Columbia, MO, United States
Columbia, MO, United States

The University of Missouri is a public research university located in the state of Missouri. In 1839, the university was founded in Columbia, Missouri as the first public institution of higher education west of the Mississippi River. As the largest university in Missouri, MU enrolls 35,441 students offering over 300 degree programs in 19 academic colleges in the 2014–15 year. The university is the flagship of the University of Missouri System, which maintains campuses in Rolla, Kansas City and St. Louis.MU is one of the nation's top-tier R1 institutions and one of the 34 public universities to be members of the Association of American Universities. There are more than 270,000 MU alumni living worldwide with almost one half continuing to reside in Missouri. The University of Missouri was ranked 99 in the 2015 U.S. News & World Report among the national universities.The campus of the University of Missouri is 1,262 acres just south of Downtown Columbia and is maintained as a botanical garden. The historical campus is centered on Francis Quadrangle, a historic district that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and a number of buildings on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1908, the world's first school of journalism was founded by Walter Williams as the Missouri School of Journalism.The University of Missouri Research Reactor Center is the world's most powerful university research reactor. It is one of only six public universities in the United States with a school of medicine, veterinary medicine, engineering, agriculture, and law all on one campus. The university also owns the University of Missouri Health Care system, which operates four hospitals in Mid-Missouri.Missouri's only athletic program that operates a Division I FBS football team is known as the Missouri Tigers and competes as a member of the Southeastern Conference. The school's mascot, Truman the Tiger, is named after Missourian and former U.S. president Harry S. Truman. According to the NCAA, the American tradition of homecoming was established at the University in 1911; the tradition has since been adopted nationwide. Wikipedia.


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Patent
University of Missouri | Date: 2015-03-12

In one embodiment, a cutting guide is disclosed for use in a surgical procedure to removed damaged tissue from a patient and form a recipient site configured and dimensioned to receive a donor graft. The cutting guide includes a first arm that abuts a section of the damaged tissue to be removed, and a second arm including a hole and a slot that receives a cutting implement, the first arm and the slot defining a distance therebetween corresponding to a desired dimension of the recipient site. In another embodiment, a cutting guide is disclosed for use in forming a donor graft from donor tissue. The cutting guide includes a body that receives the donor tissue, and a shaping member that is rotatably secured to the body. The shaping member includes at least one vane that shapes the donor tissue so as to form the donor graft.


Patent
University of Missouri and Nanova, Inc. | Date: 2016-10-26

The present disclosure relates to chemical compounds, methods for their discovery, and their therapeutic and research use. In particular, the present disclosure provides compounds as therapeutic agents against bacterial infections (e.g., biofilms). The present disclosure also provides compounds as therapeutic agents in methods for treating pneumonia, methods for reducing bacterial virulence, methods for treating a bacterial wound infection, and methods for treating a urinary tract infection. The present disclosure also provides methods for treating a bacterial infection, wherein the bacterial infection has or is suspected of having an antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The present disclosure also provides surfaces coated with the chemical compounds disclosed herein.


Patent
University of Missouri | Date: 2015-02-03

The present invention relates in general to a method for the synthesis and purification of 1) the polyhedral borane decahydrodecaborate and dodecahydrododecaborate anions and their salts and 2) amines and amine boranes. The organoammonium halide is combined with alkali metal tetrahydroborate to form organoammonium tetrahydroborate, which upon pyrolysis provides organoammonium decahydrodecaborate and organoammonium dodecahydrododecaborate.


Patent
University of Missouri and French National Center for Scientific Research | Date: 2015-02-23

Provided herein are a series of fluorescently labeled phosphonate and phosphate compounds such as can be used for affinity probes to detect certain enzymes including lipases. Also provided are methods of making and using such compounds.


Patent
University of Missouri | Date: 2016-09-28

An energy harvesting device for generating electrical power from low-frequency oscillations includes a high-frequency cantilever, a plurality of low-frequency cantilevers each configured to contact the high-frequency cantilever in response to environmental vibrations having a frequency within a near-resonance frequency range associated with said low-frequency cantilever, an a generator that produces electrical power in response to contact between at least one of the plurality of low-frequency cantilevers and the high-frequency cantilever. The energy harvesting device may also include an impact mass coupled to a free end of each of the plurality of low-frequency cantilevers. Some aspects may include a common base to which the high-frequency cantilever and the plurality of low-frequency cantilevers are coupled. Other aspects may include the generator comprising one or more of an induction coil and magnet, a variable distance capacitor, or a piezo-electric material.


Patent
Worcester Polytechnic Institute and University of Missouri | Date: 2016-08-31

A dry electrode manufacturing process employed for low cost battery through a dry mixing and formation process. A thermal activation renders the dry fabricated electrode comparable to conventional slurry casted electrodes. The dry electrode mixture results from a combination of a plurality of types of constituent particles, including at least an active charge material and a binder, and typically a conductive material such as carbon. The process heats the deposited mixture to a moderate temperature for activating the binder for adhering the mixture to the substrate; and compresses the deposited mixture to a thickness for achieving an electrical sufficiency of the compressed, deposited mixture as a charge material in a battery.


Methods for stimulating exocytosis from a cell are provided where the same electrochemical microelectrode is used to electroporate an adjacent cell and then measure quantal exocytosis from the adjacent cell. Also provided are methods for stimulating and measuring exocytosis from a select cell population arrayed on a chip comprising addressable electrodes. Calcium independent stimulation of exocytosis with inorganic anions such as chloride ions is also provided. These methods can provide for specific stimulation of a desired subset of cells without exposing other nearby cells to the stimulus.


Patent
University of Missouri | Date: 2016-10-11

Biomarkers, biomarker panels and methods for diagnosing osteoarthritis (OA) and determining treatment are disclosed, using measurement of the expression level of certain polypeptides in a test sample from a subject, including MCP1, IL8, KC, MMP2, MMP3, Apolipoprotein A1, and Apolipoprotein E. Related methods for monitoring OA treatment efficacy, diagnostic reagents, and kits are also described.


Patent
University of Missouri | Date: 2016-11-15

A method for separating an amount of osmium from a mixture containing the osmium and at least one other additional metal is provided. In particular, method for forming and trapping OsO_(4 )to separate the osmium from a mixture containing the osmium and at least one other additional metal is provided.


Patent
University of Missouri | Date: 2016-08-05

A fluorescence sensing compound for separately detecting and visualizing one or more monoamine neurotransmitters in cells, the fluorescence sensing compound having the following formula:


Patent
University of Missouri | Date: 2016-08-17

A DC/DC power converter provides high voltage gain using integrated boost and voltage multiplier (VM) stages. The boost cell operates according to a switching sequence to alternately energize and discharge a primary winding. A VM cell electrically coupled to the primary winding of the boost cell charges a multiplier capacitor to a DC output voltage greater than the input voltage when the primary winding is energized and discharges the multiplier capacitor when primary winding is discharged.


Patent
University of Missouri | Date: 2016-07-29

High-resolution 3D optical polarization tractography (OPT) images of the internal fiber structure of a target tissue. Manipulation of dual-angle imaging data of the fiber orientation inside a target tissue leads to the determination of 3D imaging properties of the target tissue, allowing transmission of the 3D image properties of the target tissue to an OPT processor to produce high-resolution 3D images.


Patent
University of Missouri | Date: 2016-10-25

A method for determining the yield loss of a crop using remote sensor data is described. The yield loss is determined using the reflectivity of light by the crop canopy measured from remote sensor data such as an aerial photograph. Pixel color values from the aerial photograph, expressed relative to pixel values from nitrogen-sufficient areas of the field, are transformed to yield losses using a transformation that was developed using empirical data. A similar method is described to determine recommended nitrogen fertilization rates for the crop fields. The yield loss data is useful for nitrogen fertilization management decisions, as it allows a producer of crops to weigh the expense of fertilization against the loss of revenue due to yield loss induced by nitrogen deficiency.


Devices and methods are provided for simultaneously interrogating multiple samples using NMR spectroscopy. A first magnetic field is induced. A flow of electricity is induced through a conductive material. The flow of electricity has a direction that is perpendicular to the first magnetic field, and the flow of electricity induces a second magnetic field. A first sample is placed in an additive magnetic field region, where a direction of the first magnetic field and a direction of the second magnetic field are aligned within the additive magnetic field region. A second sample is placed in a canceling magnetic field region, where the direction of the first magnetic field and the direction of the second magnetic field are opposed within the canceling magnetic field region. A free induction decay (FID) of at least the first and second samples is induced.


Patent
University of Missouri | Date: 2015-04-13

A method of producing an integrated circuit-type active radioisotope battery, the method comprising exposing at least a portion of an electronically functional, unactivated integrated circuit-type battery to radiation to convert transmutable material in the unactivated battery to a radioisotope thereby producing an active cell and thus the integrated circuit-type active radioisotope battery.


Patent
University of Missouri | Date: 2016-05-05

This disclosure relates to methods and devices for generating electron dense air plasmas at atmospheric pressures. In particular, this disclosure relate to self-contained toroidal air plasmas. Methods and apparatuses have been developed for generating atmospheric toroidal air plasmas. The air plasmas are self-confining, can be projected, and do not require additional support equipment once formed.


In this article, we present some interesting non-steady explicit solutions to the 2D Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. Explicit calculations on the explicit solutions show that Navier-Stokes (and Euler) equations have the novel property of rough dependence upon initial data in contrast to the sensitive dependence upon initial data found in chaos. Through the explicit calculations, we are able to obtain a lower bound on the norm of the Fréchet derivative of the solution operator at the explicit solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations. The lower bound approaches infinity as the Reynolds number approaches infinity. For Euler equations, this lower bound is indeed infinity. The rough dependence property in the inviscid case is closely related to the theorem of Cauchy. The viscous effect on the theorem of Cauchy and the rough dependence property is also studied. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd & London Mathematical Society.


Jefferson U.T.,University of Missouri
Journal of Human Lactation | Year: 2017

Background: African American mothers lag behind in breastfeeding initiation. Research is needed to gain an understanding of potential reasons for breastfeeding disparities. Research aim: This study explored breastfeeding exposure, attitudes, and intentions of African American and Caucasian college students by race and gender. Methods: Women and men (696) attending college, who were younger than 45 years and without children, were included in this study. Survey data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and the Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Scale. Results: Overall, students demonstrated favorable attitudes regarding breastfeeding but viewed formula feeding as more practical. Students who were Caucasian and female and experienced breastfeeding exposure demonstrated higher breastfeeding attitudes and intent. Breastfeeding exposure and attitudes contributed 32% of the variance in breastfeeding intentions. The odds of experiencing breastfeeding exposure and positive breastfeeding attitudes were approximately 3 times higher for Caucasian students than for African American students. Conclusion: External factors demonstrated a stronger association with breastfeeding intentions. The link with race and gender appears to operate through their effect on attitudes and exposure. More research is needed to identify strategies to improve breastfeeding exposure and attitudes among African Americans. © The Author(s) 2016.


Perry G.,University of Missouri
Human Nature | Year: 2017

Humans have been called “cooperative breeders” because mothers rely heavily on alloparental assistance, and the grandmother life stage has been interpreted as an adaptation for alloparenting. Many studies indicate that women invest preferentially in their daughters’ children, but little research has been conducted where patrilocal residence is normative. Bangladesh is such a place, but women nevertheless receive substantial alloparental investment from the matrilateral family, and child outcomes improve when maternal grandmothers are alloparents. To garner this support, women must maintain contact with their natal families. Here, the visiting behavior of 151 interviewed mothers was analyzed. Despite the challenges of patrilocality and purdah, almost all respondents visited their own mothers, and mothers-in-law were visited far less. This contrast persists in analyses controlling for proximity, respondent age, postmarital residence, family income, and marital status. These results affirm the importance women place on matrilateral ties, even under a countervailing ideology. © 2017 Springer Science+Business Media New York


Larsen S.C.,University of Missouri
Journal of Political Ecology | Year: 2016

Indigenous "country" or "land" is a region of reciprocities constituted through the relationships and obligations that preserve the continuity of life. It is a "region of care." In picking up and developing this phrase, this article opens a discussion about how regional political ecology can build from the materialist perspectives of contemporary scholarship and Indigenous politics. If, as some materialist scholars have argued, the political field in the Anthropocene is now more than ever an ecology of problems, how might regional political ecology use these perspectives to address the challenges of coexistence among humans, nonhumans, and other things? The article explores how praxis oriented around "regions of care" helps those involved in political-ecological work confront these challenges in an experimental politics that respects and works with nonhuman, material agencies through place-based relationships and networks. In this way, regional political ecology addresses the new environmental politics of the Anthropocene in a way that is attuned to the concerns of the many communities engaged in the challenges of coexistence.


CLN2 neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis is a hereditary lysosomal storage disease with primarily neurological signs that results from mutations in TPP1, which encodes the lysosomal enzyme tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1). Studies using a canine model for this disorder demonstrated that delivery of TPP1 enzyme to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by intracerebroventricular administration of an AAV-TPP1 vector resulted in substantial delays in the onset and progression of neurological signs and prolongation of life span. We hypothesized that the treatment may not deliver therapeutic levels of this protein to tissues outside the central nervous system that also require TPP1 for normal lysosomal function. To test this hypothesis, dogs treated with CSF administration of AAV-TPP1 were evaluated for the development of non-neuronal pathology. Affected treated dogs exhibited progressive cardiac pathology reflected by elevated plasma cardiac troponin-1, impaired cardiac function and development of histopathological myocardial lesions. Progressive increases in the plasma activity levels of alanine aminotransferase and creatine kinase indicated development of pathology in the liver and muscles. The treatment also did not prevent disease-related accumulation of lysosomal storage bodies in the heart or liver. These studies indicate that optimal treatment outcomes for CLN2 disease may require delivery of TPP1 systemically as well as directly to the central nervous system.Gene Therapy advance online publication, 2 February 2017; doi:10.1038/gt.2017.4. © 2017 The Author(s)


Starkweather K.E.,University of Missouri
Human Nature | Year: 2017

The Shodagor of Matlab, Bangladesh, are a seminomadic community of people who live and work on small wooden boats, within the extensive system of rivers and canals that traverse the country. This unique ecology places particular constraints on family and economic life and leads to Shodagor parents employing one of four distinct strategies to balance childcare and provisioning needs. The purpose of this paper is to understand the conditions that lead a family to choose one strategy over another by testing predictions about socioecological factors that impact the sexual division of labor, including a family’s stage in the domestic cycle, aspects of the local ecology, and the availability of alloparents. Results show that although each factor has an impact on the division of labor individually, a confluence of these factors best explains within-group, between-family differences in how mothers and fathers divide subsistence and childcare labor. These factors also interact in particular ways for Shodagor families, and it appears that families choose their economic strategies based on the constellation of constraints that they face. The results of these analyses have implications for theory regarding the sexual division of labor across cultures and inform how Shodagor family economic and parenting strategies should be contextualized in future studies. © 2017 Springer Science+Business Media New York


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: news.mit.edu

New research offers insights into how crystal dislocations — a common type of defect in materials — can affect electrical and heat transport through crystals, at a microscopic, quantum mechanical level. Dislocations in crystals are places where the orderly three-dimensional structure of a crystal lattice — whose arrangement of atoms repeats with exactly the same spacing — is disrupted. The effect is as if a knife had sliced through the crystal and then the pieces were stuck back together, askew from their original positions. These defects have a strong effect on phonons, the modes of lattice vibration that play a role in the thermal and electrical properties of the crystals through which they travel. But a precise understanding of the mechanism of the dislocation-phonon interaction has been elusive and controversial, which has slowed progress toward using dislocations to tailor the thermal properties of materials. A team at MIT has been able to learn important details about how those interactions work, which could inform future efforts to develop thermoelectric devices and other electronic systems. The findings are reported in the journal Nano Letters, in a paper co-authored by postdoc Mingda Li, Department of Mechanical Engineering head Professor Gang Chen, the late Institute Professor Emerita Mildred Dresselhaus, and five others. Dislocations — which Li describes as “atomic irregularities in a regular crystal” — are very common defects in crystals, and they affect, for example, how heat dissipates through a silicon microchip or how well current flows through a silicon solar panel. There have been two competing approaches to explaining phonon-dislocation interactions, Li explains, and a few other questions about them have remained unsolved. Now, the MIT team has found a new mathematical approach to analyzing such systems, using a new quasiparticle they formulated called a “dislon,” which is a quantized version of a dislocation, which seems to resolve these longstanding mysteries. “People have tried to learn how the dislocations change the material properties — the electrical and thermal properties,” Li says. “Before now, there were many empirical models, which need fitting parameters to be complete. There was a long debate about the nature of phonon scattering in dislocations.” The new theory, Li says, has a different starting point, as it is based on rigorous quantum field theory. It seems to resolve a number of issues, including a debate between two views known as the dynamic and static scattering approaches, showing they are simply two extreme cases within this new framework. And while both of these approaches fail to explain behavior at the nanoscale, the new approach works well at such scales. The findings could affect the search for better thermoelectric materials, which can convert heat to electricity. These are used for generating power from waste heat, or providing heaters for car seats. Thermoelectric systems can also provide cooling, for cold-drink chests, for example. Chen, who is the Carl Richard Soderberg Professor of Power Engineering, attributes the new findings to Li’s initiative. “I didn’t put that much hope in it,” Chen said. “It’s a pretty complex problem: how dislocations affect these very important properties. ... I was very surprised when he came back with this new theory. He started from basic principles and derived a quantum description for it.” Li and his team have made “a breakthrough by being able to account for the long-range nature of the dislocation strain field, by treating it as a new quantum mechanical object called the dislon,” says Jeffery Snyder, a professor at Northwestern University, who was not connected to this work. “Combining this with the quantum mechanical treatment of the dislon-electron interaction could lead to new strategies to optimize materials by using metallurgical approaches to engineer the structure, type, and location of dislocations within a material.” “Dislocations have profound effects on properties of materials, but until now the long-range nature of the strain field has prevented direct calculations of dislocation effects,” says David J. Singh, a professor at the University of Missouri who also was not involved in this work. “The quantization developed in this paper goes a long way to solving these problems. I expect that this new formalism will lead to greatly improved understanding of the effects of dislocations on the electrical and thermal properties of materials. This work is a major step forward.” The research team also included Zhiwei Ding, Jiawei Zhou, and Professor Hong Liu at MIT, and Qingping Meng and Yimei Zhu at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The work was supported by S3TEC, the Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency of the U.S. Department of Defense.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Dr. Joomee Shim is committed to provide excellence to her patients. Dr. Shim received both her BLA and medical degree within 6 years from the University of Missouri, Kansas City. She then completed her residency and fellowship at Stony Brook University Hospital in Stony Brook, NY. During her fellowship, Dr. Shim was involved in the cardio oncology program that helped guide patients to closely monitor their cardiac status with their cardiologists while they were on cardio toxic medications. Dr. Shim has worked to develop an effective work environment, placing patient safety as a priority as part of a patient safety initiative. Dr. Shim is skilled in performing bone marrow biopsies and placing intrathecal chemotherapy, as well as taking care of auto and allotransplant bone marrow patients. Dr. Shim likes to travel to different places around the world to meet new people and understand varying cultures. Dr. Shim is fluent in Korean. To deliver personalized comprehensive multidisciplinary patient care with compassion and empathy. Communication and education are key in empowering patients in understanding and treating their disease. Respect and supporting patients and their family through difficult times.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

Media coverage of public shootings may create and perpetuate a number of racial and mental health stereotypes, new research on news stories about shootings suggests. For example, past research shows that 54 percent of participants who read a story about a mass shooting believe all people with mental illnesses are dangerous, compared to only 40 percent of participants who did not read the mass shooting story. The new research finds that media portrayals of public shooters vary based on the race of the shooter, regardless of the circumstances of the shooting. Cynthia Frisby, an associate professor of strategic communication at the University of Missouri School of Journalism, examined 170 stories about public shootings published in five major national newspapers from 2008-2016. She found four primary adjectives used to describe public shooters: hero, terrorist, thug, and mentally ill. The stories about public shooters included shootings by police officers, those acting in self-defense, and criminal shootings. Throughout the 170 stories, the word “hero” was used 32 times to describe public shooters, 75 percent of whom were white, while only 16 percent were black, and 9 percent were Hispanic. Frisby also found: “It is clear that some measure of implicit bias exists among those writing stories about public shootings,” Frisby says. “Black and Hispanic shooters are more likely to be labeled as thugs, while many white public shooters seem to be given some measure of leniency by attributing their actions to mental illness. This trend not only perpetuates negative racial stereotypes, but also creates damaging stigmas around mental illness, despite the fact that the vast majority of people with mental illness are non-violent,” she says. Frisby also found that stories about white shooters were much more likely to only include objective facts, such as the time, date, and place of the shooting. However, stories about shooters of color were much more likely to include subjective facts, such as aggravating circumstances that might have caused the shooting. “News media serve as a powerful mode of communication and have incredible power in influencing public opinion on controversial topics, especially those topics that involve race, gun violence, shootings, killings, and injuring innocent victims,” Frisby says. “If social change is to occur,” she continues, “media outlets need to start facilitating conversations about race and crime in the 21st century. Hopefully journalists, like all of us, can face their personal biases and understand that words have meaning before making decisions about how to write headlines.” The study has been accepted for publication in Advances in Journalism and Communication.


