Tarkwa, Ghana

The University of Mines and Technology is located at Tarkwa in the Western Region of Ghana. UMaT is one of the public universities in the country. Wikipedia.


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News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Five researchers have been named winners of the 2017 Elsevier Foundation Awards for Early-Career Women Scientists in the Developing World for their research in engineering, innovation and technology. The winning scholars from Bangladesh, Ecuador, Ghana, Indonesia and Sudan are being honored for their accomplishments in chemical engineering, energy and minerals engineering, environmental engineering and computer science. They are also celebrated for mentoring young women scientists in their respective countries. "The determination, commitment and enthusiasm of these five women are an inspiration to us all, and especially to other women undertaking scientific research in developing countries. This award celebrates their excellent science and demonstrates that their hard work has had an impact both regionally and internationally, despite the difficult local conditions," said Jennifer Thomson, president of OWSD. The five researchers are: Dr. Tanzima Hashem of the Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology; Dr. María Fernanda Rivera Velásquez of the Universidad Nacional de Chimborazo in Ecuador; Dr. Felycia Edi Soetaredjo of the Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya in Indonesia; Dr. Grace Ofori-Sarpong of the University of Mines and Technology in Ghana; and Dr. Rania Mokhtar of the Sudan University of Science and Technology. “Each of these winners is working in emerging fields tackling some of the toughest challenges out there – from cyber security to decontamination of our most precious resources,” added Ylann Schemm, Director of the Elsevier Foundation. “By celebrating their achievements at the AAAS, our goal is to open doors and connect them with their global research peers.” The awards represent a longstanding partnership between the Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD) and the Elsevier Foundation. A panel of eminent scientists selected the winners, who will all receive USD $5,000 and all-expenses-paid trip to attend the 2017 AAAS Annual Meeting, provided by the Elsevier Foundation. The five winners were honored on February 18, 2017 during a ceremony at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting in Boston. "We are celebrating the exceptional achievements of five truly outstanding women scientists," said TWAS Executive Director a.i. Mohamed Hassan, also Special Advisor to OWSD. "Their work will be widely recognized and appreciated for the benefits it can bring to developing countries and the entire world. Just as important, they will serve as inspiring role models to future generations of women science leaders." ●    Dr. Tanzima Hashem, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Bangladesh (Central and South Asia Region) Computer science and engineering: For her work in developed computational approaches to protect the privacy of people accessing location-based services. Specifically, for her new and innovative solutions which allow citizens to have control over their personal and sensitive data on health, habits and whereabouts. "This award gives me the confidence to fulfil my dream of making user-friendly technology to solve the specific challenges we face in the developing world," said Dr. Tanzima Hashem. Environmental engineering: For her work using the fibre of a native Ecuadorian plant (Cabuya) and reactive minerals (zeolites) taken from the region to reduce contamination in industrial areas. Through her geological research into the availability of mineral resources in Ecuador, Dr. Rivera Velásquez has contributed to expanding Ecuador's capacity to exploit minerals and improving working conditions. "I belong to a generation of Ecuadorians who have received great opportunities of advanced training,” said Dr. Rivera Velásquez. “I am happy and proud to receive the OWSD-Elsevier Foundation award. It also strengthens my commitment to engage in the scientific development of my country and of the Andean region." ●    Dr. Felycia Edi Soetaredjo, Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya, Indonesia (East and South-East