Coral Gables, FL, United States
Coral Gables, FL, United States

The University of Miami is a private, nonsectarian university located in Coral Gables, Florida, United States. As of 2012, the university currently enrolls 15,613 students in 12 separate colleges, including a medical school located in Miami's Civic Center neighborhood, a law school on the main campus, and a school focused on the study of oceanography and atmospheric science on Virginia Key. These colleges offer approximately 115 undergraduate, 114 master's, 51 doctoral, and two professional areas of study. Over the years, the University's students have represented all 50 states and close to 150 foreign countries. With more than 13,000 full and part-time faculty and staff, UM is the sixth largest employer in Miami-Dade County.Research is a component of each academic division, with UM attracting $346.6 million per year in sponsored research grants. UM offers a large library system with over 3.1 million volumes and exceptional holdings in Cuban heritage and music. UM also offers a wide range of student activities, including fraternities and sororities, a student newspaper and radio station. UM's intercollegiate athletic teams, collectively known as the Miami Hurricanes, compete in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, and its football team has won five national championships since 1983. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

Patent
University of Miami | Date: 2016-09-02

A dual, imaging and radiation system provides for finely aligned movement of a subject through the use of a computer controlled mounting stage having separate, non-gantry translational and rotational controllable movement. The system cycles a subject tissue between a treatment position where radiation doses are applied and an imaging position where high-quality computed tomography (CT) imaging is performed. Selective dose profiles and dose depths are achievable around an isocenter of the system.


Red blood cell membrane derived microparticles (RMP) are safe, economical, effective hemostatic agents in the treatment of a wide range of bleeding conditions and can, therefore, be considered as universal hemostatic agents. Effective RMP are produced from red blood cells using a high-pressure extrusion membrane shear process. The RMP can be lyophilized after production and retain activity even when stored at room temperature. RMP can be administered to original donors (autologous treatment), thus avoiding transfusion complications, or can be administered to blood type compatible recipients. RMP produced from type O, Rh negative red cells can be given to any person regardless of blood type. RMP can be administered to reduce excessive bleeding resulting from trauma, surgeries, invasive procedures and various bleeding disorders such as platelet disorders, either congenital or acquired, and coagulation disorders, either congenital or acquired. Administration of RMP prepared according to the invention demonstrates effectiveness in safely reducing bleeding.


Patent
The Regents Of The University Of California and University of Miami | Date: 2015-03-05

Described here is a test strip for detection of melamine, comprising: a support configured for capillary flow of a fluid sample from a first end of the support to a second end of the support that is downstream from the first end; a conjugation pad disposed adjacent to the first end of the support and including nanoparticles configured for suspension in the sample flowing past the conjugation pad, the nanoparticles configured to produce a colorimetric effect when exposed to melamine; and a test portion downstream of the conjugation pad and including a molecular recognition agent immobilized on the support and having an affinity for melamine.


A slotted microfilter is coated with a phase changeable material having a hydrophobic state under a first temperature and a hydrophilic state under a second temperature. An example coating material is poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PIPAAm). The microfilter can be controlled to switch between a capture state where circulating tumor cells are captured by the microfilter and a release state, where viable tumor cells are released from capture for analysis, e.g., single cell phenotypic and genomic analysis, or for ex vivo culture growth.


Kryvenko O.N.,University of Miami | Epstein J.I.,University of Miami
Archives of pathology & laboratory medicine | Year: 2016

Since 1966, when Donald Gleason, MD, first proposed grading prostate cancer based on its histologic architecture, there have been numerous changes in clinical and pathologic practices relating to prostate cancer. Patterns 1 and 2, comprising more than 30% of cases in the original publications by Gleason, are no longer reported on biopsy and are rarely diagnosed on radical prostatectomy. Many of these cases may even have been mimickers of prostate cancer that were described later with the use of contemporary immunohistochemistry. The original Gleason system predated many newly described variants of prostate cancer and our current concept of intraductal carcinoma. Gleason also did not describe how to report prostate cancer on biopsy with multiple cores of cancer or on radical prostatectomy with separate tumor nodules. To address these issues, the International Society of Urological Pathology first made revisions to the grading system in 2005, and subsequently in 2014. Additionally, a new grading system composed of Grade Groups 1 to 5 that was first developed in 2013 at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and subsequently validated in a large multi-institutional and multimodal study was presented at the 2014 International Society of Urological Pathology meeting and accepted both by participating pathologists as well as urologists, oncologists, and radiation therapists. In the present study, we describe updates to the grading of prostate cancer along with the new grading system.


Majumdar S.J.,University of Miami
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society | Year: 2016

Targeted observations to improve numerical forecasts of high-impact weather events over the past two decades, particularly during the THORPEX era (2005-14), are evaluated. © 2016 American Meteorological Society.


PURPOSE:: To demonstrate the application of scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) for analyzing Schirmer strips for particle concentration, size, morphology, and type distribution. METHODS:: A cross-sectional design was used. Patients were prospectively recruited from the Miami Veterans Affairs (VA) Healthcare System eye clinic, and they underwent a complete ocular surface examination. The size, type, and chemical composition of particulate matter on Schirmer strips (from the left eye) were analyzed using SEM/EDS. RESULTS:: Schirmer strips from all 6 patients showed particle loading, ranging from 1 to 33 particles, whereas the blank Schirmer strip that served as a control showed no particle loading. Most particles were coarse, with an average size of 19.7 μm (95% confidence interval 15–24.4 μm). All samples contained organic particles (eg, pollen and mold), and 5 of the 6 samples contained nonorganic particles. The nonorganic particles were composed of silicon, minerals, and metals, including gold and titanium. The size of aluminum and iron particles was ≥62 μm, whereas the size of 2 other metals, zinc and gold, was smaller, that is, <20 μm. Most metal particles were elongated compared with the organic particles, which were round. CONCLUSIONS:: Although SEM/EDS has been extensively used in biomedical research, its novel application to assess the size, morphology, and chemical composition of the ocular surface particles offers an unprecedented opportunity to tease out the role of particulate matter exposure in ocular surface disease and disorders. Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


Batawi H.,University of Miami
Eye and Contact Lens | Year: 2017

PURPOSE:: To study sub-basal corneal nerve plexus (SCNP) parameters by in vivo corneal confocal microscopy using a new software technology and examine the effect of demographics and diabetes mellitus (DM) on corneal nerves morphology. METHODS:: A Confoscan 4 (Nidek Technologies) was used in this cross-sectional study to image the SCNP in 84 right eyes at the Miami Veterans Affairs eye clinic. Images were analyzed using a new semiautomated nerve analysis software program (The Corneal Nerve Analysis tool) which evaluated 9 parameters including nerve fibers length (NFL) and nerve fibers length density (NFLD). The main outcome measure was the examination of SCNP morphology by demographics, comorbidities, and HbA1c level. RESULTS:: Interoperator and intraoperator reproducibility were good for the 9 parameters studied (Intraclass Correlations [ICCs] 0.73–0.97). Image variability between two images within the same scan was good for all parameters (ICC 0.66–0.80). Older individuals had lower SCNP parameters with NFL and NFLD negatively correlating with age (r=−0.471, and −0.461, respectively, P<0.01 for all). Patients with diabetes had lower mean NFLD 10987.6 μm/mm (±3,284.6) and NFL 1,289.5 μm/frame (±387.2) compared with patients without diabetes (mean NFLD 15077.1 μm/mm [±4,261.3] and NFL 1750.0 μm/frame [±540.7]) (P<0.05 for all). HbA1c levels in patients with diabetes were inversely correlated with NFL and NFLD (r= −0.568, and −0.569, respectively, P<0.05 for all). CONCLUSIONS:: The Corneal Nerve Analysis tool is a reproducible diagnostic software technique for the analysis of the SCNP with confocal microscopy. Older age, DM, and higher level of HbA1c were associated with a significant reduction in SCNP parameters. © 2017 Contact Lens Association of Ophthalmologists, Inc.


Tamariz L.,University of Miami
The American journal of managed care | Year: 2015

OBJECTIVES: Recruitment strategies usually focused on a single International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code and rarely included exclusion criteria. The purpose of this study was to validate a claims-based algorithm to identify, from Veterans Affairs administrative data, eligible participants to be recruited into a hypertension trial.STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional.METHODS: Subjects were labeled as eligible if they were 75 years or older, had a hypertension ICD-9-CM code (401.x-405.x, 437.2) and did not have a diabetes (250.xx) or stroke (430.x-436.x, 437.1, 437.9, 438.x) ICD-9-CM code. We compared the eligible subjects with the medical record-which was considered the gold standard-and we calculated the positive predictive value (PPV) of identifying a subject in the medical record.RESULTS: The algorithm identified 3591 elderly veterans with hypertension with no diabetes or stroke, and we reviewed the medical records of 76 randomly selected patients. In the sample of medical record review, the mean age in years was 83 ± 5.3, 48% had coronary artery disease, and the mean systolic blood pressure was 134 mm Hg ± 15.5. When compared with the medical record, the PPV for any hypertension code was 93% (95% CI, 85%-98%), and for the entire algorithm, including 75 years or older and the absence of both diabetes and stroke, the PPV was 83% (95% CI, 73%-91%).CONCLUSIONS: The use of any ICD-9-CM code for hypertension is useful to identify elderly patients with hypertension. The algorithm to identify elderly patients with hypertension and without diabetes or stroke is a useful tool to also identify eligible patients for clinical trial participation.


Wong K.V.,University of Miami
Journal of Energy Resources Technology, Transactions of the ASME | Year: 2017

Anthropogenic heat generation in the world has been shown to be non-negligible, as it was a previous misconception. The scientific contribution of the current work is to urge scientists and engineers to develop technologies to reject heat from engineering systems to outer space. Outer space acts as a definitive heat sink since a statistical average temperature may be assigned to it as 3 K. This temperature is a lot lower than the average temperature anywhere on Earth, at any time of the year. Until recently, the concept was well known but not systematically developed nor advanced using modern engineering knowledge. Looking at recent figures of heat generated associated with power plants worldwide, a theoretical potential exists to reduce the amount of anthropogenic heat rejected in the world's environment by very significant amounts. Outer space is the ultimate sink for man's heat from engineered systems, and the upper limit is comfortably very large to not be of any concern at the present time. © 2017 by ASME.


Mariano R.,Harvard University | Wuchty S.,University of Miami
Current Opinion in Structural Biology | Year: 2017

The discovery, validation, and characterization of protein-based interactions from different species are crucial for translational research regarding a variety of pathogens, ranging from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum to HIV-1. Here, we review recent advances in the prediction of host–pathogen protein interfaces using structural information. In particular, we observe that current methods chiefly perform machine learning on sequence and domain information to produce large sets of candidate interactions that are further assessed and pruned to generate final, highly probable sets. Structure-based studies have also emphasized the electrostatic properties and evolutionary transformations of pathogenic interfaces, supplying crucial insight into antigenic determinants and the ways pathogens compete for host protein binding. Advancements in spectroscopic and crystallographic methods complement the aforementioned techniques, permitting the rigorous study of true positives at a molecular level. Together, these approaches illustrate how protein structure on a variety of levels functions coordinately and dynamically to achieve host takeover. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd


Rotundo R.L.,University of Miami
Journal of Neurochemistry | Year: 2017

Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is expressed as several homomeric and heterooligomeric forms in a wide variety of tissues such as neurons in the central and peripheral nervous systems and their targets including skeletal muscle, endocrine and exocrine glands. In addition, glycolipid-anchored forms are expressed in erythropoietic and lymphopoietic cells. While transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation is important for determining which AChE oligomeric forms are expressed in a given tissue, translational and post-translational regulatory mechanisms at the level of protein folding, assembly and sorting play equally important roles in assuring that the AChE molecules reach their intended sites on the cell surface in the appropriate numbers. This brief review will focus on the latter events in the cell with the goal of providing novel therapeutic interventional strategies for the treatment of organophosphate and carbamate pesticide and nerve agent exposure. This is an article for the special issue XVth International Symposium on Cholinergic Mechanisms. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.


Khorkova O.,OPKO Health | Wahlestedt C.,University of Miami
Nature Biotechnology | Year: 2017

Oligonucleotide therapies are currently experiencing a resurgence driven by advances in backbone chemistry and discoveries of novel therapeutic pathways that can be uniquely and efficiently modulated by the oligonucleotide drugs. A quarter of a century has passed since oligonucleotides were first applied in living mammalian brain to modulate gene expression. Despite challenges in delivery to the brain, multiple oligonucleotide-based compounds are now being developed for treatment of human brain disorders by direct delivery inside the blood brain barrier (BBB). Notably, the first new central nervous system (CNS)-targeted oligonucleotide-based drug (nusinersen/Spinraza) was approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in late 2016 and several other compounds are in advanced clinical trials. Human testing of brain-targeted oligonucleotides has highlighted unusual pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of these compounds, including complex active uptake mechanisms, low systemic exposure, extremely long half-lives, accumulation and gradual release from subcellular depots. Further work on oligonucleotide uptake, development of formulations for delivery across the BBB and relevant disease biology studies are required for further optimization of the oligonucleotide drug development process for brain applications. © 2017 Nature America, Inc., part of Springer Nature.


Tan Y.,University of Miami
Cancer Gene Therapy | Year: 2017

Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) contain tumor-infiltrating immune cells and their presence provides an opportunity and rationale for developing effective forms of immunotherapy. The types of tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells and relevant immune checkpoint inhibitors are the focus of active investigation. The most numerous tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells are tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and CD3+ T cells. Studies have shown that patients with GISTs that harbor increased numbers of CD3+ T cells have better outcomes. However, the clinical behavior of GIST has not been shown to correlate with the number of TAMs. The biological significance of other less frequent tumor-infiltrating immune cells including tumor-infiltrating neurtrophils (TINs), natural killer cells (NKs), B cells, dendritic cells (DCs) remains unclear. The immune checkpoint inhibitors CTLA-4, PD1/PDL1 and TIM3/galectin-9 are molecules that can be targeted by synthesized antibodies. Clinical and pre-clinical trials using this approach against immune checkpoint inhibitors, anti-KIT antibody and the generation of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells have shown promising results. The treatment of GIST with immunotherapy is complex and evolving; this article reviews its current status for patients with GISTs.Cancer Gene Therapy advance online publication, 10 February 2017; doi:10.1038/cgt.2016.58. © 2017 Nature America, Inc., part of Springer Nature.


Alexander P.,University of Miami
Computers and Composition | Year: 2017

This article examines the different types of knowledge that MMORPG players develop as they learn and play a game. Data is drawn from a year of case-study/ethnography based research sessions with a ten-member raiding group in the game World of Warcraft. Drawing from the work of Aristotle, contemporary game studies scholarship, actor network theory, and the concept of “practices,” what is presented here is a matrix of complex gamer knowledge types intended not only to expand the reader's understanding of the robust variations and nuances in gamer knowledge but also to serve as a potential example of how to articulate that richness in future research. The matrix is accompanied by rationale and examples of how the knowledges function in game experiences. © 2017 Elsevier Inc.


Scott G.B.,University of Miami
Obstetrics and Gynecology | Year: 2017

OBJECTIVE:: To identify missed opportunities for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). METHODS:: Data regarding HIV-infected children born between 2002 and 2009 to HIV-infected women enrolled in the U.S. International Maternal Pediatric Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials prospective cohort study (protocol P1025) were reviewed. The characteristics of the HIV-infected infants and their mothers and the mothersʼ clinical management are described. RESULTS:: Twelve cases of mother-to-child transmission of HIV occurred among 1,857 liveborn neonates, for a prevalence of 0.65 per 100 live births to HIV-infected women (95% confidence interval 0.33–1.13). Four transmissions occurred in utero, three were peripartum transmissions, and the timing of transmission for five neonates was unable to be determined. None were breastfed. Seven women had plasma viral loads greater than 400 copies/mL near delivery. Six women had less than 11 weeks of antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy; three of these women had premature deliveries. One woman received no antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy because she was diagnosed with HIV postpartum. Six had poor to moderate adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Four of the five mothers with viral loads greater than 1,000 copies/mL delivered preterm neonates. There were five women who delivered by cesarean; four were nonelective cesarean deliveries and only one was an elective cesarean delivery for HIV prevention. CONCLUSION:: Despite access to high-level care and follow-up, a small proportion of HIV-infected women transmitted the virus to their neonates. This case series provides insight into factors contributing to HIV perinatal transmission and can inform the development of new strategies for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION:: ClinicalTrials.gov, https://clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00028145. © 2017 by The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


Bourens M.,University of Miami | Barrientos A.,University of Miami
EMBO Reports | Year: 2017

Defects in mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV (CIV) frequently cause encephalocardiomyopathies. Human CIV assembly involves 14 subunits of dual genetic origin and multiple nucleus-encoded ancillary factors. Biogenesis of the mitochondrion-encoded copper/heme-containing COX1 subunit initiates the CIV assembly process. Here, we show that the intermembrane space twin CX9C protein CMC1 forms an early CIV assembly intermediate with COX1 and two assembly factors, the cardiomyopathy proteins COA3 and COX14. A TALEN-mediated CMC1 knockout HEK293T cell line displayed normal COX1 synthesis but decreased CIV activity owing to the instability of newly synthetized COX1. We demonstrate that CMC1 stabilizes a COX1-COA3-COX14 complex before the incorporation of COX4 and COX5a subunits. Additionally, we show that CMC1 acts independently of CIV assembly factors relevant to COX1 metallation (COX10, COX11, and SURF1) or late stability (MITRAC7). Furthermore, whereas human COX14 and COA3 have been proposed to affect COX1 mRNA translation, our data indicate that CMC1 regulates turnover of newly synthesized COX1 prior to and during COX1 maturation, without affecting the rate of COX1 synthesis. © 2017 EMBO.


OBJECTIVE:: Recurrent hyperkalemia frequently limits use of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system inhibitors (RAASi) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with hypertension, diabetes, and/or heart failure. Patiromer is a sodium-free, nonabsorbed potassium (K)-binding polymer approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of hyperkalemia. This post-hoc analysis of OPAL-HK examined the effectiveness and safety of patiromer in reducing serum K in hyperkalemic CKD patients on RAASi, with hypertension, receiving diuretic therapy versus those not on diuretics. METHODS:: Depending on the degree of hyperkalemia at baseline, CKD patients with serum K from 5.1 to less than 6.5?mmol/l on RAASi (n?=?243) were assigned to a patiromer of total dose 8.4 or 16.8?g, divided twice daily. Changes in serum K, and tolerability and safety were assessed over 4 weeks in patients on and not on diuretics. RESULTS:: At baseline, 132 patients used diuretics and 111 were not on diuretics, mean age was 64.3 and 64.0 years, respectively, and 63 and 51% were men. Similar reductions in serum K were seen over 4 weeks in both subgroups. At week 4, serum K fell by −0.95?±?0.04?mmol/l with any diuretic and −1.04?±?0.05?mmol/l with no diuretic. Patiromer was well tolerated, with mild-to-moderate constipation reported as the most common adverse event (7.6 and 14.4% of patients on any diuretic or no diuretic, respectively). Hypokalemia (s-K <3.5?mEq/l) was reported in 2.3% of patients on any diuretic and in 3.7% not on diuretics. CONCLUSION:: The serum K-lowering efficacy and safety profile of patiromer in hyperkalemia patients with CKD was not compromised by diuretic therapy. Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


Read S.P.,University of Miami
Current Opinion in Ophthalmology | Year: 2017

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Visualization remains a critical factor in successful ocular surgery.Here we review new technology that has the potential to allow for safer and more efficient retinal surgery. RECENT FINDINGS: Vitreoretinal surgery poses unique visualization challenges such as the need for specialized optical systems and the delicate and microscopic features of retinal structures. Better retinal visualization allows for new approaches to increasingly complex retinal cases. Wide-angle viewing has allowed stereopic visualization of the peripheral retina. Improved lighting systems have shown better safety profiles and can facilitate bimanual techniques. The potential to improve surgical decision making has been shown with intraoperative imaging such as optical coherence tomography. SUMMARY: Although some of the benefits of these developments have yet to be proven, improved technology for visualization during retinal surgery will hopefully allow for safer and more efficient surgeries. Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


PURPOSE:: To obtain pilot data on posture-induced changes of intraocular pressure (IOP), systemic pressure, and pattern electroretinogram (PERG) predictive of future optic nerve tissue loss glaucoma suspects (GSs). METHODS:: Mean peripapillary retinal fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) was measured with optical coherence tomography 2 times/year in 28 GS aged 58±8.9 years over 5.0±0.73 years. All patients had a baseline PERG, IOP, and brachial blood pressure measurements in the seated and −10 degrees head-down-body-tilt (HDT) position. Outcome measures were seated/HDT PERG amplitude and phase, IOP, mean arterial blood pressure, and estimated ocular perfusion pressure. An additional group of 11 similarly aged controls aged 56.9±13 years was tested for comparison. RESULTS:: Although all GS had initial RNFLT in the normal range, 9/28 of them developed significant (P<0.05) loss of mean RNFLT [thinners (T)] over the follow-up period as opposed to 19/28 who did not [nonthinners (NT)]. Significant (P<0.05) differences between similarly aged controls, NT, and T were found in PERG amplitude, PERG phase, mean arterial blood pressure, IOP, and ocular perfusion pressure. A nominal logistic regression using baseline PERG and hemodynamic variables was able to distinguish T from NT with an area under receiving operator characteristic of 0.89 (SE, 0.07). CONCLUSIONS:: Baseline PERG, IOP, and systemic blood pressure, together with their changes upon HDT, may have predictive value for future loss of optic nerve tissue in GS. This study supports the rationale for a full-scale clinical trial to identify patients at high risk of development of glaucoma. Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


Delgado C.F.,University of Miami
Journal of Public Health Management and Practice | Year: 2017

CONTEXT:: Lead is a preventable environmental toxin that has been previously associated with deficits in cognition, academic performance, attention, and behavior in children. Very few studies, however, have examined the relationship between exposure to lead and documented developmental disabilities. OBJECTIVE:: This study examined the relative risk of lead exposure on developmental disabilities in preschool-aged children. DESIGN:: A statewide lead surveillance data set containing blood lead level (BLL) was integrated with another statewide data set containing developmental disability classifications for special education placement for preschool-aged children. PARTICIPANTS:: The participants were the 85 178 children (average age 2.6 years) whose records in both data sets were able to be linked. Forty-six percent of the participants had an identified developmental disability. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:: Developmental disability classification served as the main outcome measure. RESULTS:: A high BLL, defined as 5 μg/dL or more, was associated with significantly increased risk for developmental disabilities (risk ratio [RR] = 1.04; 95% CI = 1.01-1.08), particularly intellectual disability (RR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.10-2.25) and developmental delay (DD; RR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.06-1.17). CONCLUSIONS:: The results of this study are consistent with previous research identifying an association between lead exposure and numerous intellectual and educational outcomes and demonstrate that high BLL is associated with meeting eligibility criteria for developmental disabilities in young children. Continued research, surveillance, and prevention efforts are needed to further reduce the negative impacts of lead on individuals and society. Reducing or eliminating lead exposure would improve outcomes for individual children (eg, better academic performance) and reduce the burden to society (eg, lower enrollments in special education systems). Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


King M.L.,University of Miami
Genesis | Year: 2017

In the 1980s, the study of localized maternal mRNAs was just emerging as a new research area. Classic embryological studies had linked the inheritance of cytoplasmic domains with specific cell lineages, but the underlying molecular nature of these putative determinants remained a mystery. The model system Xenopus would play a pivotal role in the progress of this new field. In fact, the first localized maternal mRNA to be identified and cloned from any organism was Xenopus vg1, a TGF-beta family member. This seminal finding opened the door to many subsequent studies focused on how RNAs are localized and what functions they had in development. As the field moves into the future, Xenopus remains the system of choice for studies identifying RNA/protein transport particles and maternal RNAs through RNA-sequencing. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Cynthia Germanotta, president of Born This Way Foundation which she cofounded with her daughter Lady Gaga, will be honored with the Champion Award presented by the University of Miami Health System during World OutGames Miami’s Opening Ceremonies on Saturday, May 27, 7 p.m. at The Fillmore Miami Beach, 1700 Washington Avenue. The Opening Ceremonies will kick-off the 10-day event, making its US debut with athletes, participants, thought leaders and spectators from as many as 59 countries May 26 through June 4, 2017. “The University of Miami Health System is committed to providing quality healthcare for all,” said Thinh Tran, M.D., M.B.A., chief clinical officer and chief operating officer of the University of Miami Health System. “We are thrilled to rally behind this global event and to endorse the Champion Award because what it stands for mirrors our core values which promote unity and inclusiveness.” Born This Way Foundation, led by Lady Gaga and Cynthia Germanotta, was created in 2012 to help create a kinder and braver world by supporting youth wellness and empowerment. Working with leading researchers and young people themselves, the foundation strives to build kinder communities, improve mental health resources and create more positive environments – online and offline. “I am honored to accept this award as a symbol of the progress we are making towards our goal of building a kinder and braver world,” said Cynthia Germanotta, president of Born This Way Foundation. “We share the World OutGames Miami’s spirit of inclusiveness and the belief that communities will be strongest when we embrace each other’s differences and celebrate what makes each of us unique.” Most recently, Born This Way Foundation launched Channel Kindness, a digital platform featuring stories of kindness as documented by young people around the United States. “World OutGames is honored to present Cynthia with the Champion Award for her amazing work done through Born This Way Foundation,” said Ivan Cano, CEO of World OutGames Miami. “This award recognition signifies our overall mission to foster unity and inclusiveness and it sends a strong message as the kick-off to this historic sports, culture and human rights event.” Produced by Jack Nolan & The Impression Group, Inc., the Opening Ceremonies will wow audiences featuring performances by dance music legend Kristine W, pop R&B singer and American Idol finalist David Hernandez and Miami’s Latin icon, Tito Puente Jr. and his band. Attendees will also enjoy an amazing procession of countries with 59 nations on parade. World OutGames Miami will also offer a plethora of sporting events such as swimming, soccer, track, dance, volleyball and more. Athletes with skill levels ranging from beginner to competitive, will arrive at World OutGames Miami ready to challenge themselves physically at venues across Miami-Dade County. The 4th Global LGBTQI Human Rights Conference, a three-day event held May 26-29, will offer a world view of human rights with representation from Brazil, Cuba, Canada, Miccosukee Reservation, St. Lucia, Thailand, Tonga, Uganda, the United Kingdom, the United States, Venezuela and others. The 10-day event will also offer a variety of cultural exchanges, including PULSE POINTS, an artistic response to the Orlando massacre at Pulse Nightclub from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. on June 1. World OutGames Main Village at Lummus Park, Miami Beach’s oceanfront park, will also host activities, vendors and entertainment offerings. World OutGames Miami is made possible through the support of adidas, the City of Miami Beach, Florida Sports Foundation, Miami Beach Visitor and Convention Authority, Coca-Cola, Greater Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau, Bacardi, Happy Copenhagen, the University of Miami Health System, Limitless Production Services, Inc., Arts & Business Council of Miami, the International Institute on Race, Equality and Human Rights, Miami Sports, Hotspots Media Group, OutClique, South Florida Gay News, 93.9 MIA and additional contributions from many individuals and businesses. World OutGames Miami is funded in part by a grant from the City of Miami Beach, along with the support of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners. In the spirit of true inclusiveness, World OutGames Miami is open to all, regardless of sexual orientation. For more information or to register for the Global Human Rights Conference (May 26-29) or attend any of the cultural or sports events, visit outgames.org.


