Smiths Station, AL, United States
Smiths Station, AL, United States

The University of Montevallo is a four-year public university located in Montevallo, Alabama, United States. Founded in 1896, it is Alabama's only public liberal arts college and a member of the prestigious Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges. The University of Montevallo continues to receive accolades through the rankings of "America’s Best Colleges", published by U.S. News & World Report. According to rankings for the 2013 edition, UM is once again ranked as the No. 1 public master’s-level university in Alabama, a distinction it has held each year since 2008. For 2013, Montevallo is listed as the 14th best public university in the South in its division and 37th overall in the South, up 22 spots from its 2007 ranking. Schools in 12 states make up the South geographic region. Montevallo is also recognized in the 2013 edition as one of the top four Southern universities that graduates students with the lowest average debt loads. It earned high marks for academic reputation, freshman retention rate, graduation rate, entering freshmen test scores and class rank, small class sizes and low student-faculty ratio. Wikipedia.


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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has ranked the best universities and colleges in Alabama for 2017. Using government-backed data, the site found 27 four-year schools had the caliber to be on the list. Samford University, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Spring Hill College, Auburn University and University of Alabama in Huntsville came in as the top five. 26 two-year schools also made the list, with Enterprise State Community College, Gadsden State Community College, Wallace State Community College Hanceville, Southern Union State Community College and Lurleen B. Wallace Community College ranked as the best five. A full list of schools is included below. “Alabama currently has the third-highest unemployment rate in the country, but schools are working to combat that by providing quality higher education opportunities,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.Org. “The colleges and universities on our list offer certificates, degrees and employment resources that best set students up for success in the workforce after school.” To be included on the Alabama’s “Best Colleges” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also appraised for additional data that includes employment services, student counseling, annual alumni salaries 10 years after entering college, student/teacher ratio, graduation rate and financial aid offerings. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Alabama” list, visit: The Best Four-Year Colleges in Alabama for 2017 include: Alabama A & M University Alabama State University Amridge University Athens State University Auburn University Auburn University at Montgomery Birmingham Southern College Faulkner University Huntingdon College Jacksonville State University Judson College Miles College Oakwood University Samford University Spring Hill College Stillman College Talladega College The University of Alabama Troy University Tuskegee University University of Alabama at Birmingham University of Alabama in Huntsville University of Mobile University of Montevallo University of North Alabama University of South Alabama University of West Alabama The Best Two-Year Colleges in Alabama for 2017 include: Alabama Southern Community College Bevill State Community College Bishop State Community College Calhoun State Community College Central Alabama Community College Chattahoochee Valley Community College Enterprise State Community College Faulkner State Community College Gadsden State Community College H Councill Trenholm State Technical College J F Drake State Community and Technical College J F Ingram State Technical College Jefferson Davis Community College Jefferson State Community College Lawson State Community College-Birmingham Campus Lurleen B Wallace Community College Northeast Alabama Community College Northwest-Shoals Community College Reid State Technical College Remington College-Mobile Campus Shelton State Community College Snead State Community College Southern Union State Community College Wallace Community College - Dothan Wallace Community College - Selma Wallace State Community College - Hanceville About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


Cotten S.R.,Michigan State University | Ford G.,Phoenix Center for Advanced Legal and Economic Public Policy Studies | Ford S.,University of Montevallo | Hale T.M.,Harvard University
Journals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences | Year: 2014

Objectives. The purpose of this study is to examine the association between Internet use among retired older adults in the United States and changes in a commonly used predictor of depression (the CES-D). Method. Analyzing data from four waves (2002-2008) of the Health and Retirement Survey, we assess whether an available and commonly used index of a depression state was affected by prior values of the index and Internet use. The sample includes 3,075 respondents observed over 4 waves of data, yielding a total of 12,300 observations. We analyzed the effect on depression of Internet use and past depression in a full sample and a matched sample. We also conducted informal tests for confounders. Finally, we tested a basic mediation model to determine whether Internet use affected depression through its relationship with loneliness and social isolation. Results. Across methods, we found a positive contribution of Internet use to mental well-being of retired older adults in the United States, where Internet use reduced the probability of a depression state by one third. We found no evidence of confounding. Some evidence of mediation was found. Discussion. Our dynamic probit model indicates that for retired older adults in the United States, Internet use was found to reduce the probability of a depressed state by about 33%. Number of people in the household partially mediates this relationship, with the reduction in depression largest for people living alone. This provides some evidence that the mechanism linking Internet use to depression is the remediation of social isolation and loneliness. Encouraging older adults to use the Internet may help decrease isolation and depression. © The Author 2014.