News Article | April 6, 2017
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

New research offers insights into how crystal dislocations — a common type of defect in materials — can affect electrical and heat transport through crystals, at a microscopic, quantum mechanical level. Dislocations in crystals are places where the orderly three-dimensional structure of a crystal lattice — whose arrangement of atoms repeats with exactly the same spacing — is disrupted. The effect is as if a knife had sliced through the crystal and then the pieces were stuck back together, askew from their original positions. These defects have a strong effect on phonons, the modes of lattice vibration that play a role in the thermal and electrical properties of the crystals through which they travel. But a precise understanding of the mechanism of the dislocation-phonon interaction has been elusive and controversial, which has slowed progress toward using dislocations to tailor the thermal properties of materials. A team at MIT has been able to learn important details about how those interactions work, which could inform future efforts to develop thermoelectric devices and other electronic systems. The findings are reported in the journal Nano Letters, in a paper co-authored by postdoc Mingda Li, Department of Mechanical Engineering head Professor Gang Chen, the late Institute Professor Emerita Mildred Dresselhaus, and five others. Dislocations — which Li describes as “atomic irregularities in a regular crystal” — are very common defects in crystals, and they affect, for example, how heat dissipates through a silicon microchip or how well current flows through a silicon solar panel. There have been two competing approaches to explaining phonon-dislocation interactions, Li explains, and a few other questions about them have remained unsolved. Now, the MIT team has found a new mathematical approach to analyzing such systems, using a new quasiparticle they formulated called a “dislon,” which is a quantized version of a dislocation, which seems to resolve these longstanding mysteries. “People have tried to learn how the dislocations change the material properties — the electrical and thermal properties,” Li says. “Before now, there were many empirical models, which need fitting parameters to be complete. There was a long debate about the nature of phonon scattering in dislocations.” The new theory, Li says, has a different starting point, as it is based on rigorous quantum field theory. It seems to resolve a number of issues, including a debate between two views known as the dynamic and static scattering approaches, showing they are simply two extreme cases within this new framework. And while both of these approaches fail to explain behavior at the nanoscale, the new approach works well at such scales. The findings could affect the search for better thermoelectric materials, which can convert heat to electricity. These are used for generating power from waste heat, or providing heaters for car seats. Thermoelectric systems can also provide cooling, for cold-drink chests, for example. Chen, who is the Carl Richard Soderberg Professor of Power Engineering, attributes the new findings to Li’s initiative. “I didn’t put that much hope in it,” Chen said. “It’s a pretty complex problem: how dislocations affect these very important properties. ... I was very surprised when he came back with this new theory. He started from basic principles and derived a quantum description for it.” Li and his team have made “a breakthrough by being able to account for the long-range nature of the dislocation strain field, by treating it as a new quantum mechanical object called the dislon,” says Jeffery Snyder, a professor at Northwestern University, who was not connected to this work. “Combining this with the quantum mechanical treatment of the dislon-electron interaction could lead to new strategies to optimize materials by using metallurgical approaches to engineer the structure, type, and location of dislocations within a material.” “Dislocations have profound effects on properties of materials, but until now the long-range nature of the strain field has prevented direct calculations of dislocation effects,” says David J. Singh, a professor at the University of Missouri who also was not involved in this work. “The quantization developed in this paper goes a long way to solving these problems. I expect that this new formalism will lead to greatly improved understanding of the effects of dislocations on the electrical and thermal properties of materials. This work is a major step forward.” The research team also included Zhiwei Ding, Jiawei Zhou, and Professor Hong Liu at MIT, and Qingping Meng and Yimei Zhu at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The work was supported by S3TEC, the Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency of the U.S. Department of Defense.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Women's periods don't actually synchronize if they live together, according to a new study from a period- tracking app. The study, from the period-tracking app Clue, is one of the largest of its kind to look for evidence of menstrual-cycle syncing among women, according to the Guardian. The idea that women who spend a lot of time together experience an alignment of their menstrual cycles was first examined in 1971 in a study of female college students. That study found that the start dates of women's periods got closer together if the women were roommates or close friends. One hypothesis for the results was that women release pheromones that influence each other's cycles. But the study drew  criticism for using flawed statistical methods, and many subsequent studies have failed to replicate the results. [5 Myths About Women's Bodies] In the new study, Clue teamed up with researchers at the University of Oxford to analyze data from their period-tracking app. Of the 1,500 women who responded to the study survey, the researchers narrowed it  to 360 pairs of women who used Clue. Each woman said she had some type of close relationship with the other person in the pair — they were friends, siblings, roommates, partners, mother-daughter pairs or colleagues. The researchers only included pairs who lived in the same city as each other, and about one-third of the pairs lived together. Women were excluded from the study if they used hormonal birth control. After analyzing at least three consecutive cycles from each of the pairs, the researchers found that 273 of the pairs saw their cycles diverge — that is, they actually had a larger difference in their cycle start dates at the end of the study than at the beginning. Just 79 of the pairs saw their cycles converge. And living together did not increase the likelihood of cycle alignment, Clue said. This isn't the first study to cast doubt on the idea of syncing menstrual cycles. A 1993 study conducted by researchers at New Mexico State University, which included about 30 lesbian couples, found no evidence of convergence of periods over time. A 1991 study from the University of Missouri, which included 132 sorority members and their roommates, also found that the start dates of the women's periods tended to diverge over time. And a 1994 study of women on an Israeli basketball team found no evidence of menstrual synchrony. So why do women sometimes say that, anecdotally, they've experienced their cycle aligning with someone else's? It could simply be chance, according to Beverly I. Strassmann, a professor of anthropology at the University of Michigan. For example, if two women have cycles that are 28 days long, the maximum they could be out of sync would be 14 days, Strassmann wrote in a 1999 opinion paper on the topic published in the journal Human Reproduction. On average, they will be seven days apart, and half of the time their period start dates should be even closer, Strassmann said. And since a woman's period typically lasts at least five days, "it is not surprising that friends commonly experience overlapping menses, which is taken as personal confirmation of menstrual synchrony," Strassmann said.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

Scientists have examined the effects of burning forests at different intervals over a 68-year period in order to determine how fire alters forest landscapes over time. While researchers and land managers have come to understand the beneficial effects of controlled forest fires over recent decades, questions regarding how frequently to use forest fires remain. Researchers have studied forests subjected to different frequencies of fires to determine what effects fire can have on oak forests over long periods of time. They found that the frequency of prescribed forest fires should be determined based on the long-term goals of land managers. Benjamin Knapp, an assistant professor in the forestry department at the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources, examined forest fire data collected since 1949 from the University Forest Conservation Area in southeast Missouri. Throughout the course of the study, three areas of forest were subjected to varying frequencies of prescribed forest fires. One area has been burned every year since 1949, the second area has been burned every four years, and the final area has never been burned. Knapp found that in the areas that were burned regularly (every one or four years), small trees up to 12 cm in diameter died, resulting in open woodland ecosystems that are easy to walk through and include a diversity of small, herbaceous plants. In the area that was burned annually, small trees and brush were eliminated, leaving tall canopy trees with wide spaces between them. In the area that was burned every four years, small trees re-sprouted and persisted but did not grow into the canopy. This created tall canopy trees with a slightly more closed structure due to regrown brush. Finally, the area that never experienced fire was dense with vegetation and abundant underbrush. Knapp says these different resulting forest structures show the need for land managers to carefully plan how they burn their forests. “The open structure with tall canopy trees and herbaceous plants on the forest floor may be desirable for recreational spaces or certain wildlife habitats, in which case it would make sense for land managers to burn their forests more frequently,” Knapp says. “However, frequent burning without fire-free periods can prevent forest regeneration from becoming canopy trees, so land managers should be strategic in their use of fire,” he adds. “In addition, fire can scar trees and potentially reduce their timber value, so land managers who hope to maximize timber value may want to refrain from the frequent use of fire.” Knapp says fire effects on forest ecosystems are complex and vary with many factors, so further research is necessary to better understand how much burning is necessary for various forest goals.


Dr. Daniel Hu, Board Certified OB/GYN, Arrowhead Women's Center, has joined The Expert Network, an invitation-only service for distinguished professionals. Dr. Hu has been chosen as a Distinguished Doctor™ based on peer reviews and ratings, numerous recognitions, and accomplishments achieved throughout his career. Dr. Hu outshines others in his field due to his extensive educational background, numerous awards and recognitions, and career longevity. After earning his Bachelor of Science and medical degree from Creighton University School of Medicine, Dr. Hu went on to complete his residency at the University of Missouri at Kansas City, Saint Luke's Hospital. Today, he is a board-certified OB/GYN and has helped deliver over 6,000 babies, including performing over 1,200 c-sections. With 27 years dedicated to medicine, Dr. Hu is a leading expert in the field of obstetrics and gynecology. When asked why he decided to pursue a career in this specialty, Dr. Hu said: "I wanted to be able to help those in need and help promote a healthy lifestyle, especially for those who are pregnant. As an OB/GYN, I get to be involved in one of the most significant times in human life. If you ask someone what the best time in their life is, it is probably the birth of their kids. And I get to be a part of that every day." Now a senior member of Arrowhead Women's Center and one of the most seasoned OB/GYN's in his region, Dr. Hu focuses on the entire spectrum of gynecological issues, from painful, heavy, or irregular menses to chronic pelvic pain and contraception. He also performs the latest technology in female sterilization, endometrial ablation for abnormal periods, and Robotic Gyn surgery and hysterectomy. As a thought-leader in his specialty, Dr. Hu is committed to staying abreast of advances in obstetrics and gynecology. He also pays particularly close attention to the constantly changing landscape of healthcare. He noted: "I pay attention to the overall environment of healthcare. The payer system is very dynamic and changes on an almost annual basis, so you don't know what's going to happen year-to-year. We have people that come in with no insurance, but mostly all people who come in are covered. The problem is that their premiums and deductibles are going up, so a lot of them are canceling. And I had been seeing many of them for years, but now I no longer do because they can't afford it." Acutely aware of those who are at a disadvantage in our current healthcare system, Dr. Hu has made it a point to serve a broad range of patients in his community. To this end, he volunteers free services to those who are without health insurance every week at an outreach clinic. Dr. Hu notes that his Christian values are very important to him and are a motivating force in both his private practice and his volunteer efforts. For more information, visit Dr. Hu's profile on the Expert Network here: http://expertnetwork.co/members/daniel-hu,-md/2ed6df8a085c8055 The Expert Network© has written this news release with approval and/or contributions from Dr. Daniel Hu. The Expert Network© is an invitation-only reputation management service that is dedicated to helping professionals stand out, network, and gain a competitive edge. The Expert Network selects a limited number of professionals based on their individual recognitions and history of personal excellence.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has analyzed more than a dozen metrics to rank Missouri’s best universities and colleges for 2017. Of the 40 four-year schools on the list, Washington University in St. Louis, Saint Louis University, Maryville University of Saint Louis, William Jewell College and Rockhurst University were the top five. 14 two-year schools also made the list, and State Fair Community College, Crowder College, Jefferson College, East Central College and State Technical College of Missouri were ranked as the best five. A full list of the winning schools is included below. “The schools on our list have created high-quality learning experiences for students in Missouri, with career outcomes in mind,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.Org. “They’ve shown this through the certificates and degrees that they offer, paired with excellent employment services and a record of strong post-college earnings for grads.” To be included on the “Best Colleges in Missouri” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also appraised on additional data that includes annual alumni salaries 10 years after entering college, employment services, student/teacher ratio, graduation rate and the availability of financial aid. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Missouri” list, visit: The Best Four-Year Colleges in Missouri for 2017 include: Avila University Baptist Bible College Calvary Bible College and Theological Seminary Central Methodist University-College of Liberal Arts and Sciences College of the Ozarks Columbia College Culver-Stockton College Drury University Evangel University Fontbonne University Hannibal-LaGrange University Harris-Stowe State University Kansas City Art Institute Lincoln University Lindenwood University Maryville University of Saint Louis Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary Missouri Baptist University Missouri Southern State University Missouri State University-Springfield Missouri University of Science and Technology Missouri Valley College Missouri Western State University Northwest Missouri State University Park University Rockhurst University Saint Louis University Southeast Missouri State University Southwest Baptist University Stephens College Truman State University University of Central Missouri University of Missouri-Columbia University of Missouri-Kansas City University of Missouri-St Louis Washington University in St Louis Webster University Westminster College William Jewell College William Woods University Missouri’s Best Two-Year Colleges for 2017 include: Crowder College East Central College Jefferson College Lake Career and Technical Center Mineral Area College Missouri State University - West Plains Moberly Area Community College North Central Missouri College Ozarks Technical Community College St. Charles Community College State Fair Community College State Technical College of Missouri Texas County Technical College Three Rivers Community College About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

VIDEO:  Researchers at the University of Missouri have studied forests subjected to different frequencies of fires to determine what effects fire can have on oak forests over long periods of time.... view more COLUMBIA, Mo. - In recent decades, scientists and land managers have realized the importance of controlled forest fires for reaching specific forest management objectives. However, questions remain about how often forests should be burned. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have studied forests subjected to different frequencies of fires to determine what effects fire can have on oak forests over long periods of time. They found that the frequency of prescribed forest fires should be determined based on the long-term goals of land managers. Benjamin Knapp, an assistant professor in the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Department of Forestry, examined forest fire data collected since 1949 from the University Forest Conservation Area in southeast Missouri. Throughout the course of the study, three areas of forest were subjected to varying frequencies of prescribed forest fires. One area has been burned every year since 1949, the second area has been burned every four years, and the final area has never been burned. Knapp found that in the areas that were burned regularly (every one or four years), small trees up to 12 cm in diameter died, resulting in open woodland ecosystems that are easy to walk through and include a diversity of small, herbaceous plants. In the area that was burned annually, small trees and brush were eliminated, leaving tall canopy trees with wide spaces between them. In the area that was burned every four years, small trees re-sprouted and persisted but did not grow into the canopy. This created tall canopy trees with a slightly more closed structure due to regrown brush. Finally, the area that never experienced fire was dense with vegetation and abundant underbrush. Knapp says these different resulting forest structures show the need for land managers to carefully plan how they burn their forests. "The open structure with tall canopy trees and herbaceous plants on the forest floor may be desirable for recreational spaces or certain wildlife habitats, in which case it would make sense for land managers to burn their forests more frequently," Knapp said. "However, frequent burning without fire-free periods can prevent forest regeneration from becoming canopy trees, so land managers should be strategic in their use of fire. In addition, fire can scar trees and potentially reduce their timber value, so land managers who hope to maximize timber value may want to refrain from the frequent use of fire." Knapp says fire effects on forest ecosystems are complex and vary with many factors, so further research is necessary to better understand how much burning is necessary for various forest goals. The study, "Structure and composition of an oak-hickory forest after over 60 years of repeated prescribed burning in Missouri, U.S.A." was published in Forest Ecology and Management.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: phys.org

Semiconductors are used for myriad optoelectronic devices. However, as devices get smaller and smaller and more demanding, new materials are needed to ensure that devices work with greater efficiency. Now, researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering have pioneered a new class of semiconductor materials that might enhance the functionality of optoelectronic devices and solar panels—perhaps even using one hundred times less material than the commonly used silicon. Researchers at USC Viterbi, led by Jayakanth Ravichandran, an assistant professor in the Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciencesand including Shanyuan Niu, Huaixun Huyan, Yang Liu, Matthew Yeung, Kevin Ye, Louis Blankemeier, Thomas Orvis, Debarghya Sarkar, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering Rehan Kapadia, and David J. Singh, a professor of physics from University of Missouri, have developed a new class of materials that are superior in performance and have reduced toxicity. Their process, documented in "Bandgap Control via Structural and Chemical Tuning of Transition Metal Perovskite Chalcogenide," is published in Advanced Materials. Ravichandran, the lead on this research, is a materials scientist, who has always been interested in understanding the flow of electrons and heat through materials, as well as the how electrons interact within materials. This deep knowledge of how material composition affects electron movement was critical to Ravichandran's and his colleagues' most recent innovation. Computers and electronics have been getting better, but according to Jayakanth Ravichandran, the principal investigator of this study, "the performance of the most basic device—the transistors —are not getting better." There is a plateau in terms of performance, as noted by what is considered the "end of Moore's law." Similar to electronics, there is a lot of interest to develop high performance semiconductors for opto-electronics. The collaborative team of material scientists and electrical engineers wanted to develop new materials which could showcase the ideal optical and electrical properties for a variety of applications such as displays, light detectors and emitters, as well as solar cells. The researchers developed a class of semiconductors called "transition metal perovskite chalcogenides." Currently, the most useful semiconductors don't hold enough carriers for a given volume of material (a property which is referred to as "density of states") but they transport electrons fast and thus are known to have high mobility. The real challenge for scientists has been to increase this density of states in materials, while maintaining high mobility. The proposed material is predicted to possess these conflicting properties. As a first step to show its potential applications, the researchers studied its ability absorb and emit light. "There is a saying," says Ravichandran of the dialogue among those in the optics and photonics fields, "that a very good LED is also a very good solar cell." Since the materials Ravichandran and his colleagues developed absorb and emit light effectively, solar cells are a possible application. Solar cells absorb light and convert it into electricity. However, solar panels are made of silicon, which comes from sand via a highly energy intensive extraction process. If solar cells could be made of a new, alternative semiconductor material such as the one created by the USC Viterbi researchers— a material that could fit more electrons for a given volume (and reducing the thickness of the panels), solar cells could be more efficient—perhaps using one hundred times less material to generate the same amount of energy. This new material, if applied in the solar energy industry, could make solar energy less expensive. While it is a long road to bring such a class of materials to market, the next step is to recreate this material in an ultra-thin film form to make solar cells and test their performance. "The key contribution of this work," says Ravichandran, "is our new synthesis method, which is a drastic improvement from earlier studies. Also, our demonstration of wide tunability in optical properties (especially band gap) is promising for developing new optoelectronic devices with tunable optical properties." Explore further: Crystalline material could replace silicon to double efficiency of solar cells


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Researchers find that LGBT individuals who live in smoke-free communities are more likely to want to quit smoking than those in communities without smoking bans COLUMBIA, Mo. - Tobacco use remains the leading preventable cause of death and disability in the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cigarette smoking among lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) individuals is higher than among heterosexual adults--nearly 24 percent of the LGBT population smoke compared to nearly 17 percent of the straight population. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri have found evidence of lower smoking prevalence and greater intentions to quit among the LGBT smokers who live in communities with smoke-free policies. "Past research indicated despite overall declines in smoking, higher smoking rates persist in the LGBT community, due in part to social norms," said Jenna Wintemberg, instructor of health sciences in the School of Health Professions. "LGBT people face hostility and can feel excluded from social spaces, leading individuals to create their own spaces such as bars and nightclubs, which are often targets for marketing and promotion by the tobacco industry." Researchers surveyed participants during Missouri Pride festivals with questions about where they live, personal tobacco use and support for smoke-free policies. They found that 94 percent of those who live in smoke-free communities were more likely to want to quit smoking compared to just 76 percent of those who lived in places without smoking bans. "Smoke-free policies have several positive outcomes for all people, not specifically those who identify as LGBT," said Jane McElroy, principal investigator of the study and associate professor of family and community medicine in the School of Medicine. "These outcomes include overall lower smoking rates and changes in social norms regarding smoking." Researchers also found that only 35 percent of Missourians from the study sample lived in an area with a comprehensive smoke-free law, compared to 82 percent of the population nationally. "Can smoke-free policies reduce tobacco use disparities of sexual and gender minorities in Missouri," recently was published in Nicotine and Tobacco Research. Kevin Everett, associate professor of family and community medicine, and Bin Ge, statistician in the department of medical research were co-authors for the study. Support for the Out, Proud and Healthy project was provided by the Missouri Foundation for Health.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has compiled its list of Missouri’s best online colleges and universities for 2017. Of the 31 four-year schools that made the list, Webster University, University of Missouri Columbia, University of Central Missouri, Missouri State University Springfield and Lindenwood University scored the highest. Of the 8 two-year colleges that also made the list, Crowder College, Jefferson College, Mineral Area College and State Fair Community College were top scoring schools. “Online certificates and degrees are increasingly popular option, especially for students who are unable to complete their education in a traditional classroom environment because of scheduling or location,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. “These Missouri schools have distinguished themselves by offering the best online college programs in the state, maintaining high quality and accreditation standards and providing flexibility with a variety of degrees online.” To earn a spot on the “Best Online Schools in Missouri” list, colleges and universities must be accredited, public or private not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also judged based on additional data points such as the availability of financial aid opportunities, school counseling services, student/teacher ratios and graduation rates. For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: Missouri’s Best Online Four-Year Schools for 2017 include the following: Avila University Baptist Bible College Calvary Bible College and Theological Seminary Columbia College Cox College Culver-Stockton College Drury University Evangel University Fontbonne University Hannibal-LaGrange University Lincoln University Lindenwood University Maryville University of Saint Louis Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary Missouri Baptist University Missouri Southern State University Missouri State University-Springfield Missouri University of Science and Technology Missouri Valley College Missouri Western State University Northwest Missouri State University Park University Saint Louis University Southeast Missouri State University Southwest Baptist University Stephens College University of Central Missouri University of Missouri-Columbia University of Missouri-Kansas City Webster University William Woods University Missouri’s Best Online Two-Year Schools for 2017 include the following: Crowder College Jefferson College Mineral Area College Moberly Area Community College North Central Missouri College Ozarks Technical Community College State Fair Community College Three Rivers Community College ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBIA, Mo. - More than 3 million people in the United States are estimated to have an autism spectrum disorder diagnosis and annual diagnosis rates continue to rise. Researchers from the University of Missouri have found when teenagers and young adults with autism enter adulthood and age out of many of the services designed to help them, they often are anxious about how to handle new adult responsibilities such as paying bills and filing taxes. These findings highlight the importance of incorporating financial management into early education to empower young adults with autism. Nancy Cheak-Zamora, assistant professor in the School of Health Professions, led a research team that conducted interviews with individuals with autism between 16 and 25 years old. Through the interviews, the researchers identified common themes regarding adulthood and financial skills. "Most of the participants saw a definite association between adulthood and handling money," Cheak-Zamora said. "Participants agreed that independence required managing finances and all expressed frustration in their own abilities when it came to knowing how to handle and use money. According to the participants, the lack of financial skills has serious consequences on their ability to assume adult responsibilities." This new research highlights the importance of implementing financial management programs early and tailoring them to the specific needs of people on the autism spectrum. Researchers suggest that financial management and literacy need to become an integral part of social services and education. "Despite the importance of financial autonomy and the increased independence that comes from understanding money, financial management and decision-making often are seen as outside the purview of professionals working with young people with autism," said Clark Peters, co-author of the study and associate professor in the MU School of Social Work. "Educational programs that include financial literacy in both schools and independent living programs could increase autonomy and quality of life for people with autism." Cheak-Zamora and Peters suggest that parents and caregivers can help by providing skills and encouragement. They say helping children with autism pay for items at a store and setting up bank accounts can provide the confidence needed to understand financial matters. They also suggest that financial institutions should play a role in helping customers with special needs, such as providing dedicated phone lines to assist consumers. "Financial capabilities among youth with autism spectrum disorder," recently was published in the Journal of Child and Family Studies. Michelle Teti, associate professor of health sciences, and Anna Maurer-Batjer, a graduate student in the School of Social Work also co-authored the study. Research was supported by the U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity and the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs through the Autism Research Program. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the funding agencies.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