Asia and the Pacific) Chemical engineering: For her research on using biomass for environmental remediation and renewable energy. Dr. Soetaredjo utilizes biomass and clay material to produce biosorbents, adsorbents and composites, which remove hazardous compounds such as antibiotics, heavy metals and dyes from wastewater. "Realizing that a challenge can also be an opportunity, I started working on research in the area of environment and waste,” said Dr. Soetaredjo. “My home country Indonesia is uniquely rich in biodiversity and I believe that nature has answers for each question." Energy and minerals engineering: For her research work in microbial-mineral interaction, recovery of precious metals, water quality monitoring and acid mine drainage. Dr. Ofori-Sarpong’s research focuses on making the extraction of gold-bearing minerals and free gold particles possible and more efficient. She also is the founder of the Association of Women in Mining and Allied Professions in Ghana. "Difficulties in the process of extracting gold from recalcitrant gold-bearing minerals motivated me to start a new research I call mycohydrometallurgy, which uses fungi to break down the host materials to ease gold extraction in a one-pot process,” said Dr. Ofori-Sarpong. “With this pleasant surprise from the Elsevier Foundation and OWSD, I am greatly encouraged to reach higher." Computer engineering: For her research into the knowledge, methods, theory and application of advanced security systems for mobile devices. Dr. Mokhtar is involved in research projects funded by national bodies in the field of wireless communications, agriculture automation, sensor networks and security systems. "I strive to help transform communication systems in African Universities as I see this as key to opening doors to education for many more women in STEM,” said Dr. Mokhtar. “Receiving the OWSD-Elsevier Foundation award means that I can push forward with my vision." About OWSD The Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD) provides research training, career development and networking opportunities for women scientists throughout the developing world. Headed by eminent women scientists from the South, OWSD has more than 5,000 members and runs various programmes, including a PhD fellowship programme with over 200 successful graduates from Least Developed Countries and sub-Saharan Africa. OWSD is the first international forum to unite eminent women scientists from the developing and developed worlds with the objective of strengthening their role in the development process and promoting their representation in scientific and technological leadership. OWSD is affiliated with The World Academy of Science (TWAS) and based in Trieste, Italy, with national chapters throughout the developing world. http://www.owsd.net About The Elsevier Foundation The Elsevier Foundation provides grants to knowledge centered institutions around the world, with a sustainability focus on innovations in health information, diversity in STM, research in developing countries and technology for development. Since 2006, the Foundation has awarded more than 100 grants worth millions of dollars to non-profit organizations working in these fields. Through gift-matching, the Foundation also supports the efforts of Elsevier employees to play a positive role in their local and global communities. The Elsevier Foundation is a corporate not-for-profit 501(c)(3), funded by Elsevier, a global provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services. http://www.elsevierfoundation.org About Elsevier Elsevier is a world-leading provider of information solutions that enhance the performance of science, health, and technology professionals, empowering them to make better decisions, deliver better care, and sometimes make groundbreaking discoveries that advance the boundaries of knowledge and human progress. Elsevier provides web-based, digital solutions — among them ScienceDirect, Scopus, Research Intelligence and ClinicalKey — and publishes over 2,500 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and more than 35,000 book titles, including a number of iconic reference works. Elsevier is part of RELX Group, a world-leading provider of information and analytics for professional and business customers across industries. http://www.elsevier.com