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Animals can match their background to avoid detection by predators. For instance, numerous species have evolved color patterns that help them blend into their surroundings and avoid predators -- a phenomenon called crypsis. A new experimental study found that ghost crabs in the Solomon Islands may achieve crypsis by actively choosing to live in sand background that matches their body color. Work by biologists from the University of Miami shows that crabs with dark coloration choose dark sand while crabs with light coloration choose light sand. Crabs of intermediate color show no specific choice, as they did not match either sand. "In nature, it is common to see animals match their background, but in many cases we don't know if this is through active choice, a change in color, or a combination of these two," said Dr. Floria Uy, lead author of the Biotropica article. "Our study shows that these crabs are actively choosing match their sand background." The results have implications in understanding the evolution of anti-predator adaptations.


News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Drinking at least one artificially sweetened beverage daily was associated with almost three times the risk of developing stroke or dementia compared to those who drank artificially-sweetened beverages less than once a week, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke. The authors caution that the long-term observational study was not designed or able to prove cause and effect, and only shows a trend among one group of people. “Our study shows a need to put more research into this area given how often people drink artificially-sweetened beverages,” said Matthew Pase, a senior fellow in the department of neurology at Boston University School of Medicine, Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne, Australia, and the Framingham Heart Study. “Although we did not find an association between stroke or dementia and the consumption of sugary drinks, this certainly does not mean they are a healthy option. We recommend that people drink water on a regular basis instead of sugary or artificially sweetened beverages.” The researchers analyzed the Framingham Heart Study Offspring Cohort of 2,888 people, primarily Caucasian, over the age of 45 for the stroke study and 1,484 people over the age of 60 for the dementia arm of the study. Over a period of seven years, the researchers reviewed what people were drinking at three different points in time. Participants reported their eating and drinking habits by responding to food frequency questionnaires. The researchers then followed up with the study subjects for the next 10 years to determine who developed stroke or dementia, then compared the dietary information to the risk of developing stroke and dementia over the course of the study. The data collected did not distinguish between the types of artificial sweeteners used in the beverages. At the end of the 10-year follow-up period, the researchers noted 97 cases (three percent) of stroke, 82 of which were ischemic (caused by blockage of blood vessels), and 81 (five percent) cases of dementia, 63 of which were diagnosed as Alzheimer’s disease. The researchers used statistical models, adjusted for various risk factors such as age, sex, caloric intake, education, diabetes mellitus and the presence of a variant of the Alzheimer’s risk gene apolipoprotein E, to determine potential links between artificially-sweetened drink consumption and the risk of stroke or dementia. They found that people who drank at least one artificially-sweetened beverage a day were three times as likely to develop ischemic stroke and 2.9 times as likely to develop Alzheimer's disease dementia. Although the prospective nature of the study design increases the reliability of its findings, there are limitations. The participants were overwhelmingly white, and it is possible that ethnic preferences may influence how often people select sugary or artificially sweetened drinks, Pase said. People did not drink sugary sodas as often as diet sodas, which Pase said could be one reason the researchers did not see an association with regular soda since the participants may have been health conscious and just not consuming them as frequently. The main limitation, Pase said, is the important point that an observational study like this cannot prove that drinking artificially-sweetened drinks is linked to strokes or dementia, but it does identify an intriguing trend that will need to be explored in other studies. “Even if someone is three times as likely to develop stroke or dementia, it is by no means a certain fate,” Pase said. “In our study, three percent of the people had a new stroke and five percent developed dementia, so we're still talking about a small number of people developing either stroke or dementia.” According to an accompanying editorial, the current body of scientific research is inconclusive regarding whether or not drinking artificially sweetened beverages can actually lead to stroke, dementia or other cardiovascular conditions. However, there are a growing number of population based studies, such as this study by Pase, et.al, that show associations between frequent consumption of artificially sweetened beverages and undesirable effects on blood vessels throughout the body. This suggests that it may not be advisable to substitute or promote artificially sweetened drinks as healthier alternatives to sugar-sweetened drinks. “Both sugar and artificially sweetened soft drinks may be hard on the brain,” said senior editorial author Ralph Sacco M.D., a former president of the American Heart Association and the chairman of the Department of Neurology at the Miller School of Medicine at University of Miami in Florida. “We know that limiting added sugars is an important strategy to support good nutrition and healthy body weights, and until we know more, people should use artificially sweetened drinks cautiously. They may have a role for people with diabetes and in weight loss, but we encourage people to drink water, low-fat milk or other beverages without added sweeteners,” said Rachel K. Johnson, past chair of the American Heart Association’s Nutrition Committee and professor of nutrition at the University of Vermont.


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: phys.org

Animals can match their background to avoid detection by predators. For instance, numerous species have evolved color patterns that help them blend into their surroundings and avoid predators—a phenomenon called crypsis. A new experimental study found that ghost crabs in the Solomon Islands may achieve crypsis by actively choosing to live in sand background that matches their body color. Work by biologists from the University of Miami shows that crabs with dark coloration choose dark sand while crabs with light coloration choose light sand. Crabs of intermediate color show no specific choice, as they did not match either sand. "In nature, it is common to see animals match their background, but in many cases we don't know if this is through active choice, a change in color, or a combination of these two," said Dr. Floria Uy, lead author of the Biotropica article. "Our study shows that these crabs are actively choosing match their sand background." The results have implications in understanding the evolution of anti-predator adaptations. Explore further: Sand fleas have ability to change color in order to match dramatically different backgrounds


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

(University of Miami Miller School of Medicine) Researchers at Sylvester today published a paper in the prestigious journal Nature Communications, which describes how TET2 loss can open the door for mutations that drive myeloid, lymphoid, and other cancers.


News Article | April 14, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

NEW YORK, April 14, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Fouad G. Souki, Assistant Professor of Clinical Anesthesiology at the University of Miami has been selected to join the Education Board at the American Health Council. He will be sharing his knowledge and expertise on Transplant Anesthesiology. With over a decade of experience in the field of Anesthesia, Dr. Souki offers valuable insight in his role as an Assistant Professor of Clinical Anesthesiology at the University of Miami. Recognized as part of the University of Miami Health System, the University of Miami prides itself in delivering high-quality compassionate health care, promoting health and well-being in the community, and educating the next generation of medical leaders. In his current capacity as an Assistant Professor of Clinical Anesthesiology at the University of Miami for over five years, Dr. Souki day-to-day responsibilities include clinical work, teaching residents and fellows, overseeing the Transplant Anesthesia Fellowship Program and maintaining his role as Director of Post Anesthesia Care Unit. Following his graduation with a medical degree from the American University of Beirut in 2003, Dr. Souki completed a residency in Anesthesiology at Jackson Memorial Hospital - Jackson Health System. He then continued post graduate training with a fellowship in Solid Organ Transplant Anesthesiology at Jackson Memorial Hospital - Jackson Health System. Dr. Souki maintains affiliation with the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Florida Society of Anesthesiologists, Society for the Advancement of Transplant Anesthesia, International Liver Transplant Society and International Anesthesia Research Society. He is board certified in Anesthesiology by the American Board of Anesthesiology. As a founding member of the Society for the Advancement of Transplant Anesthesia, Dr. Souki pursued Transplant Anesthesiology after being fascinated by the field, its challenges and desiring to make a positive impact on patients. Looking back, he attributes his success to hard work and dedication. Due to his outstanding career, Dr. Souki has been honored with the 2012 Anesthesiology Research Award and the 2012 Anesthesiology High Academic Achievement Award by the University of Miami. He has authored peer-reviewed publications on topics ranging from cardiac arrest in pregnancy, airway management, emergence, cardioverter defibrillators and transesophageal echocardiography. Also, he has written book chapters on transplant in geriatric patients and anesthetic implications of opioid addiction. Dr. Souki has presented at numerous national conferences including ASA, GAARRC, IARS and OAS. He is supportive of various local and international charitable organizations such as the Dolphins Cancer Challenge, United Way of Miami, and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Residing in Miami, he is an avid Miami Heat fan who enjoys playing basketball, tennis, and football in his spare time. Due to his international roots, Dr. Souki is fluent in English, Spanish, and Arabic. Considering the future, Dr. Souki plans to continue his dedication to academic medicine and develop his research for better patient care and safety.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: cen.acs.org

Researchers who study the brain routinely preserve tissue from their patients in brain banks all over the world for future analysis. However, tissue samples that have been fixed with preservatives and then frozen are difficult to analyze with powerful cell-sorting techniques such as flow cytometry. Now, scientists have developed new methods to overcome these previous limitations (ACS Chem. Neurosci. 2017, DOI: 10.1021/acschemneuro.6b00374). So far these new methods have only been validated for brain tissue, but they could also be applied to other tissue types that have been fixed, frozen, and need to be analyzed, the developers say. Since the 1970s, researchers have used flow cytometry to sort different cell populations from a mixture. They attach fluorescent tags to myriad cellular markers on or within certain cell types in the mixture, and then pass a suspension of the mixed cells through detectors, sorting the cells based on fluorescence. But once tissue is frozen, the cells become difficult to separate from the sample with existing methods without causing damage. Moreover, some freezing agents can also damage the DNA of cells, making it difficult for researchers to do genetic analysis. The ability to isolate and sort different types of brain cells from tissue banks would allow researchers to study the effects of drugs, environmental factors, and diseases on specific brain cell types. David Martin, a graduate student in Charles D. Nichols’s lab at the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, bumped up against this limitation when he wanted to study the effects of psychedelics on two particular types of brain cells, but didn’t have any preexisting protocols for isolating them from the rat brain samples he was working with. After months of trial and error, Martin and others in his lab found success. His team developed new protocols for separating cells out of brain tissue from humans, mice, and rats, fixed using formalin, zinc, and paraformaldehyde, respectively. After passing the liquified, frozen tissue through needles multiple times and, in some cases, applying an enzyme solution that cleaves chemical bonds between cells, Martin was able to successfully separate cells into a suspension and then fluorescently tag them. Passing the cell suspensions through a flow cytometer isolated the two types of neurons affected by the drugs they were testing. Importantly, he was able to perform downstream mRNA analysis on these cells, and found the gene expression of these recovered cells matched those observations from previously published studies. This work changes the long-standing belief that it’s too challenging, if not nearly impossible, to isolate individual cells from fixed, frozen neuronal tissue—let alone study their individual function, according to Claes Wahlestedt of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Jyoti J. Watters, a neuroimmunologist at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, agrees. “The method they report here will absolutely change how neuroscientists understand individual cell function in the central nervous system.” Wahlestedt, though enthusiastic about the findings, adds that the methodologies still need to be validated by others.


News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Drinking at least one artificially sweetened beverage daily was associated with almost three times the risk of developing stroke or dementia compared to those who drank artificially-sweetened beverages less than once a week, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke. The authors caution that the long-term observational study was not designed or able to prove cause and effect, and only shows a trend among one group of people. “Our study shows a need to put more research into this area given how often people drink artificially-sweetened beverages,” said Matthew Pase, a senior fellow in the department of neurology at Boston University School of Medicine, Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne, Australia, and the Framingham Heart Study. “Although we did not find an association between stroke or dementia and the consumption of sugary drinks, this certainly does not mean they are a healthy option. We recommend that people drink water on a regular basis instead of sugary or artificially sweetened beverages.” The researchers analyzed the Framingham Heart Study Offspring Cohort of 2,888 people, primarily Caucasian, over the age of 45 for the stroke study and 1,484 people over the age of 60 for the dementia arm of the study. Over a period of seven years, the researchers reviewed what people were drinking at three different points in time. Participants reported their eating and drinking habits by responding to food frequency questionnaires. The researchers then followed up with the study subjects for the next 10 years to determine who developed stroke or dementia, then compared the dietary information to the risk of developing stroke and dementia over the course of the study. The data collected did not distinguish between the types of artificial sweeteners used in the beverages. At the end of the 10-year follow-up period, the researchers noted 97 cases (three percent) of stroke, 82 of which were ischemic (caused by blockage of blood vessels), and 81 (five percent) cases of dementia, 63 of which were diagnosed as Alzheimer’s disease. The researchers used statistical models, adjusted for various risk factors such as age, sex, caloric intake, education, diabetes mellitus and the presence of a variant of the Alzheimer’s risk gene apolipoprotein E, to determine potential links between artificially-sweetened drink consumption and the risk of stroke or dementia. They found that people who drank at least one artificially-sweetened beverage a day were three times as likely to develop ischemic stroke and 2.9 times as likely to develop Alzheimer's disease dementia. Although the prospective nature of the study design increases the reliability of its findings, there are limitations. The participants were overwhelmingly white, and it is possible that ethnic preferences may influence how often people select sugary or artificially sweetened drinks, Pase said. People did not drink sugary sodas as often as diet sodas, which Pase said could be one reason the researchers did not see an association with regular soda since the participants may have been health conscious and just not consuming them as frequently. The main limitation, Pase said, is the important point that an observational study like this cannot prove that drinking artificially-sweetened drinks is linked to strokes or dementia, but it does identify an intriguing trend that will need to be explored in other studies. “Even if someone is three times as likely to develop stroke or dementia, it is by no means a certain fate,” Pase said. “In our study, three percent of the people had a new stroke and five percent developed dementia, so we're still talking about a small number of people developing either stroke or dementia.” According to an accompanying editorial, the current body of scientific research is inconclusive regarding whether or not drinking artificially sweetened beverages can actually lead to stroke, dementia or other cardiovascular conditions. However, there are a growing number of population based studies, such as this study by Pase, et.al, that show associations between frequent consumption of artificially sweetened beverages and undesirable effects on blood vessels throughout the body. This suggests that it may not be advisable to substitute or promote artificially sweetened drinks as healthier alternatives to sugar-sweetened drinks. “Both sugar and artificially sweetened soft drinks may be hard on the brain,” said senior editorial author Ralph Sacco M.D., a former president of the American Heart Association and the chairman of the Department of Neurology at the Miller School of Medicine at University of Miami in Florida. “We know that limiting added sugars is an important strategy to support good nutrition and healthy body weights, and until we know more, people should use artificially sweetened drinks cautiously. They may have a role for people with diabetes and in weight loss, but we encourage people to drink water, low-fat milk or other beverages without added sweeteners,” said Rachel K. Johnson, past chair of the American Heart Association’s Nutrition Committee and professor of nutrition at the University of Vermont.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.newscientist.com

A woman in her 80s has become the first person to be successfully treated with induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. A slither of laboratory-made retinal cells has protected her eyesight, fighting her age-related macular degeneration – a common form of progressive blindness. Such stem cells can be coaxed to form many other types of cell. Unlike other types of stem cell, such as those found in an embryo, induced pluripotent ones can be made from adult non-stem cells – a discovery that earned a Nobel prize in 2012. Now, more than a decade after they were created, these stem cells have helped someone. Masayo Takahashi at the RIKEN Laboratory for Retinal Regeneration in Kobe, Japan, and her team took skin cells from the woman and turned them into iPS cells. They then encouraged these to form retinal pigment epithelial cells, which are important for supporting and nourishing the retina cells that capture light for vision. The researchers made a slither of cells measuring just 1 by 3 millimetres. Before transplanting this into the woman’s eye in 2014, they first removed diseased tissue on her retina that was gradually destroying her sight. They then inserted the small patch of cells they had created, hoping they would become a part of her eye and stop her eyesight from degenerating. Now the results are in. Published today, they show that the treatment hasn’t made the woman’s vision any sharper, but it does seem to have prevented further deterioration – with her vision now stable for more than two years. Since the graft, the woman says her vision is “brighter”. “Takahashi and her team have done incredible work, and deserve all the praise they get for this project,” says Shinya Yamanaka, director of the Center for iPS Cell Research and Application at Kyoto University, who won the Nobel prize for inventing iPS cells and collaborated on this work. “This is a landmark study and opens the door to similar treatments for many diseases,” he says. “This first iPSC-derived retinal graft is an important landmark in the field of retinal regeneration,” says James Bainbridge at University College London, and head of a trial at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London of similar grafts made instead from human embryonic stem cells. One worry about this approach is that turning the stem cells into new tissues could lead to cancer-causing genetic mutations – though the team found no evidence of this in the treated woman. However, a trial of the technique in another person was cancelled in 2015, after tests revealed that the cells intended to be given to the man had developed genetic abnormalities. But although it has taken many years to bring proven stem cell therapies to the clinic, many private centres around the world have been advertising unregulated treatments purporting to use stem cells for some time. A second study published today shows just how badly some unregulated treatments described as stem cell therapies can go wrong. Three case reports of women given such treatments for age-related macular degeneration detail how one woman went blind and the vision of the other two became much worse. All three ended up seeking emergency treatment in 2015, after each paid $5000 to a private clinic to receive injections of their own fatty tissue into their eyes. “Patients and physicians in the US should be made aware that not all ‘stem cell’ clinics are safe, and that ‘stem therapy’ as provided in private clinics in the US is unproven and potentially harmful,” says Thomas Albini at the University of Miami’s Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Florida, who subsequently treated two of the women. Albini advises people to be suspicious of any procedure involving payment. “Most legitimate research in the US does not require patients to pay for the experimental procedures,” he says, adding that people should check whether a trial has been registered with the US Food and Drug Administration. “Be aware that if it sounds too good to be true, it may indeed not be true.” Read more: Clinic claims it has used stem cells to treat Down’s syndrome


Findings of a new study have revealed that the Earth's oceans are warming far faster than scientists previously believed. The research, which was published in the journal Science Advances on Friday, March 10, and used data from thousands of robotic floats that measured water salinity and temperature, showed that the rate of ocean warming has nearly doubled since 1994 when compared with that which occurred in earlier decades. Study researcher Tim Boyer, from NOAA's Ocean Climate Laboratory, and colleagues found that between 1960 and 2015, ocean warming worldwide was 13 percent greater than estimates made by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change or IPCC. The study likewise revealed that the warming started to spread deeper into the ocean. "OHC [ocean heat content] has increased fairly steadily and, since 1990, has increasingly involved deeper layers of the ocean," the researchers wrote. "All ocean basins examined have experienced significant warming since 1998, with the greatest warming in the southern oceans, the tropical/subtropical Pacific Ocean, and the tropical/subtropical Atlantic Ocean." The findings of the new study provide a grimmer outlook for consequences associated with warmer ocean water. The IPCC previously estimated that ocean warming can be blamed for 30 percent to 40 percent of sea level rise but based on the results of the new research, the figure would be more like 50 percent. Increased water temperatures can cause frozen bodies such as glaciers to melt resulting in increased volumes of water in the oceans. The rise in sea levels, however, brings with it unwanted risks such as flooding and potentials for storm surges. People who live in coastal areas are particularly at risk. A 2016 study has revealed that a sea level rise of 3 feet to 6 feet by the year 2100 may expose 13 million people in the United States to flooding. Even with a minimum rise of just 3 feet, researchers estimated that over 4.2 million people who live in coastal areas in the United States could still be affected. Warming ocean waters poses risk to marine life as well. Coral bleaching, for instance, which is caused by warming water temperatures, has already resulted in up to 70 percent of corals dying off in some areas. Due to rising temperatures, a new climate model suggested that 99 percent of the coral reefs worldwide could be on track to severe annual bleaching. Coral bleaching has crucial environmental and economic impact. Coral reefs provide food and income to hundreds of millions of people generating about $375 billion per year from tourism, fisheries, and coastal protection. Coral reefs are also home to at least a quarter of all marine life, which means their loss could have devastating impact on creatures that thrive in the sea. "Bleaching that takes place every year will invariably cause major changes in the ecological function of coral reef ecosystems," said Ruben van Hooidonk, from the University of Miami. "Further, annual bleaching will greatly reduce the capacity of coral reefs to provide goods and services, such as fisheries and coastal protection, to human communities." © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.gizmag.com