On April 18 and 19, the Levy Economics Institute of Bard College will gather top policymakers, economists, and analysts at the 26th Annual Hyman P. Minsky Conference on the State of the U.S. and World Economies to discuss, among many issues, the implications of the new administration’s “America First” policies, focusing on the outlook for trade, taxation, fiscal, and financial regulation measures to generate domestic investments capable of moving the growth rate beyond the “new normal” established in the aftermath of the Great Recession, without jeopardizing financial stability. The conference, “‘America First’ and Financial Stability,” is being organized by the Levy Institute and will take place Tuesday and Wednesday, April 18–19, at the Levy Economics Institute of Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York. Participants include Esther L. George, president and chief executive officer, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City; Eric S. Rosengren, president and chief executive officer, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston; Thomas M. Hoenig, vice chairman, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation; Peter Praet, chief economist and executive board member, European Central Bank; Michael E. Feroli, chief U.S. economist, JPMorgan Chase & Co.; Arturo O’Connell, formerly, member of the board of governors, Central Bank of Argentina; Lakshman Achuthan, cofounder and chief operations officer, Economic Cycle Research Institute; Rana Foroohar, global business columnist, Financial Times, and global economic analyst, CNN; Michael S. Derby, special writer, The Wall Street Journal; Christian Plumb, Latin America business editor, Reuters; and Yalman Onaran, senior writer, Bloomberg News. The 2017 Minsky Conference will assess, among other issues, the impact of different financing schemes on both infrastructure investment and the return of central bank monetary policies to more neutral interest rates. Since these new policy proposals will have a global impact, the conference will focus on their implication for the performance of European and Latin American economies. The conference will include presentations by Jan Kregel, director of research, Levy Institute; Robert J. Barbera, codirector, Center for Financial Economics, The Johns Hopkins University; Fernando J. Cardim de Carvalho, senior scholar, Levy Institute, and emeritus professor of economics, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro; Scott Fullwiler, professor of economics, University of Missouri–Kansas City; Arturo Huerta González, professor of economics, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México; Stephanie A. Kelton, research associate, Levy Institute, and professor of economics, University of Missouri–Kansas City; Paolo Savona, formerly, Italian minister of industry and president, Banco di Roma and the Fondo Interbancario di Tutela dei Depositi; Edwin M. Truman, nonresident senior fellow, Peterson Institute for International Economics; Michalis Nikiforos, research scholar, Levy Institute; and L. Randall Wray, senior scholar, Levy Institute, and professor of economics, Bard College. The Levy Economics Institute of Bard College, founded in 1986 through the generous support of the late Bard College trustee Leon Levy, is a nonprofit, nonpartisan, public policy research organization. The Institute is independent of any political or other affiliation, and encourages diversity of opinion in the examination of economic policy issues while striving to transform ideological arguments into informed debate. Press registrations should be made by calling Mark Primoff at 845-758-7412 or by sending an e-mail to primoff(at)bard.edu.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

Cigarette smoking among lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) people in the United States is higher than among heterosexual adults—nearly 24 percent of the LGBT population smoke compared to nearly 17 percent of the straight population. But a new study finds evidence of less smoking and greater intentions to quit among LGBT smokers who live in communities with smoke-free policies. “Past research indicated despite overall declines in smoking, higher smoking rates persist in the LGBT community, due in part to social norms,” says Jenna Wintemberg, instructor of health sciences in the School of Health Professions at the University of Missouri. “LGBT people face hostility and can feel excluded from social spaces, leading individuals to create their own spaces such as bars and nightclubs, which are often targets for marketing and promotion by the tobacco industry.” Researchers surveyed participants during Missouri Pride festivals with questions about where they live, personal tobacco use, and support for smoke-free policies. Of those who live in smoke-free communities, 94 percent were more likely to want to quit smoking compared to just 76 percent of those who lived in places without smoking bans. The findings are published in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research. “Smoke-free policies have several positive outcomes for all people, not specifically those who identify as LGBT,” says Jane McElroy, principal investigator of the study and associate professor of family and community medicine. “These outcomes include overall lower smoking rates and changes in social norms regarding smoking.” Further, only 35 percent of Missourians from the study sample live in an area with a comprehensive smoke-free law, compared to 82 percent of the population nationally. Kevin Everett, associate professor of family and community medicine, and Bin Ge, statistician in the medical research department are study coauthors. The Missouri Foundation for Health supported the Out, Proud and Healthy project.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBIA, Mo. - As the pervasiveness of media reports on public shootings increase, the way in which media cover these violent stories can have broad social implications, including the creation and perpetuation of racial and mental health stereotypes. For example, research shows that 54 percent of participants who read a story about a mass shooting believe all people with mental illnesses are dangerous, compared to only 40 percent of participants who did not read the mass shooting story. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri School of Journalism have found that media portrayals of public shooters vary based on the race of the shooter, regardless of the circumstances of the shooting. Cynthia Frisby, an associate professor of strategic communication at Mizzou, examined 170 stories about public shootings published in five major national newspapers from 2008-2016. She found four primary adjectives used to describe public shooters: hero, terrorist, thug and mentally ill. The stories about public shooters included shootings by police officers, those acting in self-defense, and criminal shootings. Throughout the 170 stories, the word "hero" was used 32 times to describe public shooters, 75 percent of whom were white, while only 16 percent were black and 9 percent were Hispanic. Frisby also found: "It is clear that some measure of implicit bias exists among those writing stories about public shootings," Frisby said. "Black and Hispanic shooters are more likely to be labeled as thugs, while many white public shooters seem to be given some measure of leniency by attributing their actions to mental illness. This trend not only perpetuates negative racial stereotypes, but also creates damaging stigmas around mental illness, despite the fact that the vast majority of people with mental illness are non-violent." Frisby also found that stories about white shooters were much more likely to only include objective facts, such as the time, date and place of the shooting. However, stories about shooters of color were much more likely to include subjective facts, such as aggravating circumstances that might have caused the shooting. "News media serve as a powerful mode of communication and have incredible power in influencing public opinion on controversial topics, especially those topics that involve race, gun violence, shootings, killings and injuring innocent victims," Frisby said. "If social change is to occur, media outlets need to start facilitating conversations about race and crime in the 21st century. Hopefully journalists, like all of us, can face their personal biases and understand that words have meaning before making decisions about how to write headlines." The study, "Misrepresentations of Lone Shooters: The disparate treatment of Muslim, African American, Hispanic, Asian, and White perpetrators in the U.S. news media," has been accepted for publication in Advances in Journalism and Communication.


News Article | April 29, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has determined which online colleges and universities in the U.S. have the most military-friendly programs and services. Of the 50 four-year schools that earned honors, Drexel University, University of Southern California, Duquesne University, Regis University and Harvard University were the top five. 50 two-year schools were also recognized; Laramie County Community College, Western Wyoming Community College, Dakota College at Bottineau, Mesa Community College and Kansas City Kansas Community College ranked as the top five. A complete list of top schools is included below. “Veterans and active duty members of the military often face unique challenges when it comes to transitioning into college, from navigating the GI Bill to getting used to civilian life,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.org. “These online schools not only offer military-friendly resources, they also offer an online format, allowing even the busiest members of our armed forces to earn a degree or certificate.” To be included on the “Most Military-Friendly Online Colleges” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also evaluated on additional data points such as the number and variety of degree programs offered, military tuition rates, employment services, post-college earnings of alumni and military-related academic resources. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Most Military-Friendly Online Colleges” list, visit: The Most Military-Friendly Online Four-Year Colleges in the U.S. for 2017 include: Arizona State University-Tempe Auburn University Azusa Pacific University Baker University Boston University Canisius College Carnegie Mellon University Columbia University in the City of New York Creighton University Dallas Baptist University Drexel University Duquesne University George Mason University Hampton University Harvard University Illinois Institute of Technology Iowa State University La Salle University Lawrence Technological University Lewis University Loyola University Chicago Miami University-Oxford Michigan Technological University Missouri University of Science and Technology North Carolina State University at Raleigh Norwich University Oklahoma State University-Main Campus Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus Purdue University-Main Campus Regis University Rochester Institute of Technology Saint Leo University Southern Methodist University Syracuse University Texas A & M University-College Station University of Arizona University of Denver University of Florida University of Idaho University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign University of Michigan-Ann Arbor University of Minnesota-Twin Cities University of Mississippi University of Missouri-Columbia University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Oklahoma-Norman Campus University of Southern California University of the Incarnate Word Washington State University Webster University The Most Military-Friendly Online Two-Year Colleges in the U.S. for 2017 include: Aims Community College Allen County Community College Amarillo College Barton County Community College Bunker Hill Community College Casper College Central Texas College Chandler-Gilbert Community College Cincinnati State Technical and Community College Cochise College Columbus State Community College Cowley County Community College Craven Community College Dakota College at Bottineau East Mississippi Community College Eastern New Mexico University - Roswell Campus Edmonds Community College Fox Valley Technical College GateWay Community College Grayson College Hutchinson Community College Kansas City Kansas Community College Lake Region State College Laramie County Community College Lone Star College Mesa Community College Metropolitan Community College Mitchell Technical Institute Mount Wachusett Community College Navarro College Northeast Community College Norwalk Community College Ozarka College Phoenix College Prince George's Community College Quinsigamond Community College Rio Salado College Rose State College Sheridan College Shoreline Community College Sinclair College Southeast Community College Southwestern Oregon Community College State Fair Community College Truckee Meadows Community College Western Nebraska Community College Western Oklahoma State College Western Texas College Western Wyoming Community College Yavapai College ### About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


The International Nurses Association is pleased to welcome Kari Elliott, BSN, RN, AE-C, to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare. Kari Elliott is a Registered Nurse with more than 13 years of experience and an extensive expertise in all facets of nursing, especially pediatric, ICU, NICU, emergency, travel, postpartum, burn unit, and critical care nursing. She is currently working for a local staffing agency assisting with weekend staff needs for Grace Staffing Inc., and working in a small community hospital part-time in Missouri. Kari received her Bachelor of Science Degree in Dietetics with a minor in Chemistry in 1999 from Missouri State University. She decided to pursue nursing, and obtained her Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing in 2004 from Truman State University. An advocate for continuing education, Kari is currently pursuing her Doctorate of Nursing with a pediatric emphasis at the University of Missouri-Columbia with a projected graduation in 2018. She holds additional certifications in Basic Life Support, Advanced Cardiac Life Support, Pediatric Advanced Life Support, Neonatal Resuscitation, Emergency Nursing Pediatric Course, Trauma Nursing Core Course, and is a Certified Asthma Educator. An inductee of the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing, Kari maintains professional memberships with the American Nurses Association, the Missouri Nurses Association, the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, and the Association of Asthma Educators. She engages in asthma volunteer work, and is focusing on pediatric asthma with education for parents and patients, to ensure all asthmatic children have proper prescriptions. Kari attributes her success to her education at Truman State University, her excellent mentors, and her passion for nursing. In her free time, Kari enjoys spending time with her husband of 11 years, outdoor activities, and spending time with her dogs. Learn more about Kari here: http://inanurse.org/network/index.php?do=/4135898/info/ and be sure to read her upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare.


(University of Missouri-Columbia) Gallbladder cancer is a rare, but aggressive disease. A new study by University of Missouri School of Medicine researchers has found that gallbladder cancer rates have decreased in men in recent years but not in women. The researchers also found that more people are being diagnosed with late-stage disease.


News Article | April 6, 2017
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

New research offers insights into how crystal dislocations — a common type of defect in materials — can affect electrical and heat transport through crystals, at a microscopic, quantum mechanical level. Dislocations in crystals are places where the orderly three-dimensional structure of a crystal lattice — whose arrangement of atoms repeats with exactly the same spacing — is disrupted. The effect is as if a knife had sliced through the crystal and then the pieces were stuck back together, askew from their original positions. These defects have a strong effect on phonons, the modes of lattice vibration that play a role in the thermal and electrical properties of the crystals through which they travel. But a precise understanding of the mechanism of the dislocation-phonon interaction has been elusive and controversial, which has slowed progress toward using dislocations to tailor the thermal properties of materials. A team at MIT has been able to learn important details about how those interactions work, which could inform future efforts to develop thermoelectric devices and other electronic systems. The findings are reported in the journal Nano Letters, in a paper co-authored by postdoc Mingda Li, Department of Mechanical Engineering head Professor Gang Chen, the late Institute Professor Emerita Mildred Dresselhaus, and five others. Dislocations — which Li describes as “atomic irregularities in a regular crystal” — are very common defects in crystals, and they affect, for example, how heat dissipates through a silicon microchip or how well current flows through a silicon solar panel. There have been two competing approaches to explaining phonon-dislocation interactions, Li explains, and a few other questions about them have remained unsolved. Now, the MIT team has found a new mathematical approach to analyzing such systems, using a new quasiparticle they formulated called a “dislon,” which is a quantized version of a dislocation, which seems to resolve these longstanding mysteries. “People have tried to learn how the dislocations change the material properties — the electrical and thermal properties,” Li says. “Before now, there were many empirical models, which need fitting parameters to be complete. There was a long debate about the nature of phonon scattering in dislocations.” The new theory, Li says, has a different starting point, as it is based on rigorous quantum field theory. It seems to resolve a number of issues, including a debate between two views known as the dynamic and static scattering approaches, showing they are simply two extreme cases within this new framework. And while both of these approaches fail to explain behavior at the nanoscale, the new approach works well at such scales. The findings could affect the search for better thermoelectric materials, which can convert heat to electricity. These are used for generating power from waste heat, or providing heaters for car seats. Thermoelectric systems can also provide cooling, for cold-drink chests, for example. Chen, who is the Carl Richard Soderberg Professor of Power Engineering, attributes the new findings to Li’s initiative. “I didn’t put that much hope in it,” Chen said. “It’s a pretty complex problem: how dislocations affect these very important properties. ... I was very surprised when he came back with this new theory. He started from basic principles and derived a quantum description for it.” Li and his team have made “a breakthrough by being able to account for the long-range nature of the dislocation strain field, by treating it as a new quantum mechanical object called the dislon,” says Jeffery Snyder, a professor at Northwestern University, who was not connected to this work. “Combining this with the quantum mechanical treatment of the dislon-electron interaction could lead to new strategies to optimize materials by using metallurgical approaches to engineer the structure, type, and location of dislocations within a material.” “Dislocations have profound effects on properties of materials, but until now the long-range nature of the strain field has prevented direct calculations of dislocation effects,” says David J. Singh, a professor at the University of Missouri who also was not involved in this work. “The quantization developed in this paper goes a long way to solving these problems. I expect that this new formalism will lead to greatly improved understanding of the effects of dislocations on the electrical and thermal properties of materials. This work is a major step forward.” The research team also included Zhiwei Ding, Jiawei Zhou, and Professor Hong Liu at MIT, and Qingping Meng and Yimei Zhu at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The work was supported by S3TEC, the Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency of the U.S. Department of Defense.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Researchers find that behaviors such as community service and civic engagement might be effective in reducing substance abuse among student-athletes COLUMBIA, Mo. - More than 180,000 student-athletes from 450 colleges and universities compete in Division III sports, the largest NCAA division; nearly 44 percent are female. As substance abuse continues to be a health concern in colleges and universities across the U.S., a social scientist from the University of Missouri has found that female student-athletes who volunteer in their communities and engage in helping behaviors are less likely to partake in dangerous alcohol and marijuana use. "Past research has demonstrated that prosocial behaviors such as comforting or assisting others has long-term benefits for young people," said Gustavo Carlo, Millsap Professor of Diversity in MU's College of Human Environmental Sciences. "For this study, we were interested in understanding how female student-athletes might be impacted by community service because they make up a growing number of the college population." Carlo and Alexandra Davis, former doctoral candidate from MU and current assistant professor of family and child studies at the University of New Mexico, led a research team that investigated Division III women student-athletes' social and health behaviors over a five-year period. Participants in the study self-reported their helping behaviors such as willingness to volunteer as well as their individual alcohol and marijuana use. The researchers found that student athletes with a tendency to help others were less likely to abuse alcohol or use marijuana. "Female student-athletes experience increased demands while in college from coaches and professors to family and friends," Davis said. "Because student-athletes occupy multiple roles simultaneously, they could be at an increased risk substance abuse to cope with stress. Our findings suggest that community service might be a tool to reduce substance abuse among female student-athletes." Carlo and Davis believe these findings highlight the importance of community service and engagement and say that colleges, athletic departments and families should encourage all student-athletes to spend time providing a community service that they care about. "For student-athletes, helping others is a win-win situation," Davis said. "Community service not only reduces the risk of substance abuse, but also creates positive change in the community." "Bidirectional relations between different forms of prosocial behaviors and substance use among female college student athletes," was published in the Journal of Social Psychology. Sam Hardy, associate professor at Brigham Young University; Janine Othuis, assistant professor at the University of New Brunswick; and Byron L. Zamboanga, professor at Smith College, were co-authors of the study.


News Article | April 11, 2017
Site: www.cemag.us

Semiconductors are used for myriad optoelectronic devices. However, as devices get smaller and smaller and more demanding, new materials are needed to ensure that devices work with greater efficiency. Now, researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering have pioneered a new class of semiconductor materials that might enhance the functionality of optoelectronic devices and solar panels — perhaps even using one hundred times less material than the commonly used silicon. Researchers at USC Viterbi, led by Jayakanth Ravichandran, an assistant professor in the Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences, and including Shanyuan Niu, Huaixun Huyan, Yang Liu, Matthew Yeung, Kevin Ye, Louis Blankemeier, Thomas Orvis, Debarghya Sarkar, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering Rehan Kapadia, and David J. Singh, a professor of physics from University of Missouri, have developed a new class of materials that are superior in performance and have reduced toxicity. Their process, documented in “Bandgap Control via Structural and Chemical Tuning of Transition Metal Perovskite Chalcogenide,” is published in Advanced Materials. Ravichandran, the lead on this research, is a materials scientist, who has always been interested in understanding the flow of electrons and heat through materials, as well as the how electrons interact within materials. This deep knowledge of how material composition affects electron movement was critical to Ravichandran’s and his colleagues’ most recent innovation. Computers and electronics have been getting better, but according to Jayakanth Ravichandran, the principal investigator of this study, “the performance of the most basic device — the transistors — are not getting better.” There is a plateau in terms of performance, as noted by what is considered the “end of Moore’s law.” Similar to electronics, there is a lot of interest to develop high performance semiconductors for opto-electronics. The collaborative team of material scientists and electrical engineers wanted to develop new materials which could showcase the ideal optical and electrical properties for a variety of applications such as displays, light detectors and emitters, as well as solar cells. The researchers developed a class of semiconductors called “transition metal perovskite chalcogenides.” Currently, the most useful semiconductors don’t hold enough carriers for a given volume of material (a property which is referred to as “density of states”) but they transport electrons fast and thus are known to have high mobility. The real challenge for scientists has been to increase this density of states in materials, while maintaining high mobility. The proposed material is predicted to possess these conflicting properties. As a first step to show its potential applications, the researchers studied its ability absorb and emit light. “There is a saying,” says Ravichandran of the dialogue among those in the optics and photonics fields, “that a very good LED is also a very good solar cell.” Since the materials Ravichandran and his colleagues developed absorb and emit light effectively, solar cells are a possible application. Solar cells absorb light and convert it into electricity. However, solar panels are made of silicon, which comes from sand via a highly energy intensive extraction process. If solar cells could be made of a new, alternative semiconductor material such as the one created by the USC Viterbi researchers — a material that could fit more electrons for a given volume (and reducing the thickness of the panels), solar cells could be more efficient — perhaps using one hundred times less material to generate the same amount of energy. This new material, if applied in the solar energy industry, could make solar energy less expensive. While it is a long road to bring such a class of materials to market, the next step is to recreate this material in an ultra-thin film form to make solar cells and test their performance. “The key contribution of this work,” says Ravichandran, “is our new synthesis method, which is a drastic improvement from earlier studies. Also, our demonstration of wide tunability in optical properties (especially band gap) is promising for developing new optoelectronic devices with tunable optical properties.”


