet specific base requirements, including being institutionally accredited and public or private not-for-profit institutions. Each college is scored based on additional criteria that includes its employment and counseling resources, student/teacher ratios, graduation rates and financial aid availability. For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: Ohio’s Best Online Four-Year Schools for 2017 include the following: Ashland University Baldwin Wallace University Bowling Green State University-Main Campus Case Western Reserve University Cedarville University Cleveland State University Defiance College Franciscan University of Steubenville Franklin University God’s Bible School and College Hiram College Kent State University at Kent Kent State University at Salem Kettering College Malone University Miami University-Oxford Mount Carmel College of Nursing Mount Saint Joseph University Mount Vernon Nazarene University Muskingum University Notre Dame College Ohio Christian University Ohio University-Main Campus Otterbein University Shawnee State University The University of Findlay Tiffin University Union Institute & University University of Akron Main Campus University of Cincinnati-Main Campus University of Dayton University of Mount Union University of Northwestern Ohio University of Rio Grande University of Toledo Urbana University Ursuline College Walsh University Wright State University-Lake Campus Wright State University-Main Campus Youngstown State University Ohio’s Best Online Two-Year Schools for 2017 include the following: Belmont College Bowling Green State University-Firelands Central Ohio Technical College Cincinnati State Technical and Community College Clark State Community College Columbus State Community College Cuyahoga Community College Edison State Community College Hocking College Lakeland Community College Lorain County Community College Marion Technical College North Central State College Northwest State Community College Rhodes State College Sinclair College Stark State College University of Akron Wayne College ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.