Boston, Feb. 16, 2017 - Five researchers have been named winners of the 2017 Elsevier Foundation Awards for Early-Career Women Scientists in the Developing World for their research in engineering, innovation and technology. The winning scholars from Bangladesh, Ecuador, Ghana, Indonesia and Sudan are being honored for their accomplishments in chemical engineering, energy and minerals engineering, environmental engineering and computer science. They are also celebrated for mentoring young women scientists in their respective countries. "The determination, commitment and enthusiasm of these five women are an inspiration to us all, and especially to other women undertaking scientific research in developing countries. This award celebrates their excellent science and demonstrates that their hard work has had an impact both regionally and internationally, despite the difficult local conditions," said Jennifer Thomson, president of OWSD. The five researchers are: Dr. Tanzima Hashem of the Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology; Dr. María Fernanda Rivera Velásquez of the Universidad Nacional de Chimborazo in Ecuador; Dr. Felycia Edi Soetaredjo of the Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya in Indonesia; Dr. Grace Ofori-Sarpong of the University of Mines and Technology in Ghana; and Dr. Rania Mokhtar of the Sudan University of Science and Technology. "Each of these winners is working in emerging fields tackling some of the toughest challenges out there - from cyber security to decontamination of our most precious resources," added Ylann Schemm, Director of the Elsevier Foundation. "By celebrating their achievements at the AAAS, our goal is to open doors and connect them with their global research peers." The awards represent a longstanding partnership between the Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD) and the Elsevier Foundation. A panel of eminent scientists selected the winners, who will all receive USD $5,000 and all-expenses-paid trip to attend the 2017 AAAS Annual Meeting, provided by the Elsevier Foundation. The five winners will be honored on February 18, 2017 during a ceremony at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting in Boston. "We are celebrating the exceptional achievements of five truly outstanding women scientists", said TWAS Executive Director a.i. Mohamed Hassan, also Special Advisor to OWSD. "Their work will be widely recognized and appreciated for the benefits it can bring to developing countries and the entire world. Just as important, they will serve as inspiring role models to future generations of women science leaders." Dr. Tanzima Hashem, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Bangladesh (Central and South Asia Region) Computer science and engineering: For her work in developed computational approaches to protect the privacy of people accessing location-based services. Specifically, for her new and innovative solutions which allow citizens to have control over their personal and sensitive data on health, habits and whereabouts. "This award gives me the confidence to fulfil my dream of making user-friendly technology to solve the specific challenges we face in the developing world," said Dr. Tanzima Hashem. Environmental engineering: For her work using the fibre of a native Ecuadorian plant (Cabuya) and reactive minerals (zeolites) taken from the region to reduce contamination in industrial areas. Through her geological research into the availability of mineral resources in Ecuador, Dr. Rivera Velásquez has contributed to expanding Ecuador's capacity to exploit minerals and improving working conditions. "I belong to a generation of Ecuadorians who have received great opportunities of advanced training," said Dr. Rivera Velásquez. "I am happy and proud to receive the OWSD-Elsevier Foundation award. It also strengthens my commitment to engage in the scientific development of my country and of the Andean region." Dr. Felycia Edi Soetaredjo, Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya, Indonesia (East and South-East Asia and the Pacific) Chemical engineering: For her research on using biomass for environmental remediation and renewable energy. Dr. Soetaredjo utilizes biomass and clay material to produce biosorbents, adsorbents and composites, which