One of the major impacts of climate change in the coming years will be a shift in how and where we grow our food. With rising temperatures and increasing drought in many areas, where our different foods grow best will change and some crops may have hard time growing anywhere. Computer scientists are building models to see which crops will grow best in which area, but it's also important to figure out which species of crops will be the most resistant to the effects of climate change so that they can grow even in harsher environments. That is the goal of researchers at University of Missouri. The team has built a robot system that is monitoring how different corn species are being affected by drought and heat. The data collected will help scientists pin point which species do best in hotter and dryer conditions so farmers can focus more on planting those species in the future. Gui DeSouza, an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science, and head of the Vision-Guided and Intelligent Robotics (ViGIR) Laboratory has previously worked with his colleagues in the university's agriculture department to create 3-D images of plants' root growth in the lab, but now DeSouza and his team have built a system that is creating those images out in the field. The robotic system consists of a mobile sensing tower that monitors the field within a 60-foot radius of the tower, checking for any signs of environmental stress. If the tower takes measurements that indicate stress, the robot is deployed to the area to take measurements of individual plants and create 3D models of the plant and root system to see how they are being impacted by the stress of heat and lack of water. "Measurements taken from the tower alert us if any of the plants are under stress, such as heat or drought," DeSouza said. "The tower then signals the mobile robot, which we call the Vinobot, to go to a particular area of the field and perform data collection on the individual plants. The Vinobot has three sets of sensors and a robotic arm to collect temperature, humidity and light intensity at three different heights on the corn plant. This is called plant phenotyping, which assesses growth, development, yield and items such as tolerance and resistance to environmental stressors by correlating these to physiology and shape of the plants." A field of crops can have multiple towers to monitor its entirety. The towers can monitor the health of the plants day and night, providing a wealth of data to researchers not available before. Tools like these can help scientists find the crops that will ensure food security for the world even in a changing climate. Fighting World Hunger: Robotics Aid in the Study of Corn and Drought Tolerance from MU News Bureau on Vimeo.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Expanding upon previous research, a University of Missouri veterinary neurologist has found that a biomarker test used to diagnose ALS in humans can also be applied to canines who exhibit symptoms of degenerative myelopathy (DM). DM is a progressive disease of the spinal cord, which afflicts older dogs. Typical onset of symptoms begins in canines from 8- to 14-years-old. It has been confirmed in more than 30 pure bred breeds, including German Shepherds, boxers and Pembroke Welsh corgis, as well as some mixed breed dogs. Currently there is no definitive diagnostic test or effective treatment for canine DM. Instead, veterinarians have to play a game of elimination, and rule out the possibility of other conditions before determining if a dog does have DM. Even then, the disease can only be confirmed from an autopsy. Similar to ALS, early symptoms of DM include a loss of coordination in the hind limbs, which continues to progress until full paralysis sets in. It is caused by degeneration of white matter in the spinal cord. In 2009, Joan Coates, veterinary neurologist at the University of Missouri, and fellow researchers identified a genetic link between DM in dogs and ALS in humans. Following up on this finding, Coates has now found that a biomarker test that helps diagnose ALS can also assist in providing a conclusive diagnosis of DM. Genetic testing can be done to predict the risk of a specific dog developing the disease, which proves useful for both breeders and veterinarians, but an effective diagnostic test is still needed. ALS is tested through phosphorylated neurofilament heavy proteins (pNF-H) that are released into spinal fluid and blood. These biomarkers are released during the degeneration of spinal tissues, offering a good indication that ALS is present. Coates set out to determine if this concept would work in canines. Results were published in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine. The study included 53 DM-affected dogs, 27 neurologically normal ones, seven asymptomatic but at-risk dogs and 12 DM mimic dogs. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood samples were collected from the dogs in numerous stages of the diseases. pNF-H concentrations from those samples were compared to samples from age-matched healthy dogs and dogs with mimicking diseases. “We found a significant difference in the DM-affected dogs,” Coates said. “pNF-H levels were increased in the cerebrospinal fluid of the DM-affected dogs relative to the control groups, indicating that the human ALS test could be used to diagnose DM. These results will enable us to ‘scale up’ the test to make it more accessible to veterinary community.” Additionally, Coates is seeking clinical trial participants to evaluate treatments for canine DM. She hopes the therapies being tested slow the progression of neurologic signs of DM and improve quality of life for canines. The clinical trials are taking place at the MU Veterinary Health Center (VHC) Small Animal Hospital.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBIA, Mo. - In 2009, Joan Coates, a veterinary neurologist, along with other researchers at the University of Missouri and the Broad Institute at MIT/Harvard, found a genetic link between degenerative myelopathy (DM) in dogs and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease in people. Now, MU researchers Coates and Michael Garcia, an associate professor in the Division of Biological Sciences, have found that a biomarker test that helps diagnose ALS also can assist with determining a diagnosis for degenerative myelopathy. Coates is seeking clinical trial participants to evaluate a treatment for canine DM. In dogs, DM is an older adult onset disease that can eventually lead to paralysis. The neurodegenerative disease has been confirmed in more than 30 pure bred dog breeds, such as Pembroke Welsh corgis, German Shepherd Dogs and boxers, as well as mixed breed dogs. The current genetic test for DM can be useful to breeders and veterinarians in identifying risk for the disease; however, it has limitations when diagnosing DM. "DM is a diagnosis of exclusion, meaning that veterinarians must rule out all other diseases that mimic it before coming to a final diagnosis," said Coates, a professor in the MU Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery. "This requires expensive diagnostic procedures such as MRIs of the spinal cord. Now that we know that DM and ALS are related, we are studying ways to diagnose and measure disease progression with similar diagnostic modalities used in ALS patients." ALS can be tested using phosphorylated neurofilament heavy proteins (pNF-H) that are released into spinal fluid and blood in humans with ALS. These biomarkers are released during the degeneration of spinal tissues making them a good indicator that ALS is present. Coates and co-principal investigator Garcia tested whether the diagnostic tool could be used in canines. "I was very excited by the idea that there could be another model that might have many more strength than the existing models," Garcia said. "So this was a natural fit for me." Cerebrospinal fluid and blood samples were collected from DM-affected dogs, including dogs that had a confirmed diagnosis as well as dogs in early stages of the disease. pNF-H concentrations from those samples were compared to samples from age-matched normal dogs and dogs with mimicking diseases. "We found a significant difference in the DM affected dogs," Coates said. "pNF-H levels were increased in the cerebrospinal fluid of the DM-affected dogs relative to the control groups, indicating that the human ALS test could be used to diagnose DM. These results will enable us to 'scale up' the test to make it more accessible to veterinary community." Collecting cerebrospinal fluid from patients is more complicated than a blood test, but is less expensive compared to an MRI to make a presumptive DM diagnosis, Coates said. Nonetheless, pNF-H may serve as a diagnostic tool for diagnosis of DM. Coates also is conducting clinical trial research for treatment of DM. The goals of the therapies being tested is to slow the progression of neurologic signs of DM and improve quality of life. These therapies are in collaborations with other ALS researchers and funded by the ALS Association and National Institutes of Health. The clinical trials are taking place at the MU Veterinary Health Center (VHC) Small Animal Hospital. To inquire about enrolling a dog, contact Coates at coatesj@missouri.edu. Collaborations among human health and veterinary clinicians and researchers highlights the multidisciplinary, One Health/One Medicine initiative at Mizzou. The concept is a worldwide strategy for expanding interdisciplinary collaborations and communications in all aspects of healthcare for humans and animals where biomedical research discoveries and expanding the scientific knowledge base lead to faster improvements benefitting both humans and our pets. The study, "Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels of Phosphorylated Neurofilament Heavy as a Diagnostic Marker of Canine Degenerative Myelopathy," was published in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine. Christine Toedebusch, a veterinary neurology resident and doctoral candidate, was lead author on the study. The study was funded in part by the American Boxer Charitable Foundation and the American Kennel Club Canine Health Foundation (Grant #2165). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the funding agencies.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

A biomarker test that helps diagnose ALS can also help diagnose degenerative myelopathy in dogs, report researchers. In 2009, researchers discovered a genetic link between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease, in people and degenerative myelopathy (DM) in dogs. The neurodegenerative disease, an older adult onset disease than can eventually lead to paralysis, has been confirmed in more than 30 purebred dog breeds, including Pembroke Welsh corgis, German shepherds, and boxers, as well as mixed breed dogs. The current genetic test for DM can be useful to breeders and veterinarians in identifying risk for the disease; however, it has limitations when diagnosing DM. “DM is a diagnosis of exclusion, meaning that veterinarians must rule out all other diseases that mimic it before coming to a final diagnosis,” says Joan Coates, a professor of veterinary medicine and surgery at the University of Missouri. “This requires expensive diagnostic procedures such as MRIs of the spinal cord. Now that we know that DM and ALS are related, we are studying ways to diagnose and measure disease progression with similar diagnostic modalities used in ALS patients.” ALS can be tested using phosphorylated neurofilament heavy proteins (pNF-H) that are released into spinal fluid and blood in people with the disease. These biomarkers are released during the degeneration of spinal tissues making them a good indicator that ALS is present. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood samples were collected from DM-affected dogs, including dogs that had a confirmed diagnosis as well as dogs in early stages of the disease. pNF-H concentrations from those samples were compared to samples from age-matched normal dogs and dogs with mimicking diseases. “We found a significant difference in the DM affected dogs,” Coates says. “pNF-H levels were increased in the cerebrospinal fluid of the DM-affected dogs relative to the control groups, indicating that the human ALS test could be used to diagnose DM. These results will enable us to ‘scale up’ the test to make it more accessible to veterinary community.” Collecting cerebrospinal fluid from patients is more complicated than a blood test, but is less expensive compared to an MRI to make a presumptive DM diagnosis, Coates says. Nonetheless, pNF-H may serve as a diagnostic tool for diagnosis of DM. Coates is also conducting clinical trial research for treatment of DM. The goals of the therapies being tested is to slow the progression of neurologic signs of DM and improve quality of life for dogs. Christine Toedebusch, a veterinary neurology resident and doctoral candidate, is lead author of the study in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine. The therapies are in collaborations with other ALS researchers and funded by the ALS Association and National Institutes of Health. Coates is seeking clinical trial participants to evaluate a treatment for canine DM. For more information, email her at coatesj@missouri.edu. The American Boxer Charitable Foundation and the American Kennel Club Canine Health Foundation funded the work.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A comparative cross-cultural study conducted by the HSE International Laboratory of Positive Psychology of Personality and Motivation has found that Russians tend to be as open with their friends as Americans, but unlike Americans, Russians prefer to hide their happiness when talking to strangers or government officials. These findings were published in the Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology in the paper Russians Inhibit the Expression of Happiness to Strangers: Testing a Display Rule Model. http://journals. The first attempts at studying happiness and psychological wellbeing date back to the 1960s, while systematic research in this field began in the 1980s, in particular thanks to pioneering work by American psychologist Ed Diener. At about the same time, large-scale comparative studies were undertaken to examine various value-based and socioeconomic predictors of wellbeing. Comparative cross-cultural studies help researchers pinpoint the socioeconomic factors which can affect the human mind and sense of wellbeing. 'Comparison of data from different cultural contexts makes it possible to draw interesting conclusions on how culture and society can influence people's behaviour and outlook on life,' according to Evgeny Osin, leading researcher at the HSE International Laboratory of Positive Psychology of Personality and Motivation and co-author of the paper. 'Happiness is not some kind of an admirable but distant goal, but a real psychological phenomenon which can have a significant impact on society and economy of a particular country. Many countries conduct surveys regularly in order to find out how satisfied and happy their citizens are and how new laws and policies affect these parameters. Happiness and unhappiness come with multiple social consequences -- according to research, an unhappy person can be more prone to alcoholism, drug addiction, risky behaviour and negative forms of social interaction; in contrast, happy people are more likely to succeed in life and maintain good health.' Between 2014 and 2016, researchers of the HSE International Laboratory of Positive Psychology of Personality and Motivation led by Professor Ken M. Sheldon of the University of Missouri-Columbia, studied emotional inhibition tendencies in different cultures and social situations. They surveyed 1,500 Russian students from Moscow, Tomsk, Omsk, Biysk, and Petropavlovsk and some 500 American students at the University of Missouri. According to the study authors, although all respondents are undergraduates, the samples are comparable and can support informed conclusions about certain behavioural differences between Russians and Americans. A questionnaire was designed, consisting of six groups of statements measuring the tendency to inhibit the expression of happiness or unhappiness in various social situations, e.g. with friends, strangers or authorities. The respondents were asked to agree or disagree with the following types of statements: "When I'm happy, I try not to show it to my friends." The questions varied with respect to state of mind (happiness versus unhappiness) and social situation (with friends, strangers in public places or government authorities). The main finding is fairly optimistic: Russians may actually be happier than they appear -- they just prefer not to show it. 'Looking at our gloomy faces one might assume that many Russians are unhappy, but the real reason may be that we tend to reveal our happiness only to family and friends and only when feel really good,' Osin suggests. 'This trait makes us similar to members of collectivistic East Asian cultures, such as Japan and China, where hiding certain emotions to maintain harmony in the group is considered the cultural norm.' The study also reveals that unlike the USA, where the tendency to inhibit the expression of happiness is associated with lower levels of subjective wellbeing -- i.e. dissatisfaction with life, predominance of negative emotions, unmet basic needs -- no such association has been found in Russia. In other words, Americans tend to hold back the expression of their positive emotions only when something is wrong, while Russians find it perfectly normal to hide their happiness regardless of how they feel.


Receive press releases from America's Registry of Outstanding Professionals: By Email Michael S. Stachowski Honored as an America’s Registry of Outstanding Professionals Lifetime Member Michael S. Stachowski, of Kansas City, Missouri, has recently been recognized as a Lifetime Member by America’s Registry of Outstanding Professionals for his distinguished contributions and achievements in field of Accounting. Michael S. Stachowski, CPA, LLC, ABV, CVA, CFF, CBM, CGMA, CM&AA, & MST, is a Partner with the firm of Professional Accounting Services. He began working with the firm in 2003. His roles include audits, management advisory, corporate financial accounting, income tax planning, IRS representation, tax research and tax compliance. His experience also includes financial and tax accounting for mergers and acquisitions, foreign subsidiaries, foreign sales corporations, business valuations, accounting software set-up and installation, and he is an expert witness in court. Mr. Stachowski earned a B.S. with High Honors in Accounting and Business and an M.S. with High Honors in Accounting and Taxation from the University of Missouri. He is a Certified Public Accountant, Accredited in Business Valuations, Certified Valuation Analysis, Certified Financial Forensics, Certified Business Manager, Chartered Global Management Accountant, and Certified Merger & Acquisition Advisor. He was nominated and became a member of the 6th Congressional District Tax Reform Advisory Council. Mr. Stachowski is a member of the Missouri Society of Certified Public Accountants, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the National Association of Certified Valuation Analysts, and the Alliance of Merger & Acquisition Advisors. In his leisure time, Mr. Stachowski enjoys time with his wife Michelle and his children Lane, Chloe, and Bryson. About America’s Registry of Outstanding Professionals America's Registry is a membership organization that gives its members the type of national recognition they strive for. Professional business people may join memberships, societies and organizations to develop business contacts, thus gaining image and credibility for themselves and their organization. As a powerful third party endorsement, America's Registry offers this kind of recognition for individuals on a national basis with the added benefit of instantaneous networking with the other members. Members are encouraged to welcome, network and assist each other whether they are in the same or an entirely different industry or profession. Being in America's Registry can be viewed by the members as a letter of introduction to all the other members. Kansas City, MO, April 27, 2017 --( PR.com )-- About Michael S. StachowskiMichael S. Stachowski, CPA, LLC, ABV, CVA, CFF, CBM, CGMA, CM&AA, & MST, is a Partner with the firm of Professional Accounting Services. He began working with the firm in 2003. His roles include audits, management advisory, corporate financial accounting, income tax planning, IRS representation, tax research and tax compliance. His experience also includes financial and tax accounting for mergers and acquisitions, foreign subsidiaries, foreign sales corporations, business valuations, accounting software set-up and installation, and he is an expert witness in court. Mr. Stachowski earned a B.S. with High Honors in Accounting and Business and an M.S. with High Honors in Accounting and Taxation from the University of Missouri. He is a Certified Public Accountant, Accredited in Business Valuations, Certified Valuation Analysis, Certified Financial Forensics, Certified Business Manager, Chartered Global Management Accountant, and Certified Merger & Acquisition Advisor. He was nominated and became a member of the 6th Congressional District Tax Reform Advisory Council. Mr. Stachowski is a member of the Missouri Society of Certified Public Accountants, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the National Association of Certified Valuation Analysts, and the Alliance of Merger & Acquisition Advisors. In his leisure time, Mr. Stachowski enjoys time with his wife Michelle and his children Lane, Chloe, and Bryson.About America’s Registry of Outstanding ProfessionalsAmerica's Registry is a membership organization that gives its members the type of national recognition they strive for. Professional business people may join memberships, societies and organizations to develop business contacts, thus gaining image and credibility for themselves and their organization. As a powerful third party endorsement, America's Registry offers this kind of recognition for individuals on a national basis with the added benefit of instantaneous networking with the other members. Members are encouraged to welcome, network and assist each other whether they are in the same or an entirely different industry or profession. Being in America's Registry can be viewed by the members as a letter of introduction to all the other members. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from America's Registry of Outstanding Professionals


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"To bring even more value to our customers and the communities we serve, Ameren is combining our vast energy expertise with the skills and proficiency of other energy innovators," said Warner Baxter, chairman, president and CEO of Ameren Corporation.  "As one of the leaders in our industry, we are working with our Ameren Accelerator partners to identify, accelerate and implement innovations for the grid of the future.  It's one of the ways we are leading today to transform tomorrow." Five to seven startup companies are expected to be selected for the program, and each will receive $100,000 in seed capital to participate in the Ameren Accelerator program, which will be located in Cortex, St. Louis' innovation and technology district. In addition to the seed capital, the selected startup companies will each receive intensive mentoring, technical assistance, facilities and networking connections from the Ameren Accelerator partners valued at nearly $1 million. Through May 12, applications will be accepted from interested entrepreneurs and energy technology companies focusing on products, services or applications in the following fields: Internet of Things (IoT); blockchain; artificial intelligence; augmented reality; virtual reality; big data; machine learning; deep learning; natural language processing; cyber security; information technology infrastructure; connected devices; sensor tech; autonomous systems; and drones. Information and requirements may be found at amerenaccelerator.com. In July, the selected startup companies will receive seed funding and hands-on support throughout the 12-week program. Senior-level executives from a variety of companies will provide mentorship. Subject matter experts in the areas of energy, sales, marketing, pricing, technical development, operations, talent development and finance also will provide guidance. Based out of the CIC @4240 Building in Cortex, participants will be able to network with like-minded individuals focused on innovative thinking and collaboration. CIC is one of the most cutting-edge high-tech facilities in the country and a prime destination for business creativity. At the conclusion of the program, participants will showcase their efforts to the mentoring teams and potential third-party investors during the Ameren Accelerator Demo Day in October. Ameren may select the most promising projects for ongoing mentoring and engagement beyond the accelerator program. To apply or to learn more about Ameren Accelerator, visit amerenaccelerator.com. About Ameren Corporation St. Louis-based Ameren Corporation powers the quality of life for 2.4 million electric customers and more than 900,000 natural gas customers in a 64,000-square-mile area through its Ameren Missouri and Ameren Illinois rate-regulated utility subsidiaries. Ameren Illinois provides electric distribution and transmission service, as well as natural gas distribution service, while Ameren Missouri provides vertically integrated electric service, with generating capacity of over 10,200 megawatts, and natural gas distribution service. Ameren Transmission Company of Illinois develops regional electric transmission projects. For more information, visit Ameren.com, or follow us at @AmerenCorp, Facebook.com/AmerenCorp, or LinkedIn/company/Ameren. About the University of Missouri System The University of Missouri System is the State of Missouri's largest public university, with four campuses serving more than 76,000 students, a health care system, an extension program, and more than 500,000 alumni worldwide. The UM System was created in 1963 when the University of Missouri (founded in 1839 in Columbia) and the Missouri School of Mines (now the Missouri University of Science and Technology, founded in 1870 in Rolla), were combined with the formerly private University of Kansas City (now University of Missouri–Kansas City, founded in 1933), and a newly created campus in suburban St. Louis (University of Missouri–St. Louis). About the University of Missouri-St. Louis and UMSL Accelerate The University of Missouri–St. Louis is the largest public research university in eastern Missouri with the greatest concentration of alumni in the region. Their UMSL Accelerate initiative fosters entrepreneurism and innovative thinking in and outside the classroom and helps bring concepts from mind to market. For more information, visit http://umsl.edu/accelerate/. About Capital Innovators Capital Innovators is an innovation engine that creates practical solutions across industries that can shape the future of organizations. Capital Innovators provides innovation consulting, entrepreneurial-based programs, acts as a liaison between Corporations, Universities and Startups and investment into attractive early-stage businesses. Capital Innovators has in-depth knowledge into the most cutting-edge solutions through the Accelerator division of its business, which has been ranked as a Top 10 Accelerator in the country for three years in a row and has invested in and guided 70 companies to date. Capital Innovators model is simple and effective: Innovation, Iteration, and Implementation. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/may-12-deadline-nears-for-ameren-accelerator-applications-300453177.html


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Born May 24, 1926, in St. Louis, Lee was one of two children born to Leonard and Mary MacCarthy. She grew up in Clayton and attended John Burroughs School and Clayton High School. In 1945, Lee married Jack C. Taylor, who 12 years later founded Executive Leasing, now Enterprise Holdings. Their marriage ended in 1977, but right up until Taylor's death in July 2016, the two shared a continuing devotion to their children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She married Des Lee, co-founder of Lee-Rowan Manufacturing Co., in 1978, and went on to build a strong reputation for philanthropy and civic involvement. She served on the boards of John Burroughs School, Opera Theatre of St. Louis, Springboard to Learning, the Sheldon Theatre and Forest Park Forever. Together, the Lees made generous philanthropic gifts to a wide range of causes, gifting more than $70 million over the years. Beneficiaries of their generosity included the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, Herbert Hoover Boys & Girls Club, United Way of Greater St. Louis, Saint Louis Science Center, St. Louis Zoo, Missouri Botanical Garden, University of Missouri–St. Louis, Washington University in St. Louis, Webster University, Missouri Historical Society, The Magic House, Variety the Children's Charity of St. Louis, St. Louis Art Museum and Ranken Technical College. For her dedication to the St. Louis community, in 2003 Lee received the St. Louis Woman of Achievement for Philanthropy Award. She also received the Woman of the Year Award from Variety the Children's Charity of St. Louis, the Hiram W. Leffingwell Award from Forest Park Forever and, with her husband, the NAACP Humanitarian Award. Des Lee passed away in January 2010. Mary Ann Lee is survived by her son, Andrew C. (Barbara) Taylor and her daughter, Jo Ann Taylor Kindle (Tom Caruso); her granddaughters Christine Taylor (Lee) Broughton, Patricia Taylor (Andy Magee), Alison Kindle (Kyle) Hogan and Carolyn Kindle (Adam) Betz, all of St. Louis, and Kelly Taylor of Delray, Fla.; and her great-granddaughters, Grace and Amelia Broughton and Kylie and Kenzie Hogan. A memorial service will be held at 4:30 p.m. on April 19 at Ladue Chapel, 9450 Clayton Road, St. Louis, Mo. 63124. The family requests that memorial donations be made to Forest Park Forever, 5595 Grand Drive, St. Louis, MO 63112, or to John Burroughs School, 755 South Price Road, St. Louis, MO 63124. To view a tribute to Mary Ann Lee's life and send a message of sympathy to her family, visit MaryAnnLeeRemembered.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/mary-ann-lee--may-24-1926--april-17-2017-300440322.html