News Article | January 12, 2016
Site: www.rdmag.com

Oxygen is indispensable to animal and plant life, but its presence in the wrong places can feed a fire and cause iron to rust. In the fabrication of solid state lighting devices, scientists are learning, oxygen also plays a two-edged role. While oxygen can impede the effectiveness of gallium nitride (GaN), an enabling material for LEDs, small amounts of oxygen in some cases are needed to enhance the devices' optical properties. GaN doped with europium (Eu), which could provide the red color in LEDs and other displays, is one such case. Last week, an international group of researchers shed light on this seeming contradiction and reported that the quantity and location of oxygen in GaN can be fine-tuned to improve the optical performance of Eu-doped GaN devices. The group includes researchers from Lehigh, Osaka University in Japan, the Instituto Superior Técnico in Portugal, the University of Mount Union in Ohio, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. Writing in Scientific Reports, a Nature publication, the group said that small quantities of oxygen promote the uniform incorporation of Eu into the crystal lattices of GaN. The group also demonstrated a method of incorporating Eu uniformly that utilizes only the oxygen levels that are inevitably present in the GaN anyway. Eu, a rare earth (RE) element, is added to GaN as a "dopant" to provide highly efficient red color emission, which is still a challenge for GaN-based optoelectronic devices. The devices' ability to emit light is dependent on the relative homogeneity of Eu incorporation, said Volkmar Dierolf, professor and chair of Lehigh's physics department. "Some details, such as why the oxygen is needed for Eu incorporation, are still unclear," said Dierolf, "but we have determined that the amount required is roughly 2 percent of the amount of Eu ions. For every 100 Eu ions, you need two oxygen atoms to facilitate the incorporation of Eu to GaN. "If the oxygen is not there, the Eu clusters up and does not incorporate. When the oxygen is present at about 2 percent, oxygen passivation takes place, allowing the Eu to incorporate into the GaN without clustering." The article is titled "Utilization of native oxygen in Eu(RE)-doped GaN for enabling device compatibility in optoelectronic applications." The lead author, Brandon Mitchell, received his Ph.D. from Lehigh in 2014 and is now an assistant professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Mount Union and a visiting professor at Osaka University. Coauthors of the article include Dierolf; Yasufumi Fujiwara, a professor of materials science at Osaka University; and Jonathan D. Poplawsky, a research associate at Oak Ridge National Laboratory who received his Ph.D. from Lehigh in 2012. Gallium nitride, a hard and durable semiconductor, is valued in solid state lighting because it emits light in the visible spectrum and because its wide band gap makes GaN electronic devices more powerful and energy-efficient than devices made of silicon and other semiconductors. The adverse effect of oxygen on GaN's properties has been much discussed in the scientific literature, the researchers wrote in Scientific Reports, but oxygen's influence on, and interaction with, RE dopants in GaN is less well understood. "The presence of oxygen in GaN," the group wrote in their article, which was published online Jan. 4, "...is normally discussed with a purely negative connotation, where possible positive aspects of its influence are not considered. "For the continued optimization of this material, the positive and negative roles of critical defects, such as oxygen, need to be explored." The group used several imaging techniques, including Rutherford Backscattering, Atomic Probe Tomography and Combined Excitation Emission Spectroscopy, to obtain an atomic-level view of the diffusion and local concentrations of oxygen and Eu in the GaN crystal lattice. Its investigation, the group wrote, represented the "first comprehensive study of the critical role that oxygen has on Eu in GaN." The group chose to experiment with Eu-doped GaN (GaN:Eu), said Dierolf, because europium emits bright light in the red portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, a promising quality given the difficulty scientists have encountered in realizing red LED light. The group said its results "strongly indicate that for single layers of GaN:Eu, significant concentrations of oxygen are required to ensure uniform Eu incorporation and favorable optical properties. "However, for the high performance and reliability of GaN-based devices, the minimization of oxygen is essential. It is clear that these two requirements are not mutually compatible." Preliminary LED devices containing a single 300-nanometer active GaN:Eu layer have been demonstrated in recent years, the group reported, but have not yet achieved commercial viability, in part because of the incompatibility of oxygen with GaN. To overcome that hurdle, said Dierolf, the researchers decided that instead of growing one thick, homogeneous layer of GaN:Eu they would grow several thinner layers of alternating doped and undoped regions. This approach, they found, utilizes the relatively small amount of oxygen that is naturally present in GaN grown with organo-metallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE), the common method of preparing GaN. "Instead of growing a thick layer of Eu-doped GaN," said Dierolf, "we grew a layer that alternated doped and undoped regions. Through the diffusion of the europium ion, oxygen from the undoped regions was utilized to incorporate the Eu into the GaN. The europium then diffused into the undoped regions." To determine the optimal amount of oxygen needed to circumvent the oxygen-GaN incompatibility, the researchers also conducted experiments on GaN grown with an Eu "precursor" containing oxygen and on GaN intentionally doped with argon-diluted oxygen. They found that the OMVPE- grown GaN contained significantly less oxygen than the other samples. "The concentration of this oxygen [in the OMVPE- grown GaN] is over two orders of magnitude lower than those [concentrations] found in the samples grown with the oxygen-containing Eu...precursor," the group wrote, "rendering the material compatible with current GaN-based devices. "We have demonstrated that the oxygen concentration in GaN:Eu materials can be reduced to a device-compatible level. Periodic optimization of the concentration ratio between the normally occurring oxygen found in GaN and the Eu ions resulted in uniform Eu incorporation, without sacrificing emission intensity. "These results appear to coincide with observations in other RE-doped GaN materials. Adoption of the methods discussed in this article could have a profound influence on the future optimization of these systems as well as GaN:Eu." The group plans next to grow GaN quantum well structures and determine if they enable Eu to incorporate even more favorably and effectively into GaN. Toward that end, Dierolf and Nelson Tansu, professor of electrical and computer engineering and director of Lehigh's Center for Photonics and Nanoelectronics, have been awarded a Collaborative Research Opportunity (CORE) grant from Lehigh.