remove hazardous compounds such as antibiotics, heavy metals and dyes from wastewater. "Realizing that a challenge can also be an opportunity, I started working on research in the area of environment and waste," said Dr. Soetaredjo. "My home country Indonesia is uniquely rich in biodiversity and I believe that nature has answers for each question." Energy and minerals engineering: For her research work in microbial-mineral interaction, recovery of precious metals, water quality monitoring and acid mine drainage. Dr. Ofori-Sarpong's research focuses on making the extraction of gold-bearing minerals and free gold particles possible and more efficient. She also is the founder of the Association of Women in Mining and Allied Professions in Ghana. "Difficulties in the process of extracting gold from recalcitrant gold-bearing minerals motivated me to start a new research I call mycohydrometallurgy, which uses fungi to break down the host materials to ease gold extraction in a one-pot process," said Dr. Ofori-Sarpong. "With this pleasant surprise from the Elsevier Foundation and OWSD, I am greatly encouraged to reach higher." Computer engineering: For her research into the knowledge, methods, theory and application of advanced security systems for mobile devices. Dr. Mokhtar is involved in research projects funded by national bodies in the field of wireless communications, agriculture automation, sensor networks and security systems. "I strive to help transform communication systems in African Universities as I see this as key to opening doors to education for many more women in STEM," said Dr. Mokhtar. "Receiving the OWSD-Elsevier Foundation award means that I can push forward with my vision." The awards ceremony will take place on February 18, 2017 during a ceremony at 8:30 a.m. in Boston at the Sheraton Boston Hotel Republic Ballroom during the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting. Reporters wishing to attend the ceremony can contact Domiziana Francescon at +31 61 021 5901 or d.francescon@elsevier.com. The Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD) provides research training, career development and networking opportunities for women scientists throughout the developing world. Headed by eminent women scientists from the South, OWSD has more than 5,000 members and runs various programmes, including a PhD fellowship programme with over 200 successful graduates from Least Developed Countries and sub-Saharan Africa. OWSD is the first international forum to unite eminent women scientists from the developing and developed worlds with the objective of strengthening their role in the development process and promoting their representation in scientific and technological leadership. OWSD is affiliated with The World Academy of Science (TWAS) and based in Trieste, Italy, with national chapters throughout the developing world. The Elsevier Foundation provides grants to knowledge centered institutions around the world, with a sustainability focus on innovations in health information, diversity in STM, research in developing countries and technology for development. Since 2006, the Foundation has awarded more than 100 grants worth millions of dollars to non-profit organizations working in these fields. Through gift-matching, the Foundation also supports the efforts of Elsevier employees to play a positive role in their local and global communities. The Elsevier Foundation is a corporate not-for-profit 501(c)(3), funded by Elsevier, a global provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services. Elsevier is a world-leading provider of information solutions that enhance the performance of science, health, and technology professionals, empowering them to make better decisions, deliver better care, and sometimes make groundbreaking discoveries that advance the boundaries of knowledge and human progress. Elsevier provides web-based, digital solutions -- among them ScienceDirect, Scopus, Research Intelligence and ClinicalKey -- and publishes over 2,500 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and more than 35,000 book titles, including a number of iconic reference works. Elsevier is part of RELX Group, a world-leading provider of information and analytics for professional and business customers across industries.


