Columbia, MO, United States
Columbia, MO, United States

The University of Missouri is a public research university located in the state of Missouri. In 1839, the university was founded in Columbia, Missouri as the first public institution of higher education west of the Mississippi River. As the largest university in Missouri, MU enrolls 35,441 students offering over 300 degree programs in 19 academic colleges in the 2014–15 year. The university is the flagship of the University of Missouri System, which maintains campuses in Rolla, Kansas City and St. Louis.MU is one of the nation's top-tier R1 institutions and one of the 34 public universities to be members of the Association of American Universities. There are more than 270,000 MU alumni living worldwide with almost one half continuing to reside in Missouri. The University of Missouri was ranked 99 in the 2015 U.S. News & World Report among the national universities.The campus of the University of Missouri is 1,262 acres just south of Downtown Columbia and is maintained as a botanical garden. The historical campus is centered on Francis Quadrangle, a historic district that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and a number of buildings on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1908, the world's first school of journalism was founded by Walter Williams as the Missouri School of Journalism.The University of Missouri Research Reactor Center is the world's most powerful university research reactor. It is one of only six public universities in the United States with a school of medicine, veterinary medicine, engineering, agriculture, and law all on one campus. The university also owns the University of Missouri Health Care system, which operates four hospitals in Mid-Missouri.Missouri's only athletic program that operates a Division I FBS football team is known as the Missouri Tigers and competes as a member of the Southeastern Conference. The school's mascot, Truman the Tiger, is named after Missourian and former U.S. president Harry S. Truman. According to the NCAA, the American tradition of homecoming was established at the University in 1911; the tradition has since been adopted nationwide. Wikipedia.


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Patent
University of Missouri | Date: 2015-03-12

In one embodiment, a cutting guide is disclosed for use in a surgical procedure to removed damaged tissue from a patient and form a recipient site configured and dimensioned to receive a donor graft. The cutting guide includes a first arm that abuts a section of the damaged tissue to be removed, and a second arm including a hole and a slot that receives a cutting implement, the first arm and the slot defining a distance therebetween corresponding to a desired dimension of the recipient site. In another embodiment, a cutting guide is disclosed for use in forming a donor graft from donor tissue. The cutting guide includes a body that receives the donor tissue, and a shaping member that is rotatably secured to the body. The shaping member includes at least one vane that shapes the donor tissue so as to form the donor graft.


Patent
University of Missouri and Nanova, Inc. | Date: 2016-10-26

The present disclosure relates to chemical compounds, methods for their discovery, and their therapeutic and research use. In particular, the present disclosure provides compounds as therapeutic agents against bacterial infections (e.g., biofilms). The present disclosure also provides compounds as therapeutic agents in methods for treating pneumonia, methods for reducing bacterial virulence, methods for treating a bacterial wound infection, and methods for treating a urinary tract infection. The present disclosure also provides methods for treating a bacterial infection, wherein the bacterial infection has or is suspected of having an antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The present disclosure also provides surfaces coated with the chemical compounds disclosed herein.


Patent
University of Missouri | Date: 2015-02-03

The present invention relates in general to a method for the synthesis and purification of 1) the polyhedral borane decahydrodecaborate and dodecahydrododecaborate anions and their salts and 2) amines and amine boranes. The organoammonium halide is combined with alkali metal tetrahydroborate to form organoammonium tetrahydroborate, which upon pyrolysis provides organoammonium decahydrodecaborate and organoammonium dodecahydrododecaborate.


Patent
University of Missouri and French National Center for Scientific Research | Date: 2015-02-23

Provided herein are a series of fluorescently labeled phosphonate and phosphate compounds such as can be used for affinity probes to detect certain enzymes including lipases. Also provided are methods of making and using such compounds.


Patent
University of Missouri | Date: 2016-09-28

An energy harvesting device for generating electrical power from low-frequency oscillations includes a high-frequency cantilever, a plurality of low-frequency cantilevers each configured to contact the high-frequency cantilever in response to environmental vibrations having a frequency within a near-resonance frequency range associated with said low-frequency cantilever, an a generator that produces electrical power in response to contact between at least one of the plurality of low-frequency cantilevers and the high-frequency cantilever. The energy harvesting device may also include an impact mass coupled to a free end of each of the plurality of low-frequency cantilevers. Some aspects may include a common base to which the high-frequency cantilever and the plurality of low-frequency cantilevers are coupled. Other aspects may include the generator comprising one or more of an induction coil and magnet, a variable distance capacitor, or a piezo-electric material.


Patent
Worcester Polytechnic Institute and University of Missouri | Date: 2016-08-31

A dry electrode manufacturing process employed for low cost battery through a dry mixing and formation process. A thermal activation renders the dry fabricated electrode comparable to conventional slurry casted electrodes. The dry electrode mixture results from a combination of a plurality of types of constituent particles, including at least an active charge material and a binder, and typically a conductive material such as carbon. The process heats the deposited mixture to a moderate temperature for activating the binder for adhering the mixture to the substrate; and compresses the deposited mixture to a thickness for achieving an electrical sufficiency of the compressed, deposited mixture as a charge material in a battery.


Methods for stimulating exocytosis from a cell are provided where the same electrochemical microelectrode is used to electroporate an adjacent cell and then measure quantal exocytosis from the adjacent cell. Also provided are methods for stimulating and measuring exocytosis from a select cell population arrayed on a chip comprising addressable electrodes. Calcium independent stimulation of exocytosis with inorganic anions such as chloride ions is also provided. These methods can provide for specific stimulation of a desired subset of cells without exposing other nearby cells to the stimulus.


Patent
University of Missouri | Date: 2016-10-11

Biomarkers, biomarker panels and methods for diagnosing osteoarthritis (OA) and determining treatment are disclosed, using measurement of the expression level of certain polypeptides in a test sample from a subject, including MCP1, IL8, KC, MMP2, MMP3, Apolipoprotein A1, and Apolipoprotein E. Related methods for monitoring OA treatment efficacy, diagnostic reagents, and kits are also described.


Patent
University of Missouri | Date: 2016-11-15

A method for separating an amount of osmium from a mixture containing the osmium and at least one other additional metal is provided. In particular, method for forming and trapping OsO_(4 )to separate the osmium from a mixture containing the osmium and at least one other additional metal is provided.


Patent
University of Missouri | Date: 2016-08-05

A fluorescence sensing compound for separately detecting and visualizing one or more monoamine neurotransmitters in cells, the fluorescence sensing compound having the following formula:


Patent
University of Missouri | Date: 2016-08-17

A DC/DC power converter provides high voltage gain using integrated boost and voltage multiplier (VM) stages. The boost cell operates according to a switching sequence to alternately energize and discharge a primary winding. A VM cell electrically coupled to the primary winding of the boost cell charges a multiplier capacitor to a DC output voltage greater than the input voltage when the primary winding is energized and discharges the multiplier capacitor when primary winding is discharged.


Patent
University of Missouri | Date: 2016-07-29

High-resolution 3D optical polarization tractography (OPT) images of the internal fiber structure of a target tissue. Manipulation of dual-angle imaging data of the fiber orientation inside a target tissue leads to the determination of 3D imaging properties of the target tissue, allowing transmission of the 3D image properties of the target tissue to an OPT processor to produce high-resolution 3D images.


Patent
University of Missouri | Date: 2016-10-25

A method for determining the yield loss of a crop using remote sensor data is described. The yield loss is determined using the reflectivity of light by the crop canopy measured from remote sensor data such as an aerial photograph. Pixel color values from the aerial photograph, expressed relative to pixel values from nitrogen-sufficient areas of the field, are transformed to yield losses using a transformation that was developed using empirical data. A similar method is described to determine recommended nitrogen fertilization rates for the crop fields. The yield loss data is useful for nitrogen fertilization management decisions, as it allows a producer of crops to weigh the expense of fertilization against the loss of revenue due to yield loss induced by nitrogen deficiency.


Devices and methods are provided for simultaneously interrogating multiple samples using NMR spectroscopy. A first magnetic field is induced. A flow of electricity is induced through a conductive material. The flow of electricity has a direction that is perpendicular to the first magnetic field, and the flow of electricity induces a second magnetic field. A first sample is placed in an additive magnetic field region, where a direction of the first magnetic field and a direction of the second magnetic field are aligned within the additive magnetic field region. A second sample is placed in a canceling magnetic field region, where the direction of the first magnetic field and the direction of the second magnetic field are opposed within the canceling magnetic field region. A free induction decay (FID) of at least the first and second samples is induced.


Patent
University of Missouri | Date: 2015-04-13

A method of producing an integrated circuit-type active radioisotope battery, the method comprising exposing at least a portion of an electronically functional, unactivated integrated circuit-type battery to radiation to convert transmutable material in the unactivated battery to a radioisotope thereby producing an active cell and thus the integrated circuit-type active radioisotope battery.


Patent
University of Missouri | Date: 2016-05-05

This disclosure relates to methods and devices for generating electron dense air plasmas at atmospheric pressures. In particular, this disclosure relate to self-contained toroidal air plasmas. Methods and apparatuses have been developed for generating atmospheric toroidal air plasmas. The air plasmas are self-confining, can be projected, and do not require additional support equipment once formed.


Frey S.H.,University of Missouri | Povinelli D.J.,University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences | Year: 2012

The ability to adjust one's ongoing actions in the anticipation of forthcoming task demands is considered as strong evidence for the existence of internal action representations. Studies of action selection in tool use reveal that the behaviours that we choose in the present moment differ depending on what we intend to do next. Further, they point to a specialized role for mechanisms within the human cerebellum and dominant left cerebral hemisphere in representing the likely sensory costs of intended future actions. Recently, the question of whether similar mechanisms exist in other primates has received growing, but still limited, attention. Here, we present data that bear on this issue from a species that is a natural user of tools, our nearest living relative, the chimpanzee. In experiment 1, a subset of chimpanzees showed a non-significant tendency for their grip preferences to be affected by anticipation of the demands associated with bringing a tool's baited end to their mouths. In experiment 2, chimpanzees' initial grip preferences were consistently affected by anticipation of the forthcoming movements in a task that involves using a tool to extract a food reward. The partial discrepancy between the results of these two studies is attributed to the ability to accurately represent differences between the motor costs associated with executing the two response alternatives available within each task. These findings suggest that chimpanzees are capable of accurately representing the costs of intended future actions, and using those predictions to select movements in the present even in the context of externally directed tool use. © 2011 The Royal Society.


Schoelz J.E.,University of Missouri | Harries P.A.,Pittsburg State University | Nelson R.S.,Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation
Molecular Plant | Year: 2011

Plant viruses are a class of plant pathogens that specialize in movement from cell to cell. As part of their arsenal for infection of plants, every virus encodes a movement protein (MP), a protein dedicated to enlarging the pore size of plasmodesmata (PD) and actively transporting the viral nucleic acid into the adjacent cell. As our knowledge of intercellular transport has increased, it has become apparent that viruses must also use an active mechanism to target the virus from their site of replication within the cell to the PD. Just as viruses are too large to fit through an unmodified plasmodesma, they are also too large to be freely diffused through the cytoplasm of the cell. Evidence has accumulated now for the involvement of other categories of viral proteins in intracellular movement in addition to the MP, including viral proteins originally associated with replication or gene expression. In this review, we will discuss the strategies that viruses use for intracellular movement from the replication site to the PD, in particular focusing on the role of host membranes for intracellular transport and the coordinated interactions between virus proteins within cells that are necessary for successful virus spread. © 2011 The Author.


Patent
U.S. Department Of Veterans Affairs, University of Missouri and University of Kansas | Date: 2014-04-07

An in vivo method of inhibiting tumor growth, specifically pancreatic cancer, includes administering to a subject in need thereof an effective amount of a compound, composition, and/or a pharmaceutical formulation including crocetinic acid.


Tang S.,Tianjin University of Technology | Baker G.A.,University of Missouri | Zhao H.,Savannah State University
Chemical Society Reviews | Year: 2012

In recent years, the designer nature of ionic liquids (ILs) has driven their exploration and exploitation in countless fields among the physical and chemical sciences. A fair measure of the tremendous attention placed on these fluids has been attributed to their inherent designer nature. And yet, there are relatively few examples of reviews that emphasize this vital aspect in an exhaustive or meaningful way. In this critical review, we systematically survey the physicochemical properties of the collective library of ether- and alcohol-functionalized ILs, highlighting the impact of ionic structure on features such as viscosity, phase behavior/transitions, density, thermostability, electrochemical properties, and polarity (e.g. hydrophilicity, hydrogen bonding capability). In the latter portions of this review, we emphasize the attractive applications of these functionalized ILs across a range of disciplines, including their use as electrolytes or functional fluids for electrochemistry, extractions, biphasic systems, gas separations, carbon capture, carbohydrate dissolution (particularly, the (ligno)celluloses), polymer chemistry, antimicrobial and antielectrostatic agents, organic synthesis, biomolecular stabilization and activation, and nanoscience. Finally, this review discusses anion-functionalized ILs, including sulfur- and oxygen-functionalized analogs, as well as choline-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs), an emerging class of fluids which can be sensibly categorized as semi-molecular cousins to the IL. Finally, the toxicity and biodegradability of ether- and alcohol-functionalized ILs are discussed and cautiously evaluated in light of recent reports. By carefully summarizing literature examples on the properties and applications of oxy-functional designer ILs up till now, it is our intent that this review offers a barometer for gauging future advances in the field as well as a trigger to spur further contemplation of these seemingly inexhaustible and - relative to their potential - virtually untouched fluids. It is abundantly clear that these remarkable fluidic materials are here to stay, just as certain design rules are slowly beginning to emerge. However, in fairness, serendipity also still plays an undeniable role, highlighting the need for both expanded in silico studies and a beacon to attract bright, young researchers to the field (406 references). © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: www.nature.com

University presses, those venerated producers of books (and journals), face pressures as never before. Digital access and changing acquisition patterns at libraries have disrupted the presses' traditional businesses, and they are meeting the challenges in different ways. Some are experimenting, some seeking shelter by joining with their academic libraries, and some maintaining impressive resilience. Others struggle to survive. Meanwhile, some presses retain healthy print-driven scientific books businesses, and are content to maintain them — as long as print books thrive. The presses of the UK universities of Cambridge and Oxford, established in the sixteenth century, are respectively the world's oldest and largest university publishing houses. The dozens of US members of the Association of American University Presses are comparatively young — Johns Hopkins University Press in Baltimore, Maryland, is 138 years old and the MIT Press in Cambridge, Massachusetts, 84. But their immense reputations are no guarantee against upset. Recent years have brought reorganization and lay-offs at Cambridge and Oxford, and several US institutions (including the University of Missouri in Columbia) have tried to shut their presses. In the face of disruptions to and consolidation of scientific publishing in recent decades, some presses have carved out an important space in scientific book publishing. They have fostered key lists and promising authors in the natural and social sciences for a focused but not exclusively academic audience — unlike the big commercial publishers of popular science books, such as Penguin Random House in New York City, which concentrate on the mass market. And books remain among the most important translational tools for science. They bring a scholarly examination to a public eager to know more about 'hot-button' research areas such as climate change, the potential of exoplanets, socio-economic inequality, artificial intelligence and genetics. Academic book publishing rests on three pillars: the traditional formats of textbooks, monographs and general-interest titles. The latter are aimed at natural and social scientists in other fields, graduate students and lay readers. All are undergoing change. With their high production values, prices and profits, undergraduate textbooks are still big business for firms such as Pearson in Cambridge, UK. For more than a decade, many have been more than just a book: they include access to online environments offering instructor notes, quizzes, tests and more. As publishers add multimedia access, interactive instructional modules and other bolt-ons, this demands a new level of capital investment. Universities and funders are mounting renewed efforts to compete with these businesses through open educational resources such as Open SUNY Textbooks at the State University of New York. Increasingly, textbooks follow a different trajectory from monographs and trade titles; their future is tied up with the delivery of digital instruction. Meanwhile, monographs — relatively brief, expensive, sparsely edited and simply designed formats for original research — are aimed mainly at small peer readerships, often to enhance the author's chances of tenure or promotion. For stand-alone titles, sales (targeted almost exclusively at institutions) rarely exceed 500 and have declined as cash-strapped libraries shift resources. So scientific monographs are increasingly sold in series, such as the Princeton Series in Modern Observational Astronomy at Princeton University Press in New Jersey, or in partnership with a learned society — Cambridge University Press's Econometric Society Monographs, for example. The 'series' strategy enhances specific fields of strength; by putting 'more wood behind fewer arrows', the presses can leverage editorial expertise, author lists and reviewer relationships. The third pillar — the general-interest, or academic trade book — is a case apart. These are “written with ambition to impress a wider readership beyond the tenure committee”, explains Chris Harrison, publishing director at Cambridge University Press. Their authors, he adds, may be researchers “frustrated by the limits of the journal article as a format for communication who now want to join the dots and tell a bigger story”. These books translate a concept, idea or methodology and open up the scholarly literature. Notes Amy Brand, director of MIT Press: “There is a sweet spot for academic publishers in the trade space — capturing and valuing the complexity of the work yet not having to write for an eight-year-old, respecting the intelligence of the general reader.” Some publishers may view these as works for the generalist, but Peter Dougherty, director of Princeton University Press, sees a more specific objective. “We are trying to reach a broad cross-section of scholars, beginning with those in the author's own field and moving into contiguous fields.” These would once have been published by trade houses, but as commercial publishers have focused on higher-selling titles, academic trade books have become an opportunity for university presses. A small group of presses, including Cambridge and Princeton, have developed a substantial business in these books, but they can demand a lot from the publisher. The authors with the most well-honed concepts often compete for five-figure advances — unaffordable for smaller presses. Substantial developmental editing, to frame them accessibly without sacrificing their scholarly underpinnings, is often offered. Publicists work with the news media as well as science journals: publishers hope “for reviews not only in The Times Literary Supplement, but also in the broadsheets”, says Sophie Goldsworthy, Oxford University Press's editorial director for academic and trade books. These books are generally expected to sell anywhere from 1,500 to 5,000 copies, with the exceptional case — such as economist Thomas Piketty's Capital in the Twenty-First Century (Belknap/Harvard, 2014) — selling in the millions. E-books have yet to match print books in revenue or unit volume. Broad changes may shift the traditional publishing structure. University presses and other academic publishing houses have long managed separate businesses for books and journals. Now, in a move towards flexibility in formats, several, including the University of California Press in Oakland, California, are strengthening connections to build an overall publishing strategy — or merging these departments completely. Cambridge delivers its journals and books through a single website, enabling readers of one format to discover products in the other and allowing innovation at a product level. But such radical change in production and distribution is not easy for academic houses. Elsevier and the other large commercial scientific-monograph publishers succeed because size offers considerable cost savings as they streamline production and distribution. Such publishers have also established a business model increasingly decoupled from sales for an individual book. Starting with Springer (now Springer Nature, owners of this journal) a decade ago, they moved to a bundled-subscription model for academic libraries. Readers like this model because large quantities of books are available in usable formats such as PDFs, rather than restricted digital-rights-management formats. Publishers like it too, because it eases sales to libraries. All academic publishers have begun to make their books available for digital sale, both through Amazon's Kindle platform and to academic libraries. Smaller presses are more likely to sell to libraries through third-party aggregators such as EBSCO, Project MUSE, ProQuest and JSTOR (I work for Ithaka S+R, whose parent firm operates JSTOR). Several use platforms based on technology from HighWire, Silverchair and Atypon (acquired this year by publisher Wiley of Hoboken, New Jersey). Others have taken steps to develop or operate their own platforms, supplementing or supplanting these other approaches. It is a way of being “a little more self-directed”, as Brand puts it, and enables greater product differentiation and format innovation. Some efforts to develop new formats are under way. Cambridge has introduced concise, updatable treatments called Elements. The University of California Press has debuted Luminos, an open-access publication programme that allows options for multimedia, live links and annotation to be added to its digital versions. And platforms such as Project MUSE are planning to reach back to authors to experiment with even greater format flexibility. Common themes emerge when academic publishers talk of pressures and opportunities. As Brand notes, digitized content is ever-harder to control. “Almost everything we publish gets pirated one way or another. In one sense, everything is open-access,” she says. Some publishers are fighting this with lawsuits and authentication technology, but others embrace open access. In addition to open-access monograph models available through Luminos, MUSE and JSTOR, a handful of open-access presses have launched in the past five years, including Amherst College Press in Massachusetts and UCL Press in London. Third-party efforts such as Knowledge Unlatched in Berlin syndicate open access across a group of subscribing libraries. Of greater concern are 'evidence-based acquisition' models. In these, a researcher identifies a desired book; only at the point of initial access is some fee charged to the library. Sales cannot be taken for granted and “every book really needs to sing for its supper now”, says Goldsworthy, emphasizing that Oxford University Press does not make publishing decisions on the basis of anticipated return for individual titles. Scholarly publishers take comfort that the high quality of their content will provide some immunity against sales declines, but many still express concerns that these models will have an impact over time. Recent decades have seen a re-sorting of publishers for natural- and social-science books. Some have become expert in building a new business around book publishing, having transitioned from print to digital. They are pursuing subscription-like bundles and open-access models as alternatives to declining library resources for book purchases, and are investing in digital platforms and developing new formats for scholarly communication. Others are returning to fundamentals. Says Dougherty: “We're good at taking interesting and important books by scholars and framing and packaging them well for the broader market that we are trying to reach.” With this approach, some university presses have meaningfully advanced public understanding of scholarship while also achieving business success. But their path ahead is unclear: should reading practices for these materials transition entirely to electronic formats, there will be a substantial reconfiguration as print sales dry up. Over time, issues to do with business models, distribution and scale are likely to emerge as real dilemmas for this small number of presses, and the very important translational books that they publish.