News Article | January 14, 2016
Site: www.nanotech-now.com

Abstract: Oxygen is indispensable to animal and plant life, but its presence in the wrong places can feed a fire and cause iron to rust. In the fabrication of solid state lighting devices, scientists are learning, oxygen also plays a two-edged role. While oxygen can impede the effectiveness of gallium nitride (GaN), an enabling material for LEDs, small amounts of oxygen in some cases are needed to enhance the devices' optical properties. GaN doped with europium (Eu), which could provide the red color in LEDs and other displays, is one such case. Last week, an international group of researchers shed light on this seeming contradiction and reported that the quantity and location of oxygen in GaN can be fine-tuned to improve the optical performance of Eu-doped GaN devices. The group includes researchers from Lehigh, Osaka University in Japan, the Instituto Superior Técnico in Portugal, the University of Mount Union in Ohio, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. Writing in Scientific Reports, a Nature publication, the group said that small quantities of oxygen promote the uniform incorporation of Eu into the crystal lattices of GaN. The group also demonstrated a method of incorporating Eu uniformly that utilizes only the oxygen levels that are inevitably present in the GaN anyway. Eu, a rare earth (RE) element, is added to GaN as a "dopant" to provide highly efficient red color emission, which is still a challenge for GaN-based optoelectronic devices. The devices' ability to emit light is dependent on the relative homogeneity of Eu incorporation, said Volkmar Dierolf, professor and chair of Lehigh's physics department. "Some details, such as why the oxygen is needed for Eu incorporation, are still unclear," said Dierolf, "but we have determined that the amount required is roughly 2 percent of the amount of Eu ions. For every 100 Eu ions, you need two oxygen atoms to facilitate the incorporation of Eu to GaN. "If the oxygen is not there, the Eu clusters up and does not incorporate. When the oxygen is present at about 2 percent, oxygen passivation takes place, allowing the Eu to incorporate into the GaN without clustering." The article is titled "Utilization of native oxygen in Eu(RE)-doped GaN for enabling device compatibility in optoelectronic applications." The lead author, Brandon Mitchell, received his Ph.D. from Lehigh in 2014 and is now an assistant professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Mount Union and a visiting professor at Osaka University. Coauthors of the article include Dierolf; Yasufumi Fujiwara, a professor of materials science at Osaka University; and Jonathan D. Poplawsky, a research associate at Oak Ridge National Laboratory who received his Ph.D. from Lehigh in 2012. A comprehensive study Gallium nitride, a hard and durable semiconductor, is valued in solid state lighting because it emits light in the visible spectrum and because its wide band gap makes GaN electronic devices more powerful and energy-efficient than devices made of silicon and other semiconductors. The adverse effect of oxygen on GaN's properties has been much discussed in the scientific literature, the researchers wrote in Scientific Reports, but oxygen's influence on, and interaction with, RE dopants in GaN is less well understood. "The presence of oxygen in GaN," the group wrote in their article, which was published online Jan. 4, "...is normally discussed with a purely negative connotation, where possible positive aspects of its influence are not considered. "For the continued optimization of this material, the positive and negative roles of critical defects, such as oxygen, need to be explored." The group used several imaging techniques, including Rutherford Backscattering, Atomic Probe Tomography and Combined Excitation