Early-career researchers from Bangladesh, Ecuador, Ghana, Indonesia and Sudan honored for their work in engineering sciences Five researchers have been named winners of the 2017 Elsevier Foundation Awards for Early-Career Women Scientists in the Developing World for their research in engineering, innovation and technology. The winning scholars from Bangladesh, Ecuador, Ghana, Indonesia and Sudan are being honored for their accomplishments in chemical engineering, energy and minerals engineering, environmental engineering and computer science. They are also celebrated for mentoring young women scientists in their respective countries. "The determination, commitment and enthusiasm of these five women are an inspiration to us all, and especially to other women undertaking scientific research in developing countries. This award celebrates their excellent science and demonstrates that their hard work has had an impact both regionally and internationally, despite the difficult local conditions," said Jennifer Thomson, president of OWSD. The five researchers are: Dr. Tanzima Hashem of the Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology; Dr. María Fernanda Rivera Velásquez of the Universidad Nacional de Chimborazo in Ecuador; Dr. Felycia Edi Soetaredjo of the Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya in Indonesia; Dr. Grace Ofori-Sarpong of the University of Mines and Technology in Ghana; and Dr. Rania Mokhtar of the Sudan University of Science and Technology. "Each of these winners is working in emerging fields tackling some of the toughest challenges out there - from cyber security to decontamination of our most precious resources," added Ylann Schemm, Director of the Elsevier Foundation. "By celebrating their achievements at the AAAS, our goal is to open doors and connect them with their global research peers." The awards represent a longstanding partnership between the Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD) and the Elsevier Foundation. A panel of eminent scientists selected the winners, who will all receive USD $5,000 and all-expenses-paid trip to attend the 2017 AAAS Annual Meeting, provided by the Elsevier Foundation. The five winners will be honored on February 18, 2017 during a ceremony at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting in Boston. "We are celebrating the exceptional achievements of five truly outstanding women scientists," said TWAS Executive Director a.i. Mohamed Hassan, also Special Advisor to OWSD. "Their work will be widely recognized and appreciated for the benefits it can bring to developing countries and the entire world. Just as important, they will serve as inspiring role models to future generations of women science leaders." Computer science and engineering: For her work in developed computational approaches to protect the privacy of people accessing location-based services. Specifically, for her new and innovative solutions which allow citizens to have control over their personal and sensitive data on health, habits and whereabouts. "This award gives me the confidence to fulfil my dream of making user-friendly technology to solve the specific challenges we face in the developing world," said Dr. Tanzima Hashem. Environmental engineering: For her work using the fibre of a native Ecuadorian plant (Cabuya) and reactive minerals (zeolites) taken from the region to reduce contamination in industrial areas. Through her geological research into the availability of mineral resources in Ecuador, Dr. Rivera Velásquez has contributed to expanding Ecuador's capacity to exploit minerals and improving working conditions. "I belong to a generation of Ecuadorians who have received great opportunities of advanced training," said Dr. Rivera Velásquez. "I am happy and proud to receive the OWSD-Elsevier Foundation award. It also strengthens my commitment to engage in the scientific development of my country and of the Andean region." Chemical engineering: For her research on using biomass for environmental remediation and renewable energy. Dr. Soetaredjo utilizes biomass and clay material to produce biosorbents, adsorbents and composites, which remove hazardous compounds such as antibiotics, heavy metals and dyes from wastewater. "Realizing that a challenge can also be an opportunity, I started working on research in the area of environment and waste," said Dr. Soetaredjo. "My home country Indonesia is uniquely rich in biodiversity and I believe that nature has answers for each question." Energy and minerals engineering: For her research work in microbial-mineral interaction, recovery of precious metals, water quality monitoring and acid mine drainage. Dr. Ofori-Sarpong's research focuses on making the extraction of gold-bearing minerals and free gold particles possible and more efficient. She also is the founder of the Association of Women in Mining and Allied Professions in Ghana. "Difficulties in the process of extracting gold from recalcitrant gold-bearing minerals motivated me to start a new research I call mycohydrometallurgy, which uses fungi to break down the host materials to ease gold extraction in a one-pot process," said Dr. Ofori-Sarpong. "With this pleasant surprise from the Elsevier Foundation and OWSD, I am greatly encouraged to reach higher." Computer engineering: For her research into the knowledge, methods, theory and application of advanced security systems for mobile devices. Dr. Mokhtar is involved in research projects funded by national bodies in the field of wireless communications, agriculture automation, sensor networks and security systems. "I strive to help transform communication systems in African Universities as I see this as key to opening doors to education for many more women in STEM," said Dr. Mokhtar. "Receiving the OWSD-Elsevier Foundation award means that I can push forward with my vision." The awards ceremony will take place on February 18, 2017 during a ceremony at 8:30 a.m. in Boston at the Sheraton Boston Hotel Republic Ballroom during the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting. Reporters wishing to attend the ceremony can contact Domiziana Francescon at +31-61-021-5901 or d.francescon@elsevier.com. The Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD) provides research training, career development and networking opportunities for women scientists throughout the developing world. Headed by eminent women scientists from the South, OWSD has more than 5,000 members and runs various programmes, including a PhD fellowship programme with over 200 successful graduates from Least Developed Countries and sub-Saharan Africa. OWSD is the first international forum to unite eminent women scientists from the developing and developed worlds with the objective of strengthening their role in the development process and promoting their representation in scientific and technological leadership. OWSD is affiliated with The World Academy of Science (TWAS) and based in Trieste, Italy, with national chapters throughout the developing world. http://www.owsd.net The Elsevier Foundation provides grants to knowledge centered institutions around the world, with a sustainability focus on innovations in health information, diversity in STM, research in developing countries and technology for development. Since 2006, the Foundation has awarded more than 100 grants worth millions of dollars to non-profit organizations working in these fields. Through gift-matching, the Foundation also supports the efforts of Elsevier employees to play a positive role in their local and global communities. The Elsevier Foundation is a corporate not-for-profit 501(c)(3), funded by Elsevier, a global provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services. http://www.elsevierfoundation.org Elsevier is a world-leading provider of information solutions that enhance the performance of science, health, and technology professionals, empowering them to make better decisions, deliver better care, and sometimes make ground-breaking discoveries that advance the boundaries of knowledge and human progress. Elsevier provides web-based, digital solutions - among them ScienceDirect, Scopus, Research Intelligence and ClinicalKey - and publishes over 2,500 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and more than 35,000 book titles, including a number of iconic reference works. Elsevier is part of RELX Group, a world-leading provider of information and analytics for professional and business customers across industries. http://www.elsevier.com