News Article | December 6, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Enrollment of Latino children in early care and education programs is relatively low, with six in 10 not attending preschool before kindergarten. In addition, few long-term evaluations of early care and education programs have included Latino children. Now a new study has found that low-income Latino children who attended either public school prekindergarten or center-based care with child care subsidies at age 4 did well through the end of third grade, but those in public school prekindergarten did better academically than those in center-based care, especially English language learners. The study was conducted by researchers at the University of Texas at Austin, Abt Associates, the University of Missouri, Florida International University, and George Mason University. It appears in the journal Child Development. Using a longitudinal research design that followed children attending different early childhood programs (specifically subsidized center based child care and public school pre-kindergarten), the study shows that public school prekindergarten appears to improve academic outcomes for third grade Latino children. Researchers used data from 11,902 low-income Latino children who were part of the Miami School Readiness Project (MSRP) between 2002 and 2006. About 75 percent of the children received free or reduced-price lunches (an indicator of poverty) and 80 percent were English language learners. Children attended either public school prekindergarten programs or center-based programs that accepted child care subsidies. In Miami at the time, prekindergarten programs were housed in public schools, ran for 3 to 4 hours a day, and had an average student-teacher ratio of 20:2. By contrast, the average center-based child care program was either for profit or faith based, ran for 7 to 8 hours a day, and was largely unaccredited, with an average student-teacher ratio of 16:1. The study looked at children's performance on state standardized tests of math and reading in third grade as well as children's grade point average (GPA) in third grade. Researchers tested children's school readiness at the end of preschool and the beginning of kindergarten. They also assessed the children's English proficiency each year in school. "Although all Latino children in our sample performed reasonably well through the end of third grade as compared to other public school children in the region, those who attended public school prekindergarten at age 4 outperformed their classmates previously in center-based care on math and reading, and they had higher GPAs in third grade," notes Arya Ansari, a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Virginia (who was at the University of Texas at Austin at the time of the study). The findings held even when taking into account baseline characteristics (e.g., receipt of free and reduced-price lunch, gender, age, language at home, and country of origin) and children's skills when they entered preschool (e.g., cognitive, language, and fine-motor skills, as well as social-behavioral skills). "We found that those children who took part in public school prekindergarten programs started kindergarten with stronger academic skills, more optimal social-behavior skills, and English-language proficiency," Ansari says. "This appeared to contribute to their success in third grade." The findings were also true for English language learners. Because the study looked at the experiences of Latino children in Miami, the findings are not generalizable to all Latinos (who may have different immigration backgrounds) in other parts of the United States. In addition, the study's authors caution, the research can't speak to whether these children's experiences are typical or unique compared to children from other backgrounds (for example, Latino children who attended Head Start or who were cared for at home were not included in the MSRP sample). Adds Adam Winsler, professor of psychology at George Mason University, who was a principal investigator for the original Miami School Readiness Project (MSRP) and coauthor of the study: "While our results are not causal, they provide much-needed insight into the experiences of Latino children in publicly funded early care and education programs in Miami. Our work reveals that policymakers should consider that such programs can help put Latino children on a path toward more positive school achievement." The research was funded by the Early Learning Coalition of Miami-Dade/Monroe, the Children's Trust, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and the National Research Center on Hispanic Children and Families, which is funded by the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation within the Administration for Children and Families in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Summarized from Child Development, Differential Third-Grade Outcomes Associated with Attending Publicly Funded Preschool Programs for Low-Income Latino Children by Ansari, A (University of Virginia, formerly at University of Texas at Austin), L?pez, M (Abt Associates), Manfra, L (University of Missouri), Bleiker, C, Dinehart, LHB (Florida International University), Hartman, SC (West Virginia University), and Winsler, A (George Mason University). Copyright 2016 The Society for Research in Child Development, Inc. All rights reserved.


News Article | November 24, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

AffordableCollegesOnline.org, a leading higher education information resource provider, has released its picks for the Best Colleges in the U.S. to earn an Online Teaching Degree from in 2016-2017. Comparing data on affordability and student success from thousands of schools with online teaching programs, the rankings list the top 100 two-year and four-year schools respectively. Schools topping the four-year list include Dickinson State University, Fort Hays State University, North Carolina Central University, East Carolina University and University of Southern Mississippi; schools topping the two-year list include East Mississippi Community College, Arizona Western College, Holmes Community College, Northeast Community College and Odessa College. "There were 3.5 million teachers working in elementary and secondary education in the U.S. in 2014,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and Founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. “It’s important for us to help aspiring teachers and those looking to advance their career in education find the best opportunities to earn an affordable, quality online teaching degree.” Schools who earn a spot on the Best Online Teaching Degrees lists must qualify by meeting certain baseline requirements. AffordableCollegesOnline.org requires all schools to be institutionally accredited, public or private not-for-profit institutions to be eligible. Colleges must also meet minimum affordability standards, offering in-state tuition under $5,000 per year at two-year schools and under $25,000 per year at four-year schools. Final scoring and ranks are determined by comparing data on more than a dozen qualitative and quantitative measures, such as financial aid availability and graduation rates. All schools on the 2016-2017 Best Online Teaching Degrees list can be found below. The attached map shows how many schools were honored by state. The full rankings can be found along with data and methodology details at: Allen County Community College Amarillo College Arizona Western College Arkansas Northeastern College Arkansas State University - Mountain Home Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College Baltimore City Community College Bay Mills Community College Bluegrass Community and Technical College Casper College Central Texas College Coconino Community College College of Southern Idaho Collin College Colorado Northwestern Community College Dakota College at Bottineau Dawson Community College East Mississippi Community College Eastern Wyoming College Edgecombe Community College El Paso Community College Front Range Community College Gateway Community and Technical College Haywood Community College Henry Ford Community College Holmes Community College Kilgore College Lenoir Community College Lone Star College Mitchell Community College Montgomery Community College Navarro College Nebraska Indian Community College North Central Missouri College Northeast Community College Northwest Mississippi Community College Odessa College Ozarks Technical Community College Pamlico Community College Panola College Pima Community College Shoreline Community College Stanly Community College Tri-County Community College Truckee Meadows Community College Tulsa Community College Tyler Junior College Washtenaw Community College Western Oklahoma State College Yavapai College Appalachian State University Arkansas Tech University Bowling Green State University - Main Campus Chadron State College Chaminade University of Honolulu Concordia University - Saint Paul Dickinson State University East Carolina University Eastern Kentucky University Eastern New Mexico University - Main Campus Ferris State University Fort Hays State University Granite State College Great Basin College Hobe Sound Bible College Indiana State University Judson College Lesley University Liberty University Mayville State University Minot State University Newman University North Carolina A & T State University North Carolina Central University Northeastern State University Northern Arizona University Southeastern Oklahoma State University Southern Arkansas University Main Campus Southwestern College Sterling College SUNY College at Oswego The University of West Florida University of Alaska Fairbanks University of Alaska Southeast University of Central Missouri University of Louisiana at Monroe University of Missouri - Columbia University of Nebraska at Kearney University of North Carolina at Greensboro University of Northern Colorado University of South Dakota University of Southern Mississippi University of the Southwest University of West Alabama Wayland Baptist University Western Carolina University Western Kentucky University Western New Mexico University Wilmington University Winston-Salem State University AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.


News Article | December 12, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBIA, Mo. (Dec. 12, 2016) -- Physical inactivity is a global health problem that leads to approximately 3.2 million deaths each year, according to the World Health Organization. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have found that a government-sponsored community activity program in Brazil is improving activity levels of women. The researchers believe the program could be scaled up and adapted to other communities around the world. "To combat rising obesity rates, the Brazilian government created the Academia das Cidades program, or City Academies, to give residents free access to fitness facilities and instructors," said Eduardo Simoes, M.D., chair of the MU Department of Health Management and Informatics and lead author of the study. "The program is aimed at adults, but has historically attracted middle-aged and older women who may not frequently exercise. Our research team studied the effectiveness of this program; we found that City Academies do meet their goal of increasing physical activity rates for adult women in these communities." A lack of physical activity has been associated with several health conditions, such as hypertension, high blood pressure and diabetes. Increased activity levels can help prevent these and other diseases, which can lead to better overall health. City Academies consist of free physical activity classes offered by trained physical educators every weekday morning and late afternoon in a community setting. The classes are held in renovated and beautified public spaces such as parks and plazas. Participants are screened for hypertension and obesity, and are referred to local public health programs if needed. Additionally, participants are provided free dietary guidance. The program, which began in 2002 in Recife, the capital of the Brazilian state Pernambuco, has expanded to 184 cities in that state. In 2011, the Brazilian Ministry of Health adopted a modified version of the program known as Health Academies, and has since expanded the program to thousands of cities nationwide. Researchers interviewed household members sampled through a series of three random surveys, with each survey occurring one year after the previous one. The researchers found that adult women's rates of recommended leisure-time physical activity -- at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity per week or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity per week -- were significantly higher in these cities. For women who lived in these cities for three or more years, their odds of reaching recommended levels of leisure-time physical activity increased almost 50 percent. The odds of reaching recommended levels of leisure-time physical activity increased from 60 to 900 percent, depending on whether adult residents were former or current members of the program, and if the duration of their participation lasted for less than six months or for six or more months. "With the program, we found a large increase in the population's activity levels, especially for women," Simoes said. "Worldwide and in Brazil, multiple surveys show that men are more active than women, education is directly related to leisure-time physical activity, and individuals of low socioeconomic status are less likely to engage in physical activity. Our study shows that these exercise programs help reduce those inequalities in physical activity. They may serve as a model for other communities and countries around the world to tackle the pandemic of physical inactivity." The study, "Effectiveness of a Scaled Up Physical Activity Intervention in Brazil: A Natural Experiment," recently was published in Preventive Medicine, an international journal devoted to the science and practice of disease prevention, health promotion and public health policymaking. Research reported in this publication was supported by CNPq, the Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (552752/2011-8). The researchers have no conflicts of interest to declare related to this study.


The western corn rootworm was first classified as a corn pest in 1867. Its green relative, the northern corn rootworm, was classified as a corn pest in Illinois and Missouri by the late 1870s Credit: Joseph Spencer, Illinois Natural History Survey. According to estimates, the current global population is more than 7.4 billion people and is growing at a rate of 88 million people per year. Developing corn varieties that are resistant to pests is vital to sustain the estimated 9 billion global population by 2050. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri, using advanced nuclear methods, have determined the mechanisms corn plants use to combat the western corn rootworm, a major pest threatening the growth of the vital food source. Scientists believe that using the knowledge gained from these cutting-edge studies could help crop breeders in developing new resistant lines of corn and make significant strides toward solving global food shortages. "The western corn rootworm is a voracious pest," said Richard Ferrieri, a research professor in the MU Interdisciplinary Plant Group, and an investigator at the MU Research Reactor (MURR). "Rootworm larvae hatch in the soil during late spring and immediately begin feeding on the crop's root system. Mild damage to the root system can hinder water and nutrient uptake, threatening plant fitness, while more severe damage can result in the plant falling over." Breeding corn that can fight these pests is a promising alternative. Ferrieri, and his international team of researchers, including scientists from the University of Bern in Switzerland, Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, used radioisotopes to trace essential nutrients and hormones as they moved through live corn plants. In a series of tests, the team injected radioisotope tracers in healthy and rootworm-infested corn plants. "For some time, we've known that auxin, a powerful plant hormone, is involved in stimulating new root growth," Ferrieri said. "Our target was to follow auxin's biosynthesis and movement in both healthy and stressed plants and determine how it contributes to this process." By tagging auxin with a radioactive tracer, the researchers were able to use a medical diagnostic imaging tool call positron emission tomography, or PET imaging, to "watch" the movement of auxin in living plant roots in real time. Similarly, they attached a radioactive tracer to an amino acid called glutamine that is important in controlling auxin chemistry, and observed the pathways the corn plants used to transport glutamine and how it influenced auxin biosynthesis. The researchers found that auxin is tightly regulated at the root tissue level where rootworms are feeding. The study also revealed that auxin biosynthesis is vital to root regrowth and involves highly specific biochemical pathways that are influenced by the rootworm and triggered by glutamine metabolism. "This work has revealed several new insights about root regrowth in crops that can fend off a rootworm attack," Ferrieri said. "Our observations suggest that improving glutamine utilization could be a good place to start for crop breeding programs or for engineering rootworm-resistant corn for a growing global population." Ferrieri's work highlights the capabilities of the MURR, a crucial component to research at the university for more than 40 years. Operating 6.5 days a week, 52 weeks a year, scientists from across the campus use the 10-megawatt facility to not only provide crucial radioisotopes for clinical settings globally, but also to carbon date artifacts, improve medical diagnostic tools and prevent illness. MURR also is home to a PETrace cyclotron that is used to produced other radioisotopes for medical diagnostic imaging. The study, "Dynamic Precision Phenotyping Reveals Mechanism of Crop Tolerance to Root Herbivory," was published in Plant Physiology. Explore further: Benefits of Bt corn go beyond rootworm resistance More information: Dynamic Precision Phenotyping Reveals Mechanism of Crop Tolerance to Root Herbivory, dx.doi.org/10.1104/pp.16.00735


Nordion, un negocio autónomo propiedad de Sterigenics International, en asociación con General Atomics (GA), han dado hoy la bienvenida a la consecución de la National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) del United States Department of Energy's (DOE) a los fondos del acuerdo cooperativo de Fase II a GA para finalizar su proyecto con Nordion y el University of Missouri Research Reactor Center (MURR®). Estos fondos de Fase II apoyarán la creación de un nuevo suministro fiable de molibdeno 99 (Mo-99) usando uranio poco enriquecido (LEU). La concesión de hoy lleva el compromiso total de la NNSA con el proyecto hasta los 25 millones de dólares, 15,3 millones de dólares por encima de la dotación original de Fase I de 9,7 millones de dólares proporcionada en septiembre del año 2015. Esta inversión representa un voto de confianza destacado de cara al trabajo de más de 100 profesionales altamente cualificados que han dado su aporte al proyecto en el año pasado. "La nueva asignación de fondos de la NNSA garantizará que podamos llegar a nuestro objetivo de restablecer el suministro comercial de rutina de molibdeno-99 para Norteamérica a mediados o finales del año 2018", afirmó Phil Larabie, responsable general de Isótopos Médicos de Nordion. "El programa de pruebas en marcha para este proyecto está superando nuestras expectativas, asegurando así el futuro a largo plazo de Nordion como el principal proveedor mundial de Mo-99 para los sistemas de salud en los Estados Unidos y en todo el mundo". "Estamos encantados de que la NNSA haya decidido seguir prestando fondos a este importante proyecto, y confiamos al completo en que, con nuestros socios Nordion y MURR®, desarrollaremos la capacidad para producir comercialmente Mo-99 gracias a la utilización de la tecnología selectiva de extracción de gas basada en LEU de GA. Nuestros resultados de Fase I demuestran que el producto cumple con los requisitos de especificación de Nordion más estrictos de cara a su utilización en su infraestructura existente", destacó Kathy Murray, responsable de proyecto Mo-99 de GA. Un isótopo médico es una sustancia radioactiva segura que la utilizan los profesionales de la salud para llevar a cabo el diagnóstico anual de aproximadamente 50 millones de pacientes en Norteamérica y a nivel global. El más importante de todos ellos es el tecnecio-99m (Tc-99m), que deriva del molibdeno-99 (Mo-99) y que se utiliza en más del 80% de los procedimientos de medicina nuclear. Cuando esté en fase operativa, el proyecto reemplazará al Mo-99 suministrado anteriormente por medio del Canadian National Research Universal Reactor (NRU) en Chalk River, Ontario. Aunque el NRU finalizó con la producción de Mo-99 de rutina el día 1 de noviembre de 2016, el Gobierno de Canadá, Canadian Nuclear Laboratories y Nordion se han comprometido a mantener la capacidad de producción de reserva hasta el 31 de marzo de 2018 si hubiera una carencia de suministro considerable en relación a Mo-99. Nordion Nordion es un proveedor destacado de isótopos médicos y tecnologías gamma que se utilizan para la prevención, el diagnóstico y el tratamiento de enfermedades e infecciones. Los productos de Nordion se utilizan a diario por empresas farmacéuticas y de biotecnología, fabricantes de dispositivos médicos, hospitales, clínicas y laboratorios de investigación. Nordion proporciona productos a aproximadamente 500 clientes repartidos en más de 40 países, siendo además un negocio autónomo dentro de Sterigenics International LLC, proveedor líder global dedicado a los servicios de laboratorio y esterilización por contrato para la industria de los dispositivos médicos, siendo el principal proveedor mundial de Co-60 y un proveedor destacado dedicado a los isótopos médicos. Sterigenics International, LLC es la única empresa de esterilización de integración vertical en todo el mundo. Aprenda más en la página web nordion.com y síganos en Twitter en @NordionInc. General Atomics General Atomics, con sede central sita en San Diego, está comprometido con el desarrollo de innovaciones energéticas y tecnologías avanzadas que cuentan con el potencial de cambiar el mundo. Los científicos e ingenieros del Grupo de Energía de GA están haciendo avanzar los límites del descubrimiento científico con la finalidad de producir soluciones seguras, sostenibles y económicas de cara a los desafíos globales en energía, formación de imágenes médicas y computación de la próxima generación. Más información acerca de General Atomics disponible a través de GA.com. University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR)  El University of Missouri Research Reactor Center (MURR®) cuenta con un largo historial de fiabilidad segura. Gracias a su reactor de 10 MW y su programa de funcionamiento de 6½ días por semana, durante 52 semanas al año, MURR apoya la investigación y formación al tiempo que proporciona isótopos de vida corta para usos médicos. MURR proporciona una serie de radioisótopos que ayudan a los profesionales de la medicina a diagnosticar y proporcionar tratamiento para diferentes enfermedades, como la enfermedad cardiovascular y el cáncer. Siendo el mayor reactor de investigaciones de una universidad en el país, apoya además programas de licenciatura y de posgrado que sirven de formación de cara a la próxima generación de químicos e ingenieros nucleares. Si desea más información sobre el University of Missouri Research Reactor Center visite la página web: http://www.murr.missouri.edu/.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Highly Regarded Senior Expert on Security Operations, Coordination, and Management to Lead Company into Next Phase of Growth LOS ANGELES, Feb. 16, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Airborne Wireless Network (OTCQB: ABWN) today announces that it has appointed Michael (Mike) J. Warren as Chief Executive Officer. Mike has recently served as the Regional Operations and Security Director for ECC International in Afghanistan.  In this capacity, he has overseen the security of 18 Major DOD Construction Projects, totaling $1,000,000,000, including a $500 million Asia Development Bank road project building the Ring Road from Herat to Mazer-e-Sharif, and a $50 Million USAID Infrastructure Development project with the Afghan Ministry of Mines, Oil, and Gas.  Before that, Mike was the Director of Operations, Security & Safety for Checchi & Company Consulting, Inc., in Afghanistan and he focused on the Measurement and Evaluation Program under contract with USAID.  Prior to that he was the Program Manager for the Human Terrain Systems under the International Security Assistance Force for NATO and the US Army G-2.  He has been an advisor to the US Embassy, to COMISAF and CJ2X at HQ's ISAF in Kabul, Afghanistan. Mike retired from the US Marine Corps with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in 1994.  An infantry officer, his assignments included serving as the Executive Officer, 3rd Surveillance & Reconnaissance Group in Okinawa; as Commanding Officer of the largest Marine Security Barracks at Naval Weapons Station, Concord, CA, and in multiple command positions on the drill field at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego.  A native of Illinois, he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from the University of Missouri. Mike is also a graduate of the US Marine Corps Command and Staff College.  He is also certified as a Counter Terrorism Planner, as a COIN (Counterinsurgency) expert and in numerous security and safety courses. Mike has an extensive background in project management and has served with numerous companies in the computer hardware and software industry, playing an integral role in the companies' growth and expansion. J. Edward Daniels, President of Airborne Wireless Network said, "Mike will be instrumental in advancing our technology into the next stage of growth. His expertise in security operations and background in both the civilian sector and governmental sector will be invaluable as we continue to aggressively market the Infinitus Super Highway™. We believe that his unique background and his ability to translate vision into world-class execution will be exactly what we need as we enter the next chapter of the business." For further information see: www.airbornewirelessnetwork.com This release includes "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements are based upon the current beliefs and expectations of the company's management and are subject to significant risks and uncertainties. If underlying assumptions prove inaccurate or risks or uncertainties materialize, actual results may differ materially from those set forth in the forward-looking statements. Risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, availability of capital; the inherent uncertainties associated with developing new products or technologies and operating as a development stage company; our ability to raise the additional funding we will need to continue to pursue our business and product development plans; our ability to develop and commercialize products based on our technology platform; competition in the industry in which we operate and market; general industry conditions; general economic factors; the impact of industry regulation; technological advances; new products and patents attained by competitors; manufacturing difficulties or delays; dependence on the effectiveness of the company's patents; and the exposure to litigation, including patent litigation, and/or regulatory actions.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Studies have shown that early childhood education programs can have a positive impact on a child's success later in life. However, the annual turnover rate nationally for teachers of preschool-age children is approximately 30 percent. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine have surveyed early childhood teachers and identified factors that may lead to stress and burnout. "We know from previous research that early educational programs can benefit future school achievement, job performance and social behaviors," said Laine Young-Walker, M.D., associate professor of child and adolescent psychiatry at the MU School of Medicine and lead author of the study. "However, many early childhood educators are not formally trained, requiring them to learn on the job. Our study assessed teachers' perceptions of the challenges they face and their commitment to educating the very young." Young-Walker's team surveyed 100 educators and care providers from 13 early childhood programs in Boone County, Missouri. Participants were selected by invitation from facilities enrolled in the Early Childhood Positive Behavior Support program, a countywide initiative that assists early learning centers in establishing and maintaining effective learning environments. The survey included questions relating to job commitment, stress and support. "It is clear that these educators are devoted to their profession," Young-Walker said. "Ninety-two percent agreed that they were committed to their work. However, the survey also provided insight into the challenges they experience." More than 75 percent of those surveyed wanted more training opportunities. The majority of teachers surveyed felt that the training they received covered information they already knew. More than one-third of the teachers agreed that students' negative behaviors interfered with their work and resulted in significant stress. Seventeen percent frequently felt like leaving their jobs, and 15 percent already planned to do so. "A follow-up analysis indicated that 38 percent of the early childhood teachers surveyed were at risk of burning out," Young-Walker said. "Our analysis points to a combination of their high commitment to the children they care for, and a perception that they do not have the educational support they need to address challenging behaviors in the classroom." The research team believes the data may be used to help address teacher needs and improve retention. "Teachers of young children play a central role in the prevention of behavioral problems in schools, yet they often are the least prepared to do so," Young-Walker said. "High levels of challenging behavior in the classroom contribute to teacher stress and burnout. Without additional training specific to early education, these teachers will not have the necessary tools to help themselves or their students." The study, "Supporting Professional Development Needs for Early Childhood Teachers: An Exploratory Analysis of Teacher Perceptions of Stress and Challenging Behavior," recently was published in the International Journal on Disability and Human Development. Research reported in this publication was supported by the MU School of Medicine's Department of Psychiatry. The researchers have no conflicts of interest to declare related to this study. The MU School of Medicine has improved health, education and research in Missouri and beyond for more than 165 years. MU physicians treat patients from every county in the state, and more Missouri physicians received their medical degrees from MU than from any other university. For more information, visit http://medicine. .