Emission Spectroscopy, to obtain an atomic-level view of the diffusion and local concentrations of oxygen and Eu in the GaN crystal lattice. Its investigation, the group wrote, represented the "first comprehensive study of the critical role that oxygen has on Eu in GaN." The group chose to experiment with Eu-doped GaN (GaN:Eu), said Dierolf, because europium emits bright light in the red portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, a promising quality given the difficulty scientists have encountered in realizing red LED light. The group said its results "strongly indicate that for single layers of GaN:Eu, significant concentrations of oxygen are required to ensure uniform Eu incorporation and favorable optical properties. "However, for the high performance and reliability of GaN-based devices, the minimization of oxygen is essential. It is clear that these two requirements are not mutually compatible." Preliminary LED devices containing a single 300-nanometer active GaN:Eu layer have been demonstrated in recent years, the group reported, but have not yet achieved commercial viability, in part because of the incompatibility of oxygen with GaN. To overcome that hurdle, said Dierolf, the researchers decided that instead of growing one thick, homogeneous layer of GaN:Eu they would grow several thinner layers of alternating doped and undoped regions. This approach, they found, utilizes the relatively small amount of oxygen that is naturally present in GaN grown with organo-metallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE), the common method of preparing GaN. "Instead of growing a thick layer of Eu-doped GaN," said Dierolf, "we grew a layer that alternated doped and undoped regions. Through the diffusion of the europium ion, oxygen from the undoped regions was utilized to incorporate the Eu into the GaN. The europium then diffused into the undoped regions." To determine the optimal amount of oxygen needed to circumvent the oxygen-GaN incompatibility, the researchers also conducted experiments on GaN grown with an Eu "precursor" containing oxygen and on GaN intentionally doped with argon-diluted oxygen. They found that the OMVPE- grown GaN contained significantly less oxygen than the other samples. "The concentration of this oxygen [in the OMVPE- grown GaN] is over two orders of magnitude lower than those [concentrations] found in the samples grown with the oxygen-containing Eu...precursor," the group wrote, "rendering the material compatible with current GaN-based devices. "We have demonstrated that the oxygen concentration in GaN:Eu materials can be reduced to a device-compatible level. Periodic optimization of the concentration ratio between the normally occurring oxygen found in GaN and the Eu ions resulted in uniform Eu incorporation, without sacrificing emission intensity. "These results appear to coincide with observations in other RE-doped GaN materials. Adoption of the methods discussed in this article could have a profound influence on the future optimization of these systems as well as GaN:Eu." The group plans next to grow GaN quantum well structures and determine if they enable Eu to incorporate even more favorably and effectively into GaN. Toward that end, Dierolf and Nelson Tansu, professor of electrical and computer engineering and director of Lehigh's Center for Photonics and Nanoelectronics, have been awarded a Collaborative Research Opportunity (CORE) grant from Lehigh. ### The other coauthors of the Scientific Reports paper were D. Timmerman, W. Zhu, D. Lee, R. Wakamatsu, J. Takatsu, M. Matsuda, W. Guo, A. Koizumi, and Y. Fujiwara from Osaka University, and K. Lorenz and E. Alves from the Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear of the Instituto Superior Técnico in Bobadela, Portugal. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