From bacteria to butterflies, creatures have long relied upon the Earth's magnetic field to orient themselves and navigate the planet. Eels are another animal that possess this fascinating ability known as magnetoreception, but researchers have recently discovered that the sea slitherers use the talent in a unique way that lets them travel far with minimal energy. What they found was that young European eels use magnetism to help guide them to the Atlantic Ocean's Gulf Stream. This lets them effectively use it as a conveyor belt that takes them from their birthing grounds in the Sargasso Sea to their coastal and freshwater habitats stretching from North Africa to Scandinavia. After living in those areas for a few years, the eels hop back on the Gulf Stream and hitch a ride back to the Sargasso Sea – a warm patch of ocean in the Atlantic rich in a type of free-floating seaweed called Sargassum – where they breed and die. To come to their conclusion, Lewis Naisbett-Jones at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill along with Nathan Putman of the University of Miami and other colleagues, built a device that looks a bit like a wheel. Young eels, known as "glass eels" because of their transparent skin, are placed in the center chamber. Then, various magnetic fields are applied to the apparatus and the eels are free to move from the center chamber to any of 12 compartments around the wheel. The researchers found that when a magnetic field was applied that mimicked one from the North Atlantic, the eels turned to face northeast, which is the direction they would need to travel from the Sargasso Sea to the Gulf Stream in order to be carried to their new homes. When the magnetic field mimicked that of the Sargasso Sea, however, the eels faced southwest, the direction that would carry them to the current and back to their breeding grounds. Computer models were then used to confirm that even if the eels swam weakly in the directions they oriented under the magnetic stimulation, the majority would indeed hit the Gulf Stream and get where they needed to go. "We were not surprised to find that eels have a magnetic map, but we were surprised to discover how well they can detect subtle differences in magnetic fields," says Lewis Naisbett-Jones at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. "We were even more surprised when our ocean simulation models revealed that the little eels use their map not so much to locate Europe, but to target a big conveyor belt – the Gulf Stream – that will take them there. Presumably, a little bit of work (i.e., swimming) helps increase their chances of catching a mostly free ride to their destination." The video below shows the experimental device created by Naisbett-Jones and his collaborators. Their work has been published in the journal Current Biology.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Getting a shot at your doctor's office can be a stressful experience. But what if you knew your doctor was from your hometown, liked the same food as you, or shared your religious beliefs? Now that you feel more culturally connected to your doctor, will the shot hurt less? It's a scenario posed in a new study by Dr. Elizabeth Losin, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Miami College of Arts and Sciences; Steven Anderson, a University of Miami graduate student in the Department of Psychology; and Tor Wager, Ph.D., Professor in the Institute of Cognitive Science at the University of Colorado Boulder. The study is entitled, "Feelings of clinician-patient similarity and trust influence pain: Evidence from simulated clinical interactions," and it is published in the Journal of Pain, the official journal of the American Pain Society. In Losin's lab, she simulates clinician-patient interactions to uncover the social and cultural factors that influence the pain that patients experience during medical care. Her goal is to try and find ways to help people feel less pain when seeing the doctor and help reduce phobias about doctor visits and check-ups. Losin says her study was inspired by clinical research literature that reveals how patients with racially or ethnically concordant doctors report higher levels of satisfaction. She notes that those studies often don't include outcome variables with a physiological component, such as pain. So, it's not clear how far the effects of feeling culturally similar to your doctor can go. "Pain also has a psychological component as well, and it's the interaction between the psychological and physiological aspects of pain that we're really interested in," she said. Losin says that physician-patient interactions are typically fast and superficial so people often don't actually get the time to figure out whether they have anything in common with their doctor. "You go to the doctor's office and you have to get a procedure that is painful and scary," said Losin. "We want to know how the doctor-patient dynamic, in this case how the doctor and patient perceive one another, might affect how much pain the patient feels from that painful medical procedure. If the patient feels they have something in common with their doctor, is that enough to actually change how much pain they feel?" For her study, Losin used a modified version of a "minimal group paradigm," which is normally used in social psychology experiments to create artificial groups in the lab based on something completely arbitrary and superficial. This approach allows researchers to figure out the minimal conditions required for real-world intergroup behavior, like discrimination, to occur. In Losin's study the groups weren't quite so arbitrary. "We created the groups based on participants' core personal beliefs and values, the same things that we think doctors and patients infer based on race and ethnicity in the context of medical care," said Losin. "We gave participants a questionnaire that asked about their political ideology, religious and gender role beliefs and practices. When they came into the lab, we separated the participants into two groups and told them they were assigned to these groups based on their questionnaire answers but not giving specifics to which question put them there." Losin says that the goal was to make people from the same group think they had something in common, which might then manifest itself as more positive feelings, like trust, towards participants playing the role of the doctor or the patient from their own group. The participants who played the patients interacted with one doctor from their own group and one doctor from the other group, both of their own gender. During the simulated clinical interaction, the doctors performed a pain-induction procedure on the patients by applying heat to their inner forearm, meant to simulate a painful medical procedure like a shot. "After the interaction, we asked both the doctor and the patient how similar they felt to each other and how much they trusted each other," said Losin. "We predicted that patients would report being in less pain when they had a doctor from their own group than a doctor from the other group. We also expected less pain if the patients trusted their doctor more and felt more similar to them." According to the study, the more patients reported trusting their doctor and feeling similar to them, the less pain they reported feeling from the heat on their arm. The study also suggests that participants who experience higher levels of anxiety on a day-to-day basis experienced greater reductions in pain from feeling close to their doctor. "Overall, we are interpreting our findings as suggesting that the doctor is essentially acting as a social placebo, playing the same role that a sugar pill would play if we were doing a study on placebo pain relief," said Losin. "When someone believes that something is going to help relieve their pain, their brain naturally releases pain-relieving chemicals. Our hypothesis, based on what we are seeing, is that trusting and feeling similar to the doctor who is performing the painful procedure is creating that same kind of placebo pain relief." Ultimately, Losin would like to use the results of her studies to design and test new methods clinicians can use during the doctor-patient interaction to build trust and help decrease pain for their patients.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Having diabetes is all about maintaining a healthy blood sugar level. So, you may think it's a good thing if your blood sugar dips. However, low blood sugar can be just as worrisome as high blood sugar. "There's a happy range of blood sugar that our body likes, and having it too high or too low affects us," says Cindy Cooke, a family nurse practitioner in Huntsville, Alabama, and president of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners. Hypoglycemia, another term for low blood sugar, is when your blood sugar dips below 70 milligrams per deciliter, according to the American Diabetes Association. (If you have diabetes, you likely already use a blood glucose meter to regularly check your blood sugar.) The symptoms of hypoglycemia are shakiness, sweating, poor concentration and feeling weak or lightheaded. [See: 6 Tips to Keep Diabetics Out of the Hospital.] Just what causes hypoglycemia? One common cause is skipping meals. "In our office, we call it feeling hangry," says Lory Gonzalez, a nurse educator at the Diabetes Research Institute Foundation at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Hangry cleverly combines the words hungry and angry, a feeling you've probably experienced when you haven't eaten in a while. Anyone, not just those with diabetes, can feel the effects of hypoglycemia. However, if you have diabetes, other causes of low blood sugar include increased physical activity or taking too much of your diabetes medication. For instance, you may experience hypoglycemia if your recommended medication dosage is too strong and it lowers your blood sugar, or you may take too much insulin and skip a meal, leading to hypoglycemia. How can you prevent low blood sugar and hypoglycemia? Don't skip meals and keep a high-sugar snack nearby (see examples below). "This will keep you from going south," Gonzalez says. If you think you're experiencing hypoglycemia, check your blood sugar. If it's below 70, you need to consume 15 grams of fast-acting sugar. This can include four ounces of juice or six ounces of regular soda (not diet). Many people traditionally think of orange juice to help hypoglycemia, but any type of fruit juice will work, Gonzalez says. You can also consume glucose tablets that are available over the counter. Each tablet typically has 4 grams of carbohydrates, so you'll want to take four tablets. Another approach to treat low blood sugar is the 30/30 rule, recommended by Dr. Joshua Miller, an endocrinologist and medical director of diabetes care for Stony Brook Medicine in Stony Brook, New York. With this, you consume 30 grams of fast-acting sugar, and then check your blood sugar every 30 minutes to make sure it's rising. Make sure to check your blood sugar regularly until it returns to a normal range. You want to keep a close watch on it to make sure you're not shooting it too high, Miller cautions. If your next meal is one to two hours away, have a snack that combines protein, fat and carbohydrates, like cheese and crackers, peanut butter and crackers or nuts and yogurt. Steer away from a carb-heavy snack, which may not be effective enough in lowering your blood sugar, Cooke says. It's important to keep snacks and quick sugar sources handy at all times. Stash extras around your house, at work or in your car. [Read: Don't Fall for These 6 Myths About Eating With Diabetes.] Although a one-time hypoglycemia experience may be nothing to worry about, talk to your doctor if it happens often. "One thing I counsel patients is that diabetes is a moving target," Miller says. Even if you do the right things to treat your diabetes, your body may require changes in medication to avoid drastic blood sugar changes. If you have diabetes, the effects of severe hypoglycemia can include seizures or fainting. In these situations, treatment may involve administering a shot of glucagon, a special hormone. Glucagon kits are available by prescription, and your health care provider can let you know if you need one. If you require a glucagon kit, the people around you most often should know how to give you an injection if you experience severe hypoglycemia, or they can call 911 for help. Sometimes a person living with diabetes can unknowingly have persistent low blood sugar levels -- a condition called hypoglycemia unawareness -- and it can be dangerous. "Having low blood sugar can mimic being drunk when you're driving," Gonzalez says. She recommends always carrying identification that says you have diabetes so people know what might be happening. And make sure to check your blood sugar before you drive a car so you know that you're not driving with a dangerous blood sugar level. Hyperglycemia means you have high blood sugar, generally defined as above 200 mg/dl. Uncontrolled hyperglycemia sometimes has no symptoms. Other times, symptoms can include increased thirst, urination and hunger as well as fatigue. If hyperglycemia persistently occurs -- meaning you have uncontrolled diabetes -- you're prone to the typical complications associated with diabetes, including blindness, circulation problems and kidney failure, Gonzalez says. If you are already diagnosed with diabetes, you know the risks associated with high blood sugar. If you think you've experienced hyperglycemia but don't yet have diabetes diagnosed, talk to your health care provider. "Diabetes is a lifelong disease process, but a lot of people tend to ignore it," Cooke says. However, the symptoms of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia can be similar, so it's always best to test your blood sugar to see what's going on. If you experience several episodes of hyperglycemia within a short period, it could be that you've had too much of the wrong food or you've taken too little medication to help control your blood sugar. It could be a sign of not getting enough physical activity. Also, having a cold or infection can raise your blood sugar. In that case, your blood sugar should return to normal once you're feeling better. "I always warn my patients in this situation and tell them not to panic about their blood sugar," Cooke says. [Read: 7 Things Not to Say to Someone With Diabetes.] If you experience hyperglycemia, try drinking water. You can also take a walk to help counteract the effects of foods that spike your blood sugar. However, if your blood sugar is above 240, check your urine for ketones, the American Diabetes Association recommends. You'll want to avoid physical activity if there are ketones in your urine because they could raise your blood sugar even higher. If you experience hyperglycemia more often than usual, you may want to work with a registered dietitian on your meal planning. Vanessa Caceres is a Health freelancer for U.S. News. She's a nationally published health, travel and food writer, and she has an undergraduate degree in journalism and psychology from Hampshire College and a graduate degree in linguistics/bilingual education from Georgetown University. Connect with her on Twitter at @FloridaCulture.


MIAMI -- Researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science have developed a new technology to measure the currents near the ocean's surface that carry pollutants such as plastics and spilled oil. This new technique, which includes a specialized video camera to remotely sense currents in the upper few centimeters of the water column, can help scientists more accurately predict the fate of spilled oil or other marine pollutants that are transported at the surface layer by providing these measurements that were previously unattainable. "The health and economic impacts of spilled oil and marine debris have the potential to be profoundly negative," said UM Rosenstiel School postdoctoral researcher Nathan Laxague, and lead author of the study. "Improving our ability to measure near-surface ocean currents can aid in disaster response and provides for greater context in understanding the dynamics of marine pollutant transport." Laxague and colleagues conducted two experiments -- one in a laboratory and one in the field at the mouth of the Columbia River--to test their new technique. In the laboratory study, the researchers imaged the water surface in the SUSTAIN (SUrge-STructure Atmosphere INteraction) facility using a specialized camera that simultaneously records three polarizations of reflected light off the ocean surface to determine the current profile for a range of wind speeds. In the field study, a research vessel was stationed in the mouth of the Columbia River along the Oregon-Washington border to verify the results from the lab experiment in a real-world setting. The data gathered from the experiments showed that the innovative optical technique is ideal to measure currents within the first few centimeters at the ocean's surface. "This slice of the water column is important because it is where oil, larvae and other drifting floating objects are, and yet, until now, scientists had no good way to measure it using existing technologies," said UM Rosenstiel School Ocean Science Professor Brian Haus, a co-author of the study. The study was conducted as a part of the CARTHE (Consortium for Advanced Research on Transport of Hydrocarbon in the Environment) and RIVET (RIVerine and Estuarine Transport) projects. Based at the UM Rosenstiel School, CARTHE, is a research team dedicated to predicting the fate of the oil released into our environment as a result of future oil spills. The paper, titled "Passive optical sensing of the near-surface, wind-driven current profile," appears in the Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology in its online pre-print version. The study's authors include: Laxague, Haus, David Ortiz-Suslow, Conor Smith, Guillaume Novelli, Hanjing Dai, Tamay Özgökmen, and Hans Graber from the UM Rosenstiel School Department of Ocean Sciences. The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (grant #SA1207GOMRI005) and the Office of Naval Research (grant #N000141410643) provided funding for the study. About the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School The University of Miami is one of the largest private research institutions in the southeastern United States. The University's mission is to provide quality education, attract and retain outstanding students, support the faculty and their research, and build an endowment for University initiatives. Founded in the 1940's, the Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science has grown into one of the world's premier marine and atmospheric research institutions. Offering dynamic interdisciplinary academics, the Rosenstiel School is dedicated to helping communities to better understand the planet, participating in the establishment of environmental policies, and aiding in the improvement of society and quality of life. For more information, visit: http://www. .


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

Birmingham Magazine names Darrell Cartwright a "Top Attorney" in the areas of Corporate and Finance, as well as Trusts and Estates -- Darrell Cartwright has been selected to Birmingham Magazine's "Top Attorneys" list for 2017. He was nominated by his peers and voted onto the list, which appeared in the April, 2017 issue.Cartwright, who was selected as a "Top Attorney" in two separate categories of Corporate and Finance as well as Trusts and Estates, heads the Cartwright Law Center, LLC, and is also "Of Counsel" with the RichardsonClement, P.C. business department.  Cartwright's practice focuses on assisting small and medium sized businesses and their owners, including virtually all aspects of a business, including transitioning the business to other owners through sales and mergers, as well as estate planning techniques.Cartwright obtained his C.P.A. certificate while attending Tulane Law School. He graduated from Tulane Law School in 1985, and later obrtained his Masters of Law (LL.M.) degree in Taxation from the University of Miami School of Law. More information about Cartwright can be obtained at the website, http://www.CartLaw.net


News Article | January 2, 2017
Site: compositesmanufacturingmagazine.com

When it opens this summer, the 186-foot Halls River Bridge in Homosassa, Fla., north of Tampa will likely have more composite elements than any vehicular bridge in the United States. While each of the composite technologies has been used in other projects nationally, the bridge, which will replace one built in 1954, will feature composites in its pilings, deck, retaining walls, abutments and traffic rails. “There are some pedestrian bridges, but to our knowledge I don’t think there’s another vehicular bridge that’s used composites in every element to this extent,” says Steven Nolan, P.E., senior structures design engineer with the Florida Department of Transportation’s State Structures Design Office in Tallahassee. He cites pioneering work by the University of Miami’s College of Engineering, which built a pedestrian bridge on campus that extensively used composites and was a collaborator on the Halls River Bridge design. The bridge replacement project began in 2012 when engineers at the FDOT chose the Halls River Bridge as a demonstration site for the state’s first bridge built with Hillman Composite Beams® by HCB Inc., Alpharetta, Ga. (HCBs were described by inventor John Hillman in a 2016 Composites Manufacturing article, “Making Inroads in Infrastructure,” as FRP boxes with a steel tension tie in the bottom flange resisting the thrust from a concrete arch inside the box. The FRP outer shell provides shear strength, the concrete arch offers compressive strength and the steel reinforcement running longitudinally provides tension capacity.) While the project began with a focus on HCBs, as planning progressed the FDOT engineers saw opportunities to create proof-of-concept applications for other composite technologies, too. “Ultimately, we replaced every reinforced concrete element in the project with some form of composite material or hybrid – either carbon pre-stressed reinforced concrete, GFRP-reinforced concrete, or, in the case of the HCBs, a composite shell over a steel-reinforced concrete core,” says Nolan. The FDOT opted for composites primarily because of the high costs of maintaining traditional steel-reinforced bridge elements in the state’s saltwater and wetland environments. “The majority of long-term maintenance costs on our bridges are the result of degradation of the substructure, predominantly our pilings,” says Nolan. “We spend a major portion of our bridge maintenance budget on rehabilitating piles on bridges over saltwater crossings.” Rehabilitation includes replacement, repair, pile jackets and cathodic protection – all of which are expensive and require working within the body of water.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Periodontists Dr. John Paul Gallardo and William P. Lamas will be hosting their next study club in Miami, FL for Dental ED on May 4, 2017 at CIBO Wine Bar in Coral Gables, FL. The educational event will bring together some of the area’s most respected dentists in restorative and general dentistry. The May study club will begin with dinner and social hour at 6pm and the presentation will start at 7 p.m. Once a quarter, Dr. Gallardo and Dr. Lamas host the Miami Study Club to bring the latest innovations in dentistry to South Florida. Both Dr. Gallardo and Dr. Lamas are authorized periodontists to provide continuing education to other dentists. This course’s objectives include learning to combine composites and veneers to preserve dentin, rubber dam placement, difficult case studies, and a conservative approach in management. The course is also designed to stress the essential value of breaking infection at all levels so that doctors attending can return to their offices equipped with practical infection control in the dental setting. “This platform for collaborating with our colleagues allows us to share pearls of wisdom with each other in an intellectually safe and trusting environment,” said Dr. Gallardo. “This ultimately leads to better patient care, improvement, and the evolution of even the most time-proven treatment strategies.” The Miami Study Club is part of Dental ED, an international organization that brings together a wide range of dental professionals to further their education. Each session starts with the latest in dental technologies, trends, and research. Dental ED was launched in 2004 and has become a leader in dentistry training and education by offering study club courses to professionals around the world. Using advances in technology, teach session connects educators to dentists using interactive-web conferencing technology. Dr. Gallardo and Dr. Lamas bring patients from all over the world more than 25 years of experience in the field of implant dentistry and periodontics. Dr. Gallardo attended the University of Miami, New York University, and Boston University. Dr. Lamas is an alumnus of Barry University, the Florida College of Dentistry, and Baylor College of Dentistry-TAMUS. Both doctors are highly respected in the fields of periodontics and implant dentistry. The office offers patients, laser periodontal therapy, dental implants, sedation dentistry, the innovative All-on-4®, as well as gummy smile correction and wisdom teeth removal. The upcoming study club will be held at CIBO Wine Bar, located at 45 Miracle Mile in Coral Gables. Dinner and social hour will begin at 6 p.m. and the educational presentation will follow at 7 p.m. Attending doctors will be awarded with 7.75 continuing education credits. Anyone interested in attending should RSVP by contacting Amelia Gonzalez at Amelia(at)miamiperio(dot)com or calling 305-447-1447.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Gunshot wound injuries in Miami-Dade County are clustered in predominantly poor, black neighborhoods, according to a new study from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. "These findings offer evidence to support urgent, targeted community engagement and prevention strategies to reduce local firearm violence," said Tanya L. Zakrison, M.D., M.H.Sc., M.P.H., assistant professor in the DeWitt Daughtry Family Department of Surgery and a surgeon at the Ryder Trauma Center at UM/Jackson Memorial Hospital. Zakrison sponsored the study, "Geo-demographics of Gunshot Wound Injuries in Miami-Dade County, 2002-2012," published recently in the journal BMC Public Health. Co-authors were Justin Stoler, Ph.D., M.P.H., assistant professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, whose research focuses on health disparities, and Laura Zebib, a former UM student and Miller School intern who is now an M.P.H. student at Columbia University. "We found that the epicenter of gun violence persisted in these socially and economically marginalized neighborhoods throughout the 11-year study period, implying that gun control, anti-violence, and policing strategies have been ineffective," said Zakrison. "We hope to engage local community groups and municipal politicians to find new societal-level interventions that will help eliminate systemic inequalities, also known as structural violence, evident in Miami that lead to direct violence related to firearms." The Miller School researchers reviewed 4,547 Miami-Dade cases involving an intentional firearm-related injury from 2002 to 2012. The fatality rate of injured patients was 15.4 percent. "Gun violence in Miami-Dade County is twice the national average," Zakrison said. "From a public health perspective, this is a crisis." Zakrison said more funds are needed on a national level for firearm research and injury prevention programs. "Firearm-related violence is a greater problem in societies like the United States that have extreme inequality of wealth," she said. "It also stems from a culture of fear that has permeated society so that people feel they need a gun." She added that the United States has the world's largest incarcerated population with 2.7 million people in prison. "When inmates are released, it is very difficult for them to obtain regular employment, so they are pushed back into high-risk alternatives for income, fueling the intra-community violence in Miami-Dade," she said. "We need to make changes in our society so all human beings have an opportunity to realize their full potential."


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Imagine this scenario on a highway: A driver starts to make a sudden lane change but realizes his mistake and quickly veers back, too late. Other motorists have already reacted and, in some cases, collide. Meanwhile, the original motorist -- the one who caused the problem -- drives on. This is similar to what happens with the protein TET2 and a variety of blood cancers. TET2 is a tumor suppressor, preventing hematopoietic (blood) stem cells from overgrowing. However, if TET2 becomes mutated, which happens more frequently than we like, it allows other genes to mutate. TET2 loss does not actually create a cancerous state, but it helps create the conditions for cancer to thrive. "If you lose TET2, it's not a malignant state, per se," said Mingjiang Xu, M.D., Ph.D., cancer researcher at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center and associate professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. "But it's creating a situation for other mutations to happen, leading to all types of blood cancer." Xu and colleagues have been studying Tet2 for several years, and are starting to get a handle on how it operates. They published a paper in the journal Nature Communications, which describes how TET2 loss can open the door for mutations that drive myeloid, lymphoid, and other cancers. That TET2 has a hand in several blood cancers makes it unique. Many mutated genes generate a specific type of cancer, depending on where they originate. "If you lose TET2, it leads to blood cancers and it could be any type," said Xu. "Usually if you lose one gene, it leads to one specific cancer." TET2 is an enzyme that demethylates DNA. Methylation turns down genes, keeping them from coding for specific proteins. In other words, TET2 may operate as a master switch, controlling whether certain genes are turned on or off. TET2 mutations are found in 30 percent of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS); 30 percent of secondary acute myeloid leukemias; and more than 50 percent of chronic myelomonocytic leukemias. In the Nature Communications paper, Xu's team showed that mice without the Tet2 gene are more prone to blood cancers. In fact, removing Tet2 turns blood stem cells into mutation machines, and some of those malfunctions generate cancer. From a clinical standpoint, TET2 is a little tricky. First, it is easier to turn a protein off than turn it on. In addition, TET2 does not actually drive the cancer alone -- it's the mutations acquired cooperate with the TET2 loss doing that nasty work. Turning up Tet2 could be helpful, but it has to happen early. Once the mutations are generated, targeting Tet2 would have little effect. Still, Xu believes TET2 therapeutics could have a place in blood cancer treatment. He notes that around 5 percent of people over the age of 70 have TET2 mutations, which would make them ideal candidates for a preventive therapy. "We are developing a method to target TET2," said Xu. "If we target that population for early therapy, we could potentially prevent those downstream mutations from happening."


LOS ANGELES, May 04, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Imperial Capital Group, LLC (“Imperial Capital”), announced today the continued growth of its credit sales and trading business with the hiring of Tom Champion, a high yield sales industry veteran, and the opening of a new office in Stamford, CT. The hiring of Mr. Champion and opening of the Stamford location will allow Imperial Capital to further expand and strengthen its relationships with institutional clients. “We welcome Tom to the Imperial Capital team and look forward to him fitting in nicely with our capabilities alongside his solid relationships and credit research sales abilities,” said Tom Corcoran, President of Imperial Capital. “Imperial Capital is uniquely positioned to hire senior credit professionals in a constricting fixed income employment market and allows us to continue to serve the US and European institutional investor community with top notch professionals. In addition, the add of the Stamford office further cements our commitment to better serve our institutional clients.” Tom Champion joins Imperial Capital as a Managing Director with over 30 years of experience in Credit Sales & Trading. Mr. Champion will be based in Imperial’s Stamford Office complimented with time in New York. Prior to joining Imperial Capital, Mr. Champion was a Managing Director in distressed credit sales at Stifel, Nicolaus & Company. Previously, he worked at Knight Capital, RBS, CRT Capital, UBS, Chase and Citibank in a similar capacity. Mr. Champion began his career at Wertheim Schroeder & Company. In addition, Mr. Champion earned a Bachelor of Business Administration from the University of Miami. Imperial Capital's new office is located at 1 Landmark Square, Suite 720, Stamford, CT 06901. The main office number is 203-428-3300. Imperial Capital is a full-service investment bank offering a uniquely integrated platform of comprehensive services to institutional investors and middle market companies. We offer sophisticated sales and trading services to institutional investors and a wide range of investment banking advisory, capital markets and restructuring services to middle market corporate clients. Paired with our proprietary research and sales & trading desk analysis, we provide investment analysis across an issuer's capital structure, including bank loans, debt securities, the hybrid/bank capital marketplace (through our ELP Framework), post-reorganization equities, special situations claims and listed and unlisted equities. Our comprehensive and integrated service platform, expertise across the global capital structure, and deep industry sector knowledge enable us to provide clients with research driven ideas, superior advisory services, and trade execution. We are quick to identify opportunities under any market conditions and we have a proven track record of offering creative, proprietary solutions to our clients. Imperial Capital has three principal businesses: Investment Banking, Institutional Sales & Trading and Institutional Research. More information about Imperial Capital can be found at www.imperialcapital.com. About Imperial Capital (International), LLP Imperial Capital International, founded in 2011, is an affiliate of Imperial Capital, LLC with an office in central London. Complementing Imperial Capital's existing fixed income sales and trading franchise, Imperial Capital (International), LLP expanded the Imperial Capital franchise into the EEA. The company focuses on selling the entire credit spectrum and capital structure to its European institutional clients.


AUSTIN, Texas--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Sandra L. Weber, MD, FACP, FACE was elected Vice President today of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) at its 26th Annual Scientific and Clinical Congress in Austin, Texas. “I am honored to serve as Vice President of such a dynamic organization and I am ready to help expand upon the many opportunities that we will be involved in next year,” said Dr. Weber. Dr. Weber earned her medical degree from Northwestern University. The recipient of two student research awards from the American Diabetes Association during medical school training, Dr. Weber completed her internship, residency, chief residency and fellowship at the University of Miami. A member of AACE since 1994, Dr. Weber currently practices endocrinology in Greenville, South Carolina, where she is one of the founding faculty at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville. Also, she is involved in the residency teaching program, is active in clinical research, and serves as Chief of the Division of Endocrinology and Chair of Continuing Medical Education at Greenville Health System, University Medical Group. She has served on several AACE Committees, including Chair of the 24th Annual AACE Scientific & Clinical Congress Program Committee, ACE Funding Development Committee, Chapters Committee, Legislative and Regulatory Committee, Bylaws Committee, and more. About the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) represents more than 7,500 endocrinologists in the United States and abroad. AACE is the largest association of clinical endocrinologists in the world. The majority of AACE members are certified in endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism and concentrate on the treatment of patients with endocrine and metabolic disorders including diabetes, thyroid disorders, osteoporosis, growth hormone deficiency, cholesterol disorders, hypertension and obesity. Visit our site at www.aace.com. About the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) The American College of Endocrinology (ACE) is the educational and scientific arm of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE). ACE is the leader in advancing the care and prevention of endocrine and metabolic disorders by: providing professional education and reliable public health information; recognizing excellence in education, research and service; promoting clinical research and defining the future of Clinical Endocrinology. For more information, visit www.aace.com/college.