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBIA, Mo. (Feb. 28, 2017) -- Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common form of liver cancer, but treatment options are limited and many patients are diagnosed in late stages when the disease can't be treated. Now, University of Missouri School of Medicine researchers have developed a new treatment that combines chemotherapy and immunotherapy to significantly slow tumor growth in mice. The researchers believe that with more research, the strategy could be translated to benefit patients with the disease. "The current drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat hepatocellular carcinoma only increases the average survival of patients by about three months," said Kevin Staveley-O'Carroll, M.D., Ph.D., chair of the MU School of Medicine's Hugh E. Stephenson Jr., M.D., Department of Surgery and director of Ellis Fischel Cancer Center. "While any extension of life is valuable, our research team is developing a new therapeutic strategy that might extend and improve the quality of life for these patients." Immunotherapy boosts the body's natural defenses to fight off cancer. The therapy has been used to help treat several cancers, such as melanoma and lung cancer. However, little research exists on combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy. During the study, one group of mice was treated with the chemotherapy agent sunitinib and another group was treated with an immunotherapy antibody known as anti-PD-1. Over a period of four weeks, tumors in mice treated with sunitinib grew 25 times larger. Tumors in mice treated with immunotherapy grew at a slower rate and were 15 times larger. However, a third group of mice treated with a combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy experienced even slower tumor growth at a size that was only 11 times larger. "Our results show that a combined chemo-immunotherapeutic approach can slow tumor growth in mice more effectively than either individual treatment," said Guangfu Li, Ph.D., D.V.M., assistant professor in the MU Department of Surgery. "This innovative combination promotes an anti-tumor immune response and better suppresses growth of the cancer. Our findings support the need for a clinical trial to test whether this could become a cost-effective treatment that could help improve the lives of patients with liver cancer." The study, "Successful Chemo-immunotherapy against Hepatocellular Cancer in a Novel Murine Model," was published in the January issue of the Journal of Hepatology. Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health (1 R01 CA164335-01A1 and R01-CA-025000) and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (R01DK 057830). The researchers have no conflicts of interest to declare related to this study. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the funding agencies.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Se trata de un experto senior altamente considerado en operaciones de seguridad, coordinación y gestión para la principal compañía dentro de su próxima fase de crecimiento LOS ÁNGELES, 17 de febrero de 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Airborne Wireless Network (OTCQB: ABWN) anunció hoy que ha nombrado a Michael (Mike) J. Warren como su nuevo consejero delegado. Mike ha trabajado recientemente como director de seguridad y operaciones regionales para ECC International en Afganistán. Desde este cargo, ha supervisado la seguridad de 18 destacados proyectos de construcción DOD, alcanzando los 1.000.000.000 dólares, incluyendo un proyecto de construcción de carretera de 500 millones de dólares del Asia Development Bank para la construcción de una carretera de circunvalación desde Herat a Mazer-e-Sharif, y un proyecto de desarrollo de infraestructura USAID de 50 millones de dólares con el Ministerio de Minas, Petróleo y Gas de Afganistán. Anteriormente, Mike fue el director de operaciones, seguridad y aseguración para Checchi & Company Consulting, Inc., en Afganistán y centrado en el Programa de Medidas y Evaluación bajo contrato con USAID. Anteriormente, fue el responsable de programa para Human Terrain Systems bajo la International Security Assistance Force for NATO y el US Army G-2. Ha sido asesor de la Embajada de Estados Unidos, para COMISAF y CJ2X en la sede central de ISAF en Kabul, Afganistán. Mike se retiró del US Marine Corps con la categoría de Teniente Coronel en el año 1994. Como oficial de infantería, sus tareas incluyeron trabajar como oficial ejecutivo del 3rd Surveillance & Reconnaissance Group en Okinawa; oficial al mando de los mayores Marine Security Barracks en la Naval Weapons Station, Concord, CA, además de numerosas posiciones de manda en el campo de perforación del Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego. Nativo de Illinois, se licenció en Artes en Ciencias Políticas en la University of Missouri. Mike está graduado también en US Marine Corps Command and Staff College. Está certificado además como Counter Terrorism Planner, como experto COIN (Counterinsurgency) y en numerosos cursos de seguridad y aseguramiento. Mike cuenta con una amplia experiencia en gestión de proyectos y ha trabajado para diferentes compañías en la industria informática del hardware y software, desempeñando un papel principal en el crecimiento y expansión de las compañías. J. Edward Daniels, director general de Airborne Wireless Network, comentó: "Mike será una pieza instrumental en el avance de nuestra tecnología dentro de la próxima fase de crecimiento. Su experiencia en operaciones de seguridad e historial en el sector civil y gubernamental serán de un valor incalculable al tiempo que comercializamos de forma agresiva Infinitus Super Highway™. Creemos que este historial único y su capacidad para traducir su visión en una ejecución de nivel mundial serán exactamente lo que necesitamos al tiempo que entramos en el siguiente capítulo de los negocios". Aviso acerca de las declaraciones de futuro Este comunicado incluye "declaraciones a futuro" conforme a las disposiciones de salvaguarda de la Ley de Reforma de Litigios sobre Títulos Privados de los Estados Unidos de 1995. Estas declaraciones se basan en las consideraciones y expectativas actuales de la gerencia de la compañía y se encuentran sujetas a considerables riesgos e incertidumbres. Si las suposiciones subyacentes resultan no ser ciertas o los riesgos o incertidumbres se materializan, los resultados efectivos pueden diferir considerablemente con respecto a lo establecido en estas declaraciones a futuro. Los riesgos e incertidumbres incluyen, pero sin limitarse a, la disponibilidad de capital, las incertidumbres inherentes vinculadas al desarrollo de nuevos productos o tecnologías y operar como una compañía en fase de desarrollo; nuestra capacidad para obtener el financiamiento adicional necesario para continuar con el objeto de nuestro negocio y los planes de desarrollo de producto; nuestra capacidad para desarrollar y comercializar productos sobre nuestra plataforma de tecnología; la competencia en la industria en donde operamos y comercializamos; las condiciones generales de la industria; factores económicos en general; el impacto de la regulación sobre la industria; avances tecnológicos; nuevos productos y patentes de la competencia; dificultades o demoras en la fabricación; dependencia sobre la efectividad de las patentes de la compañía y la exposición a litigios, incluso litigios sobre patentes y/o acciones regulatorias.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

ST. LOUIS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Following a nationwide search, the SSM Health Board of Directors has selected Laura Kaiser as the health system’s new President/Chief Executive Officer. Kaiser will begin with SSM Health on May 1 and replace William P. Thompson, who will retire at the end of April after 37 years of service with the organization. Kaiser is an accomplished health care executive with more than 30 years of experience in improving clinical quality and patient satisfaction, fueling operational performance and growth, and successfully facilitating health care integration. She comes to SSM Health from Intermountain Healthcare, where she has served as Executive Vice President/Chief Operating Officer for the past five years. Prior to Intermountain Healthcare, Kaiser spent 15 years at Ascension Health, serving in a number of leadership roles, including Ministry Market Leader of the Gulf Coast/Florida region for Ascension and President/CEO at Sacred Heart Health System. “Ms. Kaiser is a gifted and visionary leader with a proven track record of achieving extraordinary results,” said David Cosby, Board Chair, SSM Health Board of Directors. “We believe she is the right leader to help lead our organization into the future, while ensuring the strength of our mission and providing our patients and customers with the exceptional care and service they have come to expect from SSM Health.” As President/CEO of SSM Health, Kaiser will be responsible for leading all aspects of one of the largest integrated health care systems in the nation. She will be instrumental in guiding SSM Health’s transition to a value-based model of care as it strives to improve the health of the community, further enhance the patient and member experience, and lower the overall cost of care. “It is an honor and a privilege to join the wonderful SSM Health caregiver team and to lead this extraordinary faith-based health care system with an international reputation for quality,” said Kaiser. Kaiser, a Missouri native, earned a Bachelor of Science in Health Services Management from the University of Missouri-Columbia as well as a Master of Business Administration and Master in Healthcare Administration from Saint Louis University. She is also a Fellow of the American College of Healthcare Executives. SSM Health (ssmhc.com) is a Catholic, not-for-profit health system serving the comprehensive health needs of communities across the Midwest through one of the largest integrated delivery systems in the nation. With care delivery sites in Illinois, Missouri, Oklahoma and Wisconsin, SSM Health includes 20 hospitals, more than 60 outpatient care sites, a pharmacy benefit company, an insurance company, two nursing homes, comprehensive home care and hospice services, a technology company and two Accountable Care Organizations. With more than 8,500 physicians and 33,000 employees in four states, SSM Health is one of the largest employers in every community it serves. An early adopter of the electronic health record (EHR), SSM Health is a national leader for the depth of its EHR integration. For more information, find us on Facebook and Twitter.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.newscientist.com

Talk about unintended consequences. A compound called BPA is being phased out of plastic packaging due to fears it may disrupt our hormones – but a replacement for it may be just as harmful. BPA, or bisphenol A, is often found in disposable water bottles and babies’ milk bottles and cups. Small amounts can dissolve into the food and drink inside these containers. This is a concern because a host of studies have shown that BPA can mimic the actions of oestrogen, binding to the same receptor in the body. Oestrogen is normally involved in breast development, regulating periods and maintaining pregnancies. Animals exposed to BPA develop abnormal reproductive systems, but it is unclear if people are exposed to high enough doses to be affected. Due to public pressure – and bans in a few countries – many manufacturers have started replacing BPA. One substitute, fluorene-9-bisphenol, or BHPF, is already widely used in a variety of materials. But Jianying Hu of Peking University in Beijing and her team have found that BHPF also binds to the body’s oestrogen receptors. Unlike BPA, it does this without stimulating them, instead blocking their normal activity. In tests on female mice, BHPF caused the animals to have smaller wombs and smaller pups than controls, and in some cases miscarriages. If BHPF binds to the same receptor in humans, it has the potential to cause fertility problems. “That’s pretty scary,” says Frederick vom Saal of the University of Missouri. As food and drink containers don’t usually reveal detailed information about what they are made from, Hu’s team tested a variety of plastic bottles labelled “BPA-free” to see if they released BHPF into hot water stored inside, as heat encourages such compounds to dissolve. They found the compound was released from 23 of the 52 items tested, including all three babies’ bottles they examined. When they took blood samples from 100 college students who regularly drank water from plastic bottles, Hu’s team detected low levels of BHPF in seven people. It is unknown if the compound came from their drinking water – as there are many materials containing BHPF in the environment – nor if that would be high enough to cause harm. But vom Saal says even low levels could in theory disrupt our hormonal systems. Vom Saal says he tries to use plastic as little as possible, and avoids putting plastic containers in the microwave or dishwasher, as they degrade under heat.


News Article | November 29, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

Overseeing a Portfolio of Communities in Georgia, Tennessee and the Carolinas ATLANTA, GA--(Marketwired - November 29, 2016) - Pinnacle, one of the nation's leading multifamily management firms, announces Theresa Steen has joined the company as regional vice president to oversee nearly 8,500 apartment homes in Georgia, Tennessee, South Carolina and North Carolina, as well as a team of five regional property managers and a regional maintenance director. Steen reports to Senior Vice President Greg Mark. Steen comes to Pinnacle with 23 years of industry experience and a strong background in large portfolio management and team development. Most recently with Carroll Management, she is known for her strong sense of accountability, professionalism and compassion. Career accomplishments, which span companies such as Tribridge Residential, Ambling Management Company, and Madison Apartment Group, include the development of training and marketing programs and operational protocols to create value for her properties and clients. Steen attended University of Missouri and holds designations as a Certified Apartment Portfolio Supervisor (CAPS) and Housing Credit Certified Professional (HCCP). She brings her passion for community service with non-profit organizations to Pinnacle. "Pinnacle has grown by over 6,200 units this year in Theresa's assigned territory and we have been looking for a strategic hire with her capabilities to supplement the talent we already have in place," said Mark. "She is a seasoned professional with a track record for growth and we quickly realized she was the right candidate to manage our regional operations and team members." Reporting to Steen will be five regional property managers and one regional maintenance director, including: About Pinnacle Property Management Services, LLC Pinnacle Property Management Services, LLC, ("Pinnacle") is a privately held national real estate provider specializing in third party management of multifamily residential communities. As one of the nation's preferred third-party managers, Pinnacle's portfolio includes over 165,000 residential units and 2.5 million square feet of commercial assets. With the Corporate headquarters located in Dallas, Texas, Pinnacle has more than 4,000 employees located in 32 states. For more information, visit www.pinnacleliving.com.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Hochgeschätzter führender Experte für Operationen, Koordination und Management im Bereich Sicherheit wird das Unternehmen in die nächste Wachstumsphase steuern LOS ANGELES, 17. Februar 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Airborne Wireless Network (OTCQB: ABWN) gibt heute bekannt, dass es Michael (Mike) J. Warren zum Chief Executive Officer ernannt hat. Mike Warren war bis vor Kurzem als Direktor für regionale Operationen und Sicherheit für ECC International in Afghanistan tätig. In dieser Funktion überwachte er die Sicherheit von 18 bedeutenden Bauprojekten des US-Verteidigungsministeriums mit einem Budget von insgesamt 1.000.000.000 USD, einschließlich eines Straßenprojekts über 500 Millionen USD der Asia Development Bank zum Bau der Tangente von Herat nach Mazer-e-Sharif, und eines Infrastruktur-Entwicklungsprojekts über 50 Millionen USD von USAID in Zusammenarbeit mit dem afghanischen Ministerium für Minenwesen, Öl und Gas. Davor war Mike Warren Direktor für Operations, Security & Safety für Checchi & Company Consulting, Inc., in Afghanistan und sein Schwerpunkt lag auf dem Programm Measurement and Evaluation im Auftrag von USAID. Vor dieser Funktion arbeitete er als Programm-Manager für die Human Terrain Systems im Rahmen der Internationalen Sicherheitsbeistandstruppe (International Security Assistance Force/ISAF) für die NATO und die US-Armee G-2. Er hat als Berater für die US-Botschaft, für COMISAF und CJ2X im ISAF-Hauptquartier in Kabul in Afghanistan fungiert. Mike Warren ist im Jahr 1994 aus dem US Marine Corps im Rang eines Lieutenant Colonel ausgeschieden. Als Infanterie-Offizier gehörte zu seinen Aufgaben der Dienst als Exekutiv-Offizier, 3. Surveillance & Reconnaissance Group in Okinawa, als Kommandant der größten Marinesicherheit-Kaserne in der Marinegefechtsstation Concord, Kalifornien, und er diente in mehreren Kommandofunktionen auf dem Militärübungsplatz des Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego. Er stammt aus Illinois und hat an der University of Missouri einen Bachelor-Studienabschluss in Politikwissenschaften absolviert. Mike Warren ist ebenfalls Absolvent des US Marine Corps Command and Staff College.  Darüber hinaus verfügt er über Zertifizierungen als Stratege zur Terrorismusbekämpfung, als sogenannter COIN-Experte (Counterinsurgency/Aufstandsbekämpfung) und er hat zahlreiche Sicherheitskurse und -fortbildungen abgeschlossen. Mike Warren besitzt umfangreiches Hintergrundwissen im Projektmanagement und war bei mehreren Unternehmen in der Computerhardware- und Software-Branche aktiv, für die er entscheidende Beiträge zum Wachstum und zur Expansion der Unternehmen leistete. J. Edward Daniels, Präsident von Airborne Wireless Network sagte: „Mike wird für unseren technologischen Fortschritt auf die nächste Stufe des Wachstums eine zentrale Rolle spielen. Seine Kompetenz im Bereich Sicherheitsoperationen und sein Hintergrund - sowohl aus dem zivilen als auch dem staatlichen Sektor - sind äußerst wertvoll, während wir die Vermarktung des Infinitus Super Highway™ weiter offensiv fortsetzen. Wir sind davon überzeugt, dass sein einzigartiges Hintergrundwissen und sein Talent, Visionen in erstklassige Ergebnisse umzusetzen, genau die notwendigen Fähigkeiten sind, um das nächste Kapitel unserer Geschäftsaktivitäten zu eröffnen." Weitere Informationen finden Sie unter: www.airbornewirelessnetwork.com Diese Pressemitteilung enthält sogenannte „zukunftsbezogene Aussagen" im Sinne der Safe-Harbor-Bestimmungen des United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act von 1995. Diese Aussagen basieren auf den aktuellen Überzeugungen und Erwartungen der Geschäftsführung des Unternehmens und unterliegen beachtlichen Risiken und Ungewissheiten. Sollten sich die zugrunde gelegten Annahmen als unzutreffend erweisen oder Risiken und Unwägbarkeiten eintreten, könnten die tatsächlichen Ergebnisse wesentlich von denjenigen abweichen, die in den zukunftsbezogenen Aussagen enthalten sind. Risiken und Unwägbarkeiten beinhalten, sind aber nicht beschränkt auf die Verfügbarkeit von Kapital; die mit der Entwicklung neuer Produkte oder Technologien und der betrieblichen Tätigkeit als Unternehmen in der Entwicklungsphase verbundenen Unsicherheiten; unsere Fähigkeit zur zusätzlichen Erhöhung der Mittel, die wir benötigen, um unsere Geschäfts- und Produktentwicklungspläne weiter zu verfolgen; unsere Fähigkeit, Produkte auf Basis unserer Technologieplattform zu entwickeln und zu vermarkten; der Wettbewerb in der Branche, in der wir tätig sind und vermarkten; allgemeine Branchenbedingungen; allgemeine wirtschaftliche Faktoren; die Auswirkung von Branchenvorschriften; technologische Fortschritte; neue Produkte und Patente der Konkurrenz; Herstellungsschwierigkeiten oder -verzögerungen; Abhängigkeit von der Wirksamkeit der Patente des Unternehmens sowie das Risiko von Rechtsstreitigkeiten, einschließlich Patentstreitigkeiten und/oder regulatorischer Maßnahmen.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: en.prnasia.com