Ofori-Sarpong G.,Pennsylvania State University | Amankwah R.K.,University of Mines and Technology
Minerals Engineering | Year: 2011

In many laboratories and processing plants, different comminution equipment are used in preparing gold ores for gravity concentration. For malleable metals such as gold, particle shape changes in response to the forces applied during comminution, and these shapes can influence gravity concentration. In this study, the morphology of gold particles milled in different equipment was investigated. The disc and hammer mills generated cigar-shaped and globular particles respectively. The vibratory pulveriser created flaky particles while the ball mill formed a mix of flaky, folded and irregularly shaped particles. Gravity concentration produced enrichment ratios of 28.3, 24.0, 23.6 and 21.7 for the hammer mill, disc mill, ball mill and vibratory pulveriser respectively. The results show that the comminution equipment utilized should be taken into consideration in decisions regarding gravity gold recovery. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Amankwah R.K.,University of Mines and Technology | Ofori-Sarpong G.,Pennsylvania State University
Minerals Engineering | Year: 2011

In leaching processes, the mass transport of lixiviants from the bulk of the solution to the site of the mineral of interest is usually the slowest step. Diffusion becomes slower when the particles to be leached are occluded in host minerals. Access to the mineral of interest is enhanced by micro-crack formation within the host minerals as it enhances percolation and migration of lixiviants. Micro-crack formation also augments grinding and allows size reduction and liberation at a lower stress level. In this research, microwave pretreatment was used to augment the grinding of a free-milling gold ore containing quartz, silicates and iron oxides. Under microwave irradiation, selective heating of the different mineral components resulted in thermal stress cracking. Microwave processing enhanced the grindability of the ore, and crushing strength was reduced by 31.2%. The presence of micro-cracks improved leaching rate, and over 95% extraction was achieved within 12 h as against 22 h for the non-microwaved sample. Such a strategy can be used to maximize recovery and man-hours on processing plants. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Nana Asamoah D.,University of Mines and Technology | Amorin R.,University of Mines and Technology
Research Journal of Applied Sciences, Engineering and Technology | Year: 2011

This study aims at assessing the quality of water from bottled/sachet water in the Tarkwa-Nsuaem Municipality. Tarkwa is an ancient mining town sited in an Equatorial climate in Ghana and experiences high population growth rate as a result of mining activities. Due to this, water resources are under pressure as Ghana Water Company Ltd., (GWCL) produces only 55% of the Municipality's water requirements. The population is skeptical of using other sources of water for domestic purposes because of mining activities. Therefore, majority of the people in the Municipality depend on bottled/sachet water for drinking. This study presents and discusses the results of physicochemical and microbial analyses of six bottled/sachet water samples. The water source of these water producing companies is groundwater. Two sets of samples were collected from each company during the rainy season and the dry season to account for seasonal variations. A representative sample for each company was analyzed by the Chemistry/Bacteria Division of the GWCL, Takoradi for physicochemical parameters including pH, temperature, taste, electrical conductivity, true colour, turbidity total dissolved solids, total suspended solids, total alkalinity, total hardness and coliform bacteria. Metals and anions analysed were Ca, Mn, K, Na, Cr, Cd, Sb, Ba. BO 3 -, total Fe, Pb, Zn, As, NO 3 -, NO 2 - SO 4 -2, PO 4 -3, (NH 3-N), F -, Cl -, CN -, carbonate hardness and bicarbonate hardness. Bacteria analysed were total Coliforms, Escherichia coli and total Heterotrophic bacteria. The concentrations of most of the investigated parameters in the drinking water samples from Tarkwa Nsuaem Municipality were within the permissible limits of the World Health Organization (WHO)/Ghana Standard Board (GSB) drinking water quality guidelines except pH, Ba and Cl - contents. The pH of SKFDW and DLFWD were respectively 5.5 and 6.31; acidic and lower than the recommended WHO/GSB guideline of 6.5-8.5. The Ba contents in the water samples of ASBFDW and TLFDW Companies were respectively 1.8 and 1.9 mg/L, which are higher than the WHO/GSB threshold values of 0.7 mg/L. SKFDW water samples gave higher analytical Cl - value of 274 mg/L which is above the recommended WHO/GSB threshold values of 0-250 mg/L. These packaged waters must be treated before use. © Maxwell Scientific Organization, 2011.


Ewusi A.,University of Mines and Technology | Kuma J.S.Y.,University of Mines and Technology
Natural Resources Research | Year: 2014