LOS ANGELES, May 04, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Imperial Capital Group, LLC (“Imperial Capital”), announced today the continued growth of its credit sales and trading business with the hiring of Tom Champion, a high yield sales industry veteran, and the opening of a new office in Stamford, CT. The hiring of Mr. Champion and opening of the Stamford location will allow Imperial Capital to further expand and strengthen its relationships with institutional clients. “We welcome Tom to the Imperial Capital team and look forward to him fitting in nicely with our capabilities alongside his solid relationships and credit research sales abilities,” said Tom Corcoran, President of Imperial Capital. “Imperial Capital is uniquely positioned to hire senior credit professionals in a constricting fixed income employment market and allows us to continue to serve the US and European institutional investor community with top notch professionals. In addition, the add of the Stamford office further cements our commitment to better serve our institutional clients.” Tom Champion joins Imperial Capital as a Managing Director with over 30 years of experience in Credit Sales & Trading. Mr. Champion will be based in Imperial’s Stamford Office complimented with time in New York. Prior to joining Imperial Capital, Mr. Champion was a Managing Director in distressed credit sales at Stifel, Nicolaus & Company. Previously, he worked at Knight Capital, RBS, CRT Capital, UBS, Chase and Citibank in a similar capacity. Mr. Champion began his career at Wertheim Schroeder & Company. In addition, Mr. Champion earned a Bachelor of Business Administration from the University of Miami. Imperial Capital's new office is located at 1 Landmark Square, Suite 720, Stamford, CT 06901. The main office number is 203-428-3300. Imperial Capital is a full-service investment bank offering a uniquely integrated platform of comprehensive services to institutional investors and middle market companies. We offer sophisticated sales and trading services to institutional investors and a wide range of investment banking advisory, capital markets and restructuring services to middle market corporate clients. Paired with our proprietary research and sales & trading desk analysis, we provide investment analysis across an issuer's capital structure, including bank loans, debt securities, the hybrid/bank capital marketplace (through our ELP Framework), post-reorganization equities, special situations claims and listed and unlisted equities. Our comprehensive and integrated service platform, expertise across the global capital structure, and deep industry sector knowledge enable us to provide clients with research driven ideas, superior advisory services, and trade execution. We are quick to identify opportunities under any market conditions and we have a proven track record of offering creative, proprietary solutions to our clients. Imperial Capital has three principal businesses: Investment Banking, Institutional Sales & Trading and Institutional Research. More information about Imperial Capital can be found at www.imperialcapital.com. About Imperial Capital (International), LLP Imperial Capital International, founded in 2011, is an affiliate of Imperial Capital, LLC with an office in central London. Complementing Imperial Capital's existing fixed income sales and trading franchise, Imperial Capital (International), LLP expanded the Imperial Capital franchise into the EEA. The company focuses on selling the entire credit spectrum and capital structure to its European institutional clients.


LEESBURG, Va., May 01, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- K2M Group Holdings, Inc. (NASDAQ:KTWO) (the "Company" or "K2M"), a global leader of complex spine and minimally invasive solutions focused on achieving three-dimensional Total Body Balance™, hosted more than 100 international spine surgeons from 22 countries for its annual Meeting of Minds™ in Lisbon, Portugal, from April 28–29, 2017. Meeting of Minds is a premier, world-class curriculum in the latest approaches and techniques for the operative treatment of spinal disorders. The Company also demonstrated its Balance ACS™ (or BACS™) platform, which applies three-dimensional solutions across the entire clinical care continuum to help drive quality outcomes in spine patients. “K2M just concluded a highly successful and educational meeting in Lisbon,” stated Harry Shufflebarger, MD, director of the Division of Spinal Surgery at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital in Miami, Florida, past president of the Scoliosis Research Society, former professor of orthopedic surgery and neurosurgery, and current clinical professor of orthopaedics and rehabilitation at the University of Miami, and a guest lecturer at this year’s Meeting of Minds. “Participants heard world experts lecture and discuss a variety of spinal topics. These include pediatric and adult topics of all etiologies. I rate this as a top-level educational event.” Meeting of Minds—the largest of K2M’s many Medical Education programs—featured more than 60 interactive discussions, case presentations and hands-on demonstrations on key deformity topics in areas as diverse as adult, adolescent and cervical deformity, revision surgery, minimally invasive surgery, proximal junctional kyphosis, as well as transformative solutions for achieving three-dimensional Total Body Balance in spine patients. "Meeting of Minds was a great, well-planned meeting,” stated Anant Tambe, FRCS, MCh, MS, DNB, a scoliosis surgeon at Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital in Manchester, U.K. “The opportunity to listen to senior pioneers in spinal surgery and hear their views made it really worthwhile to be there. It lived up to, and exceeded, all expectations." Meeting of Minds was chaired by distinguished leaders in spine surgery, including Oheneba Boachie-Adjei, MD, FOCOS Orthopaedic Hospital, Accra, Ghana; René Castelein, MD, PhD, University Medical Centre Utrecht, The Netherlands; Martin Gehrchen, MD, PhD, Copenhagen University, Denmark; Kan Min, MD, Swiss Scoliosis, Zurich, Switzerland; and John P. Kostuik, MD, Chief Medical Officer and Co-founder of K2M, and professor emeritus at Johns Hopkins University. The faculty also featured 14 additional leaders in spine surgery to meet the increasing global demand for comprehensive deformity education. “K2M is proud to have welcomed some of the world’s top spine surgeons to our annual Meeting of Minds, which featured the latest clinical solutions and advancements in spine surgery,” said Dr. Kostuik. “At this year’s meeting, we also showcased BACS—a comprehensive platform of products, services and research—allowing surgeons to holistically manage the patient experience across the entire episodic care continuum. We are pleased to offer medical education curriculums, coupled with our comprehensive BACS platform, with the goal of transforming spine surgery and improving the lives of patients around the world.” BACS provides solutions focused on achieving balance of the spine by addressing each anatomical vertebral segment with a 360-degree approach to the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes, emphasizing Total Body Balance as an important component of surgical success. For more information on K2M’s comprehensive Medical Education offering, as well as K2M's complete product portfolio, visit www.K2M.com. For more information on Balance ACS, visit www.BACS.com. K2M Group Holdings, Inc. is a global leader of complex spine and minimally invasive solutions focused on achieving three-dimensional Total Body Balance. Since its inception, K2M has designed, developed, and commercialized innovative complex spine and minimally invasive spine technologies and techniques used by spine surgeons to treat some of the most complicated spinal pathologies. K2M has leveraged these core competencies into Balance ACS, a platform of products, services, and research to help surgeons achieve three-dimensional spinal balance across the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes, with the goal of supporting the full continuum of care to facilitate quality patient outcomes. The Balance ACS platform, in combination with the Company's technologies, techniques, and leadership in the 3D-printing of spinal devices, enable K2M to compete favorably in the global spinal surgery market. For more information, visit www.K2M.com and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, and YouTube. This press release contains forward-looking statements that reflect current views with respect to, among other things, operations and financial performance.  Forward-looking statements include all statements that are not historical facts such as our statements about our expected financial results and guidance and our expectations for future business prospects.  In some cases, you can identify these forward-looking statements by the use of words such as "“outlook,” “guidance,” “believes,” “expects,” “potential,” “continues,” “may,” “will,” “should,” “could,” “seeks,” “predicts,” “intends,” “plans,” “estimates,” “anticipates” or the negative version of these words or other comparable words.  Such forward-looking statements are subject to various risks and uncertainties including, among other things: our ability to achieve or sustain profitability in the future; our ability to demonstrate to spine surgeons the merits of our products; pricing pressures and our ability to compete effectively generally; collaboration and consolidation in hospital purchasing; inadequate coverage and reimbursement for our products from third-party payors; lack of long-term clinical data supporting the safety and efficacy of our products; dependence on a limited number of third-party suppliers; our ability to maintain and expand our network of direct sales employees, independent sales agencies and international distributors and their level of sales or distribution activity with respect to our products; proliferation of physician-owned distributorships in our industry; decline in the sale of certain key products; loss of key personnel; our ability to enhance our product offerings through research and development; our ability to manage expected growth; our ability to successfully acquire or invest in new or complementary businesses, products or technologies; our ability to educate surgeons on the safe and appropriate use of our products; costs associated with high levels of inventory; impairment of our goodwill and intangible assets; disruptions in our main facility or information technology systems;  our ability to ship a sufficient number of our products to meet demand; our ability to strengthen our brand; fluctuations in insurance cost and availability; our ability to comply with extensive governmental regulation within the United States and foreign jurisdictions; our ability  to maintain or obtain regulatory approvals and clearances within the United States and foreign jurisdictions; voluntary corrective actions by us or our distribution or other business partners or agency enforcement actions; recalls or serious safety issues with our products; enforcement actions by regulatory agencies for improper marketing or promotion; misuse or off-label use of our products; delays or failures in clinical trials and results of clinical trials; legal restrictions on our procurement, use, processing, manufacturing or distribution of allograft bone tissue; negative publicity concerning methods of tissue recovery and screening of donor tissue; costs and liabilities relating to environmental laws and regulations;  our failure or the failure of our agents to comply with fraud and abuse laws; U.S. legislative or Food and Drug Administration regulatory reforms; adverse effects of medical device tax provisions; potential tax changes in jurisdictions in which we conduct business; our ability to generate significant sales; potential fluctuations in sales volumes and our results of operations over the course of the year; uncertainty in future capital needs and availability of capital to meet our needs; our level of indebtedness and the availability of borrowings under our credit facility; restrictive covenants and the impact of other provisions in the indenture governing our convertible  senior notes and our credit facility;  continuing worldwide economic instability; our ability to protect our intellectual property rights; patent litigation and product liability lawsuits; damages relating to trade secrets or non-competition or non-solicitation agreements; risks associated with operating internationally; fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates; our ability to comply with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and similar laws; increased costs and additional regulations and requirements as a result of being a public company; our ability to implement and maintain effective internal control over financial reporting; potential volatility in our stock due to sales of additional shares by our pre-IPO owners or otherwise; our lack of current plans to pay cash dividends; our ability to take advantage of certain reduced disclosure requirements and exemptions as a result of being an emerging growth company; potential dilution by the future issuances of additional common stock in connection with our incentive plans, acquisitions or otherwise; anti-takeover provisions in our organizational documents and our ability to issue preferred stock without shareholder approval; potential limits on our ability to use our net operating loss carryforwards; and other risks and uncertainties, including those described under the section entitled “Risk Factors” in our most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC, as such factors may be updated from time to time in our periodic filings with the SEC, which are accessible on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov.  Accordingly, there are or will be important factors that could cause actual outcomes or results to differ materially from those indicated in these statements.  These factors should not be construed as exhaustive and should be read in conjunction with the other cautionary statements that are included in this release and our filings with the SEC. We operate in a very competitive and challenging environment.  New risks and uncertainties emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for us to predict all risks and uncertainties that could have an impact on the forward-looking statements contained in this release.  We cannot assure you that the results, events and circumstances reflected in the forward-looking statements will be achieved or occur, and actual results, events or circumstances could differ materially from those described in the forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements made in this press release relate only to events as of the date on which the statements are made.  We undertake no obligation to publicly update or review any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise, except as required by law.  We may not actually achieve the plans, intentions or expectations disclosed in our forward-looking statements and you should not place undue reliance on our forward-looking statements. Unless specifically stated otherwise, our forward-looking statements do not reflect the potential impact of any future acquisitions, mergers, dispositions, joint ventures, investments or other strategic transactions we may make.


LOS ANGELES, May 04, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Imperial Capital Group, LLC (“Imperial Capital”), announced today the continued growth of its credit sales and trading business with the hiring of Tom Champion, a high yield sales industry veteran, and the opening of a new office in Stamford, CT. The hiring of Mr. Champion and opening of the Stamford location will allow Imperial Capital to further expand and strengthen its relationships with institutional clients. “We welcome Tom to the Imperial Capital team and look forward to him fitting in nicely with our capabilities alongside his solid relationships and credit research sales abilities,” said Tom Corcoran, President of Imperial Capital. “Imperial Capital is uniquely positioned to hire senior credit professionals in a constricting fixed income employment market and allows us to continue to serve the US and European institutional investor community with top notch professionals. In addition, the add of the Stamford office further cements our commitment to better serve our institutional clients.” Tom Champion joins Imperial Capital as a Managing Director with over 30 years of experience in Credit Sales & Trading. Mr. Champion will be based in Imperial’s Stamford Office complimented with time in New York. Prior to joining Imperial Capital, Mr. Champion was a Managing Director in distressed credit sales at Stifel, Nicolaus & Company. Previously, he worked at Knight Capital, RBS, CRT Capital, UBS, Chase and Citibank in a similar capacity. Mr. Champion began his career at Wertheim Schroeder & Company. In addition, Mr. Champion earned a Bachelor of Business Administration from the University of Miami. Imperial Capital's new office is located at 1 Landmark Square, Suite 720, Stamford, CT 06901. The main office number is 203-428-3300. Imperial Capital is a full-service investment bank offering a uniquely integrated platform of comprehensive services to institutional investors and middle market companies. We offer sophisticated sales and trading services to institutional investors and a wide range of investment banking advisory, capital markets and restructuring services to middle market corporate clients. Paired with our proprietary research and sales & trading desk analysis, we provide investment analysis across an issuer's capital structure, including bank loans, debt securities, the hybrid/bank capital marketplace (through our ELP Framework), post-reorganization equities, special situations claims and listed and unlisted equities. Our comprehensive and integrated service platform, expertise across the global capital structure, and deep industry sector knowledge enable us to provide clients with research driven ideas, superior advisory services, and trade execution. We are quick to identify opportunities under any market conditions and we have a proven track record of offering creative, proprietary solutions to our clients. Imperial Capital has three principal businesses: Investment Banking, Institutional Sales & Trading and Institutional Research. More information about Imperial Capital can be found at www.imperialcapital.com. About Imperial Capital (International), LLP Imperial Capital International, founded in 2011, is an affiliate of Imperial Capital, LLC with an office in central London. Complementing Imperial Capital's existing fixed income sales and trading franchise, Imperial Capital (International), LLP expanded the Imperial Capital franchise into the EEA. The company focuses on selling the entire credit spectrum and capital structure to its European institutional clients.


MIAMI--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Cirle, Inc., a Miami-based medical technology incubator, today announced that it will unveil its latest three-dimensional Surgical Navigation System (SNS 200) at the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ASCRS) meeting in Los Angeles, California, May 4-8. The investigational system, for which Cirle is completing U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) registration, will be on display at the Cirle booth (#1261). “The SNS 200 is truly a next generation platform for 3-D intraoperative navigation during cataract surgery, incorporating everything we learned about surgeon needs, design priorities, systems integration, and commercial-scale manufacturing through the development and registration process of the original SNS,” said Richard Awdeh, M.D., a professor at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute and Founder of Cirle. “The second-generation version meets all the requirements for performance and procedure optimization that we established in our first model. As a cataract surgeon, I am excited about the potential of the SNS 200 to enhance the efficiency and precision of the procedure.” The Cirle Navigation System (SNS) is an ophthalmic image communications device which performs annotation of the source image data provided by compatible surgical microscopes. The SNS 200 incorporates smart work flow automation that increases efficiency throughout the surgery. New features of the system include: Cirle continues to focus its research programs on applications of technology and data science to improve outcomes in cataract surgery. Clinical studies designed to further characterize the advantages and importance of surgical guidance in cataract surgery are currently underway in the United States. About Cirle Established in 2010, Cirle is a medical technology incubator based in at the University of Miami Life Science and Technology Park in Miami, Fla. The company focuses on the use of translational medical research and innovative technologies to cure diseases that lead to blindness. It develops and acquires early-stage technologies, applies its specialized capabilities to refine and test them, and pursues industry collaborations to bring the technologies to market. Offering a highly interactive environment for inter-disciplinary innovation, Cirle has engaged leading eye health experts, engineers and researchers in its development projects. For more information, visit www.cirle.com.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

-- Investors' Security Trust is pleased to announce the hire of Tony Rodriguez and Derek Johnson. Rodriguez has been appointed the Director of Business Development, where he is responsible for developing new client relationships by providing trust and investment management services, IRA rollovers and charitable giving strategies. Johnson joins the team as the Vice President, Portfolio Manager for the company, where he is responsible for overseeing the development and management of investment portfolios, facilitating the design of appropriate asset allocations based on the clients' individual goals, concerns, financial profile and investment needs.Rodriguez brings more than 30 years of wealth management expertise to the Investors' Security Trust team. Prior to joining the company, Rodriguez served as senior managing director for Foundation Source, providing expertise in private foundation administration and compliance to individuals, advisors, trust companies and estate planning professionals. He has also held various senior level positions with large financial institutions providing personal trust and other wealth management services to high net worth individuals, families and institutions. Rodriguez holds a Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration from St. Thomas University in Miami. He has served as a member of the Greater Collier County and Greater Dade County Estate Planning Councils; National Planned Giving Council; and board of directors of the Conservancy of Southwest Florida. He is a member of the Literacy Volunteers of Collier County and a number of other charitable and professional organizations in Florida.Johnson joined Investors' Security Trust with over 20 years of broad experience managing globally diversified multi asset-class portfolios for high net worth families and charitable organizations. Prior to joining the company, he worked as a trust portfolio manager for several large financial institutions in Florida. Johnson has a Master of Business Administration with a specialization in Financial Planning from the University of Miami and is a Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA). He has published over 40 abstracts for CFA Digest and CFA Quarterly Selections, and is a member of the CFA Institute and the Fort Myers Toastmasters Club.Based in Fort Myers since 2004, Investors' Security Trust is an independent, locally owned wealth management company that delivers strategies designed to grow, preserve and transfer wealth to individuals, families, non-profit organizations, foundations and endowments. Services range from trust administration, estate settlement to personalized investment portfolio management. Investors' Security Trust works closely with outside advisors including attorneys, tax professionals and banking institutions to provide a full-range of trustee services and tailors investment solutions to meet the specific needs of clients. For more information, visit www.AllAboutTrust.com or call 239-267-6655.


"A superhero to me…is me, because I can deal with diabetes and it's hard," says Katie Ashkin, 8, of Long Island, who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 6. Ashkin is featured in a newly released public service announcement (PSA) that helps raise awareness about the immense challenges those with diabetes face in managing the disease on a daily basis, likening them–and the Diabetes Research Institute scientists who are working to find a cure–to real superheroes. >>Click here to view the video PSA now. "There is a little superhero in all of us," says Edra Tepper of Long Island, who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes as an adult. Tepper describes living with a chronic disease like diabetes as a "day-to-day struggle," acknowledging that for children it can be even more of a battle.  "It can take away the carefree nature of just being a kid." That's why the scientists at the Diabetes Research Institute have one mission—to find a cure. Located at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, the DRI is the largest and most comprehensive research center dedicated to curing diabetes. Scientists there are building upon decades of pioneering research to develop a biological cure by restoring natural insulin production and normalizing blood sugar levels without imposing other risks. "We are solely committed to advancing research to patients until the disease is cured," stated Camillo Ricordi, M.D., director of the Diabetes Research Institute. Type 1 diabetes, which is an autoimmune disorder and is not related to age, obesity, or lifestyle, is a relentless disease that requires constant vigilance. There are multiple components to managing the disease, such as taking shots, pricking fingers to test blood sugars, learning how to work an insulin pump, carbohydrate counting and more. The mission of the Diabetes Research Institute Foundation is to provide the Diabetes Research Institute with the funding necessary to cure diabetes now. The Diabetes Research Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine leads the world in cure-focused research. Scientists have already shown that transplanted islet cells allow patients to live without the need for insulin therapy. Some study participants have maintained insulin independence for more than 10 years. The DRI is now building upon these promising outcomes by developing a DRI BioHub, a bioengineered "mini organ" that mimics the native pancreas. While various BioHub platforms are being tested in preclinical and clinical studies, the DRI is also developing strategies to eliminate the need for anti-rejection drugs and reset the immune system to block autoimmunity. For more information or to get the #T1DSuperhero graphic, please visit DiabetesResearch.org, call 800-321-3437, or Tweet @Diabetes_DRI. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/diabetes-research-institute-foundation-recognizes-the-t1dsuperhero-on-april-28-national-superhero-day-300447606.html


LOS ANGELES, May 04, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Imperial Capital Group, LLC (“Imperial Capital”), announced today the continued growth of its credit sales and trading business with the hiring of Tom Champion, a high yield sales industry veteran, and the opening of a new office in Stamford, CT. The hiring of Mr. Champion and opening of the Stamford location will allow Imperial Capital to further expand and strengthen its relationships with institutional clients. “We welcome Tom to the Imperial Capital team and look forward to him fitting in nicely with our capabilities alongside his solid relationships and credit research sales abilities,” said Tom Corcoran, President of Imperial Capital. “Imperial Capital is uniquely positioned to hire senior credit professionals in a constricting fixed income employment market and allows us to continue to serve the US and European institutional investor community with top notch professionals. In addition, the add of the Stamford office further cements our commitment to better serve our institutional clients.” Tom Champion joins Imperial Capital as a Managing Director with over 30 years of experience in Credit Sales & Trading. Mr. Champion will be based in Imperial’s Stamford Office complimented with time in New York. Prior to joining Imperial Capital, Mr. Champion was a Managing Director in distressed credit sales at Stifel, Nicolaus & Company. Previously, he worked at Knight Capital, RBS, CRT Capital, UBS, Chase and Citibank in a similar capacity. Mr. Champion began his career at Wertheim Schroeder & Company. In addition, Mr. Champion earned a Bachelor of Business Administration from the University of Miami. Imperial Capital's new office is located at 1 Landmark Square, Suite 720, Stamford, CT 06901. The main office number is 203-428-3300. Imperial Capital is a full-service investment bank offering a uniquely integrated platform of comprehensive services to institutional investors and middle market companies. We offer sophisticated sales and trading services to institutional investors and a wide range of investment banking advisory, capital markets and restructuring services to middle market corporate clients. Paired with our proprietary research and sales & trading desk analysis, we provide investment analysis across an issuer's capital structure, including bank loans, debt securities, the hybrid/bank capital marketplace (through our ELP Framework), post-reorganization equities, special situations claims and listed and unlisted equities. Our comprehensive and integrated service platform, expertise across the global capital structure, and deep industry sector knowledge enable us to provide clients with research driven ideas, superior advisory services, and trade execution. We are quick to identify opportunities under any market conditions and we have a proven track record of offering creative, proprietary solutions to our clients. Imperial Capital has three principal businesses: Investment Banking, Institutional Sales & Trading and Institutional Research. More information about Imperial Capital can be found at www.imperialcapital.com. About Imperial Capital (International), LLP Imperial Capital International, founded in 2011, is an affiliate of Imperial Capital, LLC with an office in central London. Complementing Imperial Capital's existing fixed income sales and trading franchise, Imperial Capital (International), LLP expanded the Imperial Capital franchise into the EEA. The company focuses on selling the entire credit spectrum and capital structure to its European institutional clients.