News Article | April 30, 2017
Site: www.scientificamerican.com

We've discussed earthquakes before, and everybody's probably pretty aware of the fact that when you have an earthquake, you're probably going to have an aftershock. Or two. Or two dozen. Most of us think those aftershocks will last, at most, a few days. But studies suggest that some aftershocks will go on – are you ready for this? – for a few centuries: Many researchers assume that small-scale seismic activity reveals where stress is building up in the Earth’s crust — stress that can cause larger quakes in the future, says Mian Liu, a geophysicist at the University of Missouri in Columbia. However, Liu and Seth Stein of Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., report in the Nov. 5 Nature, many moderate-sized temblors that occur far from the edges of tectonic plates could be merely the aftershocks of larger quakes that occurred along the same faults decades or even centuries ago. Stein and Liu analyzed earthquake data gathered worldwide. For major quakes that occurred where the sides of a fault moved past each other at average rates of more than 10 millimeters per year — as the two sides of many tectonic boundaries do — aftershocks died off after a decade or so. But for faults where the sides scraped past each other at just a few millimeters per year, aftershocks lasted about 100 years, the researchers reported. The longest series of aftershocks, some which have lasted several centuries, were triggered by quakes that occurred in continental interiors along slow-moving faults. Bet you folks in the Midwest didn't think New Madrid was sending you old news, did you? But it certainly seems so. Let's step back a moment and take a look at the mechanics here: Large earthquakes are often followed by aftershocks, the result of changes in the surrounding crust brought about by the initial shock. Aftershocks are most common immediately after the main quake. As time passes and the fault recovers, they become increasingly rare. This pattern of decay in seismic activity is described by Omori's Law but Stein and Liu found that the pace of the decay is a matter of location. At the boundaries between tectonic plates, any changes wreaked by a big quake are completely overwhelmed by the movements of the plates themselves. At around a centimetre per year, they are regular geological Ferraris. They  soon "reload" the fault, dampen the aftershocks, and return the status quo within 10 years. In the middle of continents, faults move at less than a millimetre every year. In this slow lane, things can take a century or more to return to normal after a big quake, and aftershocks stick around for that duration. It's a tale of two faults! Let's have a look at New Madrid, shall we? Go ahead. Search for photos of "New Madrid Fault." I'll wait. Lots of maps, not many photos, right? That's because not a lot's going on there. Most of it's concealed below the surface, and what's been exposed doesn't look much like a fault. Unless you're a professional, the photo of the fault at this Missouri Department of Natural Resources article doesn't exactly stand out. In other words, there's not a lot going on that would show at the surface, unlike the San Andreas, which is bleeding obvious. New Madrid is a slow, sleepy fault, despite the excitement it caused over the winter of 1811-1812. Compared to New Madrid, the San Andreas fault is a speed demon, and it shows. There are other differences, of course – one's a transform fault where two plates are scooting past each other, the other's more of a rift type thing where North America started splitting apart, then decided to stay together – but the main thing is speed. According to the study, San Andreas locks and loads within a decade or so, leaving the aftershocks in the dust and nervous Californians waiting for the Big One. New Madrid's still squirming around trying to get comfortable after a fairly dramatic disruption. And every time it twitches noticeably, folks in the Midwest get twitchy themselves. The river did, after all, run backwards the last time this thing went crack. Bound to worry folks a bit. But according to Stein and Liu, there's nothing much to worry about – at least, not where New Madrid's concerned. You're just in for hundreds of years of aftershocks, since the fault moves more than 100 times slower than the San Andreas. This is good news. And the data are beautiful: "A number of us had suspected this," Liu said, "because many of the earthquakes we see today in the Midwest have patterns that look like aftershocks. They happen on the faults we think caused the big earthquakes in 1811 and 1812, and they've been getting smaller with time." To test this idea, Stein and Liu used results from lab experiments on how faults in rocks work to predict that aftershocks would extend much longer on slower moving faults. They then looked at data from faults around the world and found the expected pattern. For example, aftershocks continue today from the magnitude 7.2 Hebgen Lake earthquake that shook Montana, Idaho and Wyoming 50 years ago. "This makes sense because the Hebgen Lake fault moves faster than the New Madrid faults but slower than the San Andreas," Stein noted. "The observations and theory came together the way we like but don't always get." And this study points to the fact that the small isn't always a foreshadow of the big: The new results will help investigators in both understanding earthquakes in continents and trying to assess earthquake hazards there. "Until now," Liu observed, "we've mostly tried to tell where large earthquakes will happen by looking at where small ones do." That's why many scientists were surprised by the disastrous May 2008 magnitude 7.9 earthquake in Sichuan, China -- a place where there hadn't been many earthquakes in the past few hundred years. "Predicting big quakes based on small quakes is like the 'Whack-a-mole' game -- you wait for the mole to come up where it went down," Stein said. "But we now know the big earthquakes can pop up somewhere else. Instead of just focusing on where small earthquakes happen, we need to use methods like GPS satellites and computer modeling to look for places where the earth is storing up energy for a large future earthquake. We don't see that in the Midwest today, but we want to keep looking." Sounds like a very good idea to me. Anything we can do to increase the chances of successful earthquake prediction could help save a lot of lives. And it allows us to rest easier when we find out that those little temblors are just past earthquakes saying "So long, and thanks for all the fish."


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

Restaurant servers believe well-dressed customers are most likely to leave good tips, research shows. This judgment could result in better service for those diners. “Everyone uses first impressions to make snap judgments,” says Dae-Young Kim, associate professor of hospitality management in the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources. “For servers, especially busy servers, they often have to make decisions about how to best devote their time and energy, so they look for ways to identify which customers will reward them the most for their service. The more professionally dressed a customer is, the more likely a server is to stereotype them as a good tipper, regardless of their race or gender.” Kim and doctoral student Kathleen Kim surveyed 222 current and former restaurant servers. The researchers showed the participants pictures of people of different races, genders, and attire and asked the participants to indicate who they believed would leave good tips and poor tips. The researchers found that the race of customers did not significantly affect servers’ perceptions of their likelihood of tipping well. However, compared to white customers, well-dressed minorities were identified as more likely to leave good tips, while casually dressed minorities were identified as more likely to leave poor tips. Also, regardless of race, well-dressed men were identified as more likely to leave good tips compared to women, while casually dressed men were seen as the least likely of any group to leave good tips. “It is clear that restaurant servers use stereotypes and first impressions to determine which customers will receive good service,” says Kathleen Kim. “These findings show restaurant managers the importance of proper training for servers so all customers receive good service. “This study also shows potential issues with the tipping culture that exists in American restaurants. While the tipping culture can motivate servers to provide quality service to some customers, it may result in unequal service for others.” Coauthor Gumkwang Bae from Dong-Eui University in South Korea also contributed to the study in Cornell Hospitality Quarterly.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBIA, Mo. - With tipping a central part of the American restaurant industry, better service often is attributed to whether or not a server believes a customer will be a good tipper. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found that restaurant servers often use stereotypes to determine which customers will leave better tips. Dae-Young Kim, an associate professor of hospitality management in the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, says that servers believe well-dressed customers are the most likely to leave good tips. The researchers say this could result in those well-dressed diners receiving better service. "Everyone uses first impressions to make snap judgements," Kim said. "For servers, especially busy servers, they often have to make decisions about how to best devote their time and energy, so they look for ways to identify which customers will reward them the most for their service. The more professionally dressed a customer is, the more likely a server is to stereotype them as a good tipper, regardless of their race or gender." Kim and his doctoral student, Kathleen Kim, surveyed 222 current and former restaurant servers. The researchers showed the participants pictures of people of different races, genders and attire and asked the participants to indicate who they believed would leave good tips and poor tips. The researchers found that the race of customers did not significantly affect servers' perceptions of their likelihood of tipping well. However, compared to white customers, well-dressed minorities were identified as more likely to leave good tips, while casually dressed minorities were identified as more likely to leave poor tips. Also, regardless of race, well-dressed men were identified as more likely to leave good tips compared to women, while casually dressed men were seen as the least likely of any group to leave good tips. "It is clear that restaurant servers use stereotypes and first impressions to determine which customers will receive good service," Kathleen Kim said. "These findings show restaurant managers the importance of proper training for servers so all customers receive good service. This study also shows potential issues with the tipping culture that exists in American restaurants. While the tipping culture can motivate servers to provide quality service to some customers, it may result in unequal service for others." The study, "The Effects of Visible Customer Characteristics on Servers' Perceptions of Tipping: Potential Threats to Service Interactions," was coauthored by Gumkwang Bae, from Dong-Eui University in South Korea. The study was published in Cornell Hospitality Quarterly.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

VIDEO:  The fight against skin cancer just got a new weapon. For years, melanoma researchers have studied samples that were considered uniform in size and color, making them easier to examine... view more The fight against skin cancer just got a new weapon. For years, melanoma researchers have studied samples that were considered uniform in size and color, making them easier to examine by more conventional means. But melanomas don't always come in the same shape and hue; often, melanomas are irregular and dark, making them difficult to investigate. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have devised a new tool to detect and analyze single melanoma cells that are more representative of the skin cancers developed by most patients. The study, recently reported in Analyst published by the Royal Society of Chemistry, outlines the new techniques that could lead to better and faster diagnoses for the life-threatening disease. "Researchers often seek out the types of cancerous cells that are homogenous in nature and are easier to observe with traditional microscopic devices," said Luis Polo-Parada, an Associate Professor of Medical Pharmacology and Physiology and an investigator at Mizzou's Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center. "Yet, because the vast amount of research is conducted on one type of cell, it often can lead to misdiagnosis in a clinical setting." The team that included Gary Baker, an assistant professor of chemistry in the MU College of Arts and Science and Gerardo Gutierrez-Juarez, a professor and investigator at the University of Guanajuato in Mexico, decided to supplement an emerging technique called photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy, a specialized optical technique that is used to probe tissues and cells non-invasively. Current systems use the formation of sound waves followed by the absorption of light which means that the tissues must adequately absorb the laser light. This is why, up until now, researchers have focused only on strong-light-absorb cells melanoma cells, Polo-Parada said. The team modified a microscope that was able to merge light sources at a range conducive to observing the details of single melanoma cells. Using the modified system, human melanoma and breast cancers as well as mouse melanoma cells were diagnosed with greater ease and efficiency. The team also noted that as the cancer cells divided, they grew paler in color but the system was able to detect the newer, smaller cells as well. "Overall, our studies show that by using modified techniques we will be able to observe non-uniform cancer cells, regardless of their origin," Polo-Parada said. "Additionally, as these melanoma cells divide and distribute themselves throughout the blood, they can cause melanomas to metastasize. We were able to observe those cancers as well. This method could help medical doctors and pathologists to detect cancers as they spread, becoming one of the tools in the fight against this fatal disease." The study, "Spectrophotometric analysis at the single-cell level: elucidating dispersity within melanic immortalized cell populations," was supported in part by the Mizzou Advantage program, an initiative that fosters interdisciplinary collaboration among faculty, staff, students and external partners to solve real-world problems in four areas of strength identified at the University of Missouri, including Food for the Future, One Health/One Medicine, Sustainable Energy and Media of the Future. Ellison Gordon from the Mizzou Machine Shop was involved in the manufacturing of components for the microscope setup.


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

FILE - In this Nov. 17, 2011, file photo, Vagos motorcycle gang member Ernesto Gonzalez is led from district court in Reno, Nev., after pleading guilty in the shooting death of Hells Angels member Jeffrey Pettigrew. Gary Rudnick, the star witness who helped convict the triggerman, Gonzalez, who killed a high-ranking Hells Angels' boss at a Nevada casino in 2011 said he was lying when he testified that the shooting was an assassination plot orchestrated by a rival motorcycle gang, according to documents obtained by The Associated Press. Gonzalez is scheduled to be tried again in August 2017 after his conviction was tossed on a technicality. (David B.Parker/The Reno Gazette-Journal via AP, Pool, File) RENO, Nev. (AP) — The star witness who helped convict the triggerman who killed a high-ranking Hells Angels' boss at a Nevada casino in 2011 says he was lying when he testified that the shooting was an assassination plot orchestrated by a rival motorcycle gang, according to documents obtained by The Associated Press. Prosecutors think the recantation is a lie, but it could make it more difficult to get another murder conviction against Ernesto Gonzalez, a former Vagos gang member. He's scheduled to be tried again in August after the Nevada Supreme Court threw out the conviction because of improper jury instructions. Legal scholars say it's hard to predict jurors' reaction to recanted testimony, but it raises questions about the claims of suspects who make deals with prosecutors to take the stand in exchange for more lenient sentences, as Gary "Jabbers" Rudnick did. His testimony helped put Gonzalez in prison for life for carrying out an organized hit on Jeffrey Pettigrew during a brawl on a crowded casino floor in Sparks that sent gamblers diving for cover under blackjack tables. Gonzalez, 59, insists there was no plot. He said he opened fire because Pettigrew and another Hells Angel were kicking his partner so hard he thought they would kill him. The only witness who claimed personal knowledge of the conspiracy was Rudnick, an ex-Vagos vice president from Los Angeles who provoked Pettigrew into fighting. He was released from prison in 2016 after serving two years for conspiracy to commit murder. Rudnick testified that the Vagos international president gave Gonzalez the "green light" for the killing as the gangs feuded over turf in San Jose, where Pettigrew was the Hells Angels chapter president. In new court filings, Rudnick claims he fabricated that story under pressure from prosecutors to get a plea deal that he thought would keep him out of prison and put him in the federal witness protection program. His declaration is not dated, but Gonzalez's lawyer, David Houston, told the AP it was signed May 17, 2016, in Las Vegas. "He states that he lied and there was never any conspiracy or meeting to 'green light' a hit," Houston said. "He says he was told he'd get probation if he testified the way the state wanted him to." In a handwritten note riddled with misspellings, Rudnick said "there was no conspiracy" to kill Pettigrew. "It was just a fight between me and him," he wrote in the document signed by two witnesses, including a private investigator hired by Houston. Rudnick says the prosecutor, Karl Hall, now Reno's city attorney, didn't believe his original account. "He told me ... what he wanted me to change to lie for him," Rudnick wrote, suggesting he had no choice but to comply. "I was looking at 25 years in prison." Sean O'Brien, a professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City, Law School, said plea deals with co-conspirators raise questions about testimony that's later withdrawn. "There are incentives," O'Brien said of agreements providing leniency. "It is bought-and-paid-for testimony." Houston, Gonzalez's lawyer, said Rudnick's reversal is significant because he apparently committed perjury and it's unclear if he would show up if prosecutors tried to force him to take the stand again. Houston declined to comment on where Rudnick is now, and prosecutors would not say if they know his whereabouts, intend to subpoena him to testify or might charge him with perjury. Typically, in such situations — or when a witness dies — previous testimony can be re-entered into the record. But that's not necessarily the case if there's reason to believe it was false. It's a point of contention set for court hearings in May ahead of Gonzalez's new trial. "It is more likely that the recanting statement is false," Washoe County Deputy District Attorney Amos Stege wrote this month. He declined further comment. "Regarding the defense counsel's questionably timed 'affidavit,' courts across the nation universally regard post-conviction recantations with extreme suspicion," district attorney spokeswoman Michelle Bays said in an email. "The Vagos criminal enterprise is vast and they are known for violence, intimidation and extortion." Houston is trying to compel Rudnick's public defender to testify about the plea agreement at Gonzalez's new trial and bar the earlier testimony unless he reappears.


Frey S.H.,University of Missouri | Povinelli D.J.,University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences | Year: 2012

The ability to adjust one's ongoing actions in the anticipation of forthcoming task demands is considered as strong evidence for the existence of internal action representations. Studies of action selection in tool use reveal that the behaviours that we choose in the present moment differ depending on what we intend to do next. Further, they point to a specialized role for mechanisms within the human cerebellum and dominant left cerebral hemisphere in representing the likely sensory costs of intended future actions. Recently, the question of whether similar mechanisms exist in other primates has received growing, but still limited, attention. Here, we present data that bear on this issue from a species that is a natural user of tools, our nearest living relative, the chimpanzee. In experiment 1, a subset of chimpanzees showed a non-significant tendency for their grip preferences to be affected by anticipation of the demands associated with bringing a tool's baited end to their mouths. In experiment 2, chimpanzees' initial grip preferences were consistently affected by anticipation of the forthcoming movements in a task that involves using a tool to extract a food reward. The partial discrepancy between the results of these two studies is attributed to the ability to accurately represent differences between the motor costs associated with executing the two response alternatives available within each task. These findings suggest that chimpanzees are capable of accurately representing the costs of intended future actions, and using those predictions to select movements in the present even in the context of externally directed tool use. © 2011 The Royal Society.


Schoelz J.E.,University of Missouri | Harries P.A.,Pittsburg State University | Nelson R.S.,Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation
Molecular Plant | Year: 2011

Plant viruses are a class of plant pathogens that specialize in movement from cell to cell. As part of their arsenal for infection of plants, every virus encodes a movement protein (MP), a protein dedicated to enlarging the pore size of plasmodesmata (PD) and actively transporting the viral nucleic acid into the adjacent cell. As our knowledge of intercellular transport has increased, it has become apparent that viruses must also use an active mechanism to target the virus from their site of replication within the cell to the PD. Just as viruses are too large to fit through an unmodified plasmodesma, they are also too large to be freely diffused through the cytoplasm of the cell. Evidence has accumulated now for the involvement of other categories of viral proteins in intracellular movement in addition to the MP, including viral proteins originally associated with replication or gene expression. In this review, we will discuss the strategies that viruses use for intracellular movement from the replication site to the PD, in particular focusing on the role of host membranes for intracellular transport and the coordinated interactions between virus proteins within cells that are necessary for successful virus spread. © 2011 The Author.


Patent
U.S. Department Of Veterans Affairs, University of Missouri and University of Kansas | Date: 2014-04-07

An in vivo method of inhibiting tumor growth, specifically pancreatic cancer, includes administering to a subject in need thereof an effective amount of a compound, composition, and/or a pharmaceutical formulation including crocetinic acid.


Tang S.,Tianjin University of Technology | Baker G.A.,University of Missouri | Zhao H.,Savannah State University
Chemical Society Reviews | Year: 2012

In recent years, the designer nature of ionic liquids (ILs) has driven their exploration and exploitation in countless fields among the physical and chemical sciences. A fair measure of the tremendous attention placed on these fluids has been attributed to their inherent designer nature. And yet, there are relatively few examples of reviews that emphasize this vital aspect in an exhaustive or meaningful way. In this critical review, we systematically survey the physicochemical properties of the collective library of ether- and alcohol-functionalized ILs, highlighting the impact of ionic structure on features such as viscosity, phase behavior/transitions, density, thermostability, electrochemical properties, and polarity (e.g. hydrophilicity, hydrogen bonding capability). In the latter portions of this review, we emphasize the attractive applications of these functionalized ILs across a range of disciplines, including their use as electrolytes or functional fluids for electrochemistry, extractions, biphasic systems, gas separations, carbon capture, carbohydrate dissolution (particularly, the (ligno)celluloses), polymer chemistry, antimicrobial and antielectrostatic agents, organic synthesis, biomolecular stabilization and activation, and nanoscience. Finally, this review discusses anion-functionalized ILs, including sulfur- and oxygen-functionalized analogs, as well as choline-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs), an emerging class of fluids which can be sensibly categorized as semi-molecular cousins to the IL. Finally, the toxicity and biodegradability of ether- and alcohol-functionalized ILs are discussed and cautiously evaluated in light of recent reports. By carefully summarizing literature examples on the properties and applications of oxy-functional designer ILs up till now, it is our intent that this review offers a barometer for gauging future advances in the field as well as a trigger to spur further contemplation of these seemingly inexhaustible and - relative to their potential - virtually untouched fluids. It is abundantly clear that these remarkable fluidic materials are here to stay, just as certain design rules are slowly beginning to emerge. However, in fairness, serendipity also still plays an undeniable role, highlighting the need for both expanded in silico studies and a beacon to attract bright, young researchers to the field (406 references). © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Studies have shown that early childhood education programs can have a positive impact on a child's success later in life. However, the annual turnover rate nationally for teachers of preschool-age children is approximately 30 percent. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine have surveyed early childhood teachers and identified factors that may lead to stress and burnout. "We know from previous research that early educational programs can benefit future school achievement, job performance and social behaviors," said Laine Young-Walker, M.D., associate professor of child and adolescent psychiatry at the MU School of Medicine and lead author of the study. "However, many early childhood educators are not formally trained, requiring them to learn on the job. Our study assessed teachers' perceptions of the challenges they face and their commitment to educating the very young." Young-Walker's team surveyed 100 educators and care providers from 13 early childhood programs in Boone County, Missouri. Participants were selected by invitation from facilities enrolled in the Early Childhood Positive Behavior Support program, a countywide initiative that assists early learning centers in establishing and maintaining effective learning environments. The survey included questions relating to job commitment, stress and support. "It is clear that these educators are devoted to their profession," Young-Walker said. "Ninety-two percent agreed that they were committed to their work. However, the survey also provided insight into the challenges they experience." More than 75 percent of those surveyed wanted more training opportunities. The majority of teachers surveyed felt that the training they received covered information they already knew. More than one-third of the teachers agreed that students' negative behaviors interfered with their work and resulted in significant stress. Seventeen percent frequently felt like leaving their jobs, and 15 percent already planned to do so. "A follow-up analysis indicated that 38 percent of the early childhood teachers surveyed were at risk of burning out," Young-Walker said. "Our analysis points to a combination of their high commitment to the children they care for, and a perception that they do not have the educational support they need to address challenging behaviors in the classroom." The research team believes the data may be used to help address teacher needs and improve retention. "Teachers of young children play a central role in the prevention of behavioral problems in schools, yet they often are the least prepared to do so," Young-Walker said. "High levels of challenging behavior in the classroom contribute to teacher stress and burnout. Without additional training specific to early education, these teachers will not have the necessary tools to help themselves or their students." The study, "Supporting Professional Development Needs for Early Childhood Teachers: An Exploratory Analysis of Teacher Perceptions of Stress and Challenging Behavior," recently was published in the International Journal on Disability and Human Development. Research reported in this publication was supported by the MU School of Medicine's Department of Psychiatry. The researchers have no conflicts of interest to declare related to this study. The MU School of Medicine has improved health, education and research in Missouri and beyond for more than 165 years. MU physicians treat patients from every county in the state, and more Missouri physicians received their medical degrees from MU than from any other university. For more information, visit http://medicine. .


