University of Mohamed 1st

Oujda, Morocco

University of Mohamed 1st

Oujda, Morocco
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Barkatullah,University of Peshawar | Ibrar M.,University of Peshawar | Ikram N.,University of Peshawar | Rauf A.,University of Swabi | And 4 more authors.
Pakistan Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences | Year: 2016

The current study was designed to assess the antinociceptive and skeleton muscle relaxant effect of leaves and barks of Buddleja asiatica in animal models. In acetic acid induced writhing test, pretreatment of ethanolic extract of leaves and barks evoked marked dose dependent antinociceptive effect with maximum of 70% and 67% pain relief at 300mg/kg i.p. respectively. In chimney test, the ethanolic extract of leaves and barks evoked maximum of 66.66% and 53.33% muscle relaxant effect after 90min of treatment at 300mg/kg i.p respectively. In traction test, the ethanolic extract of leaves and barks caused maximum of 60% and 73.33% muscle relaxant effect after 90min of treatment at 300mg/kg i.p respectively. In short, both leaves and barks demonstrated profound antinociceptive and skeleton muscle relaxant effects and thus the study provided natural healing agents for the treatment of said disorders.


Rauf A.,University of Swabi | Uysal S.,Selcuk University | Hadda T.B.,University of Mohamed 1st | Uddin G.,University of Peshawar | And 6 more authors.
Biomedicine and Pharmacotherapy | Year: 2017

Diospyros lotus L. possesses different therapeutic activities such as antioxidant, anti-proliferative, anti-microbial and sedative. However, no studies on the sedative-hypnotic activity of 7-methyljuglone are reported. In the present study, we have evaluated in vivo the anxiolytic-hypnotic like effects of 7-methyljuglone in mice with open field and phenobarbitone-induced sleeping time tests. We have also assessed in silico the involvement of GABAA, GABAB and 5HT1 neurotransmission in its mechanism of action. The intraperitoneal administration of 7-methyljuglone (2.5–10 mg/kg) reduce significantly the number of crossed lines in mice open field test and concomitantly it shown a significant activity in term of onset of sleeping time and also in its duration. Moreover, 7-methyljuglone demonstrated in silico an interesting interaction with GABAA but not GABAB and 5HT1binding sites. All of these results, taken together, 7-methyljuglone may be an innovative candidate for designing new pharmaceutical and therapeutic applications. © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS


Rauf A.,University of Swabi | Abu-Izneid T.,University of Umm Al - Qura | Maalik A.,COMSATS Institute of Information Technology | Bawazeer S.,University of Umm Al - Qura | And 9 more authors.
Medicinal Chemistry | Year: 2017

Background: Pistacia integerrima has many medicinal uses in therapeutic as well as folk medicine. P. integerrima has been used for the treatment of different ailments such as blood purifier, anti-inflammatory, and as remedy for gastrointestinal disorders such as vomiting and diarrhea, expectorant, cough, asthma and fever. Objective: The main objective of this research work was to evaluate the effect of pistagremic acid (PA) isolated from the galls of Pistacia integerima in acute toxicity and gastrointestinal (GIT) motility tests. Methods: Compound 1 namely pistagremic acid (PA) (at 10, 50, 100 mg/kg i.p) were assessed for their in-vivo gastrointestinal motility test using charcoal screening model. Results: Results revealed that pretreatment of PA exhibited substantial safety in acute toxicity test up to the dose of 500 mg/kg p.o. However, when studied in charcoal meal GI transit test, PA caused significant (p < 0.05) attenuation of GIT motility and an increase in intestinal transit time, comparable to atropine (a muscarinic receptor blocking agent). Conclusion: In conclusion, PA displayed a strong dose-dependent reduction in GIT motility with considerable safety. © 2017 Bentham Science Publishers.


Rauf A.,University of Anbar | Uddin G.,University of Peshawar | Siddiqui B.S.,University of Karachi | Khan H.,Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan | And 5 more authors.
Complementary Therapies in Medicine | Year: 2016

The present study deals with the anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammtory effects of flavonoids (1-4) isolated from the chloroform fraction of Pistacia integerrima galls. The structure of isolated compounds was elucidated by using advance spectroscopy analysis and comparing their physical spectral data with reported one. The pretreatment of compounds (1-4) caused significant anti-hyperalgesic effects in acetic acid induced writhing test in a dose dependent manner. The compounds strongly complimented the effects in both phases of formalin test. However, the administration of naloxone did not abolish the induced antinociceptive effects and therefore suggested the absence of opioid receptor involvement. The pretreatment of flavonoids (1-4) elicited marked anti-inflammtory effects in carrageenan induced paw edema test in mice during various assessment times (1-5 h). The effects were dose dependent and maximum results were observed after 3rd h of treatments which remained significant up to 5th hour. It is concluded that the isolated flavonoids (1-4) possessed strong anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammtory activity and thus are strong candidates for further detail studies. © 2016.Published by Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | University of Karachi, King Saud University, Sarhad University of Science and Information Technology, University of Anbar and 4 more.
Type: | Journal: Complementary therapies in medicine | Year: 2016