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 17, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Airborne Wireless Network (OTCQB: ABWN) today announces that it has appointed Michael (Mike) J. Warren as Chief Executive Officer. Mike has recently served as the Regional Operations and Security Director for ECC International in Afghanistan.  In this capacity, he has overseen the security of 18 Major DOD Construction Projects, totaling $1,000,000,000, including a $500 million Asia Development Bank road project building the Ring Road from Herat to Mazer-e-Sharif, and a $50 Million USAID Infrastructure Development project with the Afghan Ministry of Mines, Oil, and Gas.  Before that, Mike was the Director of Operations, Security & Safety for Checchi & Company Consulting, Inc., in Afghanistan and he focused on the Measurement and Evaluation Program under contract with USAID.  Prior to that he was the Program Manager for the Human Terrain Systems under the International Security Assistance Force for NATO and the US Army G-2.  He has been an advisor to the US Embassy, to COMISAF and CJ2X at HQ's ISAF in Kabul, Afghanistan. Mike retired from the US Marine Corps with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in 1994.  An infantry officer, his assignments included serving as the Executive Officer, 3rd Surveillance & Reconnaissance Group in Okinawa; as Commanding Officer of the largest Marine Security Barracks at Naval Weapons Station, Concord, CA, and in multiple command positions on the drill field at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego.  A native of Illinois, he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from the University of Missouri. Mike is also a graduate of the US Marine Corps Command and Staff College.  He is also certified as a Counter Terrorism Planner, as a COIN (Counterinsurgency) expert and in numerous security and safety courses. Mike has an extensive background in project management and has served with numerous companies in the computer hardware and software industry, playing an integral role in the companies' growth and expansion. J. Edward Daniels, President of Airborne Wireless Network said, "Mike will be instrumental in advancing our technology into the next stage of growth. His expertise in security operations and background in both the civilian sector and governmental sector will be invaluable as we continue to aggressively market the Infinitus Super Highway™. We believe that his unique background and his ability to translate vision into world-class execution will be exactly what we need as we enter the next chapter of the business." For further information see: www.airbornewirelessnetwork.com This release includes "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements are based upon the current beliefs and expectations of the company's management and are subject to significant risks and uncertainties. If underlying assumptions prove inaccurate or risks or uncertainties materialize, actual results may differ materially from those set forth in the forward-looking statements. Risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, availability of capital; the inherent uncertainties associated with developing new products or technologies and operating as a development stage company; our ability to raise the additional funding we will need to continue to pursue our business and product development plans; our ability to develop and commercialize products based on our technology platform; competition in the industry in which we operate and market; general industry conditions; general economic factors; the impact of industry regulation; technological advances; new products and patents attained by competitors; manufacturing difficulties or delays; dependence on the effectiveness of the company's patents; and the exposure to litigation, including patent litigation, and/or regulatory actions.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Honor Society, a leading national academic and professional honor society, announced the Winter 2017 Scholarship Recipients on January 25, 2017. Six well-deserving recipients and twelve finalists were chosen to receive scholarships ranging from $500 to $2000 per person. Scholarships and awards are a key component of the raison d'etre or "reason for existence" of Honor Society. They offer students exclusive scholarships and connect them to a database of partner scholarships to help them dream bigger and reach further. Honor Society’s exclusive scholarships for members include scholarships for Community Service, Core Values, Graduate Achievers, and even a Study Abroad scholarship. “It was difficult to pick recipients for each scholarship this season because of all of the extraordinary candidates," said Honor Society Executive Director, Michael Moradian. "However, we chose some very well-deserving candidates that truly represent what the Honor Society mission is about and who are focused on excelling in their academics. We are proud to have each of them as members!” The Winter 2017 Scholarship period is one of many rounds of scholarships offered by Honor Society. Scholarship recipients are glad they joined in order to take advantage of the year-round scholarship opportunities. Undergraduate Achiever Scholarship Recipient - Kristen Brown, Northeastern University - Kristen is on the Dean’s list at her school and has completed two six-month co-ops in a neurobiology lab at Harvard Medical School to aid in her Behavioral Neuroscience major. Undergraduate Achiever Scholarship Finalist - Emily Johnson, Eastern Kentucky University - Emily has received the President's Award and is on the Dean's List at EKU. She is currently a Biomedical Science major and wants to become a dentist. Undergraduate Achiever Scholarship Finalist - Alexis Alston, Missouri State University - Alexis has a 4.0 GPA at MSU and is majoring in Mass Media with a minor in Recording Arts. Graduate Achiever Scholarship Recipient - Nicole Lynch, Northern Illinois University - Nicole worked as an Occupational Therapist at an early childhood elementary school. She is an honors student at NIU and upon completion of her Masters in Special Education she plans to teach. Graduate Achiever Scholarship Finalist - Melissa Reynolds, University of Texas at Arlington - Melissa is currently serving as Assistant City Engineer for the second fastest growing City in the Nation and maintaining a 4.0 GPA in the Masters of Public Administration program at UTA. Graduate Achiever Scholarship Finalist - Alicia Dudley, Sam Houston State University - Alicia has a 4.0 GPA in her pursuit of a Masters in Instructional Technology. She received the Teacher of the Year award at her Title 1 school where she has now taken on a job as Librarian. Core Values Scholarships Recipient - Grace Hagerty, University of Georgia - Grace is “pursuing excellence” (Honor Society Core Value #1) by maintaining a 4.0 GPA and by being a part of UGA Honors, UGA Miracle and Club Swimming. Core Values Scholarships Finalist - Olivia Voss, Southeastern Oklahoma State University - Olivia is embodying the Honor Society “Pursue Leadership and Take Initiative” Core Value by being part of SOSU’s President Leadership Class as well as acting as a Senator in her college's Student Government Association and a chapter officer in the Zeta Gamma chapter of Sigma Sigma Sigma. Member Spotlight Scholarship Recipient - Michaela Rodo, Edinboro University - Michaela is on the Dean’s List at Edinboro University and is studying in cinema to be an animator. Member Spotlight Scholarship Finalist - Lisa Smith, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley - Lisa graduated Magna Cum Laude with a BBA in Marketing at UTPA and is now obtaining her MBA in Business & Entrepreneurship at UTRGV. Study Abroad Scholarship Finalist - Daleigh Kranz, Northern Kentucky University - Daleigh will be studying abroad in Granada, Spain to immerse herself in Spanish to help in her future career working with inner city children as a social worker. Study Abroad Scholarship Finalist - Andrew Dennis, Bowling Green State University - Andrew will be attending a 9-month program in Spain at La Universidad de Alcalá in Alcalá de Henares to prepare him for a future as a world language teacher. Study Abroad Scholarship Finalist - Gavin Coulson, University of Colorado Boulder - Gavin will be studying abroad in Tel-Aviv University, Israel this Spring in a program focused on intensive Hebrew and Arabic, face-to-face interactions with Israelis and Palestinians and full immersion into a culture which will help in his pursuit of a career as a rabbinical chaplain in the United States Military. Community Service Scholarship Recipient - Elizabeth Angier, Texas A&M University–Commerce - Elizabeth spent the summer volunteering in a refugee camp and is currently volunteering as an English tutor for those students who do not have English as their first language. Community Service Scholarship Finalist - Meghan Nothdurft, University of Missouri - Meghan is a member of Little Sisters of the Golden Rose, a community service sorority, and has participated in building a home for Habitat for Humanity, packing food for the Food Bank in Columbia, Missouri, and working a children's festival for a local community. Society Involvement Scholarship Recipient - Kayla Mounce, Appalachian State - Kayla is currently pursuing a major in Sustainable Development and is on both the Dean’s and Chancellor’s List at her school. Society Involvement Scholarship Finalist - Adam Buchholtz, University of Wisconsin Eau Claire - Adam is currently working on his major in nursing and plans to work on his doctorate in nursing after his Bachelors Degree. Society Involvement Scholarship Finalist - Dorida Denas, Bergen Community College - Dorida is majoring in Graphic Design/Computer Graphics and hopes to use her degree as a brand designer or in the advertising area. About Honor Society: Honor Society is a leading honor society with active members in all 50 states, and is represented with chapters at many of universities across the country. The Honor Society community emphasizes leadership and is a platform to showcase member talents. The society offers exclusive benefits to its members and alumni, ranging from discounts and job search tools to priority internship placement programs. For more information about careers at Honor Society, or to learn more about our open positions visit our job board at: http://honorsociety.theresumator.com/. For more general information, please visit http://www.honorsociety.org or follow Honor Society on Twitter and Facebook.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

WorldatWork, a nonprofit HR association and compensation authority, is proud to announce that LifeCare has earned WorldatWork’s Seal of Distinction for 2017 for the sixth straight year. The seal is a unique mark of excellence designed to identify organizational success in total rewards effectiveness. LifeCare is one of 160 organizations to be honored as a 2017 recipient. All of the 2017 recipients will be recognized during the WorldatWork Total Rewards Conference & Exhibition, held in Washington, D.C. from May 7-10. “It is an honor to once again receive the AWLP Seal of Distinction,” said Peter Burki, LifeCare Chairman & Chief Executive Officer. “For almost 33 years we have committed ourselves to helping clients, their employees and the employees of LifeCare be successful both in the workplace and at home. We look forward to continuing our support for them as they navigate through their personal needs and life events.” Begun in 2012, the prestigious Seal of Distinction is awarded to companies that meet defined standards of workplace programs, policies and practices weighted on several factors, such as the complexity of implementation, required organizational resources, perceived breadth of access and overall level of commitment from leadership. Applicants are evaluated on: “We congratulate all of the recipients of the 2017 Seal of Distinction. These recipients represent a wide variety of industries from across the U.S. and Canada, showing that the total rewards model applies to employers and employees everywhere,” stated Anne C. Ruddy, president and CEO of WorldatWork. “This year, we saw the highest number of applicants since the Seal of Distinction was created. I’m confident that this means an increasing number of companies are recognizing the importance of a workplace environment that benefits both the employer and employee.” This year’s recipients represent industries of education, finance, government, health, law, manufacturing, and pharmaceuticals – and hail from 36 states, the District of Columbia and Canada. The 2017 list includes 80 companies who are first-time Seal of Distinction recipients. Eighty companies have received the seal in previous years. In addition, 11 organizations, including LifeCare, have qualified every year since WorldatWork started presenting the Seal of Distinction in 2012. LifeCare provides employer-sponsored work-life benefits to 61,000 clients, including Fortune 500 companies and large branches of the federal government, representing 100 million members nationwide. In addition to child and backup care solutions, LifeCare also provides a full suite of work-life solutions that save members time with personal life needs such as: elder care, legal and financial issues, health and everyday responsibilities. LifeCare also operates LifeMart, an online discount shopping website that provides real savings on everyday products and needs. LifeCare is headquartered in Shelton, CT. The Total Rewards Association WorldatWork is a nonprofit human resources association and compensation authority for professionals and organizations focused on compensation, benefits and total rewards. It's our mission to empower professionals to become masters in their fields. We do so by providing thought leadership in total rewards disciplines from the world's most respected experts; ensuring access to timely, relevant content; and fostering an active community of total rewards practitioners and leaders. WorldatWork has more than 70,000 members and subscribers worldwide; more than 80% of Fortune 500 companies employ a WorldatWork member. Founded in 1955, WorldatWork has offices in Scottsdale, Ariz., and Washington, D.C., and is affiliated with more than 70 human resources associations around the world. Below is the complete list of 2017 Seal of Distinction recipients: California ACI Specialty Benefits Actelion Pharmaceuticals US Addepar Foothill Family Fremont Bank Infoblox Inc. Intuit Inc. Los Angeles County Employees Retirement Association (LACERA) Motion Picture Industry Pension & Health Plans Professional Publications Inc. Prologis UCLA Health and David Geffen School of Medicine University of California, Davis University of California, Irvine University of California San Diego District of Columbia Advanced Medical Technology Association American Gas Association DC Water Department of Transportation - Federal Aviation Administration Federal Reserve Board of Governors Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner LLP Hill+Knowlton Strategies Raffa, P.C. Summit Consulting LLC The George Washington University U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services U.S. Department of Agriculture Florida AACSB International BayCare Health System Black Knight Financial Services, Inc. Broward Health Central Florida Regional Transportation Authority/LYNX Citizens Property Insurance Corporation Seminole State College of Florida Iowa ITA Group, Inc. Principal Financial Group Wells Enterprises Inc. Massachusetts Babson College Bright Horizons Family Solutions Inc. Globoforce Kronos Incorporated Massachusetts Institute of Technology Progress Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. Maryland Bon Secours Health System, Inc. Campbell & Company CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield Continental Realty Corporation Frederick County Public Schools Johns Hopkins University and Health System Marriott International National Institutes of Health National Security Agency Target Community & Educational Services, Inc. Missouri City of Kansas City, Missouri KCP&L Nestle Purina PetCare Co. University of Missouri System Veterans United Home Loans New Jersey BASF Corporation Becton Dickinson CRP Industries Inc. Ferring Pharmaceuticals Inc. KPMG LLP Prudential Financial Sanofi US The Electrochemical Society New York Mastercard Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center MVP Health Care MetLife NYU Langone Medical Center On Deck Capital Inc. Ralph Lauren The YMCA of Greater Rochester North Carolina BlueCross and BlueShield of North Carolina NC State University Orange Water and Sewer Authority (OWASA) RTI International Volvo Group North America Texas Capital Metropolitan Transportation Authority Children's Health City of Southlake Dell Inc. Disability Rights Texas Geokinetics Lloyd's Register Americas Inc. MOGAS Industries, Inc. Ryan, LLC Southwest Research Institute Texas Instruments


CALGARY, Alberta, Oct. 03, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Cortex Business Solutions (TSX-V:CBX), a Network-as-a-Service e-invoicing solutions provider, has strengthened the e-invoicing knowledge on our board of directors with the appointment of Gregory Mark, former CEO of Hubwoo, to Cortex’s board of directors. Mr. Mark has over 35 years’ experience creating, transforming, and growing global technology companies. Prior to joining the Cortex Board, Mr. Mark was CEO and Chairman of the Board of Hubwoo, SA, a French-based, publicly traded Cloud Procure-to-Pay company. Mr. Mark has held senior executive leadership positions at Perfect Commerce and Commerce One and was a founding member of The Indus Group (IGRP), the leader in asset management software for the highly regulated process manufacturing industries. Mr. Mark's areas of expertise include B2B commerce platforms, procurement and accounts payable process automation, plant/asset maintenance and operations and supply chain management. “Greg has been a pioneer in the online procurement space, and a mentor of mine since I joined Cortex, and I, along with the entire board are excited to welcome him,” said Joel Leetzow, President & CEO of Cortex. “We feel that the experience and leadership he brings is invaluable and will play a meaningful role in Cortex’s future growth strategy.” Mr. Mark added, “I have been amazed with the turnaround that has occurred at Cortex under Joel’s leadership and look forward to continuing to work with him, and the rest of the Board, as we continue to transform Cortex towards growth and profitability.” As an alumnus of the University of Missouri-Columbia, Mr. Mark holds a bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering and a Masters in Industrial Engineering. Cortex Business Solutions Inc. (TSX-V:CBX) is a business-to-business network that enables electronic invoicing for buying and supplying organizations. The Cortex network offers flexible connection methods to reduce the time required to process invoices and tools that leverage existing customer technologies and processes. Access to the Cortex Network enhances the exchange of documents allowing companies to connect and interact with each other to grow their businesses. For more information, please visit www.cortex.net.


News Article | February 18, 2017
Site: www.bbc.co.uk

August's total solar eclipse in the US will almost certainly be the most watched such event in history. More than 12 million people - from Oregon to South Carolina - live on the path of darkness that the Moon will cut as it sweeps in front of the Sun. Nearly four times that many live within a two-hour's drive. And then there are all the tourists who will flock to America to witness the spectacle. "By going out and looking at the Sun we take part in this time-honoured tradition of citizen science," says astronomer and artist Prof Tyler Nordgren from the University of Redlands in California. "Edmund Halley during an eclipse in 1715 in London asked people to go outside, look up and see if they could see the total solar eclipse and measure the length of totality, and by that he was able to help refine the orbit of the Moon," he told BBC News. You might think that with all the space telescopes trained on the Sun these days there is little the citizen or even the keen amateur can contribute. But total solar eclipses are special because they afford particularly favourable conditions to study the tenuous outer atmosphere of the Sun called the corona. It is in this superheated "gas" of charged particles that the solar wind originates, and from which billions of tonnes of matter can occasionally burst towards the Earth to disrupt satellites, communications and even electricity grids. The corona is outshone by the Sun's surface, its photosphere. And satellites will block out this glare using devices called coronagraphs or occulters. But these are usually so wide that they also obstruct a doughnut of light immediately above the edge of the star. "The spacecraft block out not only the Sun but also a whole lot of light around it, otherwise there would be scattering all over the image. And so we have that whole region uniquely to observe in white light from the ground at total solar eclipse," says Jay Pasachoff from Williams College, a veteran of 65 eclipses. And he wants members of the public to get in on the act. One key project in the planning is the Citizen Continental-America Telescopic Eclipse (CATE) project run by the National Solar Observatory. It is making available 59 identical telescopes and digital cameras to universities, schools and astronomy clubs along the path of the eclipse (another 40 observing kits are available to purchase). Participants are being trained to gather images of the corona from their locality that can then be spliced together with everyone else's to produce an uninterrupted 90-minute video. Citizen CATE will rely on dedicated, calibrated equipment. But a similar venture plans to make use of the countless photos that will be taken on the day with general pocket cameras and smartphones. The Eclipse Megamovie Project is led by the University of California at Berkeley's Multiverse education programme at the Space Sciences Laboratory and Google's Making & Science initiative. It has a core band of photographers, but the public will be able to participate with the aid of an app that will offer advice on getting the best image quality and provide the means to upload pictures. The 21 August event is the first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in the US since 1918. The Moon's shadow begins its journey across Earth's surface - the path of totality - out in the Pacific. It makes landfall near Newport in Oregon at 10:16 local time (17:16 GMT; 18:16 BST); and leaves the continent close to the Atlantic coastal city of Charleston, South Carolina, at 14:49 local time (18:49 GMT; 19:49 BST). The location that will experience full darkness for the "greatest duration" is just outside the town of Carbondale, Illinois. Totality there will last 2 minutes and 40.2 seconds. So many people are expected to try to view the eclipse that the American Astronomical Society has set up a taskforce to advise urban and rural communities on how to prepare for the expected population surge. Prof Nordgren works a lot with the National Parks Service: "I'm going to be at John Day Fossil Beds National Monument in eastern Oregon. "They have six parking spaces and a porta-potty, and yet they're expecting maybe 20,000 people to come there on that day." And taskforce colleague, Angela Speck from the University of Missouri, added: "We need to have communities ready for the influx of people that are coming, and that means things like emergency services, road traffic control, food and water. Especially water - the eclipse is in August." Nordgren, Speck, and Pasachoff were speaking here in Boston at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Jonathan.Amos-INTERNET@bbc.co.uk and follow me on Twitter: @BBCAmos


Patent
DuPont Pioneer, Iowa State University, North Carolina State University, Foundation University and University of Missouri | Date: 2014-03-12

The present invention comprises methods and compositions for controlling nematode parasitism in host plant. The present invention comprises novel polynucleotides and polypeptides encoded by such polynucleotides comprising one or more nucleic acid sequences disclosed herein having a nucleotide sequence comprising any one of SEQ ID NO: 1-142 or 161, a fragment or variant thereof, or a complement thereof, or a polypeptide sequence comprising any one of SEQ ID NO: 143-160, a fragment or variant thereof.


The requirement for sustainable food production is a global issue to which the EU contributes as a major livestock producer. It is critical to improve animal production efficiency while sustaining environmentally friendly milk production. More profitable dairy production requires increased milk yield, cow health, longevity and fertility; reduced environmental footprint and optimised use of inputs. These are multifactorial problems to achieve. GplusE aims to identify the genotypes controlling biological variation in the important phenotypes of dairy cows, to appreciate how these are influenced by environmental and management factors and thus allow more informed and accurate use of genomic selection. GplusE will link new genomic data in dairy cows to a comprehensive array of phenotypic information going well beyond those existing traits recorded by dairy breeding organisations. It will develop systems that will focus herd and cow management on key time points in production that have a major influence on the rest of the productive cycle including efficiency, environment, physiological status, health, fertility and welfare. This will significantly advance the science, efficiency and management practices in dairy production well beyond the current state-of-the art. The major bioinformatics element of the proposal will illuminate the bovine genome and ensure a reverse flow of information to annotate human and other mammalian genomes; it will ensure training of animal scientists (PhDs & Postdocs) to a high skill level in the use of bioinformatics. The end result of this project will be a comprehensive, integrated identification of genomic-phenotypic associations relevant to dairy production. This information will be translated into benefits for animal breeding and management that will considerably improve sustainable dairy production. It will provide basic biological information into the mechanisms by which genotype, environment and their interaction influence performance.


Johnson G.H.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | Fritsche K.,University of Missouri
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics | Year: 2012

The majority of evidence suggests that n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, including linoleic acid (LA), reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease as reflected by current dietary recommendations. However, concern has been expressed that a high intake of dietary n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid contributes to excess chronic inflammation, primarily by prompting the synthesis of proinflammatory eicosanoids derived from arachidonic acid and/or inhibiting the synthesis of anti-inflammatory eicosanoids from eicosapentaenoic and/or docosahexaenoic acids. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials that permitted the assessment of dietary LA on biologic markers of chronic inflammation among healthy noninfant populations was conducted to examine this concern. A search of the English- and non-English-language literature using MEDLINE, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and EMBASE was conducted to identify relevant articles. Fifteen studies (eight parallel and seven crossover) met inclusion criteria. None of the studies reported significant findings for a wide variety of inflammatory markers, including C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, cytokines, soluble vascular adhesion molecules, or tumor necrosis factor-α. The only significant outcome measures reported for higher LA intakes were greater excretion of prostaglandin E2 and lower excretion of 2,3-dinor-thromboxane B 2 in one study and higher excretion of tetranorprostanedioic acid in another. However, the authors of those studies both observed that these effects were not an indication of increased inflammation. We conclude that virtually no evidence is available from randomized, controlled intervention studies among healthy, noninfant human beings to show that addition of LA to the diet increases the concentration of inflammatory markers. © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.


Patent
DuPont Pioneer, Iowa State University, University of Missouri, Foundation University and North Carolina State University | Date: 2014-03-12

The present invention comprises methods and compositions for controlling nematode parasitism in host plant. The present invention comprises novel polynucleotides and polypeptides encoded by such polynucleotides comprising one or more nucleic acid sequences disclosed herein having a nucleotide sequence comprising any one of SEQ ID NOs: 1-142, a fragment or variant thereof, or a complement thereof, or a polypeptide sequence comprising any one of SEQ ID NOs: 143-159, a fragment or variant thereof.


Patent
University of Missouri, INC Research, The United States Of America, Iowa State University, Foundation University and North Carolina State University | Date: 2011-07-13

Methods of inhibiting plant parasitic nematodes, methods of obtaining transgenic plants useful for inhibiting such nematodes, and transgenic plants that are resistant to plant parasitic nematodes through inhibition of plant nematode CLE peptide receptor genes are provided. Methods for expressing genes at plant parasitic nematode feeding sites with plant nematode CLE peptide receptor gene promoters are also provided, along with nematode CLE peptide receptor gene promoters that are useful for expressing genes in nematode feeding sites as well as transgenic plants and nematode resistant transgenic plants comprising the promoters.


Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (skin cancers) selected, representing over 5,500,000 diagnoses annually in the US alone, making it the most prevalent cancer today KENNEWICK, WA / ACCESSWIRE / February 28, 2017 / Advanced Medical Isotope Corporation ("AMI") (OTC PINK: ADMD), a cancer therapeutics company focused on the commercialization of their RadioGel™ device, a tumor-injectable and biodegradable radiation that remains focused at the treatment site, today released the third letter in a four letter series outlining AMI's push towards FDA submittal and commercialization from its new President & CEO, Dr. Mike Korenko. After two months of dynamic experience-based discussions among our Medical Advisory Board Members and other senior doctors we have selected our first indication for use which we will present to the Food and Drug Administration. After thorough review to prioritize indications, we have selected basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma (skin cancers). The reasons for this important selection relates to our criteria below: This cancer is in the skin and therefore easy to access. Single injections for small tumors are easy and we have already demonstrated our parallel injection procedure in the cat at Washington State University for larger tumors. b. Therapeutic ratio (ratio of the dose to the tumor target tissue relative to dose to adjacent normal tissue) and responsiveness to radiation: Yttrium-90 is a beta emitter in RadioGel has a much higher therapeutic ratio than any gamma emitter or external beam therapy. Since Y-90 delivers high-energy beta-rays, it has an average penetration path of 4 to 5 mm (less than a quarter inch), which is ideal for skin cancer therapy. There is minimal irradiation of normal surrounding tissue. As an added bonus, the patient can go home immediately with no irradiation risk to themselves or family members. We can treat with very high doses, so response to radiation would not be an issue. (As a comparison, external beam radiation can deliver 60 to 80 Gy. Yttrium-90 in RadioGel can go to 700 Gy or higher). As discussed above, there is very low risk of collateral damage. In addition, the skin is not located next to a major organ, for example if you were injecting near spinal tumors. Because of the low collateral risk and because of the therapeutic effects that would be relatively easy to see in three months, the Medical Advisory Board felt this might be an easier device for the FDA to approve and in a shorter timeframe. In addition, some of our animal testing, that will start in about two months, are already treating similar cancers. We intentionally avoided applying to the FDA for melanoma, since it is highly metastatic and goes deep into the tissue. There are a much smaller number of cases for this cancer type (around 300,000). In addition, there are three new immunotherapy products on the market to treat melanoma cancer. They can have serious side-effects, but they are promising. That violates our next criterion below. Some skin cancers require several-hour long surgeries in which the tumor is removed, one layer at a time, and then sent for biopsy. They then require a skin graft that can lead to an infection. On tumors of the face this can be disfiguring. As people get older their skin gets thinner, which increases the difficulty. Our Advisory Board felt that for these cases in particular RadioGel has a significant therapeutic advantage. It would benefit the patient and contribute to reducing the cost of health care. 3. CAN BE PROFITABLY EMBRACED BY THE MEDICAL COMMUNITY: One out of every three new cancers in the United States is a cancerous skin lesion. The two skin cancer types that we selected are the most common. There are 3.3 million patients in the United States with 5.5 million tumors (some patients have more than one tumor.) About 1 million of these are squamous cell cancers located near the surface of the epidermal skin layer, and greater than 4 million are basal cell cancers in the deep layer of the epidermis. I would never say that we can treat them all; that would just be marketing hype, but I believe that this will be the preferred treatment in a substantial number of cases in a very large market. b. Ease of acceptance by the medical community, Medicare reimbursement: The potential lower cost of RadioGel therapy coupled with the potential very large number of patients satisfied this criterion. To further test the criterion, we are in discussions with a major private clinic with several skin treatment centers. This client believes this is a great new tool for their toolbox. They are also advising us on the obstacles that will have to be overcome, such as our Medicare reimbursement criterion. Since we believe RadioGel therapy will reduce the cost to Medicare we are confident that will not be an obstacle. There are other cancer types on our list of eighteen potential indications of use for RadioGel, and we have already prioritized to present them to the FDA in the future. Unfortunately, in the meantime, those patients will not be benefiting from this technology. As I have reported in my last shareholder letter, I am aligning the veterinarian animal testing with the human skin cancer. Specially, the University of Missouri will be focusing on the treatment for surface soft cell lesions, and Colorado State University will be refining the therapies for oral squamous cell cancers. After this selection, our next step is to prepare for the FDA pre-submittal meeting. We will request that meeting after we complete the test plans that will answer their previous questions. Until we complete these plans I can only estimate that our pre-submission to the FDA would be in June. I am really happy that we have engaged John Smith from Hogan Lovells to be at our side through this FDA process. I am excited and relieved that this selection decision had been made and I wanted to thank the members of our Medical Advisory Board – Chairman Dr. Barry D. Pressman, Dr. Albert DeNittis, Dr. Howard Sandler, and Dr. Darrell Fisher. I would also like to thank Dr. Ricardo Paz-Fumagalli and Dr. Beau Bosko Toskich from the Mayo Clinic for their valuable advice. In addition to the important developments discussed above, we continue to believe that the public markets are significantly undervaluing our company. With a fully diluted enterprise value of less than $10 million, there remains very large upside potential. As we progress on our plan, I intend to work vigorously to educate and inform the medical and investment community as to the therapeutic benefits our core technology as well as the economic model that can generate significant revenue and profits. We are committed to pursuing an uplisting to a national exchange as soon as possible in order to gain wider exposure and credibility in our pursuit of the multi-billion-dollar addressable market for Radiogel™, that can both significantly improve patient outcomes and reward shareholders. Advanced Medical Isotope Corporation (ADMD) is a late stage radiation oncology focused medical device company engaged in the development of yttrium-90 based brachytherapy devices for cancer treatment. The IsoPet Solutions division is focused on utilizing RadioGel for a cancer therapy in animals. Brachytherapy uses radiation to destroy cancerous tumors by placing a radioactive isotope inside or next to the treatment area. The Company intends to outsource material aspects of manufacturing, distribution, sales and marketing for its products in the United States and to enter into licensing arrangements outside of the United States, though the Company will evaluate its alternatives before finalizing its plans. For more information, please visit our websites: www.isopetsolutions.com and www.isotopeworld.com. This release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. You can identify these statements by the use of the words "may," "will," "should," "plans," "expects," "anticipates," "continue," "estimates," "projects," "intends," and similar expressions. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that could cause results to differ materially from those projected or anticipated. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, the Company's ability to successfully execute its expanded business strategy, including by entering into definitive agreements with suppliers, commercial partners and customers; general economic and business conditions, effects of continued geopolitical unrest and regional conflicts, competition, changes in technology and methods of marketing, delays in completing various engineering and manufacturing programs, changes in customer order patterns, changes in product mix, continued success in technical advances and delivering technological innovations, shortages in components, production delays due to performance quality issues with outsourced components, regulatory requirements and the ability to meet them, government agency rules and changes, and various other factors beyond the Company's control.


News Article | December 21, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

With 50,000 new employees needed in the mining industry by 2019, and 3.5 million manufacturing jobs expected over the next decade, The Doe Run Company (Doe Run) understands the importance of educating the next generation of the workforce. The company recently donated $40,000 to Missouri University of Science and Technology (Missouri S&T) toward the purchase of an X-ray fluorescence (XRF) Spectrometer for its geology, mining and metallurgical engineering programs. This piece of highly specialized laboratory equipment will assist students in measuring and analyzing the chemical makeup of solids, liquids, alloys, powders and thin films. It will also be used to enhance and expand the hands-on education of future scientists and engineers in the processing of complex mineral sources and toward research on bioactive glasses and sustainable steelmaking technology. “Missouri S&T has needed an XRF for more than 15 years, but the equipment requires a significant investment,” said Dr. Michael Moats, Dean’s Scholar in the College of Engineering and Computer at Missouri S&T. “Through Doe Run’s generous gift, and the support of other funders, Missouri S&T will be able to fill this need for our undergraduate and graduate students.” “The Missouri mining and manufacturing industries employ more than 270,000 people,” said Mark Coomes, vice president of human resources and community relations at Doe Run. “It’s critical that the individuals who will fill these jobs have access to state-of-the-art equipment in college to learn now how to apply innovations that can help us advance and improve the industry.” Missouri S&T’s mining engineering department includes around 200 undergraduate and graduate students and is one of only 14 mining engineering degree programs in the United States. The university’s metallurgical engineering program includes around 100 undergraduate and graduate students and is one of only eight metallurgical engineering degree programs in the U.S. In addition to projected job expansion, the U.S. mining industry will require an additional 78,000 replacement employees due to retirement, according to the National Mining Association. Likewise, the manufacturing industry is facing the possibility of more than 2 million jobs that will go unfilled over the next decade due to a skills gap, according to the National Association of Manufacturers. Missouri S&T offers an undergraduate program in manufacturing engineering to help fill that gap, and has developed an online master’s degree program in manufacturing engineering – the only program of its kind in Missouri and one of the first in the country. Missouri S&T’s College of Engineering and Computing, the Office of Sponsored Programs, the Peaslee Steel Manufacturing Center and Dr. Richard Brow, Curators’ Distinguished Professor of ceramic engineering, also contributed to the purchase of the new spectrometer. About The Doe Run Company Based in St. Louis, The Doe Run Company is a privately held natural resources company and a global provider of lead, copper and zinc concentrates. Dedicated to environmentally responsible mineral and metal production, Doe Run operates one of the world’s largest, single-site lead recycling centers, located in Boss, Mo. The Doe Run Company and its subsidiaries deliver products and services necessary to provide power, protection and convenience. Doe Run has operations in Missouri, Washington and Arizona. For more information, visit http://www.doerun.com and sustainability.doerun.com. About Missouri S&T Founded in 1870 as the University of Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy, Missouri University of Science and Technology (Missouri S&T) is a research university of more than 8,800 students and part of the four-campus University of Missouri System. Located in Rolla, Missouri, Missouri S&T offers 97 degree programs in 39 areas of study and awards bachelor’s, master’s and Ph.D. degrees in engineering, the sciences, business and information technology, the humanities, and the liberal arts. For more information about Missouri S&T, visit http://www.mst.edu.


News Article | December 6, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBIA, Mo. (Dec. 6, 2016) -- Diabetes is a global health problem that disproportionally affects individuals of ethnic and racial minorities. Minorities are more likely to experience complications from the disease, and the death rate from diabetes among Hispanics is 50 percent higher than non-Hispanic whites, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health. In the study, researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine examined the effectiveness of peer support interventions, where diabetic patients received support from a person who had knowledge from their own experiences with diabetes or someone who had been affected by diabetes, but may not have the disease themselves, such as a caregiver or family member. The researchers found that the interventions were effective at improving the blood sugar levels of participants from minority groups, especially those of Hispanic ethnicity. "Peer supporters can help diabetic patients better manage their disease by providing advice on diet and exercise regimens, monitoring blood sugar levels and coping with the new diagnoses," said Sonal Patil, M.D., assistant professor of Family and Community Medicine at the MU School of Medicine. "Peer support interventions have been suggested by the World Health Organization as a way to improve self-care behaviors of diabetic patients, but an adequate review of the effectiveness of such interventions has not happened." Patil and her colleagues analyzed results from 17 randomized control trials on diabetic peer support interventions conducted from 1960 to 2015. The researchers compared blood sugar levels of patients who received peer support to those who received similar care, but did not participate in peer interventions. Patil found that peer support interventions modestly improved patients' blood sugar levels, with the most significant improvements found in studies with predominantly minority participants. "Previous research has found that when culturally appropriate health education is provided to people with diabetes who belong to ethnic minority groups, their glycemic control and knowledge of diabetes improves," Patil said. "Our findings suggest that peer health coaches might provide more culturally appropriate health education in ethnic minority populations, particularly Latino ones." Patil said that peer support interventions not only help diabetic patients, but also provide benefits to the peers delivering the support. "Previous research has found that being a peer supporter to others actually increases one's own self-management of the disease," Patil said. More random control trials are needed with African American participants before she can determine the effectiveness of peer support for that specific community, Patil said. Additionally, Patil noted that peer support interventions should be done in conjunction, and not in place of, regular visits with the patient's health provider. Patil's study, "Peer Support Interventions for Adults with Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis of Hemoglobin A1c Outcomes," recently was published in the Annals of Family Medicine. The study was funded with internal funds from the University of Missouri Department of Family and Community Medicine.


News Article | December 20, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBIA, Mo. - According to the latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in 45 children is diagnosed with autism. As these children age, experiences such as leaving school, finding jobs and living alone can be stressful for adolescents with autism as well as their caregivers. Researchers from the University of Missouri have conducted the first study analyzing the perspectives of adolescents with autism to identify challenges as they "age out" of services. The researchers say these findings highlight the need for social workers and providers to assist children with autism as they transition to adulthood. "The challenges of living independently, gaining employment, attaining postsecondary education and building social relationships are greater for adolescents and young adults with autism," said Nancy Cheak-Zamora, assistant professor of health sciences in the MU School of Health Professions. "It is vital that professionals are prepared to assist with the transition, and that they have insight into adolescent and caregiver experiences during the difficult time of transitioning to adulthood." Cheak-Zamora, Jennifer First, a doctoral candidate in the MU School of Social Work, and Michelle Teti, associate professor of health sciences, analyzed the reported experiences of adolescents with autism and their caregivers. They identified main themes of stress impacting families: challenges in accessing services, difficulties with adapting to transition changes, and managing multiple responsibilities and higher education challenges. One of the study participants, a caregiver named Mary, related how the autism center in her community offered no support once children with autism leave. She said that she wishes that services would increase during this period; once children reach a certain age, it is difficult to find help. Caregivers and adolescents also reported a variety of strategies to cope with the stress of transitioning to adulthood with autism. Main themes included: accessing community support; receiving support from friends, family and teachers; and creating opportunities for self-determination, such as making independent choices and setting goals. "For families who are experiencing a lack of available services for their adolescent with ASD, social workers can collaborate in forming family groups that advocate for more services for individuals living with autism into adulthood," First said. "Social workers should assist families with the coordination of essential services such as medical treatment, mental health supports, independent living, respite care, college support and enhanced vocational support." "A qualitative study of stress and coping when transitioning to adulthood with autism spectrum disorder," was published in the Journal of Family Social Work. Funding for the project was obtained from the Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau (H6MMC11059). Cheak-Zamora also works with the MU Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders, a national leader in confronting the challenges of autism and other developmental conditions through its collaborative research, training and service programs.


News Article | December 22, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Stop Hunger Now and the North Carolina State University Center for Student Leadership, Ethics and Public Service have named Jonathan Chin, a student at New York University, as the 2017 President William Jefferson Clinton Hunger Leadership Award recipient. The award will be presented at the Universities Fighting World Hunger Summit March 24-25 at Walsh University in North Canton, Ohio. Each year, students across the globe with a passion to end hunger are invited to apply for the award, named in honor of President Bill Clinton for his commitment to humanitarian causes, including the eradication of hunger. The award was first presented by President Clinton in 2009. Since then, the N.C. State Center for Student Leadership, Ethics & Public Service (CSLEPS) and Stop Hunger Now, a non-profit hunger relief organization, have presented the award to students from colleges or universities around the world. "For many people, college is really the last time that they're asked to think critically. If we can catch them at this crucial juncture and show them that being responsible for the people around them is powerful and fulfilling, then when they go out to become the leaders of tomorrow, they'll have that compassion with them," said Chin. When Chin discovered that many of his fellow students at New York University (NYU) did not have enough to eat, he used his coding skills to design a web platform connecting hungry students to those who had extra swipes available on their meal cards. His platform was the launching pad for his organization and subsequent mobile app, Share Meals. Chin’s next step was to conduct a study to find out how many students on campus were food insecure, as well as to determine how much food was being wasted in the form of expired meal card swipes. He found that 18.8% of students surveyed did not have enough to eat, while 523 students surveyed left $438,910.30 unused on their meal plans. Through collaboration with various university departments and students, Chin has dedicated himself to fighting hunger at NYU. In addition to the creation of Share Meals, he has played a lead role on a committee that is working to establish food pantries on campus. Chin has led cooking classes at NYU, teaching students how to create nutritious, affordable meals. He recently delivered a TEDx Talk at the University of Missouri, and his efforts have been featured in the New York Times. The Share Meals app was the winner of NYU’s 2016 Global Hackathon. Chin has advised students, faculty and staff from universities across the U.S. and the UK on how to implement programs to combat hunger on their own campuses. He hopes to expand Share Meals to other universities. Previous Clinton Award winners are: Balanding Mennah, Arizona State University (2016); Maria Rose Belding, American University (2015); Azeem Ahmed, Auburn University (2014); Brendan Rice, University of Alabama (2013); Ryan O’Donnell, NC State (2012); Gavin Armstrong, University of Guelph (2011); Sarah Nam, Harvard (2010); and John Coggin, NC State University (2009) About Stop Hunger Now Stop Hunger Now works to end hunger by providing food and life-changing aid to the world’s most vulnerable people, and by creating a global commitment to mobilize the necessary resources. Based in Raleigh, NC, Stop Hunger Now operates meal packaging programs in 20 U.S. cities and in six international locations. For information, visit http://www.stophungernow.org.


News Article | December 21, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

According to the American Heart Association, approximately 2,200 Americans die each day from heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular diseases. The most common cause is blocked blood vessels that can no longer supply oxygen and nutrients to the heart and brain. A recent study by researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine has shown that a protein inhibitor drug prevents these blockages, and could be a new therapeutic approach to prevent heart attack, stroke and other diseases caused by blocked blood vessels. "Arteries are living hoses that narrow and enlarge in order to regulate blood flow to organs and muscles," said William Fay, M.D., the J.W. and Lois Winifred Stafford Distinguished Chair in Diabetes and Cardiovascular Research at the MU School of Medicine and senior author of the study. "Smooth muscle cells in the artery regulate blood flow by constricting and relaxing. However, when chronic inflammation occurs in a blood vessel - typically in response to diabetes, high cholesterol and cigarette smoking - the smooth muscle cells in the walls of arteries change their behavior. They gradually accumulate inside the artery and narrow the blood vessel. In the case of coronary arteries, which supply blood to heart muscle cells, this process produces blockages that can lead to a heart attack." Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, or PAI-1, is a naturally occurring protein within blood vessels that controls cell migration. With diseases such as diabetes and obesity, PAI-1 over-accumulates in blood vessels. This promotes blockage formation. This process occurs not only in arteries, but also in vein grafts in patients who have undergone coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Fay's research team studied PAI-039, also known as tiplaxtinin, an investigational drug not yet used to treat humans. The researchers found that PAI-039 inhibited the migration of cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells, and prevented the development of blockages in arteries and bypass grafts in mice. "We found that PAI-039 decreased blockage formation by about 50 percent, which is a powerful effect in the models we used," said Fay, who also serves as a research scientist at the Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital in Columbia, Missouri. "In addition to reducing vascular blockages, inhibiting PAI-1 also produces a blood thinning effect that prevents the blood clots that trigger most heart attacks and strokes." Fay hopes that if future studies are successful, PAI-039 or similar drugs could be used to prevent blockages in arteries and bypass grafts. "I don't think there will be any one 'magic pill' that prevents arterial diseases, especially for those with other high-risk conditions," Fay said. "However, perhaps someday a PAI-1 inhibitor can be used in combination with other approaches such as proper diet and exercise, aspirin and cholesterol medications to prevent blood vessel blockages and reduce heart attack and stroke risk." The study, "Pharmacological Targeting of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Decreases Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration and Neointima Formation," recently was published in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, a journal of the American Heart Association that focuses on blood vessel diseases. Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institutes of Health (HL57346 and JL095951) and a Department of Veterans Affairs Merit Review Award (CARA-007-12S). The researchers have no conflicts of interest to declare related to this study. About the MU School of Medicine The MU School of Medicine has improved health, education and research in Missouri and beyond for more than 165 years. MU physicians treat patients from every county in the state, and more Missouri physicians received their medical degrees from MU than from any other university. For more information, visit http://medicine. .


News Article | November 20, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Dr. Sachin M. Shridharani, premier plastic surgeon of New York, New York has joined the prestigious Haute Beauty network. The Haute Beauty Network, affiliated with luxury lifestyle publication Haute Living, is proud to recognize Dr. Sachin M. Shridharani as a prominent cosmetic surgeon and the network’s newest partner. Dr. Sachin M. Shridharani, a Johns Hopkins trained Plastic Surgeon based in New York City focusing on aesthetic/cosmetic surgery and complex reconstruction. Dr. Shridharani will share his skill and expert opinion with the Haute Beauty and Haute Living subscribers, educating readers on his industry and providing exciting and relevant news, tips, trends and insight relating to his specialties. Attended one of the few Bachelor/Doctor of Medicine (MD) accelerated track programs in the country. After graduating with honors and at the top of his class at the combined BA/MD program at the University of Missouri where he obtained his undergraduate degree (BA) and doctor of medicine (MD) with honors in an accelerated 6 year program straight out of high school, he was accepted into the esteemed Johns Hopkins/University of Maryland Integrated Residency Program in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery where he trained and served as Chief Resident under leaders in the field of Plastic, Reconstructive, Aesthetic, Craniomaxillofacial, and Hand Surgery. The Johns Hopkins Hospital has been ranked by US News and World Reports as the #1 hospital in America for 23 years. He went on to complete an Aesthetic Plastic Surgery Fellowship at the prestigious Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital in New York City where he focused exclusively on cosmetic surgery procedures and injectables like Botox and fillers. Dr. Shridharani has experience in developing 501(c)(3) non-profit medical organizations and was featured on the ABC TV show “Hopkins.” Furthermore, he has co-authored nearly 60 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters in some of the most well respected medical journals including the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) and Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. He has presented this research work at several national plastic surgery conferences throughout the United States. These innovative research interests have earned him many awards including the coveted Johns Hopkins/University of Maryland Plastic Surgery Resident Research Award, American Society of Plastic Surgery (ASPS) Senior Resident Conference Best Aesthetic Paper Award, and the American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (ASAPS) Gaspar W Anastasi Award for Best Research Presentation. In addition Dr. Shridharani was awarded the prestigious Johns Hopkins/University of Maryland Plastic Surgery Residency Program Teaching Award for commitment to medical student and resident education. Furthermore, he has written a media-reviewed children’s book for children suffering from cleft lip and palate deformities and the family members who take care of them. Dr. Shridharani continues to develop his interests in aesthetic/cosmetic surgery pertaining to the face, breast, abdomen, and body contouring. These procedures include (but are not limited to): facelift (rhytidectomy), rhinoplasty, eyelid surgery (blepharoplasty), breast augmentation, breast lift (mastopexy), tummy-tuck (abdominoplasty), mini-tummy tuck, “mommy-makeover surgery,” liposuction, fat grafting/transfer, botox, and dermal fillers. He is fully committed to treating each patient with the latest and safest personalized plastic surgery care in order to meet his patient’s goals and create beautiful natural results with concierge attention.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

RIVERSIDE, Calif. (http://www. ) -- Many skin conditions are misdiagnosed by doctors as brown recluse spider bites. This can lead to tragedy because about 40 medical conditions, including several deadly bacterial infections, can be confused with brown recluse bites. Rick Vetter, a retired University of California, Riverside entomologist, along with lead author Dr. W. Van Stoecker and Dr. Jonathan Dyer, both dermatologists in Missouri who specialize in treating brown recluse bites, have co-authored a just-published paper in JAMA Dermatology that describes expressions of skin conditions that are often misdiagnosed as bites from this spider. "People always tell you what a brown recluse bite looks like, so what I started emphasizing is, 'This is what a brown recluse bite doesn't look like,'" Vetter said. "That message really has the potential to save lives." In the JAMA Dermatology paper, Vetter and the dermatologists from the University of Missouri Health Sciences Center introduce a mnemonic device - NOT RECLUSE - that they created to describe the most common skin signs that are misdiagnosed as brown recluse bite. For example, the REC of NOT RECLUSE indicates Red, Elevated and Chronic. Recluse bites are whitish blue or purple (not red), flat (not elevated) and don't last more than 3 months. So, if a patient has a wound that is elevated or red or persists more than 3 months, something other than brown recluse bite should be considered. The authors also offer alternate diagnoses that are more likely for many of the acronym categories. For example, under the Red category, the authors suggest that a red lesion would indicate a bite or sting by another insect/spider or might be a bacterial infection caused by streptococcus or anthrax. Brown recluse spiders are no longer than a half-inch in body length and have a dark brown violin shape on their body, Vetter said. They are venomous, but about 90 percent of bites self-heal, about 10 percent result in a rotting flesh lesion, and less than 1 percent cause a systematic reaction that can be fatal, Vetter said. Vetter developed an interest in spiders as an undergraduate student in the late 1970s and earned his master's degree studying spiders. But, it wasn't until 1992, when he was working as a research associate in an entomology lab at UC Riverside, that he started to focus on the brown recluse. Since then, in his spare time - evenings, lunch hours, weekends - Vetter became a brown recluse spider expert. He has published on the brown recluse more than anyone in the world. "That one case triggered my whole career," said Vetter, who retired from UC Riverside in 2012. "And it has mostly been a case of dispelling myths." He added: "As a scientist you're looking for the best information. But, there was nobody working on brown recluses. I just thought there was so much nonsense out there." Vetter has more than 140 publications in scientific and medical journals, including more than 100 about spiders with more than half of those about brown recluse spiders. He is also the author of "The Brown Recluse Spider," the only book dedicated to this species written for adults. His business card has a picture of a brown recluse on it. He has named two spider species. Two spiders and a non-spider arachnid have been named after him. But, no, he has not been bitten by a brown recluse. One of his most significant contributions was spending years creating a map that shows the geographic distribution of brown recluse spiders. They are found in about 20 states, with the highest concentration around Kansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri. The map is on the web site he created, spiders.ucr.edu, which draws about one million visits a year. The JAMA Dermatology paper was the culmination of years of collaboration between Stoecker and Dyer, who developed a swab test for detecting recluse venom in bites, and Vetter, who has been documenting misdiagnosed conditions. It encapsulate 25 years of Vetter's work as well as his colleagues' 50 combined years of treating brown recluse bites in Missouri. "I'm really on a crusade here," Vetter said. "We have this knowledge that is counter to what many doctors and the general public are saying. And what they are saying is causing damage by misdiagnosis." The paper is called "NOT RECLUSE: A Mnemomic Device to Avoid False Diagnosis of Brown Recluse Spider Bites." The University of California, Riverside (http://www. ) is a doctoral research university, a living laboratory for groundbreaking exploration of issues critical to Inland Southern California, the state and communities around the world. Reflecting California's diverse culture, UCR's enrollment is now nearly 23,000 students. The campus opened a medical school in 2013 and has reached the heart of the Coachella Valley by way of the UCR Palm Desert Center. The campus has an annual statewide economic impact of more than $1 billion. A broadcast studio with fiber cable to the AT&T Hollywood hub is available for live or taped interviews. UCR also has ISDN for radio interviews. To learn more, call (951) UCR-NEWS.