Cotten S.R.,University of Alabama at Birmingham | Ford G.,Phoenix Center for Advanced Legal and Economic Public Policy Studies | Ford S.,University of Montevallo | Hale T.M.,University of Alabama at Birmingham
Computers in Human Behavior | Year: 2012

The findings regarding the impact of Internet use on well-being are mixed and studies are often criticized due to small samples and lack of consistency in measurement. Fewer studies have examined this issue among older adults. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between Internet use and depression among retired Americans age 50 years or older. Using data from the Health and Retirement Survey, the study estimates the relationship between Internet use and depression through combined use of regression and propensity score methodologies. All empirical methods indicate a positive contribution of Internet use to mental well-being of retired older adults (≥50 years), reducing depression categorization by approximately 20-28%. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Hitchcock L.I.,University of Montevallo | Mulvihill B.A.,University of Alabama at Birmingham
Maternal and Child Health Journal | Year: 2011

This historical study examines the early years of the federal program of services for children with physical disabilities in the United States (US) during the 1930s, known today as services for Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN). Established as part of the Social Security Act (SSA) of 1935, the Crippled Children Services (CCS) program was one of the first medical programs for children supported by the federal government. Under the SSA, states and territories quickly developed state-level CCS programs during the late 1930s. The US Children's Bureau administered the program for the federal government and helped states to incorporate preventive services and interdisciplinary approaches to service provision into state-level CCS programs. Factors that influenced the implementation of these programs included the availability of matching state funds, the establishment of state programs for crippled children prior to the SSA, and the accessibility of qualified health care professionals and facilities. The early efforts of this federal program on behalf of children with disabilities can be seen in services for CSHCN today. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Windham P.F.,University of Montevallo | Tinsley H.N.,University of Montevallo
Seminars in Cancer Biology | Year: 2015

One in eight women in the United States will be diagnosed with invasive breast cancer in her lifetime. Advances in therapeutic strategies, diagnosis, and improved awareness have resulted in a significant reduction in breast cancer related mortality. However, there is a continued need for more effective and less toxic drugs for both the prevention and the treatment of breast cancer in order to see a continued decline in the morbidity and mortality associated with this disease. Recent studies suggest that the cGMP signaling pathway may be aberrantly regulated in breast cancer. As such, this pathway may serve as a source of novel targets for future breast cancer drug discovery efforts. This review provides an overview of cGMP signaling in normal physiology and in breast cancer as well as current strategies being investigated for targeting this pathway in breast cancer. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Davis J.-K.,University of Montevallo | Bishop P.A.,University of Alabama
Sports Medicine | Year: 2013

Clothing targeting the exercise enthusiast has been advertised to keep individuals drier, cooler, and more comfortable during exercise in the heat. The marketing of such clothing has increased dramatically within the last decade. In hot environments, clothing acts as a barrier to thermal balance by inhibiting evaporative and convective cooling. Clothing construction, fit, and fabric are all critical influences on the amount of sweat absorbed from the skin and transported throughout the clothing. The majority of the research analyzing advertised synthetic fabrics has shown no difference in thermoregulation or clothing comfort while exercising in those fabrics in the heat compared to natural fabrics. The influence of clothing construction on thermal balance has received minimal research in regards to exercise. Further research is needed in this area, since it is poorly understood from ecologically valid human testing. Future research should also consider examining the effects of clothing characteristics on comfort during exercise and recovery. The incorporation of protocols that more closely mirror sporting and recreational activity lasting >60 min as well as simulated work-related protocols lasting >120 min is warranted. © 2013 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.


Wiegand J.R.,University of Georgia | Mathews L.D.,University of Georgia | Mathews L.D.,University of Montevallo | Smith G.D.,University of Georgia
Analytical Chemistry | Year: 2014

A novel photoacoustic spectrophotometer (PAS) for the measurement of gas-phase and aerosol absorption over the UV-visible region of the spectrum is described. Light from a broadband Hg arc lamp is filtered in eight separate bands from 300 to 700 nm using bandpass interference filters (centered at 301 nm, 314 nm, 364 nm, 405 nm, 436 nm, 546 nm, 578 and 687 nm) and modulated with an optical chopper before entering the photoacoustic cell. All wavelength bands feature a 20-s detection limit of better than 3.0 Mm-1 with the exception of the lower-intensity 687 nm band for which it is 10.2 Mm -1. Validation measurements of gas-phase acetone and nigrosin aerosol absorption cross sections at several wavelengths demonstrate agreement to within 10% with those measured previously (for acetone) and those predicted by Mie theory (for nigrosin). The PAS instrument is used to measure the UV-visible absorption spectrum of ambient aerosol demonstrating a dramatic increase in the UV region with absorption increasing by 300% from 405 to 301 nm. This type of measurement throughout the UV-visible region and free from artifacts associated with filter-based methods has not been possible previously, and we demonstrate its promise for classifying and quantifying different types of light-absorbing ambient particles. © 2014 American Chemical Society.