News Article | January 12, 2016
Site: phys.org

In the fabrication of solid state lighting devices, scientists are learning, oxygen also plays a two-edged role. While oxygen can impede the effectiveness of gallium nitride (GaN), an enabling material for LEDs, small amounts of oxygen in some cases are needed to enhance the devices' optical properties. GaN doped with europium (Eu), which could provide the red color in LEDs and other displays, is one such case. Last week, an international group of researchers shed light on this seeming contradiction and reported that the quantity and location of oxygen in GaN can be fine-tuned to improve the optical performance of Eu-doped GaN devices. The group includes researchers from Lehigh, Osaka University in Japan, the Instituto Superior Técnico in Portugal, the University of Mount Union in Ohio, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. Writing in Scientific Reports, a Nature publication, the group said that small quantities of oxygen promote the uniform incorporation of Eu into the crystal lattices of GaN. The group also demonstrated a method of incorporating Eu uniformly that utilizes only the oxygen levels that are inevitably present in the GaN anyway. Eu, a rare earth (RE) element, is added to GaN as a "dopant" to provide highly efficient red color emission, which is still a challenge for GaN-based optoelectronic devices. The devices' ability to emit light is dependent on the relative homogeneity of Eu incorporation, said Volkmar Dierolf, professor and chair of Lehigh's physics department. "Some details, such as why the oxygen is needed for Eu incorporation, are still unclear," said Dierolf, "but we have determined that the amount required is roughly 2 percent of the amount of Eu ions. For every 100 Eu ions, you need two oxygen atoms to facilitate the incorporation of Eu to GaN. "If the oxygen is not there, the Eu clusters up and does not incorporate. When the oxygen is present at about 2 percent, oxygen passivation takes place, allowing the Eu to incorporate into the GaN without clustering." The article is titled "Utilization of native oxygen in Eu(RE)-doped GaN for enabling device compatibility in optoelectronic applications." The lead author, Brandon Mitchell, received his Ph.D. from Lehigh in 2014 and is now an assistant professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Mount Union and a visiting professor at Osaka University. Coauthors of the article include Dierolf; Yasufumi Fujiwara, a professor of materials science at Osaka University; and Jonathan D. Poplawsky, a research associate at Oak Ridge National Laboratory who received his Ph.D. from Lehigh in 2012. Gallium nitride, a hard and durable semiconductor, is valued in solid state lighting because it emits light in the visible spectrum and because its wide band gap makes GaN electronic devices more powerful and energy-efficient than devices made of silicon and other semiconductors. The adverse effect of oxygen on GaN's properties has been much discussed in the scientific literature, the researchers wrote in Scientific Reports, but oxygen's influence on, and interaction with, RE dopants in GaN is less well understood. "The presence of oxygen in GaN," the group wrote in their article, which was published online Jan. 4, "...is normally discussed with a purely negative connotation, where possible positive aspects of its influence are not considered. "For the continued optimization of this material, the positive and negative roles of critical defects, such as oxygen, need to be explored." The group used several imaging techniques, including Rutherford Backscattering, Atomic Probe Tomography and Combined Excitation Emission Spectroscopy, to obtain an atomic-level view of the diffusion and local concentrations of oxygen and Eu in the GaN crystal lattice. Its investigation, the group wrote, represented the "first comprehensive study of the critical role that oxygen has on Eu in GaN." The group chose to experiment with Eu-doped GaN (GaN:Eu), said Dierolf, because europium emits bright light in the red portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, a promising quality given the difficulty scientists have encountered in realizing red LED light. The group said its results "strongly indicate that for single layers of GaN:Eu, significant concentrations of oxygen are required to ensure uniform Eu incorporation and favorable optical properties. "However, for the high performance and reliability of GaN-based devices, the minimization of oxygen is essential. It is clear that these two requirements are not mutually compatible." Preliminary LED devices containing a single 300-nanometer active GaN:Eu layer have been demonstrated in recent years, the group reported, but have not yet achieved commercial viability, in part because of the incompatibility of oxygen with GaN. To overcome that hurdle, said Dierolf, the researchers decided that instead of growing one thick, homogeneous layer of GaN:Eu they would grow several thinner layers of alternating doped and undoped regions. This approach, they found, utilizes the relatively small amount of oxygen that is naturally present in GaN grown with organo-metallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE), the common method of preparing GaN. "Instead of growing a thick layer of Eu-doped GaN," said Dierolf, "we grew a layer that alternated doped and undoped regions. Through the diffusion of the europium ion, oxygen from the undoped regions was utilized to incorporate the Eu into the GaN. The europium then diffused into the undoped regions." To determine the optimal amount of oxygen needed to circumvent the oxygen-GaN incompatibility, the researchers also conducted experiments on GaN grown with an Eu "precursor" containing oxygen and on GaN intentionally doped with argon-diluted oxygen. They found that the OMVPE- grown GaN contained significantly less oxygen than the other samples. "The concentration of this oxygen [in the OMVPE- grown GaN] is over two orders of magnitude lower than those [concentrations] found in the samples grown with the oxygen-containing Eu...precursor," the group wrote, "rendering the material compatible with current GaN-based devices. "We have demonstrated that the oxygen concentration in GaN:Eu materials can be reduced to a device-compatible level. Periodic optimization of the concentration ratio between the normally occurring oxygen found in GaN and the Eu ions resulted in uniform Eu incorporation, without sacrificing emission intensity. "These results appear to coincide with observations in other RE-doped GaN materials. Adoption of the methods discussed in this article could have a profound influence on the future optimization of these systems as well as GaN:Eu." The group plans next to grow GaN quantum well structures and determine if they enable Eu to incorporate even more favorably and effectively into GaN. Toward that end, Dierolf and Nelson Tansu, professor of electrical and computer engineering and director of Lehigh's Center for Photonics and Nanoelectronics, have been awarded a Collaborative Research Opportunity (CORE) grant from Lehigh. Explore further: Powerful gallium nitride red light-emitting diodes made with europium and magnesium codoping More information: B. Mitchell et al. Utilization of native oxygen in Eu(RE)-doped GaN for enabling device compatibility in optoelectronic applications, Scientific Reports (2016). DOI: 10.1038/srep18808