News Article | November 22, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Many human health problems are thought to result from our modern diet, especially in industrialized countries. Foremost among these is a growing epidemic of obesity and obesity-related disorders, such as diabetes. For a long time, scientists have assumed these diet-induced health problems lasted, at most, for the lifetime of the individual and would not be passed on to our kids. However, the recent discovery of so-called obesity genes -- genes that increase certain people's risk of obesity -- suggests otherwise. How genes shape the effects of different diets is the goal of a new five-year, $1.6 million grant to the University of Missouri by the National Institutes of Health Institute of General Medical Sciences. The grant was awarded to Elizabeth King, who is an assistant professor in the Division of Biological Sciences in the College of Arts and Science. Using fruit flies as a model system, King will use the funding to study how animals allocate nutritional resources to regulate their lifespan and reproduction in response to the availability of food in their environment, a fundamental process, called resource allocation. "We need to know how environment shapes life history to understand why our rich diets cause problems like obesity and diabetes. In part, we have these problems because of the way our bodies allocate food resources," says King. "We can't replay our own human evolutionary history with different variations to see the effects, but we can do these experiments with fruit flies and see how different diets affect genes that control things like fat storage, reproduction, and energy use over time." For the project, King will perform three large, controlled evolutionary experiments in the lab using fruit fly populations. Each population will be reared on one of three dietary regimes -- rich, fluctuating, and deteriorating-- and then observed over 25 generations to see what physiological responses and genetic changes evolve over time. King will compare the data between each population to see if and how, at both a whole organism and genetic level, each nutritional environment selects for different resource allocation patterns. One experiment will test the popular thrifty-gene hypothesis, which has been used to explain today's modern obesity epidemic. According to this hypothesis, an environment punctuated by famine, like that experienced by humans throughout most of our evolutionary history, favors individuals with genes that make them more likely to store fat. These so-called "thrifty genes," according to the hypothesis, are detrimental in an environment where food is abundant. "In the past, it was selectively advantageous to have a conservative, or thrifty, type of response to resource abundance; you could store those resources for when you had a famine period. Now that we don't experience famine conditions, that leads to over storage, which is no longer adaptive in our current environment," explains King. "One of the dietary environments we will test is this fluctuating resources, and we will see if that response does evolve or is reinforced under that condition as opposed to the other treatments where we would expect less fat storage." The other two experiments will see what responses evolve in an abundant dietary environment versus one where nutritional resources deteriorate over time. For the project, King will perform three selection experiments using fruit fly populations derived from the Drosophila Synthetic Population Resource. According to King, this will be the first selection experiment that studies how variability in diet selects for different responses to diet in the future. The three fruit fly populations will be derived from a special group of flies, known as the Drosophila Synthetic Population Resource (DSPR), whose complete genetic makeup is known. This will make it possible for King to pinpoint specific genes or genome regions that may change in response to the different dietary histories. The discoveries made in flies, says King, may shed light on human health. "Flies are being used as a model for all sorts of human diseases, and things like metabolic pathways have a high level of conservation between humans and flies. We believe some of the information we learn from flies will help guide the direction of study in humans," she says.


Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (skin cancers) selected, representing over 5,500,000 diagnoses annually in the US alone, making it the most prevalent cancer today KENNEWICK, WA / ACCESSWIRE / February 28, 2017 / Advanced Medical Isotope Corporation ("AMI") (OTC PINK: ADMD), a cancer therapeutics company focused on the commercialization of their RadioGel™ device, a tumor-injectable and biodegradable radiation that remains focused at the treatment site, today released the third letter in a four letter series outlining AMI's push towards FDA submittal and commercialization from its new President & CEO, Dr. Mike Korenko. After two months of dynamic experience-based discussions among our Medical Advisory Board Members and other senior doctors we have selected our first indication for use which we will present to the Food and Drug Administration. After thorough review to prioritize indications, we have selected basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma (skin cancers). The reasons for this important selection relates to our criteria below: This cancer is in the skin and therefore easy to access. Single injections for small tumors are easy and we have already demonstrated our parallel injection procedure in the cat at Washington State University for larger tumors. b. Therapeutic ratio (ratio of the dose to the tumor target tissue relative to dose to adjacent normal tissue) and responsiveness to radiation: Yttrium-90 is a beta emitter in RadioGel has a much higher therapeutic ratio than any gamma emitter or external beam therapy. Since Y-90 delivers high-energy beta-rays, it has an average penetration path of 4 to 5 mm (less than a quarter inch), which is ideal for skin cancer therapy. There is minimal irradiation of normal surrounding tissue. As an added bonus, the patent can go home immediately with no irradiation risk to themselves or family members. We can treat with very high doses, so response to radiation would not be an issue. (As a comparison, external beam radiation can deliver 60 to 80 Gy. Yttrium-90 in RadioGel can go to 700 Gy or higher). As discussed above, there is very low risk of collateral damage. In addition, the skin is not located next to a major organ, for example if you were injecting near spinal tumors. Because of the low collateral risk and because of the therapeutic effects that would be relatively easy to see in three months, the Medical Advisory Board felt this might be an easier device for the FDA to approve and in a shorter timeframe. In addition, some of our animal testing, that will start in about two months, are already treating similar cancers. We intentionally avoided applying to the FDA for melanoma, since it is highly metastatic and goes deep into the tissue. There are a much smaller number of cases for this cancer type (around 300,000). In addition, there are three new immunotherapy products on the market to treat melanoma cancer. They can have serious side-effects, but they are promising. That violates our next criterion below. Some skin cancers require several-hour long surgeries in which the tumor is removed, one layer at a time, and then sent for biopsy. They then require a skin graft that can lead to an infection. On tumors of the face this can be disfiguring. As people get older their skin gets thinner, which increases the difficulty. Our Advisory Board felt that for these cases in particular RadioGel has a significant therapeutic advantage. It would be comparatively benefit the patient and contribute to reducing the cost of health care. 3. CAN BE PROFITABLY EMBRACED BY THE MEDICAL COMMUNITY: One out or every three new cancers in the United States is a cancerous skin lesion. The two skin cancer types that we selected are the most common. There are 3.3 million patients in the United States with 5.5 million tumors (some patients have more than one tumor.) About 1 million of these are squamous cell cancers located near the surface of the epidermal skin layer, and greater than 4 million are basal cell cancers in the deep layer of the epidermis. I would never say that we can treat them all; that would just be marketing hype, but I believe that this will be the preferred treatment in a substantial number of cases in a very large market. b. Ease of acceptance by the medical community, Medicare reimbursement: The potential lower cost of RadioGel therapy coupled with the potential very large number of patients satisfied this criterion. To further test the criterion, we are in discussions with a major private clinic with several skin treatment centers. This client believes this is a great new tool for their toolbox. They are also advising us on the obstacles that will have to be overcome, such our Medicare reimbursement criterion. Since we believe RadioGel therapy will reduce the cost to Medicare we are confident that will not be an obstacle. There are other cancer types on our list of eighteen potential indications of use for RadioGel, and we have already prioritized to present them to the FDA in the future. Unfortunately, in the meantime, those patients will not be befitting from this technology. As I have reported in my last shareholder letter, I am aligning the veterinarian animal testing with the human skin cancer. Specially, the University of Missouri will be focusing on the treatment for surface soft cell lesions, and Colorado State University will be refining the therapies for oral squamous cell cancers. After this selection, our next step is to prepare for the FDA pre-submittal meeting. We will request that meeting after we complete the test plans that will answer their previous questions. Until we complete these plans I can only estimate that our pre-submission to the FDA would be in June. I am really happy that we have engaged John Smith from Hogan Lovells to be at our side through this FDA process. I am excited and relieved that this selection decision had been made and I wanted to thank the members of our Medical Advisory Board – Chairman Dr. Barry D. Pressman, Dr. Albert DeNittis, Dr. Howard Sandler, and Dr. Darrell Fisher. I would also like to thank Dr. Ricardo Paz-Fumagalli and Dr. Beau Bosko Toskich from the Mayo Clinic for their valuable advice. In addition to the important developments discussed above, we continue to believe that the public markets are significantly undervaluing our company. With a fully diluted enterprise value of less than $10 million, there remains very large upside potential. As we progress on our plan, I intend to work vigorously to educate and inform the medical and investment community as to the therapeutic benefits our core technology as well as the economic model that can generate significant revenue and profits. We are committed to pursuing an uplisting to a national exchange as soon as possible in order to gain wider exposure and credibility in our pursuit of the multi-billion-dollar addressable market for Radiogel™, that can both significantly improve patient outcomes and reward shareholders. Advanced Medical Isotope Corporation (ADMD) is a late stage radiation oncology focused medical device company engaged in the development of yttrium-90 based brachytherapy devices for cancer treatment. The IsoPet Solutions division is focused on utilizing RadioGel for a cancer therapy in animals. Brachytherapy uses radiation to destroy cancerous tumors by placing a radioactive isotope inside or next to the treatment area. The Company intends to outsource material aspects of manufacturing, distribution, sales and marketing for its products in the United States and to enter into licensing arrangements outside of the United States, though the Company will evaluate its alternatives before finalizing its plans. For more information, please visit our websites: www.isopetsolutions.com and www.isotopeworld.com. This release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. You can identify these statements by the use of the words "may," "will," "should," "plans," "expects," "anticipates," "continue," "estimates," "projects," "intends," and similar expressions. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that could cause results to differ materially from those projected or anticipated. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, the Company's ability to successfully execute its expanded business strategy, including by entering into definitive agreements with suppliers, commercial partners and customers; general economic and business conditions, effects of continued geopolitical unrest and regional conflicts, competition, changes in technology and methods of marketing, delays in completing various engineering and manufacturing programs, changes in customer order patterns, changes in product mix, continued success in technical advances and delivering technological innovations, shortages in components, production delays due to performance quality issues with outsourced components, regulatory requirements and the ability to meet them, government agency rules and changes, and various other factors beyond the Company's control. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (skin cancers) selected, representing over 5,500,000 diagnoses annually in the US alone, making it the most prevalent cancer today KENNEWICK, WA / ACCESSWIRE / February 28, 2017 / Advanced Medical Isotope Corporation ("AMI") (OTC PINK: ADMD), a cancer therapeutics company focused on the commercialization of their RadioGel™ device, a tumor-injectable and biodegradable radiation that remains focused at the treatment site, today released the third letter in a four letter series outlining AMI's push towards FDA submittal and commercialization from its new President & CEO, Dr. Mike Korenko. After two months of dynamic experience-based discussions among our Medical Advisory Board Members and other senior doctors we have selected our first indication for use which we will present to the Food and Drug Administration. After thorough review to prioritize indications, we have selected basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma (skin cancers). The reasons for this important selection relates to our criteria below: This cancer is in the skin and therefore easy to access. Single injections for small tumors are easy and we have already demonstrated our parallel injection procedure in the cat at Washington State University for larger tumors. b. Therapeutic ratio (ratio of the dose to the tumor target tissue relative to dose to adjacent normal tissue) and responsiveness to radiation: Yttrium-90 is a beta emitter in RadioGel has a much higher therapeutic ratio than any gamma emitter or external beam therapy. Since Y-90 delivers high-energy beta-rays, it has an average penetration path of 4 to 5 mm (less than a quarter inch), which is ideal for skin cancer therapy. There is minimal irradiation of normal surrounding tissue. As an added bonus, the patent can go home immediately with no irradiation risk to themselves or family members. We can treat with very high doses, so response to radiation would not be an issue. (As a comparison, external beam radiation can deliver 60 to 80 Gy. Yttrium-90 in RadioGel can go to 700 Gy or higher). As discussed above, there is very low risk of collateral damage. In addition, the skin is not located next to a major organ, for example if you were injecting near spinal tumors. Because of the low collateral risk and because of the therapeutic effects that would be relatively easy to see in three months, the Medical Advisory Board felt this might be an easier device for the FDA to approve and in a shorter timeframe. In addition, some of our animal testing, that will start in about two months, are already treating similar cancers. We intentionally avoided applying to the FDA for melanoma, since it is highly metastatic and goes deep into the tissue. There are a much smaller number of cases for this cancer type (around 300,000). In addition, there are three new immunotherapy products on the market to treat melanoma cancer. They can have serious side-effects, but they are promising. That violates our next criterion below. Some skin cancers require several-hour long surgeries in which the tumor is removed, one layer at a time, and then sent for biopsy. They then require a skin graft that can lead to an infection. On tumors of the face this can be disfiguring. As people get older their skin gets thinner, which increases the difficulty. Our Advisory Board felt that for these cases in particular RadioGel has a significant therapeutic advantage. It would be comparatively benefit the patient and contribute to reducing the cost of health care. 3. CAN BE PROFITABLY EMBRACED BY THE MEDICAL COMMUNITY: One out or every three new cancers in the United States is a cancerous skin lesion. The two skin cancer types that we selected are the most common. There are 3.3 million patients in the United States with 5.5 million tumors (some patients have more than one tumor.) About 1 million of these are squamous cell cancers located near the surface of the epidermal skin layer, and greater than 4 million are basal cell cancers in the deep layer of the epidermis. I would never say that we can treat them all; that would just be marketing hype, but I believe that this will be the preferred treatment in a substantial number of cases in a very large market. b. Ease of acceptance by the medical community, Medicare reimbursement: The potential lower cost of RadioGel therapy coupled with the potential very large number of patients satisfied this criterion. To further test the criterion, we are in discussions with a major private clinic with several skin treatment centers. This client believes this is a great new tool for their toolbox. They are also advising us on the obstacles that will have to be overcome, such our Medicare reimbursement criterion. Since we believe RadioGel therapy will reduce the cost to Medicare we are confident that will not be an obstacle. There are other cancer types on our list of eighteen potential indications of use for RadioGel, and we have already prioritized to present them to the FDA in the future. Unfortunately, in the meantime, those patients will not be befitting from this technology. As I have reported in my last shareholder letter, I am aligning the veterinarian animal testing with the human skin cancer. Specially, the University of Missouri will be focusing on the treatment for surface soft cell lesions, and Colorado State University will be refining the therapies for oral squamous cell cancers. After this selection, our next step is to prepare for the FDA pre-submittal meeting. We will request that meeting after we complete the test plans that will answer their previous questions. Until we complete these plans I can only estimate that our pre-submission to the FDA would be in June. I am really happy that we have engaged John Smith from Hogan Lovells to be at our side through this FDA process. I am excited and relieved that this selection decision had been made and I wanted to thank the members of our Medical Advisory Board – Chairman Dr. Barry D. Pressman, Dr. Albert DeNittis, Dr. Howard Sandler, and Dr. Darrell Fisher. I would also like to thank Dr. Ricardo Paz-Fumagalli and Dr. Beau Bosko Toskich from the Mayo Clinic for their valuable advice. In addition to the important developments discussed above, we continue to believe that the public markets are significantly undervaluing our company. With a fully diluted enterprise value of less than $10 million, there remains very large upside potential. As we progress on our plan, I intend to work vigorously to educate and inform the medical and investment community as to the therapeutic benefits our core technology as well as the economic model that can generate significant revenue and profits. We are committed to pursuing an uplisting to a national exchange as soon as possible in order to gain wider exposure and credibility in our pursuit of the multi-billion-dollar addressable market for Radiogel™, that can both significantly improve patient outcomes and reward shareholders. Advanced Medical Isotope Corporation (ADMD) is a late stage radiation oncology focused medical device company engaged in the development of yttrium-90 based brachytherapy devices for cancer treatment. The IsoPet Solutions division is focused on utilizing RadioGel for a cancer therapy in animals. Brachytherapy uses radiation to destroy cancerous tumors by placing a radioactive isotope inside or next to the treatment area. The Company intends to outsource material aspects of manufacturing, distribution, sales and marketing for its products in the United States and to enter into licensing arrangements outside of the United States, though the Company will evaluate its alternatives before finalizing its plans. For more information, please visit our websites: www.isopetsolutions.com and www.isotopeworld.com. This release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. You can identify these statements by the use of the words "may," "will," "should," "plans," "expects," "anticipates," "continue," "estimates," "projects," "intends," and similar expressions. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that could cause results to differ materially from those projected or anticipated. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, the Company's ability to successfully execute its expanded business strategy, including by entering into definitive agreements with suppliers, commercial partners and customers; general economic and business conditions, effects of continued geopolitical unrest and regional conflicts, competition, changes in technology and methods of marketing, delays in completing various engineering and manufacturing programs, changes in customer order patterns, changes in product mix, continued success in technical advances and delivering technological innovations, shortages in components, production delays due to performance quality issues with outsourced components, regulatory requirements and the ability to meet them, government agency rules and changes, and various other factors beyond the Company's control.


News Article | November 7, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBIA, Mo. (Nov. 7, 2016) -- While employee salaries and wages can account for up to 80 percent of the total operating budget in health care organizations, human resources departments in many U.S. hospitals still rely on traditional, bureaucratic HR practices that can constrain employee effort and initiative. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine have identified three HR practices for hospitals that can improve clinical work behaviors, leading to better outcomes for patients. "First, the hospital's CEO needs to play the role of the people's champion, as this would help to provide leadership and critical resources to the HR department, in addition to sending a clear message to the rest of the organization about the importance of HR," said Naresh Khatri, Ph.D., an associate professor in the Department of Health Management and Informatics at the MU School of Medicine and lead author of the study. "Next, the role of the HR director is almost as critical as that of the CEO in making sure the HR department has a compelling vision of how to use HR to enhance hospital performance. Finally, a successful HR department should have highly professional and competent HR employees who are capable of modifying, reconfiguring, and renewing HR practices and systems as needed." Khatri and his research team surveyed senior managers from more than 450 hospitals across the United States. The team asked questions related to the relationship between the hospital's chief executive officer and its HR department, the leadership within the HR department and the quality of patient care. The team used the survey answers to test whether the three HR practices could enhance quality of patient care via promoting proactive behaviors in their workforce. The researchers found that those practices had significant positive correlations with proactive employee behaviors that in turn improved the quality of patient care. "Given the critical role that employees play in the service industry, and especially in hospitals where their role takes on a special significance, it is of utmost importance that we understand what motivates employees to better serve their customers," Khatri said. "This study found that proactive employee behaviors could boost employee productivity, leading to improved patient care." Overall, Khatri said that the study findings show that the HR department plays a crucial role in improving the quality of patient care in U.S. hospitals and could be a source of sustainable competitive advantage for these organizations. To be able to do so, Khatri said that U.S. hospitals should build HR departments that are strategic and transformational rather than bureaucratic and administrative. "If hospitals are to capitalize on their employee skills, knowledge and abilities, it is critical that attention is paid to finding the right individual to head the HR department, while empowering him or her to perform the role to the best of their abilities," Khatri said. Khatri's study, "The Relationship between HR Capabilities and Quality of Patient Care: The Mediating Role of Proactive Work Behaviors," recently was published in Human Resource Management. The project was partially funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality of the National Institutes of Health (R03HS17549).