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBIA, Mo. (Feb. 28, 2017) -- Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common form of liver cancer, but treatment options are limited and many patients are diagnosed in late stages when the disease can't be treated. Now, University of Missouri School of Medicine researchers have developed a new treatment that combines chemotherapy and immunotherapy to significantly slow tumor growth in mice. The researchers believe that with more research, the strategy could be translated to benefit patients with the disease. "The current drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat hepatocellular carcinoma only increases the average survival of patients by about three months," said Kevin Staveley-O'Carroll, M.D., Ph.D., chair of the MU School of Medicine's Hugh E. Stephenson Jr., M.D., Department of Surgery and director of Ellis Fischel Cancer Center. "While any extension of life is valuable, our research team is developing a new therapeutic strategy that might extend and improve the quality of life for these patients." Immunotherapy boosts the body's natural defenses to fight off cancer. The therapy has been used to help treat several cancers, such as melanoma and lung cancer. However, little research exists on combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy. During the study, one group of mice was treated with the chemotherapy agent sunitinib and another group was treated with an immunotherapy antibody known as anti-PD-1. Over a period of four weeks, tumors in mice treated with sunitinib grew 25 times larger. Tumors in mice treated with immunotherapy grew at a slower rate and were 15 times larger. However, a third group of mice treated with a combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy experienced even slower tumor growth at a size that was only 11 times larger. "Our results show that a combined chemo-immunotherapeutic approach can slow tumor growth in mice more effectively than either individual treatment," said Guangfu Li, Ph.D., D.V.M., assistant professor in the MU Department of Surgery. "This innovative combination promotes an anti-tumor immune response and better suppresses growth of the cancer. Our findings support the need for a clinical trial to test whether this could become a cost-effective treatment that could help improve the lives of patients with liver cancer." The study, "Successful Chemo-immunotherapy against Hepatocellular Cancer in a Novel Murine Model," was published in the January issue of the Journal of Hepatology. Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health (1 R01 CA164335-01A1 and R01-CA-025000) and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (R01DK 057830). The researchers have no conflicts of interest to declare related to this study. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the funding agencies.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Se trata de un experto senior altamente considerado en operaciones de seguridad, coordinación y gestión para la principal compañía dentro de su próxima fase de crecimiento LOS ÁNGELES, 17 de febrero de 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Airborne Wireless Network (OTCQB: ABWN) anunció hoy que ha nombrado a Michael (Mike) J. Warren como su nuevo consejero delegado. Mike ha trabajado recientemente como director de seguridad y operaciones regionales para ECC International en Afganistán. Desde este cargo, ha supervisado la seguridad de 18 destacados proyectos de construcción DOD, alcanzando los 1.000.000.000 dólares, incluyendo un proyecto de construcción de carretera de 500 millones de dólares del Asia Development Bank para la construcción de una carretera de circunvalación desde Herat a Mazer-e-Sharif, y un proyecto de desarrollo de infraestructura USAID de 50 millones de dólares con el Ministerio de Minas, Petróleo y Gas de Afganistán. Anteriormente, Mike fue el director de operaciones, seguridad y aseguración para Checchi & Company Consulting, Inc., en Afganistán y centrado en el Programa de Medidas y Evaluación bajo contrato con USAID. Anteriormente, fue el responsable de programa para Human Terrain Systems bajo la International Security Assistance Force for NATO y el US Army G-2. Ha sido asesor de la Embajada de Estados Unidos, para COMISAF y CJ2X en la sede central de ISAF en Kabul, Afganistán. Mike se retiró del US Marine Corps con la categoría de Teniente Coronel en el año 1994. Como oficial de infantería, sus tareas incluyeron trabajar como oficial ejecutivo del 3rd Surveillance & Reconnaissance Group en Okinawa; oficial al mando de los mayores Marine Security Barracks en la Naval Weapons Station, Concord, CA, además de numerosas posiciones de manda en el campo de perforación del Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego. Nativo de Illinois, se licenció en Artes en Ciencias Políticas en la University of Missouri. Mike está graduado también en US Marine Corps Command and Staff College. Está certificado además como Counter Terrorism Planner, como experto COIN (Counterinsurgency) y en numerosos cursos de seguridad y aseguramiento. Mike cuenta con una amplia experiencia en gestión de proyectos y ha trabajado para diferentes compañías en la industria informática del hardware y software, desempeñando un papel principal en el crecimiento y expansión de las compañías. J. Edward Daniels, director general de Airborne Wireless Network, comentó: "Mike será una pieza instrumental en el avance de nuestra tecnología dentro de la próxima fase de crecimiento. Su experiencia en operaciones de seguridad e historial en el sector civil y gubernamental serán de un valor incalculable al tiempo que comercializamos de forma agresiva Infinitus Super Highway™. Creemos que este historial único y su capacidad para traducir su visión en una ejecución de nivel mundial serán exactamente lo que necesitamos al tiempo que entramos en el siguiente capítulo de los negocios". Aviso acerca de las declaraciones de futuro Este comunicado incluye "declaraciones a futuro" conforme a las disposiciones de salvaguarda de la Ley de Reforma de Litigios sobre Títulos Privados de los Estados Unidos de 1995. Estas declaraciones se basan en las consideraciones y expectativas actuales de la gerencia de la compañía y se encuentran sujetas a considerables riesgos e incertidumbres. Si las suposiciones subyacentes resultan no ser ciertas o los riesgos o incertidumbres se materializan, los resultados efectivos pueden diferir considerablemente con respecto a lo establecido en estas declaraciones a futuro. Los riesgos e incertidumbres incluyen, pero sin limitarse a, la disponibilidad de capital, las incertidumbres inherentes vinculadas al desarrollo de nuevos productos o tecnologías y operar como una compañía en fase de desarrollo; nuestra capacidad para obtener el financiamiento adicional necesario para continuar con el objeto de nuestro negocio y los planes de desarrollo de producto; nuestra capacidad para desarrollar y comercializar productos sobre nuestra plataforma de tecnología; la competencia en la industria en donde operamos y comercializamos; las condiciones generales de la industria; factores económicos en general; el impacto de la regulación sobre la industria; avances tecnológicos; nuevos productos y patentes de la competencia; dificultades o demoras en la fabricación; dependencia sobre la efectividad de las patentes de la compañía y la exposición a litigios, incluso litigios sobre patentes y/o acciones regulatorias.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.newscientist.com

Talk about unintended consequences. A compound called BPA is being phased out of plastic packaging due to fears it may disrupt our hormones – but a replacement for it may be just as harmful. BPA, or bisphenol A, is often found in disposable water bottles and babies’ milk bottles and cups. Small amounts can dissolve into the food and drink inside these containers. This is a concern because a host of studies have shown that BPA can mimic the actions of oestrogen, binding to the same receptor in the body. Oestrogen is normally involved in breast development, regulating periods and maintaining pregnancies. Animals exposed to BPA develop abnormal reproductive systems, but it is unclear if people are exposed to high enough doses to be affected. Due to public pressure – and bans in a few countries – many manufacturers have started replacing BPA. One substitute, fluorene-9-bisphenol, or BHPF, is already widely used in a variety of materials. But Jianying Hu of Peking University in Beijing and her team have found that BHPF also binds to the body’s oestrogen receptors. Unlike BPA, it does this without stimulating them, instead blocking their normal activity. In tests on female mice, BHPF caused the animals to have smaller wombs and smaller pups than controls, and in some cases miscarriages. If BHPF binds to the same receptor in humans, it has the potential to cause fertility problems. “That’s pretty scary,” says Frederick vom Saal of the University of Missouri. As food and drink containers don’t usually reveal detailed information about what they are made from, Hu’s team tested a variety of plastic bottles labelled “BPA-free” to see if they released BHPF into hot water stored inside, as heat encourages such compounds to dissolve. They found the compound was released from 23 of the 52 items tested, including all three babies’ bottles they examined. When they took blood samples from 100 college students who regularly drank water from plastic bottles, Hu’s team detected low levels of BHPF in seven people. It is unknown if the compound came from their drinking water – as there are many materials containing BHPF in the environment – nor if that would be high enough to cause harm. But vom Saal says even low levels could in theory disrupt our hormonal systems. Vom Saal says he tries to use plastic as little as possible, and avoids putting plastic containers in the microwave or dishwasher, as they degrade under heat.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Hochgeschätzter führender Experte für Operationen, Koordination und Management im Bereich Sicherheit wird das Unternehmen in die nächste Wachstumsphase steuern LOS ANGELES, 17. Februar 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Airborne Wireless Network (OTCQB: ABWN) gibt heute bekannt, dass es Michael (Mike) J. Warren zum Chief Executive Officer ernannt hat. Mike Warren war bis vor Kurzem als Direktor für regionale Operationen und Sicherheit für ECC International in Afghanistan tätig. In dieser Funktion überwachte er die Sicherheit von 18 bedeutenden Bauprojekten des US-Verteidigungsministeriums mit einem Budget von insgesamt 1.000.000.000 USD, einschließlich eines Straßenprojekts über 500 Millionen USD der Asia Development Bank zum Bau der Tangente von Herat nach Mazer-e-Sharif, und eines Infrastruktur-Entwicklungsprojekts über 50 Millionen USD von USAID in Zusammenarbeit mit dem afghanischen Ministerium für Minenwesen, Öl und Gas. Davor war Mike Warren Direktor für Operations, Security & Safety für Checchi & Company Consulting, Inc., in Afghanistan und sein Schwerpunkt lag auf dem Programm Measurement and Evaluation im Auftrag von USAID. Vor dieser Funktion arbeitete er als Programm-Manager für die Human Terrain Systems im Rahmen der Internationalen Sicherheitsbeistandstruppe (International Security Assistance Force/ISAF) für die NATO und die US-Armee G-2. Er hat als Berater für die US-Botschaft, für COMISAF und CJ2X im ISAF-Hauptquartier in Kabul in Afghanistan fungiert. Mike Warren ist im Jahr 1994 aus dem US Marine Corps im Rang eines Lieutenant Colonel ausgeschieden. Als Infanterie-Offizier gehörte zu seinen Aufgaben der Dienst als Exekutiv-Offizier, 3. Surveillance & Reconnaissance Group in Okinawa, als Kommandant der größten Marinesicherheit-Kaserne in der Marinegefechtsstation Concord, Kalifornien, und er diente in mehreren Kommandofunktionen auf dem Militärübungsplatz des Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego. Er stammt aus Illinois und hat an der University of Missouri einen Bachelor-Studienabschluss in Politikwissenschaften absolviert. Mike Warren ist ebenfalls Absolvent des US Marine Corps Command and Staff College.  Darüber hinaus verfügt er über Zertifizierungen als Stratege zur Terrorismusbekämpfung, als sogenannter COIN-Experte (Counterinsurgency/Aufstandsbekämpfung) und er hat zahlreiche Sicherheitskurse und -fortbildungen abgeschlossen. Mike Warren besitzt umfangreiches Hintergrundwissen im Projektmanagement und war bei mehreren Unternehmen in der Computerhardware- und Software-Branche aktiv, für die er entscheidende Beiträge zum Wachstum und zur Expansion der Unternehmen leistete. J. Edward Daniels, Präsident von Airborne Wireless Network sagte: „Mike wird für unseren technologischen Fortschritt auf die nächste Stufe des Wachstums eine zentrale Rolle spielen. Seine Kompetenz im Bereich Sicherheitsoperationen und sein Hintergrund - sowohl aus dem zivilen als auch dem staatlichen Sektor - sind äußerst wertvoll, während wir die Vermarktung des Infinitus Super Highway™ weiter offensiv fortsetzen. Wir sind davon überzeugt, dass sein einzigartiges Hintergrundwissen und sein Talent, Visionen in erstklassige Ergebnisse umzusetzen, genau die notwendigen Fähigkeiten sind, um das nächste Kapitel unserer Geschäftsaktivitäten zu eröffnen." Weitere Informationen finden Sie unter: www.airbornewirelessnetwork.com Diese Pressemitteilung enthält sogenannte „zukunftsbezogene Aussagen" im Sinne der Safe-Harbor-Bestimmungen des United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act von 1995. Diese Aussagen basieren auf den aktuellen Überzeugungen und Erwartungen der Geschäftsführung des Unternehmens und unterliegen beachtlichen Risiken und Ungewissheiten. Sollten sich die zugrunde gelegten Annahmen als unzutreffend erweisen oder Risiken und Unwägbarkeiten eintreten, könnten die tatsächlichen Ergebnisse wesentlich von denjenigen abweichen, die in den zukunftsbezogenen Aussagen enthalten sind. Risiken und Unwägbarkeiten beinhalten, sind aber nicht beschränkt auf die Verfügbarkeit von Kapital; die mit der Entwicklung neuer Produkte oder Technologien und der betrieblichen Tätigkeit als Unternehmen in der Entwicklungsphase verbundenen Unsicherheiten; unsere Fähigkeit zur zusätzlichen Erhöhung der Mittel, die wir benötigen, um unsere Geschäfts- und Produktentwicklungspläne weiter zu verfolgen; unsere Fähigkeit, Produkte auf Basis unserer Technologieplattform zu entwickeln und zu vermarkten; der Wettbewerb in der Branche, in der wir tätig sind und vermarkten; allgemeine Branchenbedingungen; allgemeine wirtschaftliche Faktoren; die Auswirkung von Branchenvorschriften; technologische Fortschritte; neue Produkte und Patente der Konkurrenz; Herstellungsschwierigkeiten oder -verzögerungen; Abhängigkeit von der Wirksamkeit der Patente des Unternehmens sowie das Risiko von Rechtsstreitigkeiten, einschließlich Patentstreitigkeiten und/oder regulatorischer Maßnahmen.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

WorldatWork, a nonprofit HR association and compensation authority, is proud to announce that LifeCare has earned WorldatWork’s Seal of Distinction for 2017 for the sixth straight year. The seal is a unique mark of excellence designed to identify organizational success in total rewards effectiveness. LifeCare is one of 160 organizations to be honored as a 2017 recipient. All of the 2017 recipients will be recognized during the WorldatWork Total Rewards Conference & Exhibition, held in Washington, D.C. from May 7-10. “It is an honor to once again receive the AWLP Seal of Distinction,” said Peter Burki, LifeCare Chairman & Chief Executive Officer. “For almost 33 years we have committed ourselves to helping clients, their employees and the employees of LifeCare be successful both in the workplace and at home. We look forward to continuing our support for them as they navigate through their personal needs and life events.” Begun in 2012, the prestigious Seal of Distinction is awarded to companies that meet defined standards of workplace programs, policies and practices weighted on several factors, such as the complexity of implementation, required organizational resources, perceived breadth of access and overall level of commitment from leadership. Applicants are evaluated on: “We congratulate all of the recipients of the 2017 Seal of Distinction. These recipients represent a wide variety of industries from across the U.S. and Canada, showing that the total rewards model applies to employers and employees everywhere,” stated Anne C. Ruddy, president and CEO of WorldatWork. “This year, we saw the highest number of applicants since the Seal of Distinction was created. I’m confident that this means an increasing number of companies are recognizing the importance of a workplace environment that benefits both the employer and employee.” This year’s recipients represent industries of education, finance, government, health, law, manufacturing, and pharmaceuticals – and hail from 36 states, the District of Columbia and Canada. The 2017 list includes 80 companies who are first-time Seal of Distinction recipients. Eighty companies have received the seal in previous years. In addition, 11 organizations, including LifeCare, have qualified every year since WorldatWork started presenting the Seal of Distinction in 2012. LifeCare provides employer-sponsored work-life benefits to 61,000 clients, including Fortune 500 companies and large branches of the federal government, representing 100 million members nationwide. In addition to child and backup care solutions, LifeCare also provides a full suite of work-life solutions that save members time with personal life needs such as: elder care, legal and financial issues, health and everyday responsibilities. LifeCare also operates LifeMart, an online discount shopping website that provides real savings on everyday products and needs. LifeCare is headquartered in Shelton, CT. The Total Rewards Association WorldatWork is a nonprofit human resources association and compensation authority for professionals and organizations focused on compensation, benefits and total rewards. It's our mission to empower professionals to become masters in their fields. We do so by providing thought leadership in total rewards disciplines from the world's most respected experts; ensuring access to timely, relevant content; and fostering an active community of total rewards practitioners and leaders. WorldatWork has more than 70,000 members and subscribers worldwide; more than 80% of Fortune 500 companies employ a WorldatWork member. Founded in 1955, WorldatWork has offices in Scottsdale, Ariz., and Washington, D.C., and is affiliated with more than 70 human resources associations around the world. Below is the complete list of 2017 Seal of Distinction recipients: California ACI Specialty Benefits Actelion Pharmaceuticals US Addepar Foothill Family Fremont Bank Infoblox Inc. Intuit Inc. Los Angeles County Employees Retirement Association (LACERA) Motion Picture Industry Pension & Health Plans Professional Publications Inc. Prologis UCLA Health and David Geffen School of Medicine University of California, Davis University of California, Irvine University of California San Diego District of Columbia Advanced Medical Technology Association American Gas Association DC Water Department of Transportation - Federal Aviation Administration Federal Reserve Board of Governors Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner LLP Hill+Knowlton Strategies Raffa, P.C. Summit Consulting LLC The George Washington University U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services U.S. Department of Agriculture Florida AACSB International BayCare Health System Black Knight Financial Services, Inc. Broward Health Central Florida Regional Transportation Authority/LYNX Citizens Property Insurance Corporation Seminole State College of Florida Iowa ITA Group, Inc. Principal Financial Group Wells Enterprises Inc. Massachusetts Babson College Bright Horizons Family Solutions Inc. Globoforce Kronos Incorporated Massachusetts Institute of Technology Progress Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. Maryland Bon Secours Health System, Inc. Campbell & Company CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield Continental Realty Corporation Frederick County Public Schools Johns Hopkins University and Health System Marriott International National Institutes of Health National Security Agency Target Community & Educational Services, Inc. Missouri City of Kansas City, Missouri KCP&L Nestle Purina PetCare Co. University of Missouri System Veterans United Home Loans New Jersey BASF Corporation Becton Dickinson CRP Industries Inc. Ferring Pharmaceuticals Inc. KPMG LLP Prudential Financial Sanofi US The Electrochemical Society New York Mastercard Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center MVP Health Care MetLife NYU Langone Medical Center On Deck Capital Inc. Ralph Lauren The YMCA of Greater Rochester North Carolina BlueCross and BlueShield of North Carolina NC State University Orange Water and Sewer Authority (OWASA) RTI International Volvo Group North America Texas Capital Metropolitan Transportation Authority Children's Health City of Southlake Dell Inc. Disability Rights Texas Geokinetics Lloyd's Register Americas Inc. MOGAS Industries, Inc. Ryan, LLC Southwest Research Institute Texas Instruments


News Article | February 18, 2017
Site: www.bbc.co.uk

August's total solar eclipse in the US will almost certainly be the most watched such event in history. More than 12 million people - from Oregon to South Carolina - live on the path of darkness that the Moon will cut as it sweeps in front of the Sun. Nearly four times that many live within a two-hour's drive. And then there are all the tourists who will flock to America to witness the spectacle. "By going out and looking at the Sun we take part in this time-honoured tradition of citizen science," says astronomer and artist Prof Tyler Nordgren from the University of Redlands in California. "Edmund Halley during an eclipse in 1715 in London asked people to go outside, look up and see if they could see the total solar eclipse and measure the length of totality, and by that he was able to help refine the orbit of the Moon," he told BBC News. You might think that with all the space telescopes trained on the Sun these days there is little the citizen or even the keen amateur can contribute. But total solar eclipses are special because they afford particularly favourable conditions to study the tenuous outer atmosphere of the Sun called the corona. It is in this superheated "gas" of charged particles that the solar wind originates, and from which billions of tonnes of matter can occasionally burst towards the Earth to disrupt satellites, communications and even electricity grids. The corona is outshone by the Sun's surface, its photosphere. And satellites will block out this glare using devices called coronagraphs or occulters. But these are usually so wide that they also obstruct a doughnut of light immediately above the edge of the star. "The spacecraft block out not only the Sun but also a whole lot of light around it, otherwise there would be scattering all over the image. And so we have that whole region uniquely to observe in white light from the ground at total solar eclipse," says Jay Pasachoff from Williams College, a veteran of 65 eclipses. And he wants members of the public to get in on the act. One key project in the planning is the Citizen Continental-America Telescopic Eclipse (CATE) project run by the National Solar Observatory. It is making available 59 identical telescopes and digital cameras to universities, schools and astronomy clubs along the path of the eclipse (another 40 observing kits are available to purchase). Participants are being trained to gather images of the corona from their locality that can then be spliced together with everyone else's to produce an uninterrupted 90-minute video. Citizen CATE will rely on dedicated, calibrated equipment. But a similar venture plans to make use of the countless photos that will be taken on the day with general pocket cameras and smartphones. The Eclipse Megamovie Project is led by the University of California at Berkeley's Multiverse education programme at the Space Sciences Laboratory and Google's Making & Science initiative. It has a core band of photographers, but the public will be able to participate with the aid of an app that will offer advice on getting the best image quality and provide the means to upload pictures. The 21 August event is the first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in the US since 1918. The Moon's shadow begins its journey across Earth's surface - the path of totality - out in the Pacific. It makes landfall near Newport in Oregon at 10:16 local time (17:16 GMT; 18:16 BST); and leaves the continent close to the Atlantic coastal city of Charleston, South Carolina, at 14:49 local time (18:49 GMT; 19:49 BST). The location that will experience full darkness for the "greatest duration" is just outside the town of Carbondale, Illinois. Totality there will last 2 minutes and 40.2 seconds. So many people are expected to try to view the eclipse that the American Astronomical Society has set up a taskforce to advise urban and rural communities on how to prepare for the expected population surge. Prof Nordgren works a lot with the National Parks Service: "I'm going to be at John Day Fossil Beds National Monument in eastern Oregon. "They have six parking spaces and a porta-potty, and yet they're expecting maybe 20,000 people to come there on that day." And taskforce colleague, Angela Speck from the University of Missouri, added: "We need to have communities ready for the influx of people that are coming, and that means things like emergency services, road traffic control, food and water. Especially water - the eclipse is in August." Nordgren, Speck, and Pasachoff were speaking here in Boston at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Jonathan.Amos-INTERNET@bbc.co.uk and follow me on Twitter: @BBCAmos


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Highly Regarded Senior Expert on Security Operations, Coordination, and Management to Lead Company into Next Phase of Growth LOS ANGELES, Feb. 16, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Airborne Wireless Network (OTCQB: ABWN) today announces that it has appointed Michael (Mike) J. Warren as Chief Executive Officer. Mike has recently served as the Regional Operations and Security Director for ECC International in Afghanistan.  In this capacity, he has overseen the security of 18 Major DOD Construction Projects, totaling $1,000,000,000, including a $500 million Asia Development Bank road project building the Ring Road from Herat to Mazer-e-Sharif, and a $50 Million USAID Infrastructure Development project with the Afghan Ministry of Mines, Oil, and Gas.  Before that, Mike was the Director of Operations, Security & Safety for Checchi & Company Consulting, Inc., in Afghanistan and he focused on the Measurement and Evaluation Program under contract with USAID.  Prior to that he was the Program Manager for the Human Terrain Systems under the International Security Assistance Force for NATO and the US Army G-2.  He has been an advisor to the US Embassy, to COMISAF and CJ2X at HQ's ISAF in Kabul, Afghanistan. Mike retired from the US Marine Corps with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in 1994.  An infantry officer, his assignments included serving as the Executive Officer, 3rd Surveillance & Reconnaissance Group in Okinawa; as Commanding Officer of the largest Marine Security Barracks at Naval Weapons Station, Concord, CA, and in multiple command positions on the drill field at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego.  A native of Illinois, he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from the University of Missouri. Mike is also a graduate of the US Marine Corps Command and Staff College.  He is also certified as a Counter Terrorism Planner, as a COIN (Counterinsurgency) expert and in numerous security and safety courses. Mike has an extensive background in project management and has served with numerous companies in the computer hardware and software industry, playing an integral role in the companies' growth and expansion. J. Edward Daniels, President of Airborne Wireless Network said, "Mike will be instrumental in advancing our technology into the next stage of growth. His expertise in security operations and background in both the civilian sector and governmental sector will be invaluable as we continue to aggressively market the Infinitus Super Highway™. We believe that his unique background and his ability to translate vision into world-class execution will be exactly what we need as we enter the next chapter of the business." For further information see: www.airbornewirelessnetwork.com This release includes "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements are based upon the current beliefs and expectations of the company's management and are subject to significant risks and uncertainties. If underlying assumptions prove inaccurate or risks or uncertainties materialize, actual results may differ materially from those set forth in the forward-looking statements. Risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, availability of capital; the inherent uncertainties associated with developing new products or technologies and operating as a development stage company; our ability to raise the additional funding we will need to continue to pursue our business and product development plans; our ability to develop and commercialize products based on our technology platform; competition in the industry in which we operate and market; general industry conditions; general economic factors; the impact of industry regulation; technological advances; new products and patents attained by competitors; manufacturing difficulties or delays; dependence on the effectiveness of the company's patents; and the exposure to litigation, including patent litigation, and/or regulatory actions.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: en.prnasia.com