Ekey R.C.,University of Mount Union | McCormack E.F.,Bryn Mawr College
Physical Review A - Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics | Year: 2011

Frequency-resolved observations of heavy Rydberg states in molecular hydrogen are reported in the ungerade manifold of states. Double-resonance spectroscopy via the E,F 1Σg+, v′=6 state has been used to probe the energy region above the H(1s) + H(3l) dissociation threshold. Resonances are observed by ionizing H(3l) to produce H+, which is then detected by using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The kinetic energy of the H+ ion confirms that the observed signal is due to the photoionization of neutral H(3l) atoms, indicating that dissociation is a significant decay channel for the ion-pair states. The pattern of energies of the resonances agree well with the predictions of a mass-scaled Rydberg formula for bound quantum states of the H+H- ion pair. Energies and quantum defects have been determined for principal quantum numbers in the range of n=130 to 207. © 2011 American Physical Society.


Ocean acidification refers to the process by which seawater absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, producing aqueous carbonic acid. Acidic conditions increase the solubility of calcium carbonate, threatening corals and other calcareous organisms that depend on it for protective structures. The global nature of ocean acidification and the magnitude of its potential impact on marine ecosystems and the industries they support make it an important and engaging topic to explore in the undergraduate laboratory. In this multiweek experiment, designed for second year analytical and environmental chemistry courses, artificial seawater samples containing pieces of seashell or coral were prepared. One sample was pressurized with carbon dioxide and stirred for 1 week, while the other was stirred without carbonation. Mass and pH measurements and carbonate, bicarbonate, calcium(II), and magnesium(II) titrations were performed on samples before and after treatment. Through data analysis and a rigorous consideration of the acid-base and solubility equilibria involved, students concluded that carbonation significantly decreased seawater pH and caused appreciable seashell and coral dissolution, which raised the bicarbonate and calcium(II) concentrations. Minimal change in the seawater chemistry or carbonaceous material was observed for the noncarbonated sample. Overall, the experience provided a meaningful experimental context for titration analyses and a practical application of the conceptual treatment of a multiequilibrium system. In addition to the experiment, a corresponding oral presentation assignment is presented, in which students produced a video designed to educate a general audience on the topic of ocean acidification by using their experimental results as support. Through this assignment, students reflected on the broader ecological and societal ramifications of ocean acidification and developed the ability to communicate scientific knowledge to a nonscientific audience, a critical collaborative skill for addressing such multifaceted issues. © 2016 The American Chemical Society and Division of Chemical Education, Inc.


Johnson M.A.,University of Mount Union
Qualitative Health Research | Year: 2016

Through routine screenings for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV, medical providers are able to motivate behavior change. Although established models rely on quantitative measures, doing so requires time and ability to score each. Listening for verbal cues, however, could simplify the process of suggesting HIV screenings. Using mixed methods to identify verbal indicators for readiness to change, this article conducted two phases of study. First using quantitative means of identifying participant's knowledge of HIV, perceptions of safer sex, and readiness to change safer sex behaviors (N = 487). Interviews were then conducted exploring the possibility of verbal markers for one's readiness to change (n = 25). Results confirmed the use of verbal markers when discussing perceptions of risk. Identification of verbal markers, at three stages of change, provides new possibilities for medical providers' such as providing time saving and effective tools when seeking to motivate HIV and STI testing, and other safer sex behaviors. © The Author(s) 2015.