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome James A. Slough, MD, FAAOS, Orthopedic Surgeon, to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. James A. Slough is a highly trained and qualified orthopedic surgeon with an extensive expertise in all facets of his work, especially arthroscopic and minimally invasive shoulder, knee, and hip surgery, as well as sports medicine. Dr. Slough has been in practice for more than 30 years and is currently serving patients within Excelsior Orthopaedics in Amherst, New York. He is also affiliated with the Buffalo Surgery Center and Kenmore Mercy Hospital. Dr. Slough attended the University of Michigan Medical School, graduating with his Medical Degree. He subsequently completed his General Surgery internship at the Graduate Hospital in Philadelphia, before undertaking his Orthopaedic training at the University of Missouri at Kansas City. He is certified by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery, and has earned the coveted title of Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. For his wealth of experience and knowledge, Dr. Slough is the recipient of numerous awards and recognitions, including a Navy Achievement Medal, a Franklin Dickson Outstanding Orthopaedic Resident Award, First Place for The Children’s Mercy Hospital Resident Presentation, and he is a past President of the Clinical Orthopaedic Society. Dr. Slough maintains professional memberships with the Clinical Orthopaedic Society, the Arthroscopy Association of North America, the American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine, Catholic Medical Partners, the AAOS, and has been a member of the AAOS Board of Councilors. Furthermore, Dr. Slough serves as Team Physician for the AAA Buffalo Bisons. He attributes his success to his loving and supportive family, his love of the field, and improving function and mobility in his patients. When he is not assisting his patients and taking care of the Buffalo Bisons, Dr. Slough enjoys fishing, skiing, and biking Learn more about Dr. Slough here: http://www.excelsiorortho.com/ and be sure to read his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBIA, Mo. - Invisible to the naked eye, cyst nematodes are a major threat to agriculture, causing billions of dollars in global crop losses every year. A group of plant scientists, led by University of Missouri researchers, recently found one of the mechanisms cyst nematodes use to invade and drain life-sustaining nutrients from soybean plants. Understanding the molecular basis of interactions between plants and nematodes could lead to the development of new strategies to control these major agricultural pests and help feed a growing global population. Soybeans are a major component for two-thirds of the world's animal feed and more than half the edible oil consumed in the United States, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Cyst nematodes jeopardize the healthy production of this critical global food source by "hijacking" the soybean plants' biology. "Cyst nematodes are one of the most economically devastating groups of plant-parasitic nematodes worldwide," said Melissa Goellner Mitchum, a researcher in the Bond Life Sciences Center and an associate professor in the Division of Plant Sciences at MU. "These parasites damage root systems by creating a unique feeding cell within the roots of their hosts and leeching nutrients out of the soybean plant. This can lead to stunting, wilting and yield loss for the plant. We wanted to explore the pathways and mechanisms cyst nematodes use to commandeer soybean plants." About 15 years ago, Mitchum and colleagues unlocked clues into how nematodes use small chains of amino acids, or peptides, to feed on soybean roots. Using next-generation sequencing technologies that were previously unavailable, Michael Gardner, a graduate research assistant, and Jianying Wang, a senior research associate in Mitchum's lab, made a remarkable new discovery -- nematodes possess the ability to produce a second type of peptide that can effectively "take over" plant stem cells that are used to create vital pathways for the delivery of nutrients throughout the plant. Researchers compared these peptides with those produced by plants and found that they were identical to the ones the plants use to maintain vascular stem cells, known as CLE-B peptides. "Plants send out these chemical signals to its stem cells to begin various functions of growth, including the vascular pathway that plants use to transport nutrients," Mitchum said. "Advanced sequencing showed us that nematodes use identical peptides to activate the same process. This 'molecular mimicry' helps nematodes produce the feeding sites from which they drain plant nutrients." To test their theory, Xiaoli Guo, a post-doctoral researcher in Mitchum's lab and first author of the study, synthesized the CLE-B nematode peptide and applied it to the vascular cells of Arabidopsis, a model plant system used in plant research. They found that the nematode peptides triggered a growth response in Arabidopsis much in the same way as the plants' own peptides affected development. Next, the team "knocked out" the genes Arabidopsis plants use to signal to their own stem cells. Here, the nematodes didn't do as well because the parasites were unable to signal to the plant and the nematode's feeding site was compromised, Guo says. "When a nematode attacks the root, it selects vascular stem cells that are located along the root," Mitchum said. "By knocking out that pathway, we reduced the size of the feeding site that nematodes use to control the plant. This is the first time we've been able to show that the nematode is modulating or controlling the vascular plant pathway. Understanding how plant-parasitic nematodes modulate host plants to their own benefit is a crucial step in helping to create pest-resistant plants. If we can block those peptides and the pathways nematodes use to overtake the soybean plant, then we can enhance resistance for this very valuable global food source." The study "Identification of cyst nematode B-type CLE peptides and modulation of the vascular stem cell pathway for feeding cell formation," recently was published by PLOS Pathogens. This work was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation (IOS-1456047), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (2012-67013-19345) and Huazhong Agricultural University Scientific and Technological Self-Innovation Foundation (Program No. 2016RC004). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the funding agencies. Editor's Note: For more on the story please see: https:/


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome James A. Slough, MD, FAAOS, Orthopedic Surgeon, to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. James A. Slough is a highly trained and qualified orthopedic surgeon with an extensive expertise in all facets of his work, especially arthroscopic and minimally invasive shoulder, knee, and hip surgery, as well as sports medicine. Dr. Slough has been in practice for more than 30 years and is currently serving patients within Excelsior Orthopaedics in Amherst, New York. He is also affiliated with the Buffalo Surgery Center and Kenmore-Mercy Hospital. Dr. Slough attended the University of Michigan Medical School, graduating with his Medical Degree. He subsequently completed his General Surgery internship at the Graduate Hospital in Philadelphia, before undertaking his Orthopaedic training at the University of Missouri at Kansas City. He is certified by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery, and has earned the coveted title of Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. For his wealth of experience and knowledge, Dr. Slough is the recipient of numerous awards and recognitions, including a Navy Achievement Medal, a Franklin Dickson Outstanding Orthopaedic Resident Award, First Place for The Children’s Mercy Hospital Resident Presentation, and he is a past President of the Clinical Orthopaedic Society. Dr. Slough maintains professional memberships with the AAOS Board of Councilors, the Clinical Orthopaedic Society, the Arthroscopy Association of North America, the American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine, and the Catholic Medical Partners. Furthermore, Dr. Slough serves as Team Physician for the AAA Buffalo Bisons. He attributes his success to his loving and supportive family, his love of the field, and improving function and mobility in his patients. When he is not assisting his patients and taking care of the Buffalo Bisons, Dr. Slough enjoys fishing, skiing, and biking Learn more about Dr. Slough here: http://www.excelsiorortho.com/ and be sure to read his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


News Article | December 8, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

This CAST literature review and report looks at problems caused by the current system of asynchronous approvals for biotech crops. The authors focus on the economic effects in countries that are major global commodity exporters and importers, which show that asynchrony in the global approval of new biotech crops and the resultant risk of low level presence (LLP) puts large volumes of trade worth billions of dollars at risk. In particular, the increasing disparity in the biotech product approval timelines between exporting countries that utilize new technologies and large grain importing countries is a significant and growing impediment to trade, specifically in the European Union and China. As Task Force Chair Dr. Nicholas Kalaitzandonakes said, “How the world’s regulatory systems operate in the area of biotech crops is critically important to producers and consumers.” The paper shares research regarding the impacts on the following: The report offers several potential solutions and provides research about approaches that might ease the negative impacts of asynchronous approvals and LLP. “More research is needed to evaluate the global cost of asynchronous approvals and LLP, the impacts of asynchrony on innovation and crop improvements, and the decision-making process of biotech developers, in both the public and private sectors,” say the authors. “Timely research could inform policymaking and improve the design of policy instruments.” Many factors influence the approval process—including differences in institutional arrangements, regulatory procedures, administrative capacity, and attitudes toward biotech crops. Therefore, the time required to review new biotech events varies significantly from one country to another. But, as this paper concludes, “As long as the current situation persists, agricultural biotechnology will be prevented from delivering the full range of promised benefits of improved standard of living and food security.” Task Force Authors: Nicholas Kalaitzandonakes (Chair), University of Missouri-Columbia Val Giddings, Information Technology and Innovation Foundation Alan McHughen, University of California-Riverside Ken Zahringer, University of Missouri-Columbia This CAST Literature Review and Report (QTA2016-2), its companion Ag quickCAST, and a Chinese version of the paper are available online at the CAST website, http://www.cast-science.org, along with many of CAST's other scientific publications. All CAST Issue Papers, Commentaries, and Ag quickCASTs are FREE. This study was funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Foreign Agricultural Service. CAST is an international consortium of scientific and professional societies, companies, and nonprofit organizations. Through its network of experts, CAST assembles, interprets, and communicates credible, balanced, science-based information to policymakers, the media, the private sector, and the public.


Trull T.J.,University of Missouri | Ebner-Priemer U.,Karlsruhe Institute of Technology | Ebner-Priemer U.,Central Institute of Mental Health
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology | Year: 2013

Ambulatory assessment (AA) covers a wide range of assessment methods to study people in their natural environment, including self-report, observational, and biological/physiological/behavioral. AA methods minimize retrospective biases while gathering ecologically valid data from patients' everyday life in real time or near real time. Here, we report on the major characteristics of AA, and we provide examples of applications of AA in clinical psychology (a) to investigate mechanisms and dynamics of symptoms, (b) to predict the future recurrence or onset of symptoms, (c) to monitor treatment effects, (d) to predict treatment success, (e) to prevent relapse, and (f) as interventions. In addition, we present and discuss the most pressing and compelling future AA applications: technological developments (the smartphone), improved ecological validity of laboratory results by combined lab-field studies, and investigating gene-environment interactions. We conclude with a discussion of acceptability, compliance, privacy, and ethical issues. Copyright © 2013 by Annual Reviews.


Gres A.T.,University of Missouri | Kirby K.A.,University of Missouri | KewalRamani V.N.,U.S. National Cancer Institute | Tanner J.J.,University of Missouri | And 2 more authors.
Science | Year: 2015

The detailed molecular interactions between native HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) hexamers that shield the viral genome and proteins have been elusive. We report crystal structures describing interactions between CA monomers related by sixfold symmetry within hexamers (intrahexamer) and threefold and twofold symmetry between neighboring hexamers (interhexamer). The structures describe how CA builds hexagonal lattices, the foundation of mature capsids. Lattice structure depends on an adaptable hydration layer modulating interactions among CA molecules. Disruption of this layer alters interhexamer interfaces, highlighting an inherent structural variability. A CA-targeting antiviral affects capsid stability by binding across CA molecules and subtly altering interhexamer interfaces remote to the ligand-binding site. Inherent structural plasticity, hydration layer rearrangement, and effector binding affect capsid stability and have functional implications for the retroviral life cycle. © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science. All rights reserved.


Jin P.,University of Missouri | Dalgarno S.J.,Heriot - Watt University | Atwood J.L.,University of Missouri
Coordination Chemistry Reviews | Year: 2010

The formation of hydrogen-bonded nanometer scale capsules from C-methylresorcin[4]arene represented a new area of research within the broad field of supramolecular chemistry. The related pyrogallol[4]arenes form nanocapsules of similar dimensions and this research now extends into the formation of novel metal-organic nanocapsules (MONCs). These relatively new systems are described here, with particular focus on recent advances in the formation of MONCs that are seamed together by more than one type of metal ion. This chemistry holds great potential for the isolation of designer materials that allow for enhanced control over the ratios of metal ions within these supramolecular assemblies.


Patent
University of Missouri and Helava Systems Inc. | Date: 2013-06-05

An electro-optically triggered power switch is disclosed utilizing a wide bandgap, high purity III-nitride semiconductor material such as BN, AN, GaN, InN and their compounds. The device is electro-optically triggered using a laser diode operating at a wavelength of 10 to 50 nanometers off the materials bandgap, and at a power level of 10 to 100 times less than that required in a conventionally triggered device. The disclosed device may be configured as a high power RF MOSFET, IGBT, FET, or HEMT that can be electro-optically controlled using photons rather than an electrical signal. Electro-optic control lowers the power losses in the semiconductor device, decreases the turn-on time, and simplifies the drive signal requirements. It also allows the power devices to be operated from the millisecond to the sub-picosecond timeframe, thus allowing the power device to be operated at RF frequencies (i.e., kilohertz to terahertz range) and at high temperatures where the bandgap changes with temperature.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LlamaZOO Interactive Inc. (LlamaZOO), developers of world-leading 3D veterinary anatomy software EasyAnatomy, will for the first time ever be enabling users to explore the intricacies of canine anatomy in virtual reality (VR). LlamaZOO has chosen the 2017 Western Veterinary Conference, one of the largest annual veterinary conferences in the world, as the venue to unveil this breakthrough in veterinary medicine. “We’ve made tremendous leaps in EasyAnatomy’s development this year, adding the complete nervous and circulatory systems along with animated pathologies” said LlamaZOO co-founder and CEO Charles Lavigne. “It’s all lined up to make WVC the ideal place for us to demonstrate our medically accurate 3D canine in VR for the first time.” “Being able to interact with a life-sized virtual canine cadaver, place your head inside its abdomen, and hold its organs in your hands is an extremely convincing argument for the advantages of 3D interaction compared to plastic models or textbooks” added co-founder and VP Sales Kevin Oke. EasyAnatomy is currently available on tablet, laptop, and desktop devices, and since its preliminary launch last summer has been adopted by veterinary practitioners, students, and educators all over the world. LlamaZOO’s aim is to help veterinarians have more engaged, informed, and effective conversations with clients about their pet’s health, and the recent addition of animated pathologies to EasyAnatomy makes this even easier. “Our veterinary advisors and customers have been urging us to add pathologies to EasyAnatomy since we first launched” commented Oke. “Showing an owner what a healthy pet should look like is one thing, but being able to present them with how their pet’s ailment actually appears, and demonstrate how that condition will deteriorate over time if left untreated is incredibly powerful. Our users are excited to start having more informed conversations with clients, and to enjoy the resulting increase in compliance.” Veterinary medicine is evolving, and veterinarians are increasingly adopting solutions that boost efficiency, and differentiate their practice in a competitive landscape. “The newest generation of pet owners have grown up surrounded by technology, and they’ve come to expect the businesses they interact with to be technology-inclined too” said Oke. “The time and cost savings that an effective use of technology offers is too attractive to ignore, and we’re seeing more and more veterinarians making innovative changes.” The 2017 Western Veterinary Conference takes place March 5-9 at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas. Over 14,000 participants are expected to attend, including 6000+ veterinarians and 500+ exhibiting companies. LlamaZOO will be located at Booth 1131 during the exhibition, and is now accepting reservations for limited VR demonstrations: http://www.easy-anatomy.com/WVC LlamaZOO is a leading education technology company that develops award-winning interactive software. With a primary focus on veterinary medicine, LlamaZOO has partnered with distinguished international institutions including the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Missouri, and the University of Saskatchewan in developing its 3D veterinary anatomy solution, EasyAnatomy. In March LlamaZOO will be one of 10 worldwide finalists competing in SXSWedu Launch. The company has previously been awarded the VIATEC Startup of the Year Award, been named “Top Regional Startup” by BCIC New Ventures, and was recognized as one of Douglas Magazine’s “10 to Watch”. Founded in 2014 and privately held, LlamaZOO is headquartered in Victoria BC, Canada.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A vital race is on in laboratories across the globe to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus. However, even if a vaccine were available today, many of the world's poorest people would not be able to receive it due to political and economic concerns surrounding vaccine injuries. Vaccine injuries are very rare and can range from minor immune responses such as hives to death. In an article published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Sam Halabi, University of Missouri associate professor of law, argues that a global vaccine injury compensation system administered through the World Health Organization would address this global public health issue. It is estimated that every second, more than 30,000 vaccine doses are delivered through routine immunization programs throughout the world. For the vast majority of people, vaccines offer protection from disease and infection, preventing an estimated 2 million to 3 million deaths annually. Adverse reactions are very rare. For example, the injury rate for the tetanus vaccine is less than one per 10 million doses. The injury rate for the influenza vaccine is one-to-two per 10 million. "We know that vaccines are very safe and effective, but vaccine injury does occur," Halabi said. "Who pays for those injured can become a point of contention. That's a life-and-death issue, especially when countries are amidst a public health crisis." The H1N1 vaccine, for example, was delayed by five months or more in some low-resource countries due in part to this issue, Halabi said. Halabi and his co-author support a "no-fault system" in which those who are harmed by properly manufactured vaccines are compensated from a centralized fund rather than requiring the injured to use legal action against the manufacturer. This no-fault system not only protects individuals, but also gives manufacturers protection from litigation, which encourages them to distribute their product widely. In the United States, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services administers a nationwide vaccine injury fund. The authors propose the global system be administered by the World Health Organization, which already provides technical assistance to many national immunization advisory groups. "Such a system would address barriers to vaccine manufacturers' participation as well as individual perceptions that fuel vaccine hesitancy in low-resource counties," Halabi said. "This system will bring economic certainty to this critical component of the public global health system and build necessary trust for vaccines." "A Global Vaccine Injury Compensation System," appears in the February 2017 edition of the Journal of the American Medical Association. The article is co-authored with Saad Omer, professor of global health, epidemiology and pediatrics at the Hubert Department of Global Health in the Rollins School of Public Health; and the Department of Pediatrics in the School of Medicine at Emory University.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Practical Data Solutions (PDS), a leading healthcare analytics company, is pleased to announce that Thomas Parry of Greenville, SC, has been appointed National Sales Director. “We are excited to welcome Thomas to PDS,” stated Russell J. Hendrickson, President and CEO of PDS. “He brings significant healthcare sales and marketing experience to our team as we continue to focus on managing healthcare performance through best practice analytics.” Mr. Parry comes to PDS with 16 years of experience in the healthcare IT industry, most recently with ClearDATA, the market leader for healthcare cloud computing and information security services for healthcare providers and software and service companies. Prior to ClearDATA, he was instrumental in the rapid growth and new market penetration of lifeIMAGE’s enterprise image sharing solutions. Mr. Parry is also considered one of the pioneers of Orthopaedic PACS, playing an instrumental role in taking orthopedic practices digital during his tenure at SECTRA. He earned his BS from the University of West Virginia and his MS from the University of Missouri. “This is an exciting time for PDS,” said Mr. Parry, “as we continue to evolve our business to meet the rapidly changing needs of healthcare and technology. Our focus on the future, combined with more than 20 years of proven experience, is a true formula for success and continued growth.” PDS specializes in analytics, dashboarding, business intelligence and data warehousing for healthcare organizations, leveraging industry best practice analytical technology and data modeling, paired with proven healthcare expertise in managing the business of healthcare. PDS solutions are used for revenue cycle, operations, collections, patient access, physician’s compensation, productivity, and clinical and quality reporting. PDS solutions are compatible with data coming from leading healthcare software companies like Epic, Cerner, GE, Allscripts, NextGen, Meditech, Great Plains and other leading healthcare applications.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

SCHERERVILLE, IN, February 17, 2017 /24-7PressRelease/ -- Alexis Jarrett has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process. For 46 years, Ms. Jarrett has expertly juggled her love of sports and the legal field and made careers she's been proud of out of both. She began on a strictly academic path, teaching in Esko, Minnesota public schools for four years after graduating from the University of Minnesota in 1970 with a Bachelor of Science degree. She incorporated sports into her professional life in 1974 as the University of Missouri's assistant director of athletics and head basketball, softball, and track coach, all while pursuing her postgraduate degree at the institution. Ms. Jarrett shifted her focus again in 1984 when she opened her private practice, an operation she still presently runs. Over the next three decades, beginning in the '70s, Ms. Jarrett split her time between pursuing law and pursuing sports. In addition to running multiple athletic teams and departments while at MU, she was the coordinator of the school's women's sports information department. In the '90s, she was the women's basketball and softball color analyst of the Regional Radio Sports Network, the vice president of legal affairs for the National Association of State Farm Agents, Inc., the judicial extern at the Circuit Court of Cook County, and a member of the Moot Court Council. Not one to leave her passion behind at the end of a work day, Ms. Jarrett is an active member of and leader in her local sports and law alliances: the Indiana High School Athletic Association Individual with Vision award recipient has been a sponsor of the Lake County High School Girls Basketball banquet; president and on the board of directors for the Samaritan Counseling Center; on the board of directors and the secretary-treasurer of the VNA Foundation; a guest at the American Heart Association Celebrity Dinner; the vice president of the Southwest Lake division of the American Heart Association; a member and on the board of advisors at the Basketball Hall of Fame; on the board of directors at the Boys and Girls Club; and a member of the advisory board for the industrial research liaison program at Indiana University. She is also on various committees in the American Bar Association, the Sports Lawyers Association, the Chicago Bar Association, the Indiana State Medical Association Alliance, the American Business Women's Association, and the Lake County Medical Society Alliance. Mr. Jarrett has been included in the 27th through 33rd editions of Who's Who In Finance and Industry; the 34th through 36th editions of Who's Who In Finance and Business; the 53rd, 55th through 58th, and 61st through 63rd editions of Who's Who in America; the 13th through 15th editions of Who's Who in American Law; the 23rd through 27th editions of Who's Who in the Midwest; the 11th, 12th, 17th, and 22nd editions of Who's Who in the World; the 17th through 21st and 24th through 28th editions of Who's Who of American Women; and the fourth edition of Who's Who of Emerging Leaders in America.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA--(Marketwired - February 13, 2017) - Amunix Operating Inc., a privately held biotechnology company and developer of a broad portfolio of biopharmaceuticals based on its novel XTEN® polymer half-life extension technology, XTEN drug-conjugate delivery technology and bispecific T-cell engager (ProTIA) pro-drug cancer therapeutics platforms, announced that it has appointed Frederick Hausheer, MD, FACP, as its Chief Medical Officer. Dr. Hausheer brings more than 25 years' experience in global oncology drug development, translational medicine, and drug discovery in commercial and academic settings to Amunix. Volker Schellenberger, Ph.D., President and Chief Executive Officer, said, "We are extremely pleased to have Fred join the Amunix management team. He brings exceptionally broad product development leadership and clinical expertise to the organization. His deep clinical experience in the oncology field will be especially valuable in the support of our ProTIA oncology platform. I look forward to working with Fred to accelerate the advancement of our clinical pipeline." Dr. Hausheer said, "It is a great privilege to be joining Amunix. I am exceedingly impressed with the technology, the Amunix team and the progress that has been made with the company's ProTIA T-cell engager cancer targeting platform which has broad potential to serve as a novel important therapeutic option over current cancer treatment regimens. I am excited about the prospects for advancing the pipeline of ProTIA platform products into patients and beyond. I believe that Amunix' innovative technologies will be an important advance for immuno-oncology drugs to improve patient outcomes." Over the course of his career, Dr. Hausheer has helped secure over $750 million in financial transactions involving capital raising, joint ventures, strategic alliances and licensing of compounds for partnership opportunities. He is experienced in trial design and execution, and involved in numerous regulatory interactions for drugs spanning from pre-IND and Phase I-III development in the United States, Europe, Asia/PAC and other territories. As founder, Chairman, CEO and President of BioNumerik from 1992-2015, he led the discovery and development of two novel oncologic therapeutics from laboratory through global Phase III development. In addition, he co-founded and served as Chairman of KI Pharma from 2005-2013, a joint venture between BioNumerik Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and ASKA Pharmaceutical Co., with a focus on development and commercialization of oncology products in Japan. Prior to joining industry, Dr. Hausheer was an Associate Professor of Medical Oncology and Associate Director Drug Development and Chief, Molecular Design at the University Texas Health Science Center and Cancer Therapy and Research Center and performed oncology drug research as a Senior Scientist at the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Hausheer completed his graduate training in Physiology and Biophysics at the University of Illinois-Champagne. He obtained his MD and completed his Internal Medicine residency at the University of Missouri School of Medicine, followed by completion of Medical Oncology fellowship training and joining the faculty at Johns Hopkins, where he focused on development of novel experimental therapeutics and pharmacology. He currently holds adjunct professorships at the University of Missouri in Internal Medicine and Oncology and The Johns Hopkins Oncology Center in Medical Oncology. He is board certified in Internal Medicine and Medical Oncology. Dr. Hausheer has published over 200 articles, abstracts and book chapters, and is an inventor or co-inventor on more than 400 issued/allowed United States and international patents. He has served as a board member to JP Morgan Chase, the Whittaker Institute for BioMedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Experimental Therapeutics Study Section I, and the NCI Institutional Review Board. Amunix, based in Mountain View, CA, is a privately held biotechnology company focused on the discovery and development of biologics with improved in vivo half-lives. Amunix' half-life extension technology is based on XTEN -- hydrophilic, unstructured, biodegradable proteins that impart a number of favorable properties upon the molecules to which they are attached. XTEN can be recombinantly fused or chemically conjugated to peptides, proteins, and other pharmaceuticals. In addition to the advantages of reduced dosing frequency, XTENylation also stabilizes plasma drug concentrations, which often results in increased efficacy as well as reduced side effects. Two genetically fused XTENylated products have been tested clinically. VRS-859 (exenatide-XTEN) has been tested through Phase I in the treatment of diabetes and VRS-317 (human growth hormone-XTEN) is currently in Phase III testing. Amunix is also working with additional partners, including Eli Lilly, Bioverativ, Roche, Janssen, Naia and other undisclosed companies in a wide range of therapeutic areas. Amunix is developing an internal pipeline of ProTIA (Protease Triggered Immune Activator) immuno-oncology therapeutics. ProTIAs are bispecific molecules that bind tumor antigens and T cells. ProTIAs are administered as long-acting prodrugs that can be activated in the tumor environment by tumor-associated proteases. Amunix is actively seeking partnerships for applications of its XTEN technology and its ProTIA platform. For additional information about the company, please visit www.amunix.com.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