The use of untreated surface water for domestic purposes has resulted in the infection of some people by guinea worm and other water borne diseases in the Northern Region of Ghana. The aim of this study is to assess the current groundwater quantity and quality conditions in the 7,820 km2 Daka catchment and project the water demand in 2025. Results of groundwater analyses generally show good water quality for domestic use. Borehole analyses indicate that the catchment’s groundwater system can be characterized by a regolith aquifer underlain by a deeper fractured rock aquifer in some areas. The current per capita water demand is estimated at 40 l/day although 60 l/day is the desired amount, indicating that with the current population of 363,350, the projected water demand for the communities is 21,800 m3/day. With a projected population of 555,500 in 2025, an expected 33,300 m3/day of water is required. The estimated optimum potential groundwater available for use in the catchment is 154 × 106 m3/year (4.24 × 105 m3/day). However, the current total groundwater abstraction is only 8,876 m3/day or 2% of the optimum. In comparison, the projected total current and 2025 water demands are only 5 and 8%, respectively, of the optimum potential groundwater available for use in the catchment. In addition, only 1,780 m3/day (0.65 × 106 m3/year) or 0.06% of the average annual flow of 1,016 × 106 m3/year of the Daka River is treated for domestic use. These figures reveal that a significantly very large water resource potential exists for both surface and groundwater development in the Daka catchment. It is suggested that their development should proceed conjunctively. © 2014, International Association for Mathematical Geosciences.


Sarpong S.,University of Mines and Technology
European Business Review | Year: 2014

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the recent horsemeat scandal in European markets. The paper is primarily interested in how this scandal has festered and what perhaps ought to be done to ensure consumers get what they feel they should be getting. It also attempts to identify the lapses that have created the basis for this to happen. Design/methodology/approach: The paper mainly draws on reports in the media and discussions generated following the scandal to assess the issues under consideration. It also looks at the issues surrounding the global supply chain environment and provides solutions on how to strengthen the weak links in the meat supply chain. Findings: The paper finds that the scandal has damaged consumer confidence in the industry's ability to regulate itself. It notes that pinpointing risk has become a difficult struggle as retailers are often inundated with data, and suppliers, for lack of time, have become reluctant to "waste time" completing check-lists and audits. The paper maintains that there is the urgent need for adequate inspection and a means to incentivise the food industry to police itself much better. It recognises that lack of visibility and a lack of direct influence over suppliers further down the supply chain have led to distinct problems within the food industry. Originality/value: The paper contributes to an ongoing discussion that has been of considerable concern to many consumers. Its importance lies in the fact that it suggests important measures, which, if implemented, could help in ensuring the elimination of fraud in the food chain. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.


Mohammed S.,University of Mines and Technology
38th Nigeria Annual International Conference and Exhibition, NAICE 2014 - Africa's Energy Corridor: Opportunities for Oil and Gas Value Maximization Through Integration and Global Approach | Year: 2014

A simple approach is presented that utilizes production data to determine original gas-in-place (OGIP). In particular, we propose a "modified" Agarwal-Gardner rate/cumulative decline type curves that yield an anchor point of unity, instead of 1/2π. The advantage of this unit anchor point is that, the normalized pseudopressure drop ratio, which is a plotting function on the abscissa, need not be modified; hence, providing a simpler approach than the traditional methods. The computation of pseudopressure drop ratio (or pseudocumulative function) requires a prior knowledge of average reservoir pressure history, or indirectly, OGIP. Consequently, various methods have been proposed in the literature to solve OGIP. This paper utilizes an approximate gas flowing material balance equation, which was previously presented by this author, to make an initial estimate or provide a "true window" for OGIP. This approximate plot yields two negative slopes during boundary-dominated flow regime - early-time pseudosteady state and late-time pseudosteady state lines. The early-time pseudosteady state line is shown to yield a reasonable initial estimate of OGIP while the late-time pseudosteady state line yields an optimistic result. The proposed approach is applicable to general variable pressure and/or variable rate case for singleand multi-well systems during boundary-dominated flow regime. The method is validated with two simulated data; and then, applied to two field data - one from a single-well system and the other from a multi-well system. Copyright 2014, Society of Petroleum Engineers.


Pu Y.,University of Mines and Technology
Electronic Journal of Geotechnical Engineering | Year: 2014

Three zones (caving zone, fissure zone, bending zone) will be formed in overlying strata after mining. It is important to understand the distribution of "three zones" in order to conduct gas extraction, strata behaviors and mining under water. Numerical calculation, field measurement, similar material simulation will be used for detecting the distribution of 'three zones' in #1202 longwall face of Yuwu mine in Shanxi province of China to provide gists for gas extraction. Researches show that, on the vertical dimension, the demarcation point between caving zone and fissure zone locates between 29.5m~33.4m. The height of fractured zone is between 60m~64m. © 2014 ejge.

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