Hermalin A.I.,University of Michigan | Lowry D.S.,University of Montevallo
Population Research and Policy Review | Year: 2012

The smoking prevalence by age of women in China is distinct from most other countries in showing more frequent smoking among older women than younger. Using newly developed birth cohort histories of smoking, the authors demonstrate that although over one quarter of women born 1908-1912 smoked, levels of smoking declined across successive cohorts. This occurred despite high rates of smoking by men and the wide availability of cigarettes. The analysis shows how this pattern is counter to that predicted by the leading theoretical perspectives on the diffusion of smoking and suggests that it arose out of a mix of Confucian traditions relating to gender and the socio-economic and political events early in the twentieth century which placed emerging women's identities in conflict with national identities. That a similar pattern of smoking is evident in Japan and Korea, two countries with strong cultural affinities to China, is used to buttress the argument. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Fajardo A.M.,University of South Alabama | Piazza G.A.,University of South Alabama | Tinsley H.N.,University of Montevallo
Cancers | Year: 2014

For more than four decades, the cyclic nucleotides cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP) have been recognized as important signaling molecules within cells. Under normal physiological conditions, cyclic nucleotides regulate a myriad of biological processes such as cell growth and adhesion, energy homeostasis, neuronal signaling, and muscle relaxation. In addition, altered cyclic nucleotide signaling has been observed in a number of pathophysiological conditions, including cancer. While the distinct molecular alterations responsible for these effects vary depending on the specific cancer type, several studies have demonstrated that activation of cyclic nucleotide signaling through one of three mechanisms-induction of cyclic nucleotide synthesis, inhibition of cyclic nucleotide degradation, or activation of cyclic nucleotide receptors-is sufficient to inhibit proliferation and activate apoptosis in many types of cancer cells. These findings suggest that targeting cyclic nucleotide signaling can provide a strategy for the discovery of novel agents for the prevention and/or treatment of selected cancers. © 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.


Receive press releases from University of Montevallo: By Email Montevallo, AL, February 25, 2017 --( Cynthia Todd ’88, Minority Alumni club president, welcomed and thanked everyone for attending. She then invited alumnus Dr. Lonnie J. Edwards Sr. ’71 to the podium to speak on the award bearing his name. Edwards came to UM in 1969 as the University’s first African American male athlete. His impressive accomplishments on the court later inducted him into the UM Athletic Hall of Fame in 1992. Edwards compared the decision to attend the newly integrated University to the poem “The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost. “Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, and I took the one less traveled. And it made a valuable difference in my life,” he said. After his tenure as a star basketball player for the Fighting Falcons, Edwards went on to a successful career in education. He was the assistant superintendent of the DeKalb County School System in Georgia for 30 years and the superintendent of schools in Jackson, Mississippi for three years. He now resides in Atlanta. Concluding his speech, Edwards stated he was honored to have the award bare his name. “Hindsight is a true indicator of having made a good or bad decision,” he said. “Montevallo was certainly a great decision for me.” After Edwards’ introduction, Todd invited Morant Adams to receive the award. She graduated with a degree in management, later earning her MBA from Samford. The alumna is also a proud lifelong member of Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority. Morant Adams currently holds the position of executive vice president of Small Business and Community Development at Renasant Bank in Birmingham. In addition, the NAACP has recognized her advocacy work in helping to develop small businesses in underserved communities. Morant Adams spoke on how humbled she was to receive the inaugural award. She recognized the many people who’ve shaped her throughout her life, including her husband, Jeff Adams, and her mother who urged her to consider Montevallo. She praised the University for its “history of uniqueness and foundation of excellence,” saying she hoped other small town men and women were as transformed by the education UM offers as she was. Montevallo, AL, February 25, 2017 --( PR.com )-- On Saturday, Feb. 11, the University of Montevallo’s Minority Alumni club gathered for a homecoming brunch to bestow the organization’s inaugural award, the Dr. Lonnie J. Edwards Distinguished Minority Alumnus Award, to Birmingham’s Tracey Morant Adams ’88.Cynthia Todd ’88, Minority Alumni club president, welcomed and thanked everyone for attending. She then invited alumnus Dr. Lonnie J. Edwards Sr. ’71 to the podium to speak on the award bearing his name.Edwards came to UM in 1969 as the University’s first African American male athlete. His impressive accomplishments on the court later inducted him into the UM Athletic Hall of Fame in 1992.Edwards compared the decision to attend the newly integrated University to the poem “The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost. “Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, and I took the one less traveled. And it made a valuable difference in my life,” he said.After his tenure as a star basketball player for the Fighting Falcons, Edwards went on to a successful career in education. He was the assistant superintendent of the DeKalb County School System in Georgia for 30 years and the superintendent of schools in Jackson, Mississippi for three years. He now resides in Atlanta.Concluding his speech, Edwards stated he was honored to have the award bare his name. “Hindsight is a true indicator of having made a good or bad decision,” he said. “Montevallo was certainly a great decision for me.”After Edwards’ introduction, Todd invited Morant Adams to receive the award. She graduated with a degree in management, later earning her MBA from Samford. The alumna is also a proud lifelong member of Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority.Morant Adams currently holds the position of executive vice president of Small Business and Community Development at Renasant Bank in Birmingham. In addition, the NAACP has recognized her advocacy work in helping to develop small businesses in underserved communities.Morant Adams spoke on how humbled she was to receive the inaugural award. She recognized the many people who’ve shaped her throughout her life, including her husband, Jeff Adams, and her mother who urged her to consider Montevallo.She praised the University for its “history of uniqueness and foundation of excellence,” saying she hoped other small town men and women were as transformed by the education UM offers as she was. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from University of Montevallo

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