UHY Advisors, Inc. (“UHY Advisors”), one of the nation’s fastest growing professional services firms, announces the appointment of six new managing directors: Cynthia Hannafey, Stacey Massa, Pamela May, Keith Moore, Marian Shaw and Paul Truber. “We are very excited to welcome these outstanding individuals as our newest managing directors. They epitomize the opportunity we present to all of our employees to take their career to the next level- both from a technical and quality perspective," said Anthony Frabotta, UHY Advisors’ chief executive officer and chairman of the board. “In addition, the fact that a significant portion of our newest leaders are participants in our WISE initiative (Women Invested in Success and Excellence) is a trend that is likely to continue. UHY’s ongoing growth demands that we continue to lead and build not only the WISE group, but create opportunities for all of our associates.” Richard David, chief operating officer of UHY Advisors, adds: “We are excited to see the ranks of our managing directors expand through the addition of these talented professionals. They have proven their commitment to quality client service and have impeccable technical and business skills. These future leaders are to be congratulated on reaching this significant career milestone.” Cynthia Hannafey is a managing director of UHY Advisors GA, Inc. As a leader of the firm’s management and technology consulting practice, she excels in the aggressive execution of projects that impact a client’s internal operations. Ms. Hannafey provides strategic planning and visioning services, portfolio, program and project management (P3M); digital transformation services; shared service implementation and optimization, post-merger integration, and operational and financial process optimization services to her clients. She is a results focused executive with more than 20 years of experience in analyzing existing operations and implementing the strategies, processes and technologies to address enterprise-wide challenges. Ms. Hannafey received her B.S. in Accounting from the University of South Florida and M.B.A. from Kennesaw State University, Michael Coles School of Business. She is a licensed CPA in the state of Georgia and a Project Management Professional®. Stacey Massa is a managing director of UHY Advisors MO, Inc., partner of UHY LLP and leading member of the firm’s national manufacturing group. She is the head of the audit and assurance department for the Missouri practice. Ms. Massa oversees and provides financial expertise in a variety of audit, business acquisitions/dispositions, efficiency reviews and financial reporting engagements. She is the audit lead on a variety of clients with complex organizational structures and international operations. Her leadership extends to her involvement in the National Tooling & Machining Association and as an accounting advisory board member of her alma mater, UMSL. She received her B.S. in Accounting and Finance from the University of Missouri St. Louis and is a licensed CPA in the state of Missouri. Ms. Massa has been a member of the firm and its predecessors since 1996. Pamela May is a managing director of UHY Advisors MI, Inc. and partner of UHY LLP. Ms. May is responsible for delivering tax and attest services to a diverse client base in the manufacturing, real estate, wholesale distribution and professional service industries. She has extensive knowledge in corporate and partnership tax planning, compliance and research. Ms. May advises clients on how to maximize profit and limit taxes through proper planning. She received her B.A. in Accounting and an M.S. in Taxation from Walsh College, and is a licensed CPA in the state of Michigan. Ms. May serves as a finance committee chairman for the Macomb County Chamber of Commerce, Macomb County Foundation and Macomb County Advocacy for Business. She has been with the firm and its predecessors since 1997. Keith Moore is a managing director of UHY Advisors MI, Inc., partner of UHY LLP and leading member of the firm’s industry group servicing petroleum marketers. He assists companies with developing and implementing strategic plans to improve operations, protect assets and increase profitability. Mr. Moore has consulted on numerous business transactions providing buy side and sell side advisory, business expansion transactions, due diligence, financial analysis, profitability and cost cutting analysis, tax strategies, IRS and state tax audits, and financing. He received his B.S. in Accounting from Wayne State University and is a licensed CPA in the states of Indiana, Kentucky and Michigan. He is also a British Standards Institute ISO/QS9000 Certified Auditor. Mr. Moore has been with the firm and its predecessors since 1990. Marian Shaw is a managing director of UHY Advisors NY, Inc. and partner of UHY LLP. She has diversified audit and tax experience in managing the functions of federal, international and state income tax compliance, tax audits, ASC 740 tax provisions, tax research and planning strategies. Ms. Shaw serves a variety of entities including US multinational companies with foreign subsidiaries and foreign companies doing business in the US. She received her B.A. in Accounting from City University of New York at Bernard M. Baruch College and is a licensed CPA in the state of New York. She has been a member of the firm and its predecessors since 1998. Paul Truber is a managing director of UHY Advisors MO, Inc. and partner of UHY LLP. As a leader of Missouri’s tax practice, he has become a trusted source to his clients for tax planning, research, consulting and compliance. Mr. Truber has taken on various thought leadership roles including leading the implementation of tax regulations and presenting the annual tax update at the firm’s executive briefing series. He received his B.S. in Accounting from Lindenwood University and is a licensed CPA in the state of Missouri. Mr. Truber has been a member of the firm and its predecessors since 1999. About UHY Advisors UHY Advisors provides tax and advisory services to entrepreneurial and other organizations, principally those enterprises in the dynamic middle market. UHY LLP, a licensed CPA firm, provides audit and other attest services to publicly traded, privately owned and nonprofit organizations in a number of industry sectors. UHY Advisors, operating in an alternative practice structure with UHY LLP, forms one of the largest professional services firms in the US. While that scale might provide confidence for some clients, others tell us our greatest value is the way we bring these resources to bear to help address today’s evolving business challenges. It’s a philosophy we call “The Next Level of Service”. To learn more visit http://www.uhy-us.com. All of the above entities are members of Urbach Hacker Young International Limited (“UHYI”), a worldwide network of independent professional services firms that provide audit, tax and advisory services around the globe. UHYI is ranked among the top international accountancy networks and a proud member in good standing of the Forum of Firms. Collectively, the US operating entities (UHY Advisors and UHY LLP) are the largest independent members of UHYI with significant participation, bringing the power of the international network to serve the individualized needs of US clients. UHY Advisors, Inc. provides tax and business consulting services through wholly owned subsidiary entities that operate under the name of “UHY Advisors.” UHY LLP is a licensed independent CPA firm that performs attest services in an alternative practice structure with UHY Advisors, Inc. and its subsidiary entities. UHY Advisors, Inc. and its subsidiary entities are not licensed CPA firms. UHY Advisors, Inc. and UHY LLP are US members of UHYI, a UK company, and form part of the international UHYI network of legally independent accounting and consulting firms. “UHY” is the brand name for the UHYI international network. Any services described herein are provided by UHY Advisors, Inc. and/or UHY LLP (as the case may be) and not by UHYI or any other member firm of UHYI. Neither UHYI nor any member of UHYI has any liability for services provided by other members.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

TEMPE, Ariz.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--National restaurant chain Tilted Kilt Pub & Eatery®, where “A Cold Beer Never Looked So Good®,” announced a partnership with the Coaches vs. Cancer program today in an effort to encourage Tilted Kilt guests and fans to come together for the fight to end cancer. From February 20 through April 3, Tilted Kilt guests are invited to “Take a Shot Against Cancer” by adding onto their checks a $1, $3, or $5 donation – correlating with a free throw, 3-pointer, and slam dunk. Guests will receive a basketball paper cut-out to autograph and display on local Tilted Kilt pub walls as part of the Kilt Cares fundraiser. All proceeds will benefit Coaches vs. Cancer program. “It’s an incredible opportunity for Tilted Kilt to partner with such a meaningful program as Coaches vs. Cancer,” said Tilted Kilt’s president, Ron Lynch. “We knew this would be natural fit for a partnership as our sports pubs and guests are gearing up for March Madness. The collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the National Association of Basketball Coaches has truly impacted the lives of so many, and we are excited to have the opportunity to use our passion for sports to help make a difference.” The Coaches vs. Cancer program was founded in 1993 by former University of Missouri coach Norm Stewart. A collaboration between the National Association of Basketball Coaches and the American Cancer Society, the program works in partnership with coaches, teams, fans, and local communities to make a difference in the fight against cancer by encouraging them to get involved and make an impact. To date, the program has raised more than $100 million dollars for the American Cancer Society. “Our partnership with Tilted Kilt gives local community members and fans the chance to be a part of the Coaches vs. Cancer team, while supporting the American Cancer Society's mission to save lives, celebrate lives, and lead the fight for a world without cancer,” said David Doan, VP, sports alliances. “Tilted Kilt is a hub for avid sports fans, and we are confident they will help us to defeat cancer—our ultimate opponent.” For more information about Tilted Kilt, visit tiltedkilt.com. For more information about the Coaches vs. Cancers program, visit coachesvscancer.org. Tilted Kilt Pub and Eatery, known as “The Best Looking Sports Pub You’ve Ever Seen,” has 95+ units in operation throughout the U.S. and Canada, with additional 20 pubs in various stages of development. Tilted Kilt is uniquely different than other sports bars because of its fun pub experience. The pubs feature dozens of large, HDTVs and big screens to show all the hottest sporting events. Every Pub has 30+ draught and bottled beers along with excellent tasting, high quality menu items served to you by the World Famous Kilt Girls ®. The Tilted Kilt Girls and Guys are inviting and represent the comfortable atmosphere while simultaneously demonstrating a high level of service in the industry. The brand’s slogan “A Cold Beer Never Looked So Good ®” personifies the Fun, Food, Spirits and Sports that the Tilted Kilt is well-known for bringing to pub guests in both the United States and Canada.


Hwang T.-C.,University of Missouri | Kirk K.L.,University of Alabama at Birmingham
Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine | Year: 2013

Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ATP-gated anion channel with two remarkable distinctions. First, it is the only ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that is known to be an ion channel-almost all others function as transport ATPases. Second, CFTR is the only ligand-gated channel that consumes its ligand (ATP) during the gating cycle-a consequence of its enzymatic activity as an ABC transporter. We discuss these special properties of CFTR in the context of its evolutionary history as an ABC transporter. Other topics include the mechanisms by which CFTR gating is regulated by phosphorylation of its unique regulatory domain and our current view of the CFTR permeation pathway (or pore). Understanding these basic operating principles of the CFTR channel is central to defining the mechanisms of action of prospective cystic fibrosis drugs and to the development of new, rational treatment strategies. © 2013 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.


Patent
City University of New York, University of Missouri and University of North Texas | Date: 2016-09-15

A method for enhancing amidohydrolase activity of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) is disclosed. The method comprising administering a phenoxyacyl-ethanolamide that causes the enhanced activity. The enhanced activity can have numerous effects on biological organisms including, for example, enhancing the growth of certain seedlings.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2011

The Toyon Research Corporation and Missouri University of Science and Technology (Toyon-MST) team proposes development of a system which fuses multi-spectral EO and 3D data collected with a low-cost LIDAR to enable improved perception and navigation for unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs). Phase I research and development will include system design based on analysis of sensor and algorithm capabilities using measured EO and LIDAR data, as well as feasibility demonstration of critical algorithm components. The proposed development includes innovative algorithms for fully-automated dense 3D reconstruction from 2D EO images, with accurate representation of intermediate reconstruction ambiguities. This enables near-optimal calibration of the EO and LIDAR sensors, as well as LIDAR sensor tasking and data fusion to obtain high-resolution 3D information using a low-scan-rate/low-cost LIDAR. The proposed development also includes innovative algorithms for fused EO-LIDAR obstacle detection, and leverages the experience of the Toyon-MST team with UGV platform, sensor, and algorithm development. The proposed Phase I work is designed to set the stage for development and demonstration of a complete prototype and real-time processing implementation in Phase II, and for integration of the developed technology in Navy systems.


News Article | October 29, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 48 million Americans contract foodborne diseases annually, with Salmonella being the leading cause of illness. Salmonella has a unique characteristic that allows the bacteria to penetrate through cell barriers and replicate inside its host. Now, scientists at the Cancer Research Center and the University of Missouri have developed a non-toxic strain of Salmonella to penetrate and target cancer cells. Results from this study could lead to promising new treatments that actively target and control the spread of cancer. "Salmonella strains have a natural preference for infiltrating and replicating within the cancer cells of a tumor, making the bacteria an ideal candidate for bacteriotherapy," said Robert Kazmierczak, a senior investigator at the Cancer Research Center and a post-doctoral fellow in the Division of Biological Sciences in the MU College of Arts and Science. "Bacteriotherapy is the use of live bacteria as therapy to treat a medical condition, like cancer." Kazmierczak and the team at the Cancer Research Center (CRC) developed CRC2631, a Salmonella strain that has been genetically modified to render the bacteria nontoxic and enhance its natural ability to target and kill cancer cells -- without harming normal, healthy cells. The Salmonella strain was administered directly into the circulatory system of mice with prostate cancer. "We found that the mice tolerated the treatment well and when examined, their prostate tumors decreased by about 20 percent compared to the control group," Kazmierczak said. "One of the most remarkable aspects of Salmonella is its ability to target, spread and persist inside the tumor. We are taking advantage of this ability by using Salmonella to carry or generate effective chemotherapeutic drugs, concentrating them at and throughout the tumor. The goal of this treatment is to develop a bacterial vector that can destroy the tumor from the inside out and reduce the amount of side effects endured by patients with cancer." CRC2631 is derived from a Salmonella sample that was stored in a test tube at room temperature for more than 50 years. The sample originates from the Demerec collection, a collection of mutant strains of Salmonella collected by geneticist Milisav Demerec and curated by Abraham Eisenstark, scientific director at the CRC and professor emeritus of biological sciences at MU. The collection contains over 20,000 different samples of Salmonella, with half of the samples housed at the Cancer Research Center where researchers affiliated with MU focus on three areas of cancer research: early detection, targeted treatment and new, effective chemotherapy. "The uniqueness of CRC2631 differentiates our Salmonella strains from other universities trying to achieve the same goal; it is one of a kind," Eisenstark said. "The strain of Salmonella we are using is essential to the success of our study." The study, "Salmonella Bacterial Monotherapy Reduces Autochthonous Prostate Tumor Burden in the TRAMP Mouse Model," was recently published in PLOS ONE.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are caused by a type of staph bacteria that has become resistant to the antibiotics used to treat ordinary staph infections. The rise of MRSA infections is limiting the treatment options for physicians and surgeons. Now, an international team of researchers, led by Elizabeth Loboa, dean of the University of Missouri College of Engineering, has used silver ion-coated scaffolds, or biomaterials that are created to hold stem cells, which slow the spread of or kill MRSA while regenerating new bone. Scientists feel that the biodegradable and biocompatible scaffolds could be the first step in the fight against MRSA in patients. "Osteomyelitis is a debilitating bone infection that can result when MRSA invades bone tissue, including bone marrow or surrounding soft tissues," said Loboa, who also is a professor of bioengineering. "Increasingly, those in the healthcare profession are running out of choices when it comes to treating MRSA while regenerating tissue. Using previously reported scaffolds that were created in our lab, we set out to determine the efficacy of coating these structures with silver ions and whether they were useful in treating or preventing osteomyelitis." The scaffolds were created from a polymer called polylactic acid (PLA), which is an FDA approved material that eventually biodegrades in the body. Next, researchers applied a silver ion releasing coating to the scaffolds and "seeded" them with fat-derived adult stem cells that could be "triggered" to create bone cells. Researchers also seeded the scaffolds with MRSA so that they could observe whether silver ions could fight the bacteria. The scientists found that the silver ion-releasing scaffolds not only inhibited MRSA, but also supported bone tissue formation. "Silver is well known for its antimicrobial properties and is highly toxic to a wide range of microorganisms such as MRSA," Loboa said. "Silver ions work mechanically--they actually disrupt the cellular machinery of MRSA. Our research now has shown that bone tissues still can be formed even in the presence of MRSA. We've created the materials needed for bone tissue engineering that will allow patients to use their own fat cells to create patient-specific bone and surgically implant those cells and tissues while diminishing, or potentially eliminating, the risk of MRSA infection." The early-stage results of this research are promising. If additional studies are successful within the next few years, MU officials could request authority from the federal government to begin human device development. After this status has been granted, researchers may conduct human clinical trials with the hope of developing new treatments for osteomyelitis. Their findings, "Evaluation of Silver Ion-Releasing Scaffolds in a 3-D Coculture system of MRSA and Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Their Potential Use in Treatment or Prevention of Osteomyelitis" recently was published in the journal Tissue Engineering, Part A. The research team included Mahsa Mohiti-Asli and Casey Molina of the Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Diteepeng Thamonwan of Silpakorn University in Thailand, and Behnam Pourdeyhimi of NCSU. Editor's Note: For more on the story, please see: http://engineering.


BETHESDA, MD, March 01, 2017-- Maurine Hoffman Beasley has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Recognized for more than five and a half decades of invaluable contributions to her field, Dr. Beasley parlays her knowledge into her role as emeritus professor at the University of Maryland, College Park, which she has held since 2009. She started pursing her passions for journalism and history at the University of Missouri, where she earned a Bachelor of Arts in history and a Bachelor of Science in journalism. After graduating, she started as an education editor for the Kansas City Star. Three years later, she earned a Master of Science in journalism from Columbia University and started as a staff writer for the Washington Post.In the mid-70s, Dr. Beasley again worked to further her career, this time by obtaining a Ph.D. in American civilization from George Washington University. The degree propelled her to roles as professor and graduate director of the Philip Merrill College of Journalism, University of Maryland, College Park, and later instructor for the Osher program at Johns Hopkins University. In order to keep abreast of changes in the field, she affiliates herself with Women in Communications, the American Journalism Historians Association, the Society of Professional Journalists, and the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communications.Over the years, Dr. Beasley has won numerous awards for her work, including the Haiman Award from the Speech Communications Association and the Founders Distinguished Senior Scholar Award from the American Association of University Women Educational Foundation. Additionally, she has been included in Who's Who in American Education, the inaugural edition of Who's Who in Media and Communication and 14 volumes of Who's Who of American Women. She has served as National President of both the American Journalism Historians Association and Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.Throughout her career, Dr. Beasley has gained knowledge that she has poured into such books as "Eleanor Roosevelt and the Media: A Public Quest for Self-Fulfillment," "First Ladies and the Press: The Unfinished Partnership of the Media Age," "Eleanor Roosevelt: Transformative First Lady," and "Women of The Washington Press: Politics, Prejudice and Persistence," which won the Kappa Tau Alpha Book Award in 2013. This text archives the discrimination faced by women journalists in Washington from the 1830s to the present day. A notable historian, she is currently awaiting the release of her latest book, "Ruby A. Black: Eleanor Roosevelt, Puerto Rico, and Political Journalism in Washington," which will be published in 2017. In the coming years, Dr. Beasley intends to produce additional works on women and journalism.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


Martens M.P.,University of Missouri | Smith A.E.,University of Missouri | Murphy J.G.,University of Memphis
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology | Year: 2013

Objective: College students are an at-risk population for heavy drinking and negative alcohol-related outcomes. Research has established that brief, multicomponent motivational interviewing-based interventions can be effective at reducing alcohol use or related problems, but less is known about the efficacy of individual components within these interventions. The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of 2 single-component, in-person, brief (15-20 min) alcohol interventions: personalized normative feedback (PNF) and protective behavioral strategies feedback (PBSF). Method: Data were collected on 365 undergraduate students from a large Midwestern university (65% women; 89% White) who were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 conditions: PNF, PBSF, or alcohol education (AE). Participants completed measures of alcohol use, alcohol-related problems, social norms, and protective behavioral strategies. Results: Results indicated that the PNF intervention was efficacious relative to the other conditions at reducing alcohol use and that its effects at 6-month follow-up were mediated by changes in perceived norms at the 1-month follow-up. The PBSF intervention was not efficacious at reducing alcohol use or alcohol-related problems. Conclusions: These findings provide support for the efficacy of an in-person PNF intervention and theoretical support for the hypothesized mechanisms of change in the intervention. Implications for researchers and clinicians are discussed. © 2013 American Psychological Association.

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