News Article | April 14, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

The migration of European eels as they traverse thousands of miles across the Atlantic Ocean has stumped scientists for a while now. The answer to a particular question — regarding this phenomenon — has eluded scientists and pertains to the navigational ability of the eels to traverse such vast oceans. Now, a recent study may have found the answer to what enables the eels to maintain their sense of direction during their journey. The eels in question hatch in the Sargasso Sea and from there make a 3,728-mile-long journey to reach Europe. Scientists wanted to find out how these newborn creatures managed to find their way across the ocean. Previously, many biologists believed that the hatchlings swam randomly until they were picked up by the Gulf Stream. However, the new study shows that like other marine creatures, the eels too may be using the Earth's magnetic field to determine the direction they approach. Previous research has yielded similar results for the sea turtle, trout, and salmon migrations. This indicates that a sixth sense exists in these creatures, through which they are able to discern the Earth's magnetic field and use it to their advantage. To prove their hypothesis, marine biologists from the University of North Carolina and the University of Miami teamed up for the study. They constructed an underwater chamber, which included a central section connected to a dozen outer parts. Each of these sections represented 30 degree angles on a compass. A movable wall ensured that the eels were contained inside the central portion of the chamber until the magnetic field was turned on. As the researchers turned on the field in different parts of the chamber, the glass eels — which is what the newborn eels turn into upon arriving in Europe — were quick to change their course of movement and headed toward a specific direction. For instance, in a magnetic field which is similar to the one in Sargasso Sea, the eels headed southwest, while a magnetic field similar to the one present in the Atlantic off North America induced the eels to turn northeast. This proved that the eels changed directions depending upon the magnetic field. "We were not surprised to find eels have a magnetic map, but we were surprised to discover how well they can detect subtle differences in magnetic fields," stated Naisbett-Jones, a marine biologist from the University of North Carolina and one of the researchers who conducted the experiment. The experiment was carried out on juvenile or glass eels who were around two years old. Marine biologists around the world assert that newborn eels are very different from these juveniles. Moreover, as the eels age, their ability to pick up magnetic fields may also improve. Critics posit that to conclusively prove that the newborn eels use the Earth's magnetic field to journey across the Atlantic Ocean, researchers would need to perform tests with the hatchlings and not the older juveniles. The findings of the study have been published in the journal Current Biology. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


HOLLYWOOD, Fla.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Erin Andrews, host of ABC’s Dancing with the Stars, reporter with Fox Sports and cervical cancer survivor, will be a special guest at a forum designed to provide patients and families with an overview of the impact of cervical cancer, available support programs and the need for new, innovative treatments. “Latest Advances in Cervical Cancer: Living with the Disease,” an event hosted by Gilda’s Club South Florida in collaboration with Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, part of the University of Miami Health System, and sponsored by Advaxis, Inc. (NASDAQ:ADXS), will be held Thursday, May 18, at 5 p.m. at the Diplomat Beach Resort in Hollywood, Fla. Space is limited and registration is required. Please register at www.advaxis.com/forum2017 on or before Tuesday, May 16. The event features Ms. Andrews, who will discuss her life experiences and career, including her journey to becoming a cervical cancer survivor. Ms. Andrews was diagnosed and treated early during the 2016 NFL season. Erin will tell her story in a moderated discussion and Q&A. The event program also includes leading oncologists, researchers and patient advocates who will discuss the details of cervical cancer, new advances in care and programs to support patients and families fighting this disease. Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide, and each year about 13,000 women in the United States are diagnosed. Annually, approximately 4,200 U.S. lives are lost to the disease. More than 90 percent of cervical cancer cases can be attributed to strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is now the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, with recently published research showing that 39.9 percent of U.S. women are infected. Over the past 30 years there has only been one new product approved for the treatment of cervical cancer, and patients and families need additional support and new treatments. Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center offers patients with cervical cancer access to available treatment options including chemo-radiation therapy. The cancer center is also a trial site for Advaxis’ global Phase 3 AIM2CERV trial, which is evaluating axalimogene filolisbac in patients with high-risk, locally advanced cervical cancer. Axalimogene filolisbac, a targeted Listeria monocytogenes (Lm)-based immunotherapy, is the only known cancer immunotherapy agent shown in preclinical studies to alert the body’s immune system to the presence of cancer, diminish that cancer’s natural defense mechanisms and then rally the body’s killer T cells to attack the cancer. Currently, AIM2CERV is the only active industry-sponsored global phase 3 clinical trial in cervical cancer. Axalimogene filolisbac and other advances in cervical cancer will be discussed during the event on May 18. The speaking program, which will be followed by a reception, also includes: About Cervical Cancer Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer affecting women worldwide. An estimated 13,000 new cases will be diagnosed in the United States in 2016, and 4,100 women will have this disease as their cause of death, according to the National Cancer Institute. Decades of research have shown that persistent HPV infection, particularly with high-risk virus types such as HPV-16 and HPV-18, is the most important factor in the development of cervical cancer. The prognosis for women with advanced and recurrent cervical cancer remains poor, with median survival of only six to seven months following initiation of palliative treatment with chemotherapy. According to the American Cancer Society, the five-year survival rate for Stage IV disease is at 15 to 16 percent. There is no approved therapy following failure of first-line treatment, and there has been limited advancement in developing new therapeutics for advanced cervical cancer over the last 30 years. About Gilda’s Club Gilda’s Club, was named in honor of comedian Gilda Radner, who lost her battle with ovarian cancer in 1989 at 42 years old. Gilda’s Club South Florida’s mission is to create welcoming communities of free support for everyone living with cancer – men, women, teens, and children – along with their families and friends. Our innovative program is an essential complement to medical care, providing networking and support groups, workshops, education and social activities. Gilda’s Club has been providing programs to those living with cancer and their family and friends in South Florida since 1997. About Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, part of UHealth – the University of Miami Health System and the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, is among the nation’s leading cancer centers and South Florida's only Cancer Center of Excellence. A 2015 study by Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, published in The Journal of the American Medical Association, showed that cancer patients treated at Sylvester have a 10 percent higher chance of survival than those treated at nearly any other cancer center in the nation. With the combined strength of more than 120 cancer researchers and 130 cancer specialists, Sylvester discovers, develops and delivers more targeted therapies, providing the next generation of cancer clinical care – precision cancer medicine – to each patient. Our comprehensive diagnostics, coupled with teams of scientific and clinical experts who specialize in just one type of cancer, enable us to better understand each patient’s individual cancer and develop treatments that target the cells and genes driving the cancer's growth and survival, leading to better outcomes. At Sylvester, patients have access to more treatment options and more cancer clinical trials than most hospitals in the southeastern United States. To better serve current and future patients, Sylvester has a network of conveniently located outpatient treatment facilities in Miami, Kendall, Hollywood, Plantation, Deerfield Beach, Coral Springs, and Coral Gables. For more information, visit sylvester.org. About Advaxis, Inc. Located in Princeton, N.J., Advaxis, Inc. is a biotechnology company developing multiple cancer immunotherapies based on its proprietary Lm Technology™. The Lm Technology, using bioengineered live attenuated Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) bacteria, is the only known cancer immunotherapy agent shown in preclinical studies to both generate cancer fighting T cells directed against cancer antigens and neutralize Tregs and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) that protect the tumor microenvironment from immunologic attack and contribute to tumor growth. Advaxis' lead Lm Technology immunotherapy, axalimogene filolisbac, targets HPV-associated cancers and is in clinical trials for three potential indications: Phase 3 in invasive cervical cancer, Phase 2 in head and neck cancer, and Phase 2 in anal cancer. The FDA has granted axalimogene filolisbac orphan drug designation for each of these three clinical settings, as well as Fast Track designation for adjuvant therapy for HRLACC patients and a SPA for the Phase 3 AIM2CERV trial in HRLACC patients. Axalimogene filolisbac has also been classified as an advanced therapy medicinal product for the treatment of cervical cancer by the EMA’s CAT. Advaxis has two additional immunotherapy products: ADXS-PSA in prostate cancer and ADXS-HER2 in HER2 expressing solid tumors, in human clinical development. In addition, Advaxis and Amgen are developing ADXS-NEO, an investigational cancer immunotherapy treatment designed to activate a patient's immune system to respond against the unique mutations, or neoepitopes, contained in and identified from each individual patient's tumor, with plans to enter the clinic in 2017. To learn more about Advaxis, visit www.advaxis.com and connect on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, and YouTube. Advaxis Forward-Looking Statement This press release contains forward-looking statements, including, but not limited to, statements regarding Advaxis’ ability to develop the next generation of cancer immunotherapies, and the safety and efficacy of Advaxis’ proprietary immunotherapy, axalimogene filolisbac. These forward-looking statements are subject to a number of risks including the risk factors set forth from time to time in Advaxis’ SEC filings including, but not limited to, its report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended October 31, 2016, which is available at http://www.sec.gov. Any forward-looking statements set forth in this presentation speak only as of the date of this presentation. We do not intend to update any of these forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances that occur after the date hereof other than as required by law. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements.


Rossi G.A.,Instituto G Gaslini | Colin A.A.,University of Miami
European Respiratory Journal | Year: 2015

There is evidence that respiratory viruses play a key role in the development and exacerbation of obstructive respiratory diseases in children. This review attempts to juxtapose the separate profiles and prototypes of pathogenenetic mechanisms represented by the two most common amongst such viruses: respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human rhinovirus (HRV). RSV represents the most common agent of severe airway disease in infants and young children, and is predominant in winter months. Large epidemiological studies have revealed an unequivocal relationship between RSV infection and subsequent wheezing into childhood, thought to be related to long-term changes in neuroimmune control of the airways rather than allergic sensitisation. HRV is a highly diverse group of viruses that affect subjects of all ages, is ubiquitous and occurs yearround. In contrast to RSV, infections with HRV cause minimal cytotoxicity but induce a rapid production of cytokines and chemokines with amplification of the inflammatory response. The susceptibility to HRV-induced bronchiolitis and subsequent wheezing appears to be linked to individual predisposition since it is often associated with a family or personal history of asthma/atopy. Thus, RSV probably serves as an "inducer" rather than a "trigger" . Conversely, HRVs seem to serve as a "trigger" rather than an "inducer" in predisposed individuals. Copyright ©ERS 2015.


The large and systematic negative shifts in the δ13C values (>12%) of carbonate-dominated rocks that preceded Neoproterozoic glacial successions have been interpreted to record a dramatic series of global environmental and evolutionary events. These values are widely considered to be marine rather than diagenetic in origin because stratigraphic patterns of change are systematic and reproducible from basin to basin, distinct in magnitude, and associated with recognizable stratigraphic markers such as glacial deposits. In contrast, diagenetic systems are commonly considered to have a more local and stochastic influence on δ13C values. Cores taken in Quaternary carbonate platform sediments, however, reveal a curious similarity in magnitude, thickness, and core to core reproducibility where diagenetic alteration has occurred in response to sea-level fall. Sealevel changes produced similar δ13C and δ18O stratigraphic records at globally disparate locations, which are unrelated to the global marine δ13C signal and bear no relation to the global carbon cycle. By analogy with the Pliocene-Pleistocene, we propose that spatial reproducibility of δ13C in some Neoproterozoic successions might be attributed to causes other than secular variation of the global carbon cycle, including diagenesis. This observation does not negate the stratigraphic utility of the carbon isotopic values, only the origin of the signal. © 2012 Geological Society of America.


Zijdewind I.,University of Groningen | Thomas C.K.,University of Miami
Journal of Physiology | Year: 2012

Involuntary motor unit activity at low rates is common in hand muscles paralysed by spinal cord injury. Our aim was to describe these patterns of motor unit behaviour in relation to motoneurone and motor unit properties. Intramuscular electromyographic activity (EMG), surface EMG and force were recorded for 30 min from thenar muscles of nine men with chronic cervical SCI. Motor units fired for sustained periods (>10 min) at regular (coefficient of variation ≤ 0.15, CV, n= 19 units) or irregular intervals (CV > 0.15, n= 14). Regularly firing units started and stopped firing independently suggesting that intrinsic motoneurone properties were important for recruitment and derecruitment. Recruitment (3.6 Hz, SD 1.2), maximal (10.2 Hz, SD 2.3, range: 7.5-15.4 Hz) and derecruitment frequencies were low (3.3 Hz, SD 1.6), as were firing rate increases after recruitment (~20 intervals in 3 s). Once active, firing often covaried, promoting the idea that units received common inputs. Half of the regularly firing units showed a very slow decline (>40 s) in discharge before derecruitment and had interspike intervals longer than their estimated afterhyperpolarisation potential (AHP) duration (estimated by death rate and breakpoint analyses). The other units were derecruited more abruptly and had shorter estimated AHP durations. Overall, regularly firing units had longer estimated AHP durations and were weaker than irregularly firing units, suggesting they were lower threshold units. Sustained firing of units at regular rates may reflect activation of persistent inward currents, visible here in the absence of voluntary drive, whereas irregularly firing units may only respond to synaptic noise. © 2012 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2012 The Physiological Society.


Patent
University of Miami | Date: 2010-06-23

There is provided a method of treating human hepatomas utilizing bombesin antagonist pseudopeptides of Formula I: X-A^(1)-A^(2)-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Leu--A^(9) -Q(SEQ ID NO: 32)wherein X is hydrogen, Hca, Hna, Hpp, Mpp or Naa,A^(1) is a D-, L- or DL-amino acid residue selected from the group consisting of Phe, p-HI-Phe, pGlu, Nal, Pal, Tpi, unsubstituted Trp or Trp substituted in the benzene ring by one or more members selected from the group consisting of F, Cl, Br, NH_(2) or C_(1-3) alkyl; or a peptide bond linking the acyl moiety of X (where present) to the alpha amino moiety of A^(2),A^(2) is Gin, Glu [-], Glu (Y), or His, wherein[-] is a single bond, linking the gamma carboxyl moiety or the 3-propionyl moiety of A^(2) with the alpha amino moiety of A^(1),Y isa) -OR^(5) wherein R^(5) is hydrogen, C_(3) alkyl or phenyl; orb) R_(6)^(6) is hydrogen or C_(1-3) alkyl; R^(7) is hydrogen, C_(1-3) alkyl or-NHCONH_(2). Leu-- is a reduced form of Leu wherein the C = O moiety of Leu is instead -CH_(2)- such that the bond of this -CH_(2)- moiety with the alpha amino moiety of the adjacent A^(9) residue is a pseudopeptide bond. Suitably A^(9) is Tac, MTac, or DMTac,Q is NH_(2) or -OQ where Q is hydrogen, C_(1-10) alkyl, phenyl or phenyl-C_(1-10) -alkyl; and the pharmaceutically acceptable acids or salts thereof.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.8.0 | Award Amount: 2.85M | Year: 2010

Scientists develop computer models of real, complex systems to increase understanding of their behaviour and make predictions. A prime example is the Earths climate. Complex climate models are used to compute the climate change in response to expected changes in the composition of the atmosphere due to man-made emissions. Years of research have improved the ability to simulate the climate of the recent past but these models are still far from perfect. The model projections of the globally averaged temperature increase by the end of this century differ by as much as a factor of two, and differ completely in regard to projections for specific regions of the globe.\n\nCurrent practice commonly averages the predictions of the separate models. Our proposed approach is instead to form a consensus by combining the models into one super model. The super model has learned from past observations how to optimally exchange information among individual models at every moment in time. Results in nonlinear dynamics suggest that the models can be made to synchronize with each other even if only a small amount of information is exchanged, forming a consensus that best represents reality. This innovative approach to reduce uncertainty might be compared to a group of scientists resolving their differences through dialogue, rather than simply voting or averaging their opinions.\n\nExperts from non-linear dynamics, machine-learning and climate science are brought together within SUMO to produce a climate change simulation with a super model combining state-of-the-art climate models. The super-modelling concept has the potential to provide improved estimates of global and regional climate change, so as to motivate and inform policy decisions. The approach is applicable in other situations where a small number of alternative models exist of the same real-world complex system, as in economy, ecology or biology.


Patent
University of Miami, U.S. Department Of Veterans Affairs, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Date: 2011-09-16

Agonists of growth hormone releasing hormone promote islet graft growth and proliferation in patients. Methods of treating patients comprise the use of these agonists.


Patent
University of Miami and NOGRA PHARMA Ltd | Date: 2013-04-18

Disclosed herein are methods for treating/and or preventing diabetes using a specific inhibitor of SMAD7 expression or function. Also disclosed are methods of promoting organ and/or cell, e.g., pancreatic islet cell, survival after transplantation using a specific inhibitor of SMAD7 expression or function.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

MIAMI--A new study on how ocean currents transport floating marine debris is helping to explain how garbage patches form in the world's oceans. Researchers from the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and colleagues developed a mathematical model that simulates the motion of small spherical objects floating at the ocean surface. The researchers feed the model data on currents and winds to simulate the movement of marine debris. The model's results were then compared with data from satellite-tracked surface buoys from the NOAA Global Drifter Program's database. Data from both anchored buoys and those that become unanchored, or undrogued, over time were used to see how each accumulated in the five ocean gyres over a roughly 20-year timeframe. "We found that undrogued drifters accumulate in the centers of the gyres precisely where plastic debris accumulate to form the great garbage patches," said Francisco Beron-Vera, a research associate professor in the UM Rosenstiel School's Department of Atmospheric Sciences and lead author of the study. "While anchored drifters, which are designed to closely follow water motion, take a much longer time to accumulate in the center of the gyres." The study, which takes into account the combined effects of water and wind-induced drag on these objects, found that the accumulation of marine debris in the subtropical gyres is too fast to be due solely to the effect of trade winds that converge in these regions. "We show that the size and weight of the drifters must be taken into account to fully explain the accumulation," said Maria Josefina Olascoaga, an associate professor in the UM Rosenstiel School's Department of Ocean Sciences and a co-author of the study. The model could be used to track shipwrecks, airplane debris, sea ice and pollution among the many practical applications according to the researchers. The study, titled "Inertia-induced accumulation of flotsam in the subtropical gyres," was published in Geophysical Research Letters. The study's authors are: Francisco Beron-Vera, Maria Josefina Olascoaga, and Rick Lumpkin from the NOAA Atlantic Oceanic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML). The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative, NOAA/AOML, and the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS), a joint enterprise between NOAA/AOML and the University of Miami Rosenstiel School, supported the work. The University of Miami is one of the largest private research institutions in the southeastern United States. The University's mission is to provide quality education, attract and retain outstanding students, support the faculty and their research, and build an endowment for University initiatives. Founded in the 1940's, the Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science has grown into one of the world's premier marine and atmospheric research institutions. Offering dynamic interdisciplinary academics, the Rosenstiel School is dedicated to helping communities to better understand the planet, participating in the establishment of environmental policies, and aiding in the improvement of society and quality of life. For more information, visit: http://www. . Twitter:UMiamiRSMAS


FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla., Feb. 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Paymeon, Inc. (OTC MARKETS:PAYM) today announced that its Basalt America subsidiary has supplied its RockMesh® concrete reinforcement product for delivery on its first government contract.  The end customer, the City of Miami, will use the product in a new skateboard park currently under construction.  Vincent L. Celentano, a Director and the Company’s largest shareholder said "Though it is a small project, relative to our goals of reinforcing all bridges, roads and commercial buildings in the future, I compare it to Neil Armstrong's famous words, ‘One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.’  I see this as a catalyst and our gateway to other projects we are currently seeking out." The first bridge to incorporate the Company’s suite of products is on the campus of the University of Miami.  See the University of Miami’s Innovation Bridge video here.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xy3ISYNJfOI Disclaimers Forward-Looking Statements:  Except for statements of historical fact, this news release contains certain "forward-looking statements" as defined by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, including, without limitation expectations, beliefs, plans and objectives regarding the development, use and marketability of products and partnerships, as well as potential transactions the Company may be considering or may have closed. Such forward-looking statements are based on present circumstances and on PAYM's predictions with respect to events that have not occurred, that may not occur, or that may occur with different consequences and timing than those now assumed or anticipated. Such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, and are not guarantees of future performance or results and involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual events or results to differ materially from the events or results expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Such factors include general economic and business conditions, the ability to successfully develop and market products, consumer and business consumption habits, the ability to fund operations, reliance on representations from third parties that may not execute as planned, development of new markets, and other factors over which PAYM has little or no control. Such forward-looking statements are made only as of the date of this release, and PAYM assumes no obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect subsequent events or circumstances. Readers should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Risks, uncertainties and other factors are discussed in documents filed from time to time by PAYM with the Securities and Exchange Commission. This press release does not and shall not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of any offer to buy any securities.  For additional information and potential risk factors, readers should review PAYM’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, which can be found at www.sec.gov.


Company to Begin Selling its Innovative Infrastructure Products Utilizing “Green” Substitute for Steel under the name Basalt America FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla., Feb. 21, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Paymeon, Inc. (OTC MARKETS:PAYM) today announced it has completed its acquisition of Rockstar Acquisitions, LLC.  Going forward, Rockstar Acquisitions will conduct business under the name “Basalt America.” Basalt America holds an exclusive license to produce, market and sell basalt fiber reinforced polymer products aimed at the $1 trillion steel component of the construction industry.  Basalt America leverages its licensed intellectual property, technology and processes to produce Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer products that are superior to anything in the market today and that are used as replacements for steel products that reinforce concrete such as rebar.  Basalt America’s licensed products, which include RockRebar®, RockStirrups®, RockStaples™ and RockMesh® are two to three times stronger and 75% lighter than steel.  Unlike steel, Basalt America’s products never rust, create virtually no carbon footprint and have lifespans of more than a century.  These characteristics will redefine the standards that the construction industry adheres to.  Basalt America’s materials are more fully described at www.basaltamerica.com. Paymeon will issue restricted common shares valued at approximately $35.5 million in exchange for 100% of the membership interests of Basalt America.  Basalt America will immediately begin operations as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Paymeon, Inc.  Paymeon expects that sales will commence towards the end of the first quarter, 2017. According to Ed Cespedes, CEO of Paymeon, “We believe these products represent a paradigm shift in how the construction industry will look at concrete reinforcement going forward.  We believe that demand for these products will be driven by a number of factors, including new regulatory requirements to consider the lifespan of projects, as well as substantial increases in infrastructure spending expected in the near future.  We expect demand for our products to come from a broad range of customers ranging from small retail contractors, to very large government entities.” Prior to its acquisition by Paymeon, Basalt America was privately funded with more than $1.3 million from accredited investors, including affiliates of our Chairman and CEO, Ed Cespedes and our Director and largest shareholder, Vincent L. Celentano.  Proceeds were used primarily to secure a license for exclusive manufacture and distribution of RockRebar®, RockStirrups®, RockStaples™ and RockMesh® in the United States, excluding California and Hawaii, for 18 months, and rights of first refusal for other parts of the world.  Upon expiration, Basalt America will continue to have rights of first refusal for any undeveloped territories within the United States, and around the world. Basalt America’s products are the first of their kind to be used in conjunction with the construction of projects that formerly were exclusively steel.  In 2016, the University of Miami, working with standards from the Florida Department of Transportation and the US Army Corps of Engineers, constructed the Innovation Bridge, a 70 foot bridge on the University of Miami’s campus made exclusively out of fiber reinforced polymers and without any steel at all.  A summary of the work done on the Innovation Bridge can be seen here:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xy3ISYNJfOI&t=44s According to Vincent L. Celentano, member of Paymeon’s Board of Directors and the Company’s largest shareholder, “We see Basalt America’s products as disruptors of today’s modern steel industry and believe their characteristics will create a dramatic shift in construction that will lead to the next industrial revolution. Given the expected increase in infrastructure spending, Basalt America is well positioned to participate in what is expected to be a high-growth industry by offering its green technology solutions, which compare favorably with steel in many aspects.  Steel rusts and always will.  Our basalt products last virtually forever.” Mr. Celentano continued, “Steel had a good run and dominated the 20th century, but it’s tired and old and is the reason for the failing infrastructure today.  Products made of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymers or ‘BFRP’ will lead the 21st century.” Disclaimers Forward-Looking Statements:  Except for statements of historical fact, this news release contains certain "forward-looking statements" as defined by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, including, without limitation expectations, beliefs, plans and objectives regarding the development, use and marketability of products and partnerships, as well as potential transactions the Company may be considering or may have closed. Such forward-looking statements are based on present circumstances and on PAYM's predictions with respect to events that have not occurred, that may not occur, or that may occur with different consequences and timing than those now assumed or anticipated. Such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, and are not guarantees of future performance or results and involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual events or results to differ materially from the events or results expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Such factors include general economic and business conditions, the ability to successfully develop and market products, consumer and business consumption habits, the ability to fund operations, reliance on representations from third parties that may not execute as planned, development of new markets, and other factors over which PAYM has little or no control. Such forward-looking statements are made only as of the date of this release, and PAYM assumes no obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect subsequent events or circumstances. Readers should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Risks, uncertainties and other factors are discussed in documents filed from time to time by PAYM with the Securities and Exchange Commission. This press release does not and shall not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of any offer to buy any securities.  For additional information and potential risk factors, readers should review PAYM’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, which can be found at www.sec.gov.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

A new study published this month in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine indicates that treating heart patients with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) does not increase their risk of irregular heart beat (arrhythmia). In fact, the MSCs had the opposite effect and showed promise of improving the condition. “This could be an important breakthrough for many heart patients, as proarrhythmia – which is a new or more frequent occurrence of pre-existing arrhythmia – unfortunately can be a side effect of some of the drugs we’re using to treat these patients,” said the study’s lead author, Raul Mitrani, M.D., of the University of Miami School of Medicine’s Division of Cardiology (Miami, Florida). Arrhythmia is a common condition resulting when electrical impulses in the heart do not work properly, causing the heart to beat either too fast, too slow or erratically. This in turn interferes with blood flow throughout the body and can potentially damage or shut down organs. While some experience no symptoms and their arrhythmia is harmless, in others it can be life threatening. Treatments include anti-arrhythmic drugs; implantable devices such as a pacemaker; surgery; or catheter ablation (a procedure that uses radiofrequency energy to destroy a small area of heart tissue that is causing the off-kilter beats). As more studies are showing the potential of stem cells to repair damage caused by heart disease, Dr. Mitrani and his colleagues at UM wondered whether the stem cells – specifically MSCs, which are 'adult' stem cells that can produce more than one type of specialized cell of the body – would follow the path of some of the anti-arrhythmia drugs and worsen the condition. Previous studies had indicated that perhaps was the case with certain other types of stem cells, but no studies had focused on MSCs. To find the answer, they analyzed the results of 88 patients enrolled in two clinical trials testing the potential of MSCs in treating ischemic cardiomyopathy. This is a common condition in which the heart's ability to pump blood is decreased because its main pumping chamber, the left ventricle, is enlarged, dilated and weak. The patients had an average age of 61 years and were divided into groups treated with either MSCs, bone marrow stem cells (BMCs) or placebo. A year after their treatments, those who received MSCs all showed no signs of arrhythmia. “We were encouraged by what we saw,” Dr. Mitrani said. “Even better, in a group of patients with low ventricular ectopy burden – what some call ‘heart hiccups’ or ‘skipped beats’ – there were definite signs of improvement while in the BMC and placebo groups, no similar signal for improvement was noted. “This leads us to believe that prospective studies might clarify the role of MSCs to reduce ventricular arrhythmias.” “By combining data from two studies, the authors were able to study this question in one of the largest groups of patients to date,” said Anthony Atala, Editor-in-Chief of STEM CELLS Translational Medicine and director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine. “These findings are important because they emphasize the need for further large prospective studies to evaluate the anti-arrhythmic potential of mesenchymal and other newer cell-based therapies.” The full article, “Effects of Transendocardial Stem Cell Injection on Ventricular Proarrhythmia in Patients with Ischemic Cardiomyopathy: Results from the POSEIDON and TAC-HFT Trials,” can be accessed at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/sctm.16-0328/full. About STEM CELLS Translational Medicine: STEM CELLS Translational Medicine (SCTM), published by AlphaMed Press, is a monthly peer-reviewed publication dedicated to significantly advancing the clinical utilization of stem cell molecular and cellular biology. By bridging stem cell research and clinical trials, SCTM will help move applications of these critical investigations closer to accepted best practices. About AlphaMed Press: Established in 1983, AlphaMed Press with offices in Durham, NC, San Francisco, CA, and Belfast, Northern Ireland, publishes two other internationally renowned peer-reviewed journals: STEM CELLS® (http://www.StemCells.com), celebrating its 35th year, is the world's first journal devoted to this fast paced field of research. The Oncologist® (http://www.TheOncologist.com), also a monthly peer-reviewed publication, entering its 22nd year, is devoted to community and hospital-based oncologists and physicians entrusted with cancer patient care. All three journals are premier periodicals with globally recognized editorial boards dedicated to advancing knowledge and education in their focused disciplines.