Potkanowicz E.S.,Ohio Northern University | Mendel R.W.,University of Mount Union
Sports Medicine | Year: 2013

When discussing sports and the athletes who participate in them, it has long been recognized that fitness is a prerequisite for optimal performance. The goal of training to improve fitness levels in athletes is ultimately to minimize the stress that the body experiences during competition. When it comes to the topic of racecar drivers, however, drivers and their trainers have largely been left to their own devices to figure out the stressors and the areas of specific training focus. Unfortunately, racecar drivers have battled the stereotype that they are not athletes, and with little regard for them as athletes, drivers are seldom the focus of scientific research related to their performance. Like the cars they drive, driver-athletes are complex, but from a physiological perspective. However, unlike the cars they drive, driver-athletes have not been examined, evaluated, and tweaked to the same degree. The purpose of this review is two-fold: first, by examining the available literature, to make the case for new research into the driver's role in the driver-car system (i.e. driver science) and the stresses experienced; second, to make the case for more extensive use of microtechnology in the real-time monitoring of driver-athletes. With the miniaturization of sensors and the advent of portable data storage devices, the prospect of quantifying the stresses unique to the driver are no longer as daunting, and the relative impossibility and difficulties associated with measuring the driver-athlete in real-time no longer need to be as challenging. Using microtechnology in the assessment of the driver-athlete and with a more public discussion and dissemination of information on the topic of driver science, the scientific community has the opportunity to quantify that which has been largely assumed and speculated. The current article will offer the following recommendations: first, rather than examining a singular physiological stressor, to examine the interaction of stressors; second, to examine variables/stressors that are more representative of the changing driver demographics; third, to measure drivers in real-time during actual race events; lastly, to work to develop training programs that more accurately apply to the driver and the stresses experienced. In uncovering this information, there is an opportunity to contribute to racing becoming that much safer, that much more competitive, and that much more comprehensive for the driver, the team, and the sport. © 2013 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.


Boyd-Kimball D.,University of Mount Union
Journal of Chemical Education | Year: 2012

Adaptive tools and techniques for lecture instruction were developed for a blind student in a nonmajors college chemistry course. These adaptive instructional aids assisted the student in writing and balancing chemical reactions, calculating unit conversions and concentrations, drawing Lewis dot structures, understanding structural representations of molecules with three-dimensional models, and identifying organic functional groups. © 2012 The American Chemical Society and Division of Chemical Education, Inc.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Factor Finders, LLC is excited to announce the recipient of their scholarship, which aims to help students at Ohio four-year colleges cover their education expenses. Kylie Sees is the official winner of the $1,000 scholarship award in which entrants submitted an essay answering the question, “The internet has forever changed our society, but for good or bad?” Ms. Sees is a freshman at the University of Mount Union and pursuing a degree in Marketing. After graduation, she hopes to put her marketing skills to use for a non-profit organization and eventually start a small business of her own. “We’re proud to offer a scholarship to an Ohio student,” said Phil Cohen, President of Factor Finders. “We wish Kylie a bright and successful future.” The winning applicant was chosen by a scholarship evaluation committee based on the content of their essay. The $1,000 scholarship contest is open to any undergraduate student enrolled full-time at an accredited 4-year college or university in the state of Ohio. Factor Finders offers two scholarship opportunities per year, one for the Spring semester and one for the Fall. Submissions for Fall 2017 are currently being accepted. Students interested in applying should visit factorfinders.com/scholarship for more information. ####### Factor Finders is an Ohio-based B2B funding intermediary that matches business owners with the best funding solution for their unique needs. Founded by a seasoned factoring professional, Factor Finders understands the needs of small businesses and uses that expertise to identify the optimal funding source for clients. Visit factorfinders.com for additional information about Factor Finders’ accounts receivable factoring and alternative funding services.

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