The present study deals with the anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammtory effects of flavonoids (1-4) isolated from the chloroform fraction of Pistacia integerrima galls. The structure of isolated compounds was elucidated by using advance spectroscopy analysis and comparing their physical spectral data with reported one. The pretreatment of compounds (1-4) caused significant anti-hyperalgesic effects in acetic acid induced writhing test in a dose dependent manner. The compounds strongly complimented the effects in both phases of formalin test. However, the administration of naloxone did not abolish the induced antinociceptive effects and therefore suggested the absence of opioid receptor involvement. The pretreatment of flavonoids (1-4) elicited marked anti-inflammtory effects in carrageenan induced paw edema test in mice during various assessment times (1-5 h). The effects were dose dependent and maximum results were observed after 3rd h of treatments which remained significant up to 5th hour. It is concluded that the isolated flavonoids (1-4) possessed strong anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammtory activity and thus are strong candidates for further detail studies.


PubMed | University of Swabi, Gandhara University, University of Umm Al - Qura, Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Pakistan journal of pharmaceutical sciences | Year: 2016

The current study was designed to assess the antinociceptive and skeleton muscle relaxant effect of leaves and barks of Buddleja asiatica in animal models. In acetic acid induced writhing test, pretreatment of ethanolic extract of leaves and barks evoked marked dose dependent antinociceptive effect with maximum of 70% and 67% pain relief at 300mg/kg i.p. respectively. In chimney test, the ethanolic extract of leaves and barks evoked maximum of 66.66% and 53.33% muscle relaxant effect after 90min of treatment at 300mg/kg i.p respectively. In traction test, the ethanolic extract of leaves and barks caused maximum of 60% and 73.33% muscle relaxant effect after 90min of treatment at 300mg/kg i.p respectively. In short, both leaves and barks demonstrated profound antinociceptive and skeleton muscle relaxant effects and thus the study provided natural healing agents for the treatment of said disorders.


Rauf A.,University of Anbar | Uddin G.,University of Peshawar | Raza M.,Beijing University of Chemical Technology | Patel S.,San Diego State University | And 6 more authors.
Natural Product Research | Year: 2016

The dimeric napthoquione 5,8,4′-trihydroxy-1′-methoxy-6, 6′-dimethyl-7,3′-binaphtyl-1,4,5′,8′-tetraone (1) was isolated from the chloroform fraction of Diospyros lotus extract. Compound 1 was screened for its inhibitory effects against four enzymes: urease, phosphodiesterase-I, carbonic anhydrase-II and α-chymotrypsin, and showed selective activity against urease enzyme with an IC50 value of 254.1 ± 3.82 μM as compared to the standard thiourea (IC50 = 21 ± 0.11 μM). Furthermore, in silico docking study was carried out to explain the molecular mechanism of compound 1 against the target receptor. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group


PubMed | University of Jordan, San Diego State University, University of Anbar, King Saud University and 5 more.
Type: | Journal: Natural product research | Year: 2016

The dimeric napthoquione 5,8,4-trihydroxy-1-methoxy-6, 6-dimethyl-7,3-binaphtyl-1,4,5,8-tetraone (1) was isolated from the chloroform fraction of Diospyros lotus extract. Compound 1 was screened for its inhibitory effects against four enzymes: urease, phosphodiesterase-I, carbonic anhydrase-II and -chymotrypsin, and showed selective activity against urease enzyme with an IC


Ghabbour N.,University of Mohamed 1st | Lamzira Z.,University of Mohamed 1st | Thonart P.,University of Liège | Cidalia P.,New University of Lisbon | And 2 more authors.
Grasas y Aceites | Year: 2011

A total of 177 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from early-stage Moroccan Picholine green olive fermentation, including Lactobacillus plantarum (44.63%), Lactobacillus pentosus (25.99%), Lactobacillus brevis (9.61%) and Pediococcus pentosaceus (19.77%). All the isolates were screened for their tolerance to olive leaf extract and oleuropein. Most of the isolates (85.3%) were found able to degrade oleuropein, when evaluated by either oleuropein or 5-Bromo- 4-chloro-3-indolyl β-D-glucuronide (X-Gluc) as substrates. The biodegradation capacity of the selected strains of each species was confirmed by HPLC analysis.

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