DURHAM, N.C., March 02, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Heat Biologics, Inc. (“Heat”) (Nasdaq:HTBX), a leader in the development of immunotherapies designed to activate a patient’s immune system against cancer, announced that it will present a poster on its ComPACT platform technology at the AACR Annual Meeting being held on April 1-5, 2017 in Washington, DC.  The details for the poster presentation at the AACR Annual Meeting are as follows: Title: Potency of Gp96-Ig/Fc-OX40L cell-based combination vaccine in cancer immunotherapy Date and Time: April 2, 2017 at 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. ET Location: Convention Center, Halls A-C, Poster Section 26 Session Title: T-cell Immunity to Cancer: New Progress Poster Board Number: 9 Abstract Number: 605 Copies of the abstract are available and can be viewed online through the AACR website at www.aacr.org.  The poster will be uploaded to the Publications section of Heat’s corporate website in line with the conference’s embargo policy. About Heat Biologics, Inc. Heat Biologics, Inc. (Nasdaq:HTBX) is an immuno-oncology company developing novel therapies that are designed to activate a patient’s immune system against cancer utilizing an engineered form of gp96, a protein that activates the immune system when cells die. Heat’s highly specific T cell-stimulating therapeutic vaccine platform technologies, ImPACT and ComPACT, form the basis of its product candidates. These platforms, in combination with other therapies, such as checkpoint inhibitors, are designed to address three distinct but synergistic mechanisms of action: robust activation of CD8+ “killer” T cells (one of the human immune system’s most potent weapons against cancer); reversal of tumor-induced immune suppression; and T cell co-stimulation to further enhance patients’ immune response.  Currently, Heat is conducting a Phase 1b trial with HS-110 (viagenpumatucel-L) in combination with an anti-PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor to treat patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and a Phase 2 trial with HS-410 (vesigenurtacel-L) in patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Heat’s wholly-owned subsidiary, Zolovax, Inc., is developing therapeutic and preventative vaccines to treat infectious diseases based on Heat’s gp96 vaccine technology, with a current focus on the development of a Zika vaccine in conjunction with the University of Miami. For more information, please visit www.heatbio.com. Forward Looking Statements This press release includes forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 on our current expectations and projections about future events.  In some cases, forward-looking statements can be identified by terminology such as "may," "should," "potential," "continue," "expects," "anticipates," "intends," "plans," "believes," "estimates," and similar expressions.  These statements are based upon current beliefs, expectations and assumptions and include statements regarding the potential of Heat’s ImPACT and ComPACT therapies.  These statements are based on management’s expectations and assumptions as of the date of this press release and are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, many of which are difficult to predict that could cause actual results to differ materially from current expectations and assumptions from those set forth or implied by any forward-looking statements, including the ability of Heat's ImPACT and ComPACT therapies to perform as designed, to demonstrate safety and efficacy, as well as results that are consistent with prior results, the ability to enroll patients and complete the clinical trials on time and achieve desired results and benefits, the company’s ability to obtain regulatory approvals for commercialization of product candidates or to comply with ongoing regulatory requirements, regulatory limitations relating to the company’s  ability to promote or commercialize its product candidates for specific indications, acceptance of its product candidates in the marketplace and the successful development, marketing or sale of products, the Company’s ability to maintain its license agreements, the continued maintenance and growth of its patent estate, its ability to establish and maintain collaborations, its  ability to obtain or maintain the capital or grants necessary to fund its research and development activities, and its ability to retain its key scientists or management personnel and the other factors described in the company’s annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2015 and other filings with the SEC.  The information in this release is provided only as of the date of this release and the company undertakes no obligation to update any forward-looking statements contained in this release based on new information, future events, or otherwise, except as required by law.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Sustainable Petroleum Group Inc. (the "Company") (OTCQB SPGX) is pleased to announce the appointment of additional officers and directors to further strengthen its management team and the implementation of its business strategy. Effective February 13, 2017, Christian Winzenried was appointed by the board of directors as the new President and CEO of SPGX. During the past five years, Mr. Winzenried has been an entrepreneur and executive officer in several companies in IT, Financial Services, Banking, Consulting and Lifestyle; most notably with zeb/ (a top management consultancy focusing on strategy, marketing, pricing and sales) where he was responsible for the development of business projects in the regional markets of Germany, Switzerland and Austria. For more than 20 years, Mr. Winzenried has taught Management and Leadership as well as SME Startup Founding processes at several Business Management Schools. He graduated with degrees in Leadership, Management of MIS/IT, Marketing and Economics. Also, on February 13, 2017 both Christian Winzenried and Stefan Mühlbauer were appointed as additional directors of SPGX. The board of directors of SPGX currently consists of Christian Winzenried (President and CEO), Suha Hächler (CFO, Treasurer, and Corporate Secretary), Stefan Mühlbauer (Chief Communications Officer), and Dr. Philip Grothe. Suha Hächler has been an entrepreneur and executive officer in several companies, including Xerox AG, where he was involved with the development and implementation of printing systems. Mr. Hächler is currently teaching business management consultancy at the international school Gustav Käser in Switzerland and also studied economics at the international school HSG St. Gallen in Switzerland. Dr. Philip Grothe has served as the CEO of alimex Group, a leading aluminum company, since 2014. Prior to joining alimex Dr. Grothe was partner and shareholder of Simon, Kucher & Partners, a top management consultancy focusing on strategy, marketing, pricing and sales. Dr. Grothe began his career at Deloitte Consulting where he worked as a manager and project leader in numerous marketing and sales projects. Dr. Grothe graduated with a degree in Economics and obtained his PhD in Strategic Management. Stefan Mühlbauer has served as CEO of Arma Communications Inc, a business development and marketing Agency in Naples, Florida since 2013. Additionally Mr. Mühlbauer serves as managing partner for Eagle Run Capital Inc. Previously, Mr. Mühlbauer held positions with various leading investment banks in Europe. Mr. Mühlbauer was the Chief Operating Officer at Silvia Quandt & Cie AG where he was responsible for building up the institution's research and corporate finance activities. Mr. Mühlbauer received his degree in Finance from the University of Miami. Christian Winzenried, the CEO of SPGX stated: "Together we are a very diverse management team with many years of expertise in leadership roles across a broad range of industries. As a team we look forward to developing continued shareholder value." About Sustainable Petroleum Group Inc. SPGX as a member of SP Group is positioned to become a world leading natural resources holding and development company through value based investments and collaborative partnerships with global leaders across the natural resources sector. SP Group has initiated its goals by pursuing investment and partnerships with some of the most diversified and integrated companies available on the market. On behalf of Sustainable Petroleum Group Inc. Christian Winzenried Chief Executive Officer CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS This press release contains statements that plan for or anticipate the future, called "forward-looking statements." In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as "may," "will," "should," "could," "expects," "plans," "intends," "anticipates," "believes," "estimates," "predicts," "potential" or "continue" or the negative of those terms and other comparable terminology. These forward-looking statements appear in a number of places in this press release and include, but are not limited to, statements about: our market opportunity; revenue generation; our strategies; competition; expected activities and expenditures as we pursue our business plan; the adequacy of our available cash resources; our ability to acquire assets or projects on commercially viable terms; challenges to our title to our assets; operating or technical difficulties in connection with our development activities; currency fluctuations; and governmental regulations. Many of these contingencies and uncertainties can affect our actual results and could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied in any forward-looking statements made by, or on behalf of, us. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance. All of the forward-looking statements made in this press release are qualified by these cautionary statements. Specific reference is made to our most recent annual report on Form 10-KSB and other filings made by us with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission for more detailed discussions of the contingencies and uncertainties enumerated above and the factors underlying the forward-looking statements. These reports and filings may be inspected and copied at the Public Reference Room maintained by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. You can obtain information about operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission at 1-800-SEC-0330. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission also maintains an Internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission at http://www.sec.gov. We disclaim any intention or obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except to the extent required by applicable laws. This press release is for informational purposes only and is not and should not be construed as an offer to solicit, buy, or sell any security.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

UK Scientists, in collaboration with groups in Europe and the US, have discovered why the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) is one of the most destructive pests to many of our most important crops. Their research will inform industry and research programmes to support pest control and aid global food security. Unlike most plant-colonising insects, which have adapted to live on a small range of closely related plants, green peach aphids can colonise over four hundred plant species. Developing resistance to over 70 different pesticides, coupled with the ever changing climate affecting crop losses in the EU and UK, the pest wreaks havoc on crop yields. The green peach aphid transmits over a hundred different plant viruses and this notorious insect feeds on essential crops such as oilseed rape, sugar beet, tomato and potato, as well as wild plant species, which may serve as sources of the plant viruses. An example being the Turnip yellows virus (TuYV) and related viruses, which if left uncontrolled can reduce yields of multiple crops, such as oilseed rape and sugar beet, by up to 30%, rendering some crops unprofitable in the UK. The aphids spend winter living on host plants such as peach, apricot or plum, but in the summer months can colonise a huge range of vegetables -- from potatoes to spinach, squash, parsley and parsnip. Generally, the insect parasites that live on a certain species are genetically very well adapted to live on just that plant. Yet, research led by the Earlham Institute (EI) and the John Innes Centre (JIC), has found that the green peach aphid foregoes this specialisation for a more flexible approach involving turning gene activity 'up' or 'down' in response to different plant hosts and environments. Dr David Swarbreck, Group Leader at the Earlham Institute, said: "Our study has shed light on the genetic plasticity1 that allows the green peach aphid to survive so well on a multitude of plant species, giving us a greater insight into the survival strategies of one of the most challenging of crop pests." More intriguing about the insect's strategy is that aphids can reproduce clonally -- i.e. they produce genetically identical lineages. This allows biologists to compare individual aphids with the same genetic background and see precisely what genes are more active than others in aphids living on different plant species. By growing aphid clones on three different plant species, it was possible for the scientists to find the specific genes that were involved in colonising the different host plants. It appears that the genes responsible for helping aphids adjust to different plants are found in clusters within the genome and are rapidly increased or decreased in two days of transfer to a new host plant species. Dr Yazhou Chen, Postdoctoral Scientist at the John Innes Centre, said: "The genes rapidly turn up or down in single aphids in just two days upon transfer to a new host plant. Given that a single aphid can produce her own offspring, and a lot of it, new aphid infestations may start with just a single aphid." The team found that rapid changes in gene expression were vital for the green peach aphid's generalist lifestyle. Interfering with the expression of one particular gene family, cathepsin B, reduced aphid offspring production, but only on the host plant where the expression of these genes is increased. Thomas Mathers, Postdoctoral Scientist at the Earlham Institute, said: "Surprisingly, many of the genes involved in host adjustment arose during aphid diversification and are not specific to the green peach aphid. This suggests that it may be the ability to rapidly adjust the expression of key genes in a coordinated fashion that enables generalism, rather than the presence of an expanded genomic toolbox of genes." Professor Saskia Hogenhout at the John Innes Centre, added: "Future research is expected to reveal mechanisms involved in the amazing plasticity of the green peach aphid leading to new ways to control this notorious pest. More generally, the research will help understand how some organisms are able to adjust quickly to a broad range of environmental conditions, whereas others are pickier and go extinct more easily, research that is central given our rapidly changing environment due to, for instance, climate change." The scientific paper, titled: "Rapid transcriptional plasticity of duplicated gene clusters enables a clonally reproducing aphid to colonize diverse plant species" is published in Genome Biology. This research project was led by the Earlham Institute (Norwich, UK) and the John Innes Centre (Norwich, UK) in collaboration with the University of East Anglia (Norwich, UK), INRA Rennes (France), University of Miami (USA) and Boyce Thomspon Institute for Plant Research (New York, USA). This project was funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the National Institute for Food in Agriculture (NIFA), (USA). For further information, read our feature: Aphids - the versatile agricultural nuisance. Watch Genome Biology's video on Gene regulation, the secret to aphid's wide-ranging crop diet. 1. The ability of one genotype to produce more than one phenotype when exposed to different environments - phenotypic plasticity allows an organism to change its phenotype in response to changes in the environment. 2. Paper DOI: 10.1186/s13059-016-1145-3 (Paper PDF available on request). Link to paper title goes live after embargo has lifted. 3. Accompanying images can be accessed here: https:/ 4. David Swarbreck and Tom Mathers (joint first author), Earlham Institute project leads are available for interview. 5. Saskia Hogenhout, JIC lead is available for interview. Please contact: Formerly The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC), the Earlham Institute is a leading research institute focusing on the development of genomics and computational biology. The Earlham Institute is based within the Norwich Research Park and is one of eight institutes that receive strategic funding from Biotechnology and Biological Science Research Council (BBSRC) -- £6.45M in 2015/2016 -- as well as support from other research funders. The Earlham Institute operates a National Capability to promote the application of genomics and bioinformatics to advance bioscience research and innovation. The Earlham Institute offers a state of the art DNA sequencing facility, unique by its operation of multiple complementary technologies for data generation. The Institute is a UK hub for innovative bioinformatics through research, analysis and interpretation of multiple, complex data sets. It hosts one of the largest computing hardware facilities dedicated to life science research in Europe. It is also actively involved in developing novel platforms to provide access to computational tools and processing capacity for multiple academic and industrial users and promoting applications of computational Bioscience. Additionally, the Institute offers a training programme through courses and workshops, and an outreach programme targeting key stakeholders, and wider public audiences through dialogue and science communication activities. The John Innes Centre is an independent, international centre of excellence in plant science and microbiology. Our mission is to generate knowledge of plants and microbes through innovative research, to train scientists for the future, to apply our knowledge of nature's diversity to benefit agriculture, the environment, human health and wellbeing, and engage with policy makers and the public. To achieve these goals we establish pioneering long-term research objectives in plant and microbial science, with a focus on genetics. These objectives include promoting the translation of research through partnerships to develop improved crops and to make new products from microbes and plants for human health and other applications. We also create new approaches, technologies and resources that enable research advances and help industry to make new products. The knowledge, resources and trained researchers we generate help global societies address important challenges including providing sufficient and affordable food, making new products for human health and industrial applications, and developing sustainable bio-based manufacturing. This provides a fertile environment for training the next generation of plant and microbial scientists, many of whom go on to careers in industry and academia, around the world. The John Innes Centre is strategically funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). In 2015-2016 the John Innes Centre received a total of £30.1 million from the BBSRC. The John Innes Centre is also supported by the John Innes Foundation through provision of research accommodation and long term support of the Rotation PhD programme. The John Innes Centre is the winner of the BBSRC's 2013 - 2016 Excellence With Impact award. The Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) invests in world-class bioscience research and training on behalf of the UK public. Our aim is to further scientific knowledge, to promote economic growth, wealth and job creation and to improve quality of life in the UK and beyond. Funded by Government, BBSRC invested over £509M in world-class bioscience in 2014-15 and is the leading funder of wheat research in the UK (over£100M investment on UK wheat research in the last 10 years). We support research and training in universities and strategically funded institutes. BBSRC research and the people we fund are helping society to meet major challenges, including food security, green energy and healthier, longer lives. Our investments underpin important UK economic sectors, such as farming, food, industrial biotechnology and pharmaceuticals. For more information about BBSRC, our science and our impact see: http://www. For more information about BBSRC strategically funded institutes see: http://www.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Mentice, the endovascular training solutions specialists, today announced the release of the world’s first simulation training software module for prostatic artery embolization (PAE). The software has been developed together with two of the world’s leading PAE authorities: Dr. Shivank Bhatia Associate Professor of Interventional Radiology and Urology at University of Miami Hospital, and Dr. Marc Sapoval, Professor of Clinical Radiology at the Hôpital Européen George-Pompidou in Paris. “The Mentice software, created from real patients’ data, will allow interventional radiologists (IRs) to train for PAE, and will help reduce the steep learning curve associated with this technically challenging and complex procedure,” says Dr. Bhatia. “Collaborating with Mentice has resulted in a training innovation that I am personally very proud of.” PAE is a novel procedure that was first presented at SIR 2011. A minimally invasive endovascular procedure, PAE has been shown to be safe and efficacious. PAE scores highly in terms of patient satisfaction, and dramatically reduces length of hospital stays compared to transurethral resection of the prostate. “PAE,” comments Dr. Sapoval, “is a demanding procedure performed by experienced IRs. The anatomy is highly variable, the microcatheter and microwire skills required are advanced, and a high degree of technical competence in various areas is essential. Simulation training aims to facilitate the learning curve for performing PAE.” Mentice will formally release and demonstrate the PAE simulation training software at SIR 2017, the Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society of Interventional Radiology, to be held March 4-9 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Washington, D.C. “Mentice is proud to collaborate with these two world-class experts,” says Göran Malmberg, Mentice CEO. “We are offering a unique training environment for experienced physicians. PAE has great potential, it is a challenging procedure with a significant learning process. Realistic, hands-on training is a must—and that’s what the new Mentice software module delivers.” Mentice will present and demonstrate the PAE simulation training module at booth 302 March 5-8. About Mentice Mentice is a world leader in medical simulation, providing qualified solutions for training, education and assessment opportunities. With a focus on minimally invasive techniques and procedures, Mentice develops simulation systems for training in a safe environment within the fields of endovascular intervention and minimally invasive surgery. The advantages of training with Mentice solutions are well documented enhancing clinical performance, reducing cost, and, in the long term, improving patient safety. For more information please visit http://www.mentice.com.


Scythian Biosciences Inc is developing a proprietary Cannabinoid (CBD) combination therapy for the prevention and treatment of concussions and traumatic brain injury NOT FOR DISSEMINATION IN THE UNITED STATES OR FOR DISTRIBUTION TO U.S. NEWSWIRE SERVICES Kitrinor Metals Inc. (TSX VENTURE:KIT) (the "Company") is pleased to announce that it has entered into a non-binding letter of intent dated February 17, 2017 (the "Letter of Intent") with Scythian Biosciences Inc., a private Canadian corporation ("Scythian"), in connection with a proposed reverse take-over of the Company (the "Proposed Transaction"), subject to approval of the TSX Venture Exchange ("TSXV"), to list the shares of the resulting entity (the "Resulting Issuer") on the TSXV. The Resulting Issuer will operate as a life sciences issuer continuing the business of Scythian. Aphria Inc. (TSX VENTURE:APH)(OTCQB:APHQF) is expected to be a lead investor in the Offering as defined below. The Letter of Intent provides that the Company and Scythian will negotiate and enter into a definitive agreement in respect of the Proposed Transaction on or before March 10, 2017 (the "Definitive Agreement"). Pursuant to the terms of the Letter of Intent, completion of the Proposed Transaction will be subject to a number of conditions, including completion of an Offering (described below), shareholder approval, if required, completion or waiver of sponsorship, receipt of all required regulatory approvals, including the approval of the TSXV, completion of satisfactory due diligence reviews, satisfaction of the initial listing requirements of the TSXV and all requirements under the policies of the TSXV relating to the completion of the Proposed Transaction, and execution of the Definitive Agreement. The Company and Scythian will complete the Proposed Transaction by way of a three-cornered amalgamation whereby a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company will amalgamate with Scythian to form a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Resulting Issuer. The Proposed Transaction is an arm's length transaction. Prior to or contemporaneously with the completion of the Proposed Transaction, Scythian will complete a consolidation of its issued and outstanding common shares on a 4 for 1 basis. The anticipated completion date for the Proposed Transaction is May 31, 2017. A filing statement or management information circular, as applicable, will be prepared and filed in accordance with the policies of the TSXV. As a condition to the completion of the Proposed Transaction, Scythian will complete a brokered subscription receipt financing, through a syndicate of agents led by Clarus Securities Inc. and including Haywood Securities Inc. and Canaccord Genuity Corp. (the "Agents"), for aggregate gross proceeds of up to $10,000,000 through the issuance of up to 25,000,000 subscription receipts ("Subscription Receipts") at a price of $0.40 per Subscription Receipt (the "Offering"), subject to the rules of, and approval by, the TSXV. Upon satisfaction of the escrow release conditions, including all conditions precedent to the Proposed Transaction being satisfied, each Subscription Receipt will automatically convert without any further action on the part of the holder into one (1) common share of the Resulting Issuer. Should the escrow release conditions not be satisfied, the Subscription Receipts will be cancelled and all proceeds from the sale of Subscription Receipts will be returned to subscribers without interest. As compensation for the services provided in connection with the Offering, the Agents will receive a cash commission equal to 7% of the gross proceeds raised in connection with the Offering and broker warrants equal to 7% of the Resulting Issuer shares. Upon completion of the Proposed Transaction, the proceeds of the Offering will be used to further develop the business of the Resulting Issuer and for general working capital purposes. Sponsorship of the Proposed Transaction may be required by the TSXV unless an exemption or waiver from this requirement can be obtained in accordance with the policies of the TSXV. The Company intends to apply for a waiver of the sponsorship requirement. There is no assurance that a waiver from this requirement can or will be obtained. Scythian is a research and development company committed to finding a solution for the prevention and treatment of concussions and traumatic brain injury ("TBI") with its proprietary Cannabinoid ("CBD") combination. Scythian's mission is to be the first accepted drug regimen for concussive treatment. Scythian has recently formed a collaboration with the University of Miami and its world renowned neuroscientific team to conduct pre-clinical and clinical trials of its drug regimen. The University of Miami believes that Scythian's scientific approach shows significant promise and differs from previous approaches to treat this growing problem. The collaboration with the University of Miami allows access to their extensive knowledge base in the fields of traumatic brain injury and concussions and allows for Scythian's clinical studies to be undertaken at their world-class facilities. Gillian A. Hotz, PhD, is leading Scythian's program at the University of Miami. Dr. Hotz is a nationally recognized behavioral neuroscientist and expert in neurotrauma, concussion management, and neurorehabilitation. She has extensive experience in neurocognitive testing. Dr. Hotz has been the co-director of University of Miami Miller School of Medicine's Concussion Program since 1995. Scythian is also endorsed by the NFL Alumni Association and the World Boxing Association on its mission. Kitrinor is a junior mining exploration company engaged in the acquisition, exploration and development of mineral resource properties in Canada. The Company's activities are currently focused on the exploration and development of the Culroc Property located in the Township of Sothman, Ontario. The common shares of the Company are currently halted from trading pending completion of the Proposed Transaction. A comprehensive press release with further particulars relating to the Proposed Transaction, financial particulars and descriptions of the proposed board of directors and management of the Resulting Issuer will follow in accordance with the policies of the TSXV. All information contained in this press release with respect to the Company and Scythian was supplied by the parties respectively, for inclusion herein, and each party and its directors and officers have relied on the other party for any information concerning the other party. Completion of the Proposed Transaction is subject to a number of conditions including, but not limited to, completion of satisfactory due diligence, completion of the Offering, execution of the Definitive Agreement in respect of the Proposed Transaction, TSXV acceptance and, if applicable, pursuant to policies of the TSXV, majority of the minority shareholder approval. Where applicable, the Proposed Transaction cannot close until the required shareholder approval is obtained. There can be no assurance that the Proposed Transaction will be completed as proposed, or at all. Investors are cautioned that, except as disclosed in the management information circular or filing statement to be prepared in connection with the Proposed Transaction, any information released or received with respect to the Proposed Transaction may not be accurate or complete and should not be relied upon. Trading in the securities of the Company should be considered highly speculative. Neither the TSXV nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSXV) has in any way passed upon the merits of the Proposed Transaction and associated transactions and neither of the foregoing entities has in any way approved or disapproved of the contents of this press release. Neither the TSXV nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSXV) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this press release. The common shares of the Company have not been and will not be registered under the United States Securities Act of 1933, as amended and may not be offered or sold in the United States absent registration or an applicable exemption from the registration requirement. This press release shall not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy nor shall there be any sale of the securities in any jurisdiction in which such offer, solicitation or sale would be unlawful. This news release contains "forward-looking information" within the meaning of applicable securities laws relating to the Proposed Transaction including statements regarding the terms and conditions of the Proposed Transaction and the Letter of Intent, as well as information relating to Scythian. The information about Scythian contained in the press release has not been independently verified by the Company. Although the Company believes in light of the experience of its officers and directors, current conditions and expected future developments and other factors that have been considered appropriate, that the expectations reflected in this forward-looking information are reasonable, undue reliance should not be placed on them because the Company can give no assurance that they will prove to be correct. Readers are cautioned to not place undue reliance on forward-looking information. Actual results and developments may differ materially from those contemplated by these statements depending on, among other things, the risks that the parties will not proceed with the Proposed Transaction and the Letter of Intent; that the ultimate terms of the Proposed Transaction and the Letter of Intent will differ from those that currently are contemplated; and that the Proposed Transaction and the Letter of Intent will not be successfully completed for any reason (including the failure to obtain the required approvals or clearances from regulatory authorities). The terms and conditions of the Proposed Transaction may change based on the Company's due diligence and the receipt of tax, corporate and securities law advice for both the Company and Scythian. The statements in this press release are made as of the date of this release. The Company undertakes no obligation to comment on analyses, expectations or statements made by third-parties in respect of the Company, Scythian, their securities, or their respective financial or operating results (as applicable).