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 17, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Airborne Wireless Network (OTCQB: ABWN) today announces that it has appointed Michael (Mike) J. Warren as Chief Executive Officer. Mike has recently served as the Regional Operations and Security Director for ECC International in Afghanistan.  In this capacity, he has overseen the security of 18 Major DOD Construction Projects, totaling $1,000,000,000, including a $500 million Asia Development Bank road project building the Ring Road from Herat to Mazer-e-Sharif, and a $50 Million USAID Infrastructure Development project with the Afghan Ministry of Mines, Oil, and Gas.  Before that, Mike was the Director of Operations, Security & Safety for Checchi & Company Consulting, Inc., in Afghanistan and he focused on the Measurement and Evaluation Program under contract with USAID.  Prior to that he was the Program Manager for the Human Terrain Systems under the International Security Assistance Force for NATO and the US Army G-2.  He has been an advisor to the US Embassy, to COMISAF and CJ2X at HQ's ISAF in Kabul, Afghanistan. Mike retired from the US Marine Corps with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in 1994.  An infantry officer, his assignments included serving as the Executive Officer, 3rd Surveillance & Reconnaissance Group in Okinawa; as Commanding Officer of the largest Marine Security Barracks at Naval Weapons Station, Concord, CA, and in multiple command positions on the drill field at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego.  A native of Illinois, he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from the University of Missouri. Mike is also a graduate of the US Marine Corps Command and Staff College.  He is also certified as a Counter Terrorism Planner, as a COIN (Counterinsurgency) expert and in numerous security and safety courses. Mike has an extensive background in project management and has served with numerous companies in the computer hardware and software industry, playing an integral role in the companies' growth and expansion. J. Edward Daniels, President of Airborne Wireless Network said, "Mike will be instrumental in advancing our technology into the next stage of growth. His expertise in security operations and background in both the civilian sector and governmental sector will be invaluable as we continue to aggressively market the Infinitus Super Highway™. We believe that his unique background and his ability to translate vision into world-class execution will be exactly what we need as we enter the next chapter of the business." For further information see: www.airbornewirelessnetwork.com This release includes "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements are based upon the current beliefs and expectations of the company's management and are subject to significant risks and uncertainties. If underlying assumptions prove inaccurate or risks or uncertainties materialize, actual results may differ materially from those set forth in the forward-looking statements. Risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, availability of capital; the inherent uncertainties associated with developing new products or technologies and operating as a development stage company; our ability to raise the additional funding we will need to continue to pursue our business and product development plans; our ability to develop and commercialize products based on our technology platform; competition in the industry in which we operate and market; general industry conditions; general economic factors; the impact of industry regulation; technological advances; new products and patents attained by competitors; manufacturing difficulties or delays; dependence on the effectiveness of the company's patents; and the exposure to litigation, including patent litigation, and/or regulatory actions.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Honor Society, a leading national academic and professional honor society, announced the Winter 2017 Scholarship Recipients on January 25, 2017. Six well-deserving recipients and twelve finalists were chosen to receive scholarships ranging from $500 to $2000 per person. Scholarships and awards are a key component of the raison d'etre or "reason for existence" of Honor Society. They offer students exclusive scholarships and connect them to a database of partner scholarships to help them dream bigger and reach further. Honor Society’s exclusive scholarships for members include scholarships for Community Service, Core Values, Graduate Achievers, and even a Study Abroad scholarship. “It was difficult to pick recipients for each scholarship this season because of all of the extraordinary candidates," said Honor Society Executive Director, Michael Moradian. "However, we chose some very well-deserving candidates that truly represent what the Honor Society mission is about and who are focused on excelling in their academics. We are proud to have each of them as members!” The Winter 2017 Scholarship period is one of many rounds of scholarships offered by Honor Society. Scholarship recipients are glad they joined in order to take advantage of the year-round scholarship opportunities. Undergraduate Achiever Scholarship Recipient - Kristen Brown, Northeastern University - Kristen is on the Dean’s list at her school and has completed two six-month co-ops in a neurobiology lab at Harvard Medical School to aid in her Behavioral Neuroscience major. Undergraduate Achiever Scholarship Finalist - Emily Johnson, Eastern Kentucky University - Emily has received the President's Award and is on the Dean's List at EKU. She is currently a Biomedical Science major and wants to become a dentist. Undergraduate Achiever Scholarship Finalist - Alexis Alston, Missouri State University - Alexis has a 4.0 GPA at MSU and is majoring in Mass Media with a minor in Recording Arts. Graduate Achiever Scholarship Recipient - Nicole Lynch, Northern Illinois University - Nicole worked as an Occupational Therapist at an early childhood elementary school. She is an honors student at NIU and upon completion of her Masters in Special Education she plans to teach. Graduate Achiever Scholarship Finalist - Melissa Reynolds, University of Texas at Arlington - Melissa is currently serving as Assistant City Engineer for the second fastest growing City in the Nation and maintaining a 4.0 GPA in the Masters of Public Administration program at UTA. Graduate Achiever Scholarship Finalist - Alicia Dudley, Sam Houston State University - Alicia has a 4.0 GPA in her pursuit of a Masters in Instructional Technology. She received the Teacher of the Year award at her Title 1 school where she has now taken on a job as Librarian. Core Values Scholarships Recipient - Grace Hagerty, University of Georgia - Grace is “pursuing excellence” (Honor Society Core Value #1) by maintaining a 4.0 GPA and by being a part of UGA Honors, UGA Miracle and Club Swimming. Core Values Scholarships Finalist - Olivia Voss, Southeastern Oklahoma State University - Olivia is embodying the Honor Society “Pursue Leadership and Take Initiative” Core Value by being part of SOSU’s President Leadership Class as well as acting as a Senator in her college's Student Government Association and a chapter officer in the Zeta Gamma chapter of Sigma Sigma Sigma. Member Spotlight Scholarship Recipient - Michaela Rodo, Edinboro University - Michaela is on the Dean’s List at Edinboro University and is studying in cinema to be an animator. Member Spotlight Scholarship Finalist - Lisa Smith, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley - Lisa graduated Magna Cum Laude with a BBA in Marketing at UTPA and is now obtaining her MBA in Business & Entrepreneurship at UTRGV. Study Abroad Scholarship Finalist - Daleigh Kranz, Northern Kentucky University - Daleigh will be studying abroad in Granada, Spain to immerse herself in Spanish to help in her future career working with inner city children as a social worker. Study Abroad Scholarship Finalist - Andrew Dennis, Bowling Green State University - Andrew will be attending a 9-month program in Spain at La Universidad de Alcalá in Alcalá de Henares to prepare him for a future as a world language teacher. Study Abroad Scholarship Finalist - Gavin Coulson, University of Colorado Boulder - Gavin will be studying abroad in Tel-Aviv University, Israel this Spring in a program focused on intensive Hebrew and Arabic, face-to-face interactions with Israelis and Palestinians and full immersion into a culture which will help in his pursuit of a career as a rabbinical chaplain in the United States Military. Community Service Scholarship Recipient - Elizabeth Angier, Texas A&M University–Commerce - Elizabeth spent the summer volunteering in a refugee camp and is currently volunteering as an English tutor for those students who do not have English as their first language. Community Service Scholarship Finalist - Meghan Nothdurft, University of Missouri - Meghan is a member of Little Sisters of the Golden Rose, a community service sorority, and has participated in building a home for Habitat for Humanity, packing food for the Food Bank in Columbia, Missouri, and working a children's festival for a local community. Society Involvement Scholarship Recipient - Kayla Mounce, Appalachian State - Kayla is currently pursuing a major in Sustainable Development and is on both the Dean’s and Chancellor’s List at her school. Society Involvement Scholarship Finalist - Adam Buchholtz, University of Wisconsin Eau Claire - Adam is currently working on his major in nursing and plans to work on his doctorate in nursing after his Bachelors Degree. Society Involvement Scholarship Finalist - Dorida Denas, Bergen Community College - Dorida is majoring in Graphic Design/Computer Graphics and hopes to use her degree as a brand designer or in the advertising area. About Honor Society: Honor Society is a leading honor society with active members in all 50 states, and is represented with chapters at many of universities across the country. The Honor Society community emphasizes leadership and is a platform to showcase member talents. The society offers exclusive benefits to its members and alumni, ranging from discounts and job search tools to priority internship placement programs. For more information about careers at Honor Society, or to learn more about our open positions visit our job board at: http://honorsociety.theresumator.com/. For more general information, please visit http://www.honorsociety.org or follow Honor Society on Twitter and Facebook.


Patent
DuPont Pioneer, Iowa State University, North Carolina State University, Foundation University and University of Missouri | Date: 2014-03-12

The present invention comprises methods and compositions for controlling nematode parasitism in host plant. The present invention comprises novel polynucleotides and polypeptides encoded by such polynucleotides comprising one or more nucleic acid sequences disclosed herein having a nucleotide sequence comprising any one of SEQ ID NO: 1-142 or 161, a fragment or variant thereof, or a complement thereof, or a polypeptide sequence comprising any one of SEQ ID NO: 143-160, a fragment or variant thereof.


The requirement for sustainable food production is a global issue to which the EU contributes as a major livestock producer. It is critical to improve animal production efficiency while sustaining environmentally friendly milk production. More profitable dairy production requires increased milk yield, cow health, longevity and fertility; reduced environmental footprint and optimised use of inputs. These are multifactorial problems to achieve. GplusE aims to identify the genotypes controlling biological variation in the important phenotypes of dairy cows, to appreciate how these are influenced by environmental and management factors and thus allow more informed and accurate use of genomic selection. GplusE will link new genomic data in dairy cows to a comprehensive array of phenotypic information going well beyond those existing traits recorded by dairy breeding organisations. It will develop systems that will focus herd and cow management on key time points in production that have a major influence on the rest of the productive cycle including efficiency, environment, physiological status, health, fertility and welfare. This will significantly advance the science, efficiency and management practices in dairy production well beyond the current state-of-the art. The major bioinformatics element of the proposal will illuminate the bovine genome and ensure a reverse flow of information to annotate human and other mammalian genomes; it will ensure training of animal scientists (PhDs & Postdocs) to a high skill level in the use of bioinformatics. The end result of this project will be a comprehensive, integrated identification of genomic-phenotypic associations relevant to dairy production. This information will be translated into benefits for animal breeding and management that will considerably improve sustainable dairy production. It will provide basic biological information into the mechanisms by which genotype, environment and their interaction influence performance.


Johnson G.H.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | Fritsche K.,University of Missouri
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics | Year: 2012

The majority of evidence suggests that n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, including linoleic acid (LA), reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease as reflected by current dietary recommendations. However, concern has been expressed that a high intake of dietary n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid contributes to excess chronic inflammation, primarily by prompting the synthesis of proinflammatory eicosanoids derived from arachidonic acid and/or inhibiting the synthesis of anti-inflammatory eicosanoids from eicosapentaenoic and/or docosahexaenoic acids. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials that permitted the assessment of dietary LA on biologic markers of chronic inflammation among healthy noninfant populations was conducted to examine this concern. A search of the English- and non-English-language literature using MEDLINE, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and EMBASE was conducted to identify relevant articles. Fifteen studies (eight parallel and seven crossover) met inclusion criteria. None of the studies reported significant findings for a wide variety of inflammatory markers, including C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, cytokines, soluble vascular adhesion molecules, or tumor necrosis factor-α. The only significant outcome measures reported for higher LA intakes were greater excretion of prostaglandin E2 and lower excretion of 2,3-dinor-thromboxane B 2 in one study and higher excretion of tetranorprostanedioic acid in another. However, the authors of those studies both observed that these effects were not an indication of increased inflammation. We conclude that virtually no evidence is available from randomized, controlled intervention studies among healthy, noninfant human beings to show that addition of LA to the diet increases the concentration of inflammatory markers. © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.


Patent
DuPont Pioneer, Iowa State University, University of Missouri, Foundation University and North Carolina State University | Date: 2014-03-12

The present invention comprises methods and compositions for controlling nematode parasitism in host plant. The present invention comprises novel polynucleotides and polypeptides encoded by such polynucleotides comprising one or more nucleic acid sequences disclosed herein having a nucleotide sequence comprising any one of SEQ ID NOs: 1-142, a fragment or variant thereof, or a complement thereof, or a polypeptide sequence comprising any one of SEQ ID NOs: 143-159, a fragment or variant thereof.


Patent
University of Missouri, INC Research, The United States Of America, Iowa State University, Foundation University and North Carolina State University | Date: 2011-07-13

Methods of inhibiting plant parasitic nematodes, methods of obtaining transgenic plants useful for inhibiting such nematodes, and transgenic plants that are resistant to plant parasitic nematodes through inhibition of plant nematode CLE peptide receptor genes are provided. Methods for expressing genes at plant parasitic nematode feeding sites with plant nematode CLE peptide receptor gene promoters are also provided, along with nematode CLE peptide receptor gene promoters that are useful for expressing genes in nematode feeding sites as well as transgenic plants and nematode resistant transgenic plants comprising the promoters.


Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (skin cancers) selected, representing over 5,500,000 diagnoses annually in the US alone, making it the most prevalent cancer today KENNEWICK, WA / ACCESSWIRE / February 28, 2017 / Advanced Medical Isotope Corporation ("AMI") (OTC PINK: ADMD), a cancer therapeutics company focused on the commercialization of their RadioGel™ device, a tumor-injectable and biodegradable radiation that remains focused at the treatment site, today released the third letter in a four letter series outlining AMI's push towards FDA submittal and commercialization from its new President & CEO, Dr. Mike Korenko. After two months of dynamic experience-based discussions among our Medical Advisory Board Members and other senior doctors we have selected our first indication for use which we will present to the Food and Drug Administration. After thorough review to prioritize indications, we have selected basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma (skin cancers). The reasons for this important selection relates to our criteria below: This cancer is in the skin and therefore easy to access. Single injections for small tumors are easy and we have already demonstrated our parallel injection procedure in the cat at Washington State University for larger tumors. b. Therapeutic ratio (ratio of the dose to the tumor target tissue relative to dose to adjacent normal tissue) and responsiveness to radiation: Yttrium-90 is a beta emitter in RadioGel has a much higher therapeutic ratio than any gamma emitter or external beam therapy. Since Y-90 delivers high-energy beta-rays, it has an average penetration path of 4 to 5 mm (less than a quarter inch), which is ideal for skin cancer therapy. There is minimal irradiation of normal surrounding tissue. As an added bonus, the patient can go home immediately with no irradiation risk to themselves or family members. We can treat with very high doses, so response to radiation would not be an issue. (As a comparison, external beam radiation can deliver 60 to 80 Gy. Yttrium-90 in RadioGel can go to 700 Gy or higher). As discussed above, there is very low risk of collateral damage. In addition, the skin is not located next to a major organ, for example if you were injecting near spinal tumors. Because of the low collateral risk and because of the therapeutic effects that would be relatively easy to see in three months, the Medical Advisory Board felt this might be an easier device for the FDA to approve and in a shorter timeframe. In addition, some of our animal testing, that will start in about two months, are already treating similar cancers. We intentionally avoided applying to the FDA for melanoma, since it is highly metastatic and goes deep into the tissue. There are a much smaller number of cases for this cancer type (around 300,000). In addition, there are three new immunotherapy products on the market to treat melanoma cancer. They can have serious side-effects, but they are promising. That violates our next criterion below. Some skin cancers require several-hour long surgeries in which the tumor is removed, one layer at a time, and then sent for biopsy. They then require a skin graft that can lead to an infection. On tumors of the face this can be disfiguring. As people get older their skin gets thinner, which increases the difficulty. Our Advisory Board felt that for these cases in particular RadioGel has a significant therapeutic advantage. It would benefit the patient and contribute to reducing the cost of health care. 3. CAN BE PROFITABLY EMBRACED BY THE MEDICAL COMMUNITY: One out of every three new cancers in the United States is a cancerous skin lesion. The two skin cancer types that we selected are the most common. There are 3.3 million patients in the United States with 5.5 million tumors (some patients have more than one tumor.) About 1 million of these are squamous cell cancers located near the surface of the epidermal skin layer, and greater than 4 million are basal cell cancers in the deep layer of the epidermis. I would never say that we can treat them all; that would just be marketing hype, but I believe that this will be the preferred treatment in a substantial number of cases in a very large market. b. Ease of acceptance by the medical community, Medicare reimbursement: The potential lower cost of RadioGel therapy coupled with the potential very large number of patients satisfied this criterion. To further test the criterion, we are in discussions with a major private clinic with several skin treatment centers. This client believes this is a great new tool for their toolbox. They are also advising us on the obstacles that will have to be overcome, such as our Medicare reimbursement criterion. Since we believe RadioGel therapy will reduce the cost to Medicare we are confident that will not be an obstacle. There are other cancer types on our list of eighteen potential indications of use for RadioGel, and we have already prioritized to present them to the FDA in the future. Unfortunately, in the meantime, those patients will not be benefiting from this technology. As I have reported in my last shareholder letter, I am aligning the veterinarian animal testing with the human skin cancer. Specially, the University of Missouri will be focusing on the treatment for surface soft cell lesions, and Colorado State University will be refining the therapies for oral squamous cell cancers. After this selection, our next step is to prepare for the FDA pre-submittal meeting. We will request that meeting after we complete the test plans that will answer their previous questions. Until we complete these plans I can only estimate that our pre-submission to the FDA would be in June. I am really happy that we have engaged John Smith from Hogan Lovells to be at our side through this FDA process. I am excited and relieved that this selection decision had been made and I wanted to thank the members of our Medical Advisory Board – Chairman Dr. Barry D. Pressman, Dr. Albert DeNittis, Dr. Howard Sandler, and Dr. Darrell Fisher. I would also like to thank Dr. Ricardo Paz-Fumagalli and Dr. Beau Bosko Toskich from the Mayo Clinic for their valuable advice. In addition to the important developments discussed above, we continue to believe that the public markets are significantly undervaluing our company. With a fully diluted enterprise value of less than $10 million, there remains very large upside potential. As we progress on our plan, I intend to work vigorously to educate and inform the medical and investment community as to the therapeutic benefits our core technology as well as the economic model that can generate significant revenue and profits. We are committed to pursuing an uplisting to a national exchange as soon as possible in order to gain wider exposure and credibility in our pursuit of the multi-billion-dollar addressable market for Radiogel™, that can both significantly improve patient outcomes and reward shareholders. Advanced Medical Isotope Corporation (ADMD) is a late stage radiation oncology focused medical device company engaged in the development of yttrium-90 based brachytherapy devices for cancer treatment. The IsoPet Solutions division is focused on utilizing RadioGel for a cancer therapy in animals. Brachytherapy uses radiation to destroy cancerous tumors by placing a radioactive isotope inside or next to the treatment area. The Company intends to outsource material aspects of manufacturing, distribution, sales and marketing for its products in the United States and to enter into licensing arrangements outside of the United States, though the Company will evaluate its alternatives before finalizing its plans. For more information, please visit our websites: www.isopetsolutions.com and www.isotopeworld.com. This release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. You can identify these statements by the use of the words "may," "will," "should," "plans," "expects," "anticipates," "continue," "estimates," "projects," "intends," and similar expressions. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that could cause results to differ materially from those projected or anticipated. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, the Company's ability to successfully execute its expanded business strategy, including by entering into definitive agreements with suppliers, commercial partners and customers; general economic and business conditions, effects of continued geopolitical unrest and regional conflicts, competition, changes in technology and methods of marketing, delays in completing various engineering and manufacturing programs, changes in customer order patterns, changes in product mix, continued success in technical advances and delivering technological innovations, shortages in components, production delays due to performance quality issues with outsourced components, regulatory requirements and the ability to meet them, government agency rules and changes, and various other factors beyond the Company's control.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

RIVERSIDE, Calif. (http://www. ) -- Many skin conditions are misdiagnosed by doctors as brown recluse spider bites. This can lead to tragedy because about 40 medical conditions, including several deadly bacterial infections, can be confused with brown recluse bites. Rick Vetter, a retired University of California, Riverside entomologist, along with lead author Dr. W. Van Stoecker and Dr. Jonathan Dyer, both dermatologists in Missouri who specialize in treating brown recluse bites, have co-authored a just-published paper in JAMA Dermatology that describes expressions of skin conditions that are often misdiagnosed as bites from this spider. "People always tell you what a brown recluse bite looks like, so what I started emphasizing is, 'This is what a brown recluse bite doesn't look like,'" Vetter said. "That message really has the potential to save lives." In the JAMA Dermatology paper, Vetter and the dermatologists from the University of Missouri Health Sciences Center introduce a mnemonic device - NOT RECLUSE - that they created to describe the most common skin signs that are misdiagnosed as brown recluse bite. For example, the REC of NOT RECLUSE indicates Red, Elevated and Chronic. Recluse bites are whitish blue or purple (not red), flat (not elevated) and don't last more than 3 months. So, if a patient has a wound that is elevated or red or persists more than 3 months, something other than brown recluse bite should be considered. The authors also offer alternate diagnoses that are more likely for many of the acronym categories. For example, under the Red category, the authors suggest that a red lesion would indicate a bite or sting by another insect/spider or might be a bacterial infection caused by streptococcus or anthrax. Brown recluse spiders are no longer than a half-inch in body length and have a dark brown violin shape on their body, Vetter said. They are venomous, but about 90 percent of bites self-heal, about 10 percent result in a rotting flesh lesion, and less than 1 percent cause a systematic reaction that can be fatal, Vetter said. Vetter developed an interest in spiders as an undergraduate student in the late 1970s and earned his master's degree studying spiders. But, it wasn't until 1992, when he was working as a research associate in an entomology lab at UC Riverside, that he started to focus on the brown recluse. Since then, in his spare time - evenings, lunch hours, weekends - Vetter became a brown recluse spider expert. He has published on the brown recluse more than anyone in the world. "That one case triggered my whole career," said Vetter, who retired from UC Riverside in 2012. "And it has mostly been a case of dispelling myths." He added: "As a scientist you're looking for the best information. But, there was nobody working on brown recluses. I just thought there was so much nonsense out there." Vetter has more than 140 publications in scientific and medical journals, including more than 100 about spiders with more than half of those about brown recluse spiders. He is also the author of "The Brown Recluse Spider," the only book dedicated to this species written for adults. His business card has a picture of a brown recluse on it. He has named two spider species. Two spiders and a non-spider arachnid have been named after him. But, no, he has not been bitten by a brown recluse. One of his most significant contributions was spending years creating a map that shows the geographic distribution of brown recluse spiders. They are found in about 20 states, with the highest concentration around Kansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri. The map is on the web site he created, spiders.ucr.edu, which draws about one million visits a year. The JAMA Dermatology paper was the culmination of years of collaboration between Stoecker and Dyer, who developed a swab test for detecting recluse venom in bites, and Vetter, who has been documenting misdiagnosed conditions. It encapsulate 25 years of Vetter's work as well as his colleagues' 50 combined years of treating brown recluse bites in Missouri. "I'm really on a crusade here," Vetter said. "We have this knowledge that is counter to what many doctors and the general public are saying. And what they are saying is causing damage by misdiagnosis." The paper is called "NOT RECLUSE: A Mnemomic Device to Avoid False Diagnosis of Brown Recluse Spider Bites." The University of California, Riverside (http://www. ) is a doctoral research university, a living laboratory for groundbreaking exploration of issues critical to Inland Southern California, the state and communities around the world. Reflecting California's diverse culture, UCR's enrollment is now nearly 23,000 students. The campus opened a medical school in 2013 and has reached the heart of the Coachella Valley by way of the UCR Palm Desert Center. The campus has an annual statewide economic impact of more than $1 billion. A broadcast studio with fiber cable to the AT&T Hollywood hub is available for live or taped interviews. UCR also has ISDN for radio interviews. To learn more, call (951) UCR-NEWS.


Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (skin cancers) selected, representing over 5,500,000 diagnoses annually in the US alone, making it the most prevalent cancer today KENNEWICK, WA / ACCESSWIRE / February 28, 2017 / Advanced Medical Isotope Corporation ("AMI") (OTC PINK: ADMD), a cancer therapeutics company focused on the commercialization of their RadioGel™ device, a tumor-injectable and biodegradable radiation that remains focused at the treatment site, today released the third letter in a four letter series outlining AMI's push towards FDA submittal and commercialization from its new President & CEO, Dr. Mike Korenko. After two months of dynamic experience-based discussions among our Medical Advisory Board Members and other senior doctors we have selected our first indication for use which we will present to the Food and Drug Administration. After thorough review to prioritize indications, we have selected basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma (skin cancers). The reasons for this important selection relates to our criteria below: This cancer is in the skin and therefore easy to access. Single injections for small tumors are easy and we have already demonstrated our parallel injection procedure in the cat at Washington State University for larger tumors. b. Therapeutic ratio (ratio of the dose to the tumor target tissue relative to dose to adjacent normal tissue) and responsiveness to radiation: Yttrium-90 is a beta emitter in RadioGel has a much higher therapeutic ratio than any gamma emitter or external beam therapy. Since Y-90 delivers high-energy beta-rays, it has an average penetration path of 4 to 5 mm (less than a quarter inch), which is ideal for skin cancer therapy. There is minimal irradiation of normal surrounding tissue. As an added bonus, the patent can go home immediately with no irradiation risk to themselves or family members. We can treat with very high doses, so response to radiation would not be an issue. (As a comparison, external beam radiation can deliver 60 to 80 Gy. Yttrium-90 in RadioGel can go to 700 Gy or higher). As discussed above, there is very low risk of collateral damage. In addition, the skin is not located next to a major organ, for example if you were injecting near spinal tumors. Because of the low collateral risk and because of the therapeutic effects that would be relatively easy to see in three months, the Medical Advisory Board felt this might be an easier device for the FDA to approve and in a shorter timeframe. In addition, some of our animal testing, that will start in about two months, are already treating similar cancers. We intentionally avoided applying to the FDA for melanoma, since it is highly metastatic and goes deep into the tissue. There are a much smaller number of cases for this cancer type (around 300,000). In addition, there are three new immunotherapy products on the market to treat melanoma cancer. They can have serious side-effects, but they are promising. That violates our next criterion below. Some skin cancers require several-hour long surgeries in which the tumor is removed, one layer at a time, and then sent for biopsy. They then require a skin graft that can lead to an infection. On tumors of the face this can be disfiguring. As people get older their skin gets thinner, which increases the difficulty. Our Advisory Board felt that for these cases in particular RadioGel has a significant therapeutic advantage. It would be comparatively benefit the patient and contribute to reducing the cost of health care. 3. CAN BE PROFITABLY EMBRACED BY THE MEDICAL COMMUNITY: One out or every three new cancers in the United States is a cancerous skin lesion. The two skin cancer types that we selected are the most common. There are 3.3 million patients in the United States with 5.5 million tumors (some patients have more than one tumor.) About 1 million of these are squamous cell cancers located near the surface of the epidermal skin layer, and greater than 4 million are basal cell cancers in the deep layer of the epidermis. I would never say that we can treat them all; that would just be marketing hype, but I believe that this will be the preferred treatment in a substantial number of cases in a very large market. b. Ease of acceptance by the medical community, Medicare reimbursement: The potential lower cost of RadioGel therapy coupled with the potential very large number of patients satisfied this criterion. To further test the criterion, we are in discussions with a major private clinic with several skin treatment centers. This client believes this is a great new tool for their toolbox. They are also advising us on the obstacles that will have to be overcome, such our Medicare reimbursement criterion. Since we believe RadioGel therapy will reduce the cost to Medicare we are confident that will not be an obstacle. There are other cancer types on our list of eighteen potential indications of use for RadioGel, and we have already prioritized to present them to the FDA in the future. Unfortunately, in the meantime, those patients will not be befitting from this technology. As I have reported in my last shareholder letter, I am aligning the veterinarian animal testing with the human skin cancer. Specially, the University of Missouri will be focusing on the treatment for surface soft cell lesions, and Colorado State University will be refining the therapies for oral squamous cell cancers. After this selection, our next step is to prepare for the FDA pre-submittal meeting. We will request that meeting after we complete the test plans that will answer their previous questions. Until we complete these plans I can only estimate that our pre-submission to the FDA would be in June. I am really happy that we have engaged John Smith from Hogan Lovells to be at our side through this FDA process. I am excited and relieved that this selection decision had been made and I wanted to thank the members of our Medical Advisory Board – Chairman Dr. Barry D. Pressman, Dr. Albert DeNittis, Dr. Howard Sandler, and Dr. Darrell Fisher. I would also like to thank Dr. Ricardo Paz-Fumagalli and Dr. Beau Bosko Toskich from the Mayo Clinic for their valuable advice. In addition to the important developments discussed above, we continue to believe that the public markets are significantly undervaluing our company. With a fully diluted enterprise value of less than $10 million, there remains very large upside potential. As we progress on our plan, I intend to work vigorously to educate and inform the medical and investment community as to the therapeutic benefits our core technology as well as the economic model that can generate significant revenue and profits. We are committed to pursuing an uplisting to a national exchange as soon as possible in order to gain wider exposure and credibility in our pursuit of the multi-billion-dollar addressable market for Radiogel™, that can both significantly improve patient outcomes and reward shareholders. Advanced Medical Isotope Corporation (ADMD) is a late stage radiation oncology focused medical device company engaged in the development of yttrium-90 based brachytherapy devices for cancer treatment. The IsoPet Solutions division is focused on utilizing RadioGel for a cancer therapy in animals. Brachytherapy uses radiation to destroy cancerous tumors by placing a radioactive isotope inside or next to the treatment area. The Company intends to outsource material aspects of manufacturing, distribution, sales and marketing for its products in the United States and to enter into licensing arrangements outside of the United States, though the Company will evaluate its alternatives before finalizing its plans. For more information, please visit our websites: www.isopetsolutions.com and www.isotopeworld.com. This release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. You can identify these statements by the use of the words "may," "will," "should," "plans," "expects," "anticipates," "continue," "estimates," "projects," "intends," and similar expressions. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that could cause results to differ materially from those projected or anticipated. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, the Company's ability to successfully execute its expanded business strategy, including by entering into definitive agreements with suppliers, commercial partners and customers; general economic and business conditions, effects of continued geopolitical unrest and regional conflicts, competition, changes in technology and methods of marketing, delays in completing various engineering and manufacturing programs, changes in customer order patterns, changes in product mix, continued success in technical advances and delivering technological innovations, shortages in components, production delays due to performance quality issues with outsourced components, regulatory requirements and the ability to meet them, government agency rules and changes, and various other factors beyond the Company's control. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (skin cancers) selected, representing over 5,500,000 diagnoses annually in the US alone, making it the most prevalent cancer today KENNEWICK, WA / ACCESSWIRE / February 28, 2017 / Advanced Medical Isotope Corporation ("AMI") (OTC PINK: ADMD), a cancer therapeutics company focused on the commercialization of their RadioGel™ device, a tumor-injectable and biodegradable radiation that remains focused at the treatment site, today released the third letter in a four letter series outlining AMI's push towards FDA submittal and commercialization from its new President & CEO, Dr. Mike Korenko. After two months of dynamic experience-based discussions among our Medical Advisory Board Members and other senior doctors we have selected our first indication for use which we will present to the Food and Drug Administration. After thorough review to prioritize indications, we have selected basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma (skin cancers). The reasons for this important selection relates to our criteria below: This cancer is in the skin and therefore easy to access. Single injections for small tumors are easy and we have already demonstrated our parallel injection procedure in the cat at Washington State University for larger tumors. b. Therapeutic ratio (ratio of the dose to the tumor target tissue relative to dose to adjacent normal tissue) and responsiveness to radiation: Yttrium-90 is a beta emitter in RadioGel has a much higher therapeutic ratio than any gamma emitter or external beam therapy. Since Y-90 delivers high-energy beta-rays, it has an average penetration path of 4 to 5 mm (less than a quarter inch), which is ideal for skin cancer therapy. There is minimal irradiation of normal surrounding tissue. As an added bonus, the patent can go home immediately with no irradiation risk to themselves or family members. We can treat with very high doses, so response to radiation would not be an issue. (As a comparison, external beam radiation can deliver 60 to 80 Gy. Yttrium-90 in RadioGel can go to 700 Gy or higher). As discussed above, there is very low risk of collateral damage. In addition, the skin is not located next to a major organ, for example if you were injecting near spinal tumors. Because of the low collateral risk and because of the therapeutic effects that would be relatively easy to see in three months, the Medical Advisory Board felt this might be an easier device for the FDA to approve and in a shorter timeframe. In addition, some of our animal testing, that will start in about two months, are already treating similar cancers. We intentionally avoided applying to the FDA for melanoma, since it is highly metastatic and goes deep into the tissue. There are a much smaller number of cases for this cancer type (around 300,000). In addition, there are three new immunotherapy products on the market to treat melanoma cancer. They can have serious side-effects, but they are promising. That violates our next criterion below. Some skin cancers require several-hour long surgeries in which the tumor is removed, one layer at a time, and then sent for biopsy. They then require a skin graft that can lead to an infection. On tumors of the face this can be disfiguring. As people get older their skin gets thinner, which increases the difficulty. Our Advisory Board felt that for these cases in particular RadioGel has a significant therapeutic advantage. It would be comparatively benefit the patient and contribute to reducing the cost of health care. 3. CAN BE PROFITABLY EMBRACED BY THE MEDICAL COMMUNITY: One out or every three new cancers in the United States is a cancerous skin lesion. The two skin cancer types that we selected are the most common. There are 3.3 million patients in the United States with 5.5 million tumors (some patients have more than one tumor.) About 1 million of these are squamous cell cancers located near the surface of the epidermal skin layer, and greater than 4 million are basal cell cancers in the deep layer of the epidermis. I would never say that we can treat them all; that would just be marketing hype, but I believe that this will be the preferred treatment in a substantial number of cases in a very large market. b. Ease of acceptance by the medical community, Medicare reimbursement: The potential lower cost of RadioGel therapy coupled with the potential very large number of patients satisfied this criterion. To further test the criterion, we are in discussions with a major private clinic with several skin treatment centers. This client believes this is a great new tool for their toolbox. They are also advising us on the obstacles that will have to be overcome, such our Medicare reimbursement criterion. Since we believe RadioGel therapy will reduce the cost to Medicare we are confident that will not be an obstacle. There are other cancer types on our list of eighteen potential indications of use for RadioGel, and we have already prioritized to present them to the FDA in the future. Unfortunately, in the meantime, those patients will not be befitting from this technology. As I have reported in my last shareholder letter, I am aligning the veterinarian animal testing with the human skin cancer. Specially, the University of Missouri will be focusing on the treatment for surface soft cell lesions, and Colorado State University will be refining the therapies for oral squamous cell cancers. After this selection, our next step is to prepare for the FDA pre-submittal meeting. We will request that meeting after we complete the test plans that will answer their previous questions. Until we complete these plans I can only estimate that our pre-submission to the FDA would be in June. I am really happy that we have engaged John Smith from Hogan Lovells to be at our side through this FDA process. I am excited and relieved that this selection decision had been made and I wanted to thank the members of our Medical Advisory Board – Chairman Dr. Barry D. Pressman, Dr. Albert DeNittis, Dr. Howard Sandler, and Dr. Darrell Fisher. I would also like to thank Dr. Ricardo Paz-Fumagalli and Dr. Beau Bosko Toskich from the Mayo Clinic for their valuable advice. In addition to the important developments discussed above, we continue to believe that the public markets are significantly undervaluing our company. With a fully diluted enterprise value of less than $10 million, there remains very large upside potential. As we progress on our plan, I intend to work vigorously to educate and inform the medical and investment community as to the therapeutic benefits our core technology as well as the economic model that can generate significant revenue and profits. We are committed to pursuing an uplisting to a national exchange as soon as possible in order to gain wider exposure and credibility in our pursuit of the multi-billion-dollar addressable market for Radiogel™, that can both significantly improve patient outcomes and reward shareholders. Advanced Medical Isotope Corporation (ADMD) is a late stage radiation oncology focused medical device company engaged in the development of yttrium-90 based brachytherapy devices for cancer treatment. The IsoPet Solutions division is focused on utilizing RadioGel for a cancer therapy in animals. Brachytherapy uses radiation to destroy cancerous tumors by placing a radioactive isotope inside or next to the treatment area. The Company intends to outsource material aspects of manufacturing, distribution, sales and marketing for its products in the United States and to enter into licensing arrangements outside of the United States, though the Company will evaluate its alternatives before finalizing its plans. For more information, please visit our websites: www.isopetsolutions.com and www.isotopeworld.com. This release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. You can identify these statements by the use of the words "may," "will," "should," "plans," "expects," "anticipates," "continue," "estimates," "projects," "intends," and similar expressions. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that could cause results to differ materially from those projected or anticipated. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, the Company's ability to successfully execute its expanded business strategy, including by entering into definitive agreements with suppliers, commercial partners and customers; general economic and business conditions, effects of continued geopolitical unrest and regional conflicts, competition, changes in technology and methods of marketing, delays in completing various engineering and manufacturing programs, changes in customer order patterns, changes in product mix, continued success in technical advances and delivering technological innovations, shortages in components, production delays due to performance quality issues with outsourced components, regulatory requirements and the ability to meet them, government agency rules and changes, and various other factors beyond the Company's control.


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome James A. Slough, MD, FAAOS, Orthopedic Surgeon, to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. James A. Slough is a highly trained and qualified orthopedic surgeon with an extensive expertise in all facets of his work, especially arthroscopic and minimally invasive shoulder, knee, and hip surgery, as well as sports medicine. Dr. Slough has been in practice for more than 30 years and is currently serving patients within Excelsior Orthopaedics in Amherst, New York. He is also affiliated with the Buffalo Surgery Center and Kenmore Mercy Hospital. Dr. Slough attended the University of Michigan Medical School, graduating with his Medical Degree. He subsequently completed his General Surgery internship at the Graduate Hospital in Philadelphia, before undertaking his Orthopaedic training at the University of Missouri at Kansas City. He is certified by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery, and has earned the coveted title of Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. For his wealth of experience and knowledge, Dr. Slough is the recipient of numerous awards and recognitions, including a Navy Achievement Medal, a Franklin Dickson Outstanding Orthopaedic Resident Award, First Place for The Children’s Mercy Hospital Resident Presentation, and he is a past President of the Clinical Orthopaedic Society. Dr. Slough maintains professional memberships with the Clinical Orthopaedic Society, the Arthroscopy Association of North America, the American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine, Catholic Medical Partners, the AAOS, and has been a member of the AAOS Board of Councilors. Furthermore, Dr. Slough serves as Team Physician for the AAA Buffalo Bisons. He attributes his success to his loving and supportive family, his love of the field, and improving function and mobility in his patients. When he is not assisting his patients and taking care of the Buffalo Bisons, Dr. Slough enjoys fishing, skiing, and biking Learn more about Dr. Slough here: http://www.excelsiorortho.com/ and be sure to read his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome James A. Slough, MD, FAAOS, Orthopedic Surgeon, to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. James A. Slough is a highly trained and qualified orthopedic surgeon with an extensive expertise in all facets of his work, especially arthroscopic and minimally invasive shoulder, knee, and hip surgery, as well as sports medicine. Dr. Slough has been in practice for more than 30 years and is currently serving patients within Excelsior Orthopaedics in Amherst, New York. He is also affiliated with the Buffalo Surgery Center and Kenmore-Mercy Hospital. Dr. Slough attended the University of Michigan Medical School, graduating with his Medical Degree. He subsequently completed his General Surgery internship at the Graduate Hospital in Philadelphia, before undertaking his Orthopaedic training at the University of Missouri at Kansas City. He is certified by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery, and has earned the coveted title of Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. For his wealth of experience and knowledge, Dr. Slough is the recipient of numerous awards and recognitions, including a Navy Achievement Medal, a Franklin Dickson Outstanding Orthopaedic Resident Award, First Place for The Children’s Mercy Hospital Resident Presentation, and he is a past President of the Clinical Orthopaedic Society. Dr. Slough maintains professional memberships with the AAOS Board of Councilors, the Clinical Orthopaedic Society, the Arthroscopy Association of North America, the American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine, and the Catholic Medical Partners. Furthermore, Dr. Slough serves as Team Physician for the AAA Buffalo Bisons. He attributes his success to his loving and supportive family, his love of the field, and improving function and mobility in his patients. When he is not assisting his patients and taking care of the Buffalo Bisons, Dr. Slough enjoys fishing, skiing, and biking Learn more about Dr. Slough here: http://www.excelsiorortho.com/ and be sure to read his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBIA, Mo. - Invisible to the naked eye, cyst nematodes are a major threat to agriculture, causing billions of dollars in global crop losses every year. A group of plant scientists, led by University of Missouri researchers, recently found one of the mechanisms cyst nematodes use to invade and drain life-sustaining nutrients from soybean plants. Understanding the molecular basis of interactions between plants and nematodes could lead to the development of new strategies to control these major agricultural pests and help feed a growing global population. Soybeans are a major component for two-thirds of the world's animal feed and more than half the edible oil consumed in the United States, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Cyst nematodes jeopardize the healthy production of this critical global food source by "hijacking" the soybean plants' biology. "Cyst nematodes are one of the most economically devastating groups of plant-parasitic nematodes worldwide," said Melissa Goellner Mitchum, a researcher in the Bond Life Sciences Center and an associate professor in the Division of Plant Sciences at MU. "These parasites damage root systems by creating a unique feeding cell within the roots of their hosts and leeching nutrients out of the soybean plant. This can lead to stunting, wilting and yield loss for the plant. We wanted to explore the pathways and mechanisms cyst nematodes use to commandeer soybean plants." About 15 years ago, Mitchum and colleagues unlocked clues into how nematodes use small chains of amino acids, or peptides, to feed on soybean roots. Using next-generation sequencing technologies that were previously unavailable, Michael Gardner, a graduate research assistant, and Jianying Wang, a senior research associate in Mitchum's lab, made a remarkable new discovery -- nematodes possess the ability to produce a second type of peptide that can effectively "take over" plant stem cells that are used to create vital pathways for the delivery of nutrients throughout the plant. Researchers compared these peptides with those produced by plants and found that they were identical to the ones the plants use to maintain vascular stem cells, known as CLE-B peptides. "Plants send out these chemical signals to its stem cells to begin various functions of growth, including the vascular pathway that plants use to transport nutrients," Mitchum said. "Advanced sequencing showed us that nematodes use identical peptides to activate the same process. This 'molecular mimicry' helps nematodes produce the feeding sites from which they drain plant nutrients." To test their theory, Xiaoli Guo, a post-doctoral researcher in Mitchum's lab and first author of the study, synthesized the CLE-B nematode peptide and applied it to the vascular cells of Arabidopsis, a model plant system used in plant research. They found that the nematode peptides triggered a growth response in Arabidopsis much in the same way as the plants' own peptides affected development. Next, the team "knocked out" the genes Arabidopsis plants use to signal to their own stem cells. Here, the nematodes didn't do as well because the parasites were unable to signal to the plant and the nematode's feeding site was compromised, Guo says. "When a nematode attacks the root, it selects vascular stem cells that are located along the root," Mitchum said. "By knocking out that pathway, we reduced the size of the feeding site that nematodes use to control the plant. This is the first time we've been able to show that the nematode is modulating or controlling the vascular plant pathway. Understanding how plant-parasitic nematodes modulate host plants to their own benefit is a crucial step in helping to create pest-resistant plants. If we can block those peptides and the pathways nematodes use to overtake the soybean plant, then we can enhance resistance for this very valuable global food source." The study "Identification of cyst nematode B-type CLE peptides and modulation of the vascular stem cell pathway for feeding cell formation," recently was published by PLOS Pathogens. This work was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation (IOS-1456047), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (2012-67013-19345) and Huazhong Agricultural University Scientific and Technological Self-Innovation Foundation (Program No. 2016RC004). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the funding agencies. Editor's Note: For more on the story please see: https:/

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