WALTHAM, Mass., Feb. 21, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Minerva Neurosciences, Inc. (Nasdaq:NERV), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of therapies to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders, will host a Research and Development Day to highlight unmet needs, including negative symptoms and cognitive impairment, and emerging treatment strategies in schizophrenia in New York City on March 2, 2017 from 8:00 am to 9:30 am Eastern Time. The meeting will feature presentations by key opinion leaders Philip Harvey, PhD (University of Miami) and René Kahn, MD, PhD (Mount Sinai), who will discuss the current treatment landscape for schizophrenia. Dr. Remy Luthringer, president and chief executive officer of Minerva, will provide an overview of the Company’s ongoing clinical development work with MIN-101, including the Company’s clinical strategy moving forward.  The presenters will be available to answer questions following the breakfast. Philip D. Harvey, PhD is Leonard M. Miller Professor of Psychiatry and director of the Division of Psychology at the University Of Miami Miller School Of Medicine and a VA Senior Health Scientist.  Dr. Harvey’s research has focused on cognition and functioning, and he has written extensively on aging in schizophrenia, negative symptoms in schizophrenia, functional impairments in severe mental illness, the cognitive effects of typical and atypical antipsychotics, and the effects of cognitive enhancing agents and cognitive training in various conditions.  Dr. Harvey is a widely cited author who was repeatedly designated by Thomson-Reuters as being in the top 1% of all researchers in citations in mental health each year since 2010. He has received numerous awards for his research in schizophrenia. Dr. René Kahn is the Esther and Joseph Klingenstein Professor and System Chair of Psychiatry at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Over the last 30 years, Dr. Kahn and his research group have been instrumental in showing that brain changes in schizophrenia are progressive over time and have helped educate the medical community on the clinical relevance of these changes on cognitive function.  He has served as principal investigator on several clinical trials for schizophrenia and has published over 800 research papers. He was Treasurer and Vice President of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology and is currently past-President of The Schizophrenia International Research Society. He is a fellow of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. This event is intended for institutional investors, sell-side analysts, investment bankers and business development professionals only.  Please RSVP in advance if you plan to attend, as space is limited. To reserve a spot, please reply to this email or contact LifeSci Advisors, LLC at Mac@LifeSciAdvisors.com. A live and archived webcast of the event, with slides, will be available at http://lifesci.rampard.com/20170302/reg.jsp and on the Investors section of the Company’s website at http://ir.minervaneurosciences.com. MIN-101 is a drug candidate with equipotent affinities for sigma 2 and 5‑hydroxytryptamine-2A (5-HT ) and lower affinity at α1-adrenergic receptors. MIN-101 has no direct dopaminergic post-synaptic blocking effects, known to be involved in some side effects like extrapyramidal symptoms, sedation, prolactin increases and weight gain. As described by the National Institute of Mental Health, schizophrenia is a chronic and severe disorder that affects how a person thinks, feels and acts1.  In 2015 approximately 3.2 million people suffered from schizophrenia in the U.S., Japan and the five major European markets.  Schizophrenic patients suffer from positive, negative and cognitive symptoms.  Negative symptoms are disruptions to normal emotions and behaviors that may signal social withdrawal.  Patients may be socially inhibited, lack the ability to begin and sustain planned activities, or speak little even when forced to interact.  Negative symptoms account for a substantial portion of the morbidity associated with schizophrenia2.  They persist chronically throughout an individual patient’s lifetime and increase with severity over time.  Similar to negative symptoms, cognitive symptoms may be difficult to recognize and often are detected only when specific testing is performed.  Cognitive symptoms include: poor “executive functioning,” or the ability to understand information and use it to make decisions; trouble focusing or paying attention; problems with “working memory,” or the ability to use information immediately after learning it.  Poor cognition is related to worse employment and social outcomes for patients with schizophrenia. Minerva Neurosciences, Inc. is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of a portfolio of product candidates to treat CNS diseases.  Minerva’s proprietary compounds include: MIN-101, in clinical development for schizophrenia; MIN-117, in clinical development for major depressive disorder (MDD); MIN-202 (JNJ-42847922), in clinical development for insomnia and MDD; and MIN-301, in pre-clinical development for Parkinson’s disease.  Minerva’s common stock is listed on the NASDAQ Global Market under the symbol “NERV.”  For more information, please visit www.minervaneurosciences.com. 2 Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, American Psychiatric Association.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

MastersinAccounting.info, a leading career and education website focused on graduate programs in accounting and finance, has released its ranking of the Top Online Master’s in Accounting Programs. To be considered for the list, schools with an online master’s in accounting program were checked for not-for-profit status and accreditation from one of the six regional accreditation agencies in the US recognized by the US Department of Education. The online degrees from the schools on the list are also the same degrees granted to traditional, on-campus students. The rankings were based on factors measuring academic quality, student experience, and graduate success. The ranking uses a unique methodology that considers such factors as the average tuition cost per online credit hour; program accreditation by the AACSB, ACBSP, or IACBE; the average mid-career pay of alumni; and school rankings according to US News & World Report in the regional, national, and online categories. Rob Voce, founder of MastersinAccounting.info, said about the list: “Enrollment in online degree programs is increasing and schools are responding by offering more distance education programs at the graduate level - which can be particularly convenient for those who are already working full-time. Our ranking is designed to help these prospective students learn about and compare first-rate online master’s in accounting programs that offer long-term value.” Overall, 37 schools with online master’s in accounting programs satisfied the inclusion requirements and ranked on this list. Auburn University, in Auburn, Alabama, captured the top spot on the list, followed by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the second spot. As well as providing schools’ results on ranking factors, the Top Online Master’s in Accounting Programs list includes detailed information on schools’ admissions statistics and requirements as well as tuition comparisons. For the top-ranking schools the list also provides: The top schools on this year’s list are: 1. Auburn University Raymond J. Harbert College of Business (Auburn, AL) 2. University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler Business School (Chapel Hill, NC) 3. University of Connecticut School of Business (Storrs, CT) 4. University of Massachusetts Amherst Isenberg School of Management (Amherst, MA) 5. Pennsylvania State University World Campus (State College, PA) 6. University of Southern California Marshall School of Business (Los Angeles, CA) 7. Emporia State University School of Business (Emporia, KS) 8. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey Business School (New Brunswick, NJ) 9. Colorado State University College of Business (Fort Collins, CO) 10. University of Alabama at Birmingham Collat School of Business (Birmingham, AL) 11. University of Texas at Dallas Naveen Jindal School of Business (Richardson, TX) 12. St. John’s University Peter J. Tobin College of Business (Jamaica, NY) 13. Georgia Southern University College of Business Administration (Statesboro, GA) 14. Northeastern University D’Amore-McKim School of Business (Boston, MA) 15. DePaul University Kellstadt Graduate School of Business (Chicago, IL) 16. Golden Gate University Edward S. Ageno School of Business (San Francisco, CA) 17. Southern New Hampshire University College of Online and Continuing Education (Hooksett, NH) 18. California State University, Sacramento College of Business Administration (Sacramento, CA) 19. University of Scranton Kania School of Management (Scranton, PA) 20. Syracuse University Martin J. Whitman School of Management (Syracuse, NY) 21. University of Hartford Barney School of Business (West Hartford, CT) 22. University of Miami School of Business Administration (Coral Gables, FL) 23. George Mason University School of Business (Fairfax, VA) 24. University of South Dakota Beacom School of Business (Vermillion, SD) 25. Florida Atlantic University College of Business (Boca Raton, FL) 26. Stetson University M.E. Rinker Sr. Institute of Tax and Accountancy (DeLand, FL) 27. Rider University College of Business Administration (Lawrenceville, NJ) 28. New England College School of Graduate and Professional Studies (Henniker, NH) 29. Western Governors University (Salt Lake City, UT) 30. Indiana Wesleyan University DeVoe School of Business (Marion, IN) 31. Plymouth State University College of Business Administration (Plymouth, NH) 32. Bellevue University College of Business (Bellevue, NE) 33. Loyola University Chicago Quinlan School of Business (Chicago, IL) 34. Franklin University Ross College of Business (Columbus, OH) 35. Nova Southeastern University Huizenga College of Business (Fort Lauderdale, FL) 36. Saint Mary’s University Graduate School of Business and Technology (Winona, MN) 37. Baypath University School of Science & Management (Longmeadow, MA) *See the full rankings and program details here: http://www.mastersinaccounting.info/online-masters-in-accounting/ About MastersinAccounting.info: MastersinAccounting.info is a free online resource focused on providing accurate and up-to-date information on degrees, programs, and schools for prospective master’s in accounting students. The site also provides additional resources such as career outlooks, graduate student guides, scholarships, and more. MastersinAccounting.info’s goal is to be best in class.


PHILADELPHIA -- (Feb. 27, 2017) -- Scientists at The Wistar Institute in collaboration with Roswell Park Cancer Institute found a significant association between a rare genetic variant of the p53 gene present in African American women and their risk of developing breast cancer in premenopausal age. The study was published online by the journal NPJ Breast Cancer. TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer. The p53 protein is a critical tumor suppressor in the cell and genetic mutations that occur in cancer cause a loss of its function in regulating proliferation arrest and cell death. In addition to these changes, there are several minor, naturally occurring genetic variants of the p53 gene, also known as polymorphisms, and some of them are associated with an increased risk of cancer. The rare p53 polymorphism analyzed in this study is found almost exclusively in populations of African descent. Wistar scientists have previously shown that this polymorphism impairs the ability of p53 to induce cell death in vitro and significantly increases cancer risk when recreated in a mouse model. The new study analyzed the statistical association of this variant with the risk of developing breast cancer in African American women. "Based on our previous studies on the functional effects of this genetic variant on the p53 protein, we sought to verify if it alters cancer risk in human carriers," said Maureen Murphy, Ph.D., professor and program leader of the Molecular and Cellular Oncogenesis Program at Wistar and senior author of the study. "This genetic variant is present exclusively in people of African descent, so our study addresses cancer disparities in African American women, a historically underrepresented group in research studies." "Our results show that the risk of developing breast cancer is increased by nearly 70 percent in premenopausal women who carry this polymorphism," Murphy said. "Because its frequency is very low in the African American population, larger studies will be needed to confirm our observations." Murphy and colleagues conducted statistical studies on a cohort of more than 14,000 women of African descent and didn't find any association of the polymorphism with increased breast cancer risk overall. However, as previously observed with other genetic variants of p53, a significant association was present in women in premenopausal age. Elucidating the effects of p53 polymorphisms on cancer risk is a challenging task, especially due to the limited availability of sample cohorts from specific populations. This study provides a strong suggestion that the genetic variant considered might be associated with a significant increase in breast cancer risk, although this association will need to be confirmed in a larger sample set. This work was supported by National Institutes of Health grants R01 CA102184, CA201430, P01 CA151135, R01 CA092447, R01 CA135288, P01 CA82707, R25-CA57726, NICHD-N01-HD-3-3175, NCO-N01-PC-67010, NIEHS-ES07084, R01 CA142996, P50 CA125183, R01 CA89085, and U01 CA161032; National Cancer Institute grant UM1CA164974 and the Intramural Research Program of the National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research; grants from the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, the University Cancer Research Fund of North Carolina, the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, the Era of Hope Scholar Award Program W81XWH-08-1-0383, the Komen Foundation for the Cure, and the Stacy Goldstein Faculty Scholar Award. Core support for The Wistar Institute and the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey was provided by the Cancer Center Support Grants P30CA010815 and P30CA072720, respectively. Qin Liu is a co-author of this study from The Wistar Institute. Other co-authors include: Song Liu, Chi-Chen Hong, Qiang Hu and Christine B. Ambrosone from Roswell Park Cancer Institute; Dezheng Huo and Olufunmilayo I. Olopade from the University of Chicago; Sonia C. Dolfi and Kim M. Hirshfield from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey; Andrew F. Olshan and Sarah Nyante from University of North Carolina; Temidayo O. Ogundiran from University of Ibadan, Nigeria; Clement Adebamowo from University of Maryland; Susan M. Domchek and Katherine L. Nathanson from the University of Pennsylvania; Barbara Nemesure from Stony Brook University; Stefan Ambs and Regina G. Ziegler from National Cancer Institute; William J. Blot, Wei Zheng and Sandra L. Deming from Vanderbilt University; Ye Feng, Sue A. Ingles, Michael F. Press and Christopher A. Haiman from University of Southern California; Esther M. John from Stanford University; Leslie Bernstein from Beckman Research Institute; Jennifer J. Hu and Jorge L. Rodriguez-Gil from University of Miami; Kathryn L. Lunetta and Julie R. Palmer from Boston University. The Wistar Institute is an international leader in biomedical research with special expertise in cancer research and vaccine development. Founded in 1892 as the first independent nonprofit biomedical research institute in the United States, Wistar has held the prestigious Cancer Center designation from the National Cancer Institute since 1972. The Institute works actively to ensure that research advances move from the laboratory to the clinic as quickly as possible. wistar.org.


Yoneyama K.,Japan Agency for Marine - Earth Science and Technology | Zhang C.,University of Miami | Long C.N.,Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society | Year: 2013

A field campaign in the Indian Ocean region collected unprecedented observations during October 2011'March 2012 to help advance knowledge of physical processes of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO). Studies on the MJO mean seasonal cycle indicated that main MJO initiation activity takes place in the central IO from October to March, with the highest occurrence probability near the equator in October-January. The special observing period (SOP) was designed to obtain high-resolution data to capture the diurnal cycle of convective activity with the maximum observing capacity. All other instruments continued to operate after the SOP until the end of the intensive observing period (IOP). Accompanying the sounding arrays and equally essential to the field campaign was a radar network. The 2011-12 MJO field campaign provided observations that are unique in several aspects in comparison to previous tropical field campaigns that aimed at interactions between atmospheric convection and its large-scale environment and between the atmosphere and ocean.


Harhaj E.W.,University of Miami | Dixit V.M.,Genentech
Cell Research | Year: 2011

Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is a critical regulator of multiple biological functions including innate and adaptive immunity and cell survival. Activation of NF-κB is tightly regulated to preclude chronic signaling that may lead to persistent inflammation and cancer. Ubiquitination of key signaling molecules by E3 ubiquitin ligases has emerged as an important regulatory mechanism for NF-κB signaling. Deubiquitinases (DUBs) counteract E3 ligases and therefore play a prominent role in the downregulation of NF-κB signaling and homeostasis. Understanding the mechanisms of NF-κB downregulation by specific DUBs such as A20 and CYLD may provide therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. © 2011 IBCB, SIBS, CAS All rights reserved.


Toonkel R.L.,University of Miami | Hare J.M.,University of Miami | Matthay M.A.,University of California at San Francisco | Glassberg M.K.,University of Miami
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine | Year: 2013

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive, debilitating, and fatal lung disease characterized by interstitial fibrosis with decreasing lung volumes and hypoxemic respiratory failure. The prognosis for patients with IPF is poor and the quest to find effective therapies has been unsuccessful. Despite several clinical trials over the past decade, there are no U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved treatments for patients with IPF and thus no standard of care. In terms of pathogenesis, IPF is characterized by alveolar epithelial cell injury and activation with interstitial inflammation, fibroblast proliferation with extracellular matrix collagen deposition, and loss of lung function. Becausemesenchymalstemcells (MSCs)hometo sites of injury, inhibit inflammation, and contribute to epithelial tissue repair, their use has been suggested as a therapy for the treatment of IPF. MSCs have potential as a novel therapeutic agent in multiple diseases and they have been safely administered in a number of clinical trials. Some, but not all, preclinical studies in animal models of lung fibrosis suggest that MSCs might be effective in the treatment of IPF. Given the safety and ease of MSC administration in other patient populations, the results in preclinical animal models of IPF, and the major need for novel therapeutic options in this devastating disease, we propose that carefully designed clinical trials of MSCs for the treatment of patients with IPF are appropriate. Establishing safety in the setting of IPF is the first priority in early clinical trials followed by clinical and biological measures of efficacy. Copyright © 2013 by the American Thoracic Society.


Harhaj E.W.,University of Miami | Dixit V.M.,Genentech
Immunological Reviews | Year: 2012

The nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway is a critical regulator of innate and adaptive immunity. Noncanonical K63-linked polyubiquitination plays a key regulatory role in NF-κB signaling pathways by functioning as a scaffold to recruit kinase complexes containing ubiquitin-binding domains. Ubiquitination is balanced by deubiquitinases that cleave polyubiquitin chains and oppose the function of E3 ubiquitin ligases. Deubiquitinases therefore play an important role in the termination of NF-κB signaling and the resolution of inflammation. In this review, we focus on NF-κB regulation by deubiquitinases with an emphasis on A20 and CYLD. Deubiquitinases and the ubiquitin/proteasome components that regulate NF-κB may serve as novel therapeutic targets for inflammatory diseases and cancer. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.


Shembade N.,University of Miami | Ma A.,University of California at San Francisco | Harhaj E.W.,University of Miami
Science | Year: 2010

A20 negatively regulates inflammation by inhibiting the nuclear factor kB (NF-kB) transcription factor in the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways. A20 contains deubiquitinase and E3 ligase domains and thus has been proposed to function as a ubiquitin-editing enzyme downstream of TNFRl by inactivating ubiquitinated RIP1. However, it remains unclear how A20 terminates NF-kB signaling downstream of TLRs. We have shown that A20 inhibited the E3 ligase activities of TRAF6, TRAF2, and clAPl by antagonizing interactions with the E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzymes Ubd3 and UbcH5c. A20, together with the regulatory molecule TAXlBPl, interacted with Ubc13 and UbcH5c and triggered their ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation. These findings suggest a mechanism of A20 action in the inhibition of inflammatory signaling pathways.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 389.56K | Year: 2012

This research applies methods and tools from mathematical knowledge management and theorem proving to theoretical economics, by working with a class of cooperative games called pillage games. Pillage games, introduced by Jordan in 2006, provide a formal way of thinking about the ability of powerful coalitions to take resources from less powerful ones. While their name suggests primitive, violent interactions, pillage games are more applicable to advanced democracies, in which coalitions seek to form governments to alter the distribution of societys resources in their favour. If, for some allocation of societys resources, the coalition preferring another allocation is stronger than that preferring the status quo, the other allocation `dominates the status quo. The most conceptually intriguing, and the most computationally intractable solution concept for cooperative games is the `stable set. A stable set, has two features: no allocation in the set dominates another; each allocation outside the set is dominated by an allocation in the set. For pillage games with three agents under a few additional conditions, we have determined when stable sets exist, that they are unique and contain no more than 15 allocations, and how to determine them for a given power function. In this research, we first formally represent the mathematical knowledge developed in Jordans and our work using sTeX, a mathematical knowledge management tool. This allows, e.g., automatic identification of how various results depend on each other. We then use two modern automated theorem provers (ATPs), Isabelle and Theorema, to formally prove these results. Theorem proving is a hard task and if not provided with domain specific knowledge ATPs have to search through big search spaces in order to find proofs. To increase their reasoning power, we shall seek to identify recurring patterns in proofs, and extract proof tactics, reducing the interactions necessary to prove the theorems interactively. As important results in pillage games can be summarised in pseudo-algorithms, containing both computational and non-computational steps, we shall study such pseudo-algorithms, seeking to push them towards the much more efficient computational steps. Finally, we shall use the identified proof tactics to help the ATPs prove new results in order evaluate their true value. The research seeks to make a number of contributions. For theorem proving, pillage games form a new set of challenge problems. As the study of pillage games is new, and the canon of applicable knowledge small, this gives an unprecedented opportunity to encode most of it. The research will expand the tractable problem domain for ATPs; and - by identifying successful tactics - increase both the efficiency with which ATPs search for proofs, and - ideally - their ability to establish new results. For economics, this is the first major application of formal knowledge management and theorem proving techniques. The few previous applications of ATP to economics have formalised isolated results without engaging economists and have thus largely gone unnoticed by the discipline. As cooperative games are a known hard class of economic problems, and pillage games known to be tractable, this research therefore presents a strong `proof of concept for the use of ATP within economics. Cooperative game theory is formally similar to graph theory, the techniques and insights developed may be applicable to matching problems, network economics, operations research, and combinatorial optimisation more generally. Additionally, the researchers will introduce ATP techniques to the leading PhD summer school in computational economics, and are working in collaboration with economic theorists with strong computational backgrounds. Thus, the research seeks to form a focal point for formal knowledge management and theorem proving efforts in economics.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 299.02K | Year: 2015

DESCRIPTION provided by applicant Pathological cardiac remodeling including myocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis and myocardial interstitial fibrosis constitutes a common pathway to heart failure in disease Despite current pharmacologic therapy and other advances that attenuate remodeling mortality due to heart failure remains high New more effective therapeutic options are desperately needed in an increasing patient population to improve both the survival and quality of life for patients with or susceptible to heart failure We recently discovered that the protein kinase p ribosomal S kinase type RSK plays a critical role in the regulation of pathological cardiac remodeling In Anchored RSK Inhibitors LLC was founded by Dr Michael Kapiloff to develop novel therapeutics based upon RSK inhibition that will prevent and or treat heart failure RSK was required for pathological remodeling even though RSK is less abundant in the cardiac myocyte than other members of the RSK protein kinase family We found that in myocytes RSK andapos s unique N terminal domain conferred high affinity regulated binding to the scaffold protein muscle A kinase anchoring protein mAKAP This novel protein protein interaction explained the selective binding of that kinase isoform to the scaffold New preliminary data show that expression both in vitro and in vivo of an anchoring disruptor peptide that blocks mAKAP RSK binding will attenuate pathological remodeling preventing the development of heart failure in response to pressure overload The goal of this STTR application is to support the development of a new adeno associated virus AAV gene therapy vector that expresses the RSK anchoring disruptor peptide The proposed research will provide proof of concept for a new therapeutic approach for the treatment and or prevention of heart failure based upon RSK displacement within the myocyte SPECIFIC AIM Treatment of Pressure Overload induced Heart Failure by Anchoring Disruptor Therapy Cardiac myocyte selective expression of a mAKAP RSK binding peptide RBD using AAV prevents transverse aortic constriction induced heart failure in vivo In this Aim we will test whether RSK anchoring disruptor therapy can induce reverse remodeling and treat heart failure in mice with established pathology due to pressure overload SPECIFIC AIM Prevention of Myocardial Infarction induced Heart Failure by Anchoring Disruptor Therapy In this Aim we will test whether AAV RBD can block remodeling following myocardial infarction without having deleterious effects on infarct size or scar formation Results obtained through this phase I STTR grant will provide insight into how broadly AAV RBD therapy may be applied in cardiovascular disease and inform the choice of subsequent large animal studies necessary to progress to a FDA Investigational New Drug Application PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE Heart failure is a syndrome of major public heath significance that is the cause of death for about in Americans accountable for nearly deaths each year Despite a range of existing therapies the mortality rate for patients with heart failur remains very high with about of patients dying within years of a diagnosis In this application we aim to develop a new therapy for heart failure based upon the selective targeting of RSK


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.4.4-2 | Award Amount: 3.85M | Year: 2012

Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare genetically heterogeneous disorder which results from dysfunction of motile hair-like organelles (cilia) that results in severe, chronic airways disease. Due to other cilia-related disease mechanisms several other organ systems like the heart can be affected. The complexity of the disease phenotype, late diagnosis, as well as lack of evidence based management guidelines contribute to a high burden of disease and cause high health care costs. Therefore, there is a great need for observational trials as well as well-designed randomised controlled trials to put evidence-based diagnostic and treatment approaches into effect. The main objective of our project is to improve diagnosis and treatment of PCD patients. To accomplish this, we propose to: 1) Establish widespread, early diagnosis by introduction of nasal Nitric Oxide measurement as screening tool, and by introduction of high-speed videomicroscopy as diagnostic tool; 2) Develop new outcome criteria, especially a PCD-specific quality of life questionnaire, as a prerequisite for controlled PCD trials; 3) Establish a PCD registry for both cross-sectional analysis of current disease status and longitudinal observational analysis of disease progression under different regimens; 4) Generate evidence-based treatment guidelines by conducting two prospective randomized trials on the inhalation of hypertonic saline and long term azithromycin therapy. To achieve these goals members of the European Respiratory Societys PCD task force will join forces with members of the NIH-funded US-PCD-network. In our multi-national project, we will for the first time establish evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis, clinical management and therapy. We expect that in a high proportion of children the diagnosis will be established before irreversible lung damage has occurred. In later diagnosed individuals the disease burden will be reduced and chronic respiratory failure retarded.


Patent
University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign, Northwestern University and University of Miami | Date: 2014-04-03

The present invention provides methods for purifying a layer of carbon nanotubes comprising providing a precursor layer of substantially aligned carbon nanotubes supported by a substrate, wherein the precursor layer comprises a mixture of first carbon nanotubes and second carbon nanotubes; selectively heating the first carbon nanotubes; and separating the first carbon nanotubes from the second carbon nanotubes, thereby generating a purified layer of carbon nanotubes. Devices benefiting from enhanced electrical properties enabled by the purified layer of carbon nanotubes are also described.


With an upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare, Alberto J. Fernandez, RN, BSN, joins the prestigious ranks of the International Nurses Association. Alberto J. Fernandez is a Registered Nurse with seven years of experience in his field and an extensive expertise in all facets of nursing, especially Neuro-Stepdown unit and Stroke Rehabilitation nursing. Alberto is currently serving patients within Baptist Health South Florida, a faith based, non profit healthcare organization and clinical care network in Southern Florida. Alberto attended the University of Phoenix, where he graduated with his Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing in 2014. An advocate for continuing education, he is currently pursuing his Master of Science Degree in Nursing with a Family Practice Nurse concentration at the University of Miami with a projected graduation in 2018. To keep up to date with the latest advances and developments in the challenging nursing field, Alberto maintains a professional membership with the American Nurses Association. Learn more about Alberto J. Fernandez here: http://inanurse.org/network/index.php?do=/4135265/info/ and be sure to read his upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Researchers from the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine and the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have shown that a neuroprotective compound tested in rats provides two-pronged protection for brain cells during stroke and improves physical and cognitive outcomes in the treated animals. Every year, nearly 800,000 Americans have a stroke and almost 130,000 die. Survivors often are left with long-term physical and cognitive disability that significantly alters their lives. When a stroke interrupts the brain's blood supply, mature brain cells (neurons) die. In addition, reestablishing blood flow, known as reperfusion, also leads to processes that cause cell death. A part of the brain's natural response to stroke injury is to increase production of new brain cells in two specific regions (the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles), which normally make a smaller number of new brain cells every day. Unfortunately, the vast majority of these newborn cells die within one to two weeks, limiting the benefit of this potential repair process. Minimizing the loss of brain cells is a primary goal for new stroke therapies. "If we could prevent the mature brain cells from dying that would be beneficial," says Andrew Pieper, MD, PhD, professor of psychiatry in the UI Carver College of Medicine and co-senior study author. "But if we could also support or enhance this surge in neurogenesis (birth of new neurons), we might be able to further foster recovery, especially in terms of cognitive function, which is critically dependent on the hippocampus." Using rats, Pieper and his colleagues Zachary B. Loris and W. Dalton Dietrich, PhD, tested the effects of a compound called P7C3-A20 on these two aspects of neuroprotection following ischemic stroke. Blood flow to the rats' brains was interrupted for 90 minutes and then the blockage was cleared allowing reperfusion. One group of rats was given the P7C3-A20 compound twice daily for seven days following the stroke. P7C3-A20 has previously been shown to prevent brain cell death in other animal models of neurologic injury, including Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stress-associated depression, and traumatic brain injury. In terms of the brain itself, the P7C3-A20 compound reduced loss of brain tissue (atrophy) and increased survival of newborn neurons six weeks after stroke. In addition to the improved survival of both mature and newborn neurons, rats that received the P7C3-A20 compound for seven days after stroke also had better physical and cognitive outcomes than untreated rats. Treated rats had improved balance and coordination one week after stroke, and improved learning and memory one month after stroke. The findings were published recently in the journal Experimental Neurology. "There is no previous demonstration of a pharmacologic agent that both protects mature neurons from dying and also boosts the net magnitude of neurogenesis," Pieper says. "Our compound is beneficial in this animal model of stroke, and we're hopeful that it might eventually benefit patients." "Currently there are limited treatments for acute stroke that make a real difference in patient's lives. There is an urgent need to identify, test, and translate new therapies to the clinic," adds Dietrich, co-senior study author and Scientific Director of The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, professor of neurological surgery, neurology, biomedical engineering and cell biology at the University of Miami where the studies were conducted. "The ability to both protect and repair the injured nervous system has major implications on how we think about improving outcomes in millions of people each year with acute neurological injuries." The neuronal protection provided by the P7C3-A20 compound was also associated with a boost in the levels of a substance called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) in the rats' brains. NAD is emerging as an important player in neuronal health and survival. Levels of this substance are depleted during stroke, and it has been proposed that increasing NAD levels may be a therapeutic target for treating stroke. In this study, P7C3-A20 treatment restored NAD to normal levels in the rats' cortex after a stroke. Importantly, the study examined the effects of P7C3-A20 on cognitive and physical outcomes well beyond the time of the initial stroke. The sustained physical and cognitive improvement seen in the rats up to one month after the stroke suggests that the P7C3-A20 compound provides a long-term benefit. "We found we can give the compound in this critical period immediately after the stroke and it has a lasting effect," notes Pieper, who also is a professor of neurology, radiation oncology, and a psychiatrist with the Iowa City Veterans Affairs Health Care System. In recent years, advances in treatments that break up or remove stroke-causing blood clots have reduced the death rate for stroke and are improving outcomes for patients. The researchers hope that a treatment based on P7C3-A20 used in addition to the clot-clearing therapies might further improve outcomes by protecting brain cells during the traumatic ischemia/reperfusion period. The research was supported by funding from the American Heart Association, The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, the Mary Alice Smith Fund for Neuropsychiatry Research, the Titan Neurologic Research fund, and the University of Iowa and the Department of Veterans Affairs.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

BOSTON, MA, February 21, 2017-- Bascom Palmer Eye Institute has installed the Ceeable Visual Field Analyzer (CVFA) digital health technology. Bascom Palmer Eye Institute is a world class teaching and research institution for ophthalmology. CVFA was designed to offer caregivers the ability to perform visual field testing of patients in non-traditional test locations such as, primary clinics, geriatric clinics, and adult care centers.The CVFA is a cloud-based digital platform for the detection and characterization of visual field distortions due to retinal disease, which includes patients with AMD and diabetic retinopathy. Moreover, CVFA allows monitoring progression of diseases affecting vision. The CVFA will deliver rapid, accurate and low-cost visual field testing to patient populations that may not have access to traditional vision testing services."We have selected the Ceeable system to deliver visual field testing technology to a large portion of the patient population who are unable to access care at traditional test locations," says Dr. Delia DeBuc, research associate professor of ophthalmology at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute. CVFA will be used in a clinical research study sponsored by the Finker Frenkel Legacy Foundation, Inc. The study is investigating retinal features that have been associated with cognitive decline and brain alternations in relation to aging and brain abnormalities in early Alzheimer's disease.CVFA has successfully tested thousands of patients in the United States and across the globe, delivering and enabling much-needed efficient and effective eye care services to a diverse patient population.Bascom Palmer Eye Institute is ranked the nation's best in ophthalmology by U.S. News & World Report, for 12 consecutive years. The Institute serves as the Department of Ophthalmology for the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, www.bascompalmer.org About CeeableCeeable, Inc. is a leader in digital mobile health for ophthalmology. The Ceeable Visual Field Analyzer (CVFA) is cloud-based digital platform used to detect and diagnose retinal disease. There are more than 300 million people worldwide that suffer from retinal disease. The Ceeable technology can reach more people worldwide than any currently available retinal diagnostic technology. Better patient management of eye disease will reduce healthcare costs and help prevent blindness, www.ceeable.com


News Article | February 20, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

We know you love your pet because he or she is cute, loyal, and entertaining, too. But scientific evidence suggests that you might want to show your pet some gratitude for your good health. Pet ownership can boost your health and your social life, says Erika Friedmann, Ph.D., associate dean of research at the University of Maryland School of Nursing, who has conducted several studies on pets and well-being. So today, on National Love Your Pet Day, here are three reasons to give Scruffy a little extra affection: Of all the research in the field, the strongest evidence suggests, unsurprisingly, that people with pets, especially dogs, tend to be more active than their pet-free counterparts. “Exercising more is probably one of the best things that people can do in general,” says Evan Paul Cherniak, M.D., the lead author of a 2014 review of the benefits of pet ownership in the elderly, and director of the Geriatric Evaluation and Management unit at the University of Miami. “And because dog owners have to walk their dog, they’re forced to get outside and exercise.” One study published in the Journal of Physical Activity and Health assessed the walking patterns of 41,514 adults living in California. They found that dog owners walked about 20 minutes more per week than people with cats, or those who had no pet. An additional 20 minutes per week may not seem like a lot, but even modest increases in physical activity can be beneficial, according to the study authors, and can help you hit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendation of at least 2.5 hours of moderate-intensity physical activity (which includes brisk walking) per week. According to the CDC, pet ownership is associated with decreases in blood pressure, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels—all factors that play a role in heart disease. Even after a heart attack, people with pets seem to do better. For example, in a study that followed 460 people aged 33 to 84 beginning six months after they had a heart attack, Friedmann and her colleagues from the University of Maryland School of Nursing found that pet owners were 67 percent less likely to die during the study period than those who did not have a pet. “We think it’s the social support that may explain the benefits,” says Friedmann. Pets help reduce feelings of loneliness and depression, the latter of which has been linked to an increased risk of heart disease. Pet ownership, and animal therapy dog visits in particular, might boost mental health by counteracting anxiety and depression, says Friedmann, especially among the elderly. One study published in 2013 in the the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry found that among 65 nursing home residents with moderate to severe dementia, those who participated in one 45-minute session of petting and grooming a therapy dog each week were less depressed and agitated over the two and a half months of the study than those who did not. “There’s quite a bit of evidence showing that when a pet is present, people may be less stressed, and feel safer and more comfortable in the environments they’re in,” says Friedmann. For example, she says, walking with your dog in your neighborhood might make you feel safer than if you were walking alone. And there have even been studies that show that other people are more likely to be friendly—smiling at you, or striking up a conversation for example—when you’re accompanied by an animal. Of course, not all pet owners will experience these benefits, say Friedmann and Cherniak, and pet ownership isn’t right for everyone. Caring for an animal can be expensive and require a lot of time, and pets could even pose a danger for the immune-compromised. But for people who have the time, means, and desire to own a pet, there’s lots to love. More from Consumer Reports: Top pick tires for 2016 Best used cars for $25,000 and less 7 best mattresses for couples Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. Copyright © 2006-2017 Consumers Union of U.S.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

One of the least-understood yet least-researched pediatric cancers — osteosarcoma — will be the focus of a first-ever conference, February 23–25 at The Biltmore Hotel in Miami, Florida. The event will bring patients, families, doctors and researchers together to explore ways to boost research and funding for this devastating disease. Osteosarcoma is a primary bone cancer that typically affects kids and teenagers aged 10 to 19. It requires aggressive treatment that can involve chemotherapy combinations plus limb-salvage surgery and/or amputation of the affected limb. No new treatments for this disease have been developed in 30+ years — a reality that profoundly frustrates osteosarcoma patients and their families in this era of comparative progress against some other forms of cancer. “With research for all pediatric cancers, including osteosarcoma, receiving less than four percent of the national research budget, Osteosarcoma is considered an “orphan cancer” with less than 200,000 cases per year,” says Ann Graham, President & Founder of MIB Agents. Organized by a team of volunteers with the 501(c)(3) national nonprofit osteosarcoma support organization MIB (Make It Better) Agents, this inaugural conference — dubbed FACTOR, which stands for Funding-Awareness-Collaboration-Trials-Osteosarcoma-Research — aims to help improve education, increase collaboration, raise awareness, increase the number of clinical trials, discover better therapies, advance research efforts, and much more. The MIB FACTOR 2017 Conference will feature 34 distinguished speakers, including doctors from leading cancer treatment and research centers around the U.S., such as: Cleveland Clinic, Taussig Cancer Institute Johns Hopkins, All Children's Hospital Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute Stanford University School of Medicine University of Kansas Medical Center University of Miami, Sylvester Cancer Center University of Minnesota, Masonic Cancer Center University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center University of Utah UT Southwestern Medical Center Speakers are volunteering their time and have been invited directly by their patients to attend and present. See the complete speaker list at http://www.mibagents.org/factor-speakers.html. Following the event, MIB Agents intends to help fund the most promising research presented at the conference, selected by a vote of the conference attendees. In addition to the research focus, conference-goers will have a wide array of sessions and activities to participate in, from coping skills therapy to relationship-building social, and recreational opportunities. The conference is being funded by family and friends of osteosarcoma patients and a handful of nonprofit organizations — honoring requests from three young adults who have since passed away from this disease asking that posthumous donations be made on their behalf to MIB Agents to make the conference happen. The conference organizing team was led by Theresa Beech and Ann Graham, two women whose lives have been personally affected by osteosarcoma. Beech is the mother of two children, Sarah (18) and Daniel. Daniel died from osteosarcoma in August 2016 at the age of 13. She developed a research database that is now the second largest in the U.S. and was an inspiration for this conference. Graham, founder of MIB Agents, was herself diagnosed with osteosarcoma at the age of 43, becoming the only adult to be treated on the pediatric floor at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. MIB Agents Background Ann Graham started MIB Agents when her fellow osteosarcoma patient, 10-year-old Alyssa, a dancer, discovered a recurrence. Alyssa’s leg was amputated and she began a clinical trial, which failed. Alyssa was sent home on hospice care and Ann wanted to make her final days special. She planned a NYC trip for Alyssa, which consisted of seeing the Rockettes, Mary Poppins on Broadway, visiting the American Girl Doll store, and watching the Nutcracker at Lincoln Center where she was allowed to dance on stage after the show. Alyssa passed away two weeks later, but Ann was inspired to improve the final days of other children like Alyssa. The missions continued and were self-funded, until becoming an official 501(c)(3) in February 2016. MIB Agents Mission MIB Agents offers love and support for kids with osteosarcoma in several ways by: pairing a child in active treatment with a child who survived (through letters of hope & support and gaming); providing items of comfort and entertainment (iTunes Cards, iPads, noise canceling headphones, etc.); arranging end-of-life experiences or comfort items (chairs to sleep in while sitting upright to a home viewing of Star Wars movies); and providing a platform for collaboration and research (such as the FACTOR Conference). Visit http://www.mibagents.org for more information and to get involved.


SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., Feb. 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Achaogen, Inc. (NASDAQ:AKAO), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company discovering and developing novel antibacterials addressing multi-drug resistant (MDR) gram-negative infections, today reported that it will host a Research & Development Day to highlight advances in the Company’s pipeline, in New York City on March 1, 2017 from 12:00pm to 2:30pm ET. The meeting will feature presentations by key opinion leaders Yoav Golan, MD, MS, FIDSA (Tufts Medical Center) and Thomas M. Hooton, MD (University of Miami School of Medicine), who will discuss the current treatment landscape for MDR gram-negative infections and novel treatments under development. Both experts will be available to answer questions. Achaogen will provide an overview of its lead product candidate, plazomicin, which is being developed to treat serious bacterial infections due to MDR Enterobacteriaceae, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). Management will also outline notable progress on the research and preclinical pipeline, including an overview of a new program that is planned to commence human clinical trials in 2017, and advances with their antibody discovery platform. Yoav Golan, MD, MS, FIDSA is currently an attending physician in the Division of Geographic Medicine and Infectious Diseases at Tufts Medical Center and Associate Professor of Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine. His fields of professional expertise include hospital-acquired infections, antibiotic resistance and its impact on patient outcomes and pharmacoeconomics. Over the past 10 years, Dr. Golan has been involved in the pre-clinical and clinical development of several antibiotics, including Cubicin, Dificid and Teflaro. Dr. Golan has a comprehensive understanding of clinical research methodologies and, as a clinician and researcher, he is familiar first-hand with current unmet medical needs. Thomas M. Hooton, MD is a Professor of Clinical Medicine at University of Miami School of Medicine, and Medical Director for Infection Control and Occupational Health at the University of Miami Health System. He has devoted his 30-year career to clinical care and research in infectious diseases. Considered one of the nation’s leading experts in the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of urinary tract infection (UTI), Dr. Hooton has chaired and served on several committees of the Infectious Diseases Society of America that publish guidelines on screening and treating asymptomatic bacteriuria, catheter-associated and uncomplicated urinary tract infection, and antimicrobial stewardship. Dr. Hooton received his medical degree from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas. This event is intended for institutional investors, sell-side analysts, investment bankers, and business development professionals only. Please RSVP in advance if you plan to attend, as space is limited. To reserve attendance, email or contact LifeSci Advisors, LLC at Mac@LifeSciAdvisors.com.  A live and archived webcast of the event, with slides, will be available at http://lifesci.rampard.com/20170301/reg.jsp and on the Investors section of the Company’s website at www.achaogen.com. About Achaogen Achaogen is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company passionately committed to the discovery, development, and commercialization of novel antibacterials to treat MDR gram-negative infections. Achaogen is developing plazomicin, Achaogen's lead product candidate, for the treatment of serious bacterial infections due to MDR Enterobacteriaceae, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Achaogen's plazomicin program is funded in part with a contract from the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority. Plazomicin is the first clinical candidate from Achaogen's gram-negative antibiotic discovery engine, and Achaogen has other programs in early and late preclinical stages focused on other MDR gram-negative infections. For more information, please visit www.achaogen.com.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The BMT Tandem Meetings of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) and the Center for International Blood & Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) will take place Feb. 22-26, 2017 at the Gaylord Palms Convention Center in Orlando, Fla. The combined scientific sessions offer investigators, clinicians, laboratory technicians, clinical research professionals, nurses, pharmacists, administrators, and allied health professionals the latest medical instruction in hematopoietic cell transplantation. Alongside the scientific education being offered will be posters and abstracts highlighting the best new research in the field, including: The ASBMT and CIBMTR will also honor a few of its members with awards and named lectures on Friday evening, Feb. 24, 2017 beginning at 5:00 PM. The ASBMT will induct Krishna Komanduri, MD of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine as its new president. The CIBMTR welcomes its new Chair, Robert J. Soiffer, MD, of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. For complete details about the meeting, please visit http://bit.ly/2017Tandem. For a full list of best abstracts, visit http://bit.ly/BestAbs17 or for late breaking abstracts, visit http://bit.ly/BreakingAbs17. The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) is a professional society of more than 2,200 individuals from over 45 countries. The Society is dedicated to advancing the science and clinical care for patients who require blood and marrow transplants for blood cancers and other deadly diseases. The CIBMTR® (Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research®) is a research collaboration between the National Marrow Donor Program® (NMDP)/Be The Match® and the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW). The CIBMTR collaborates with the global scientific community to advance hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and cellular therapy worldwide to increase survival and enrich quality of life for patients.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Polyglass U.S.A., Inc. announced today that it is a funding partner of the 2017 Dolphins Cancer Challenge (DCC), the Miami Dolphins’ signature health initiative. The $50,000 sponsorship represents part of Polyglass’ commitment to this charity, along with its team of employees who will raise funds and participate in the DCC event scheduled for February 11, 2017. “Everyone has been touched by cancer in some way and the Polyglass organization wants to help find a cure,” said Director of Strategic Marketing, Scott Lelling. “The money raised at the DCC has made a difference in the lives of many people affected by cancer and Polyglass is proud to be a funding partner of this worthy initiative for the second year.” Since founded by the Miami Dolphins organization in 2010, the DCC has raised $16.5 million to further cancer research at the University of Miami, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center. One hundred percent of the participant-raised funds has been used by Sylvester to make life-changing discoveries leading to more individualized treatments, better outcomes and more hope for cancer patients. The allocation of the donations include translational research, clinical trials, pediatric oncology treatment, breast cancer research, genitourinary cancer research and radiation oncology research. At the DCC event in February, Polyglass employees will join other bikers, runners and walkers in a race to beat cancer. All participants will end their race at the Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens, Fla. The event closes with a concert at the finish line. DCC has announced that multiplatinum musicians Counting Crows will headline the 2017 DCC Finish Line Celebration. The DCC has also incorporated the hashtag #CancerFighters as part of its campaign. About the Dolphins Cancer Challenge (DCC): The DCC is dedicated to improving people’s lives through the financial support of innovative cancer research at the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center. Launched in 2010 as the signature initiative of the Miami Dolphins Foundation, the DCC is a way all of us can be cancer fighters! 100% of participant-raised funds go to innovative cancer research at the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center. About Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center: Sylvester serves as the hub for cancer diagnosis and treatment for UHealth -University of Miami Health System. In 2003, Sylvester expanded its cancer services to patients in Broward and Palm Beach with the opening of Sylvester at Deerfield Beach. A third facility, Sylvester at Kendall, was opened in 2009 to serve patients in southern Miami-Dade county. About Polyglass: Polyglass U.S.A. Inc. is a leading manufacturer of modified bitumen roof membranes. Known for its self-adhered roofing systems based on the company’s patented ADESO® technology and its new patent-pending CURE Technology®, Polyglass also produces a full line of premium roof coatings and roof maintenance systems. Providing quality, innovation and service at its best, Polyglass adds value worldwide. For more information about the premium products and services offered by Polyglass, call 800.222.9782 or visit http://www.polyglass.us.


Focke P.J.,Oregon Health And Science University | Wang X.,University of Miami | Larsson H.P.,University of Miami
Structure | Year: 2013

At synapses, sodium-coupled transporters remove released neurotransmitters, thereby recycling them and maintaining a low extracellular concentration of the neurotransmitter. The molecular mechanism underlying sodium-coupled neurotransmitter uptake is not completely understood. Several structures of homologs of human neurotransmitter transporters have been solved with X-ray crystallography. These crystal structures have spurred a plethora of computational and experimental work to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying sodium-coupled transport. Here, we compare the structures of Glt Ph, a glutamate transporter homolog, and LeuT, a homolog of neurotransmitter transporters for the biogenic amines and inhibitory molecules GABA and glycine. We relate these structures to data obtained from experiments and computational simulations, to draw conclusions about the mechanism of uptake by sodium-coupled neurotransmitter transporters. Here, we propose how sodium and substrate binding is coupled and how binding of sodium and substrate opens and closes the gates in these transporters, thereby leading to an efficient coupled transport. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Lebwohl M.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine | Swanson N.,Oregon Health And Science University | Anderson L.L.,Dermatology Associates of Tyler | Melgaard A.,Data Management | And 2 more authors.
New England Journal of Medicine | Year: 2012

BACKGROUND: Actinic keratosis is a common precursor to sun-related squamous-cell carcinoma. Treating actinic keratoses and the surrounding skin area (i.e., field therapy) can eradicate clinical and subclinical actinic keratoses. Topical field therapy currently requires weeks or months of treatment. We investigated the efficacy and safety of a new topical field therapy for actinic keratosis, ingenol mebutate gel (0.015% for face and scalp and 0.05% for trunk and extremities). METHODS: In four multicenter, randomized, double-blind studies, we randomly assigned patients with actinic keratoses on the face or scalp or on the trunk or extremities to receive ingenol mebutate or placebo (vehicle), self-applied to a 25-cm 2 contiguous field once daily for 3 consecutive days for lesions on the face or scalp or for 2 consecutive days for the trunk or extremities. Complete clearance (primary outcome) was assessed at 57 days, and local reactions were quantitatively measured. RESULTS: In a pooled analysis of the two trials involving the face and scalp, the rate of complete clearance was higher with ingenol mebutate than with placebo (42.2% vs. 3.7%, P<0.001). Local reactions peaked at day 4, with a mean maximum composite score of 9.1 on the local-skin-response scale (which ranges from 0 to 4 for six types of reaction, yielding a composite score of 0 to 24, with higher numbers indicating more severe reactions), rapidly decreased by day 8, and continued to decrease, approaching baseline scores by day 29. In a pooled analysis of the two trials involving the trunk and extremities, the rate of complete clearance was also higher with ingenol mebutate than with placebo (34.1% vs. 4.7%, P<0.001). Local skin reactions peaked between days 3 and 8 and declined rapidly, approaching baseline by day 29, with a mean maximum score of 6.8. Adverse events were generally mild to moderate in intensity and resolved without sequelae. CONCLUSIONS: Ingenol mebutate gel applied topically for 2 to 3 days is effective for field treatment of actinic keratoses. (Funded by LEO Pharma; ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT00742391, NCT00916006, NCT00915551, and NCT00942604.) Copyright © 2012 Massachusetts Medical Society.


Singh R.K.,University of Miami | Lokeshwar B.L.,University of Miami | Lokeshwar B.L.,VA Hospital
Cancer Research | Year: 2011

The proinflammatory chemokine receptor CXCR7 that binds the ligands CXCL11 and CXCL12 (SDF-1a) is elevated in a variety of human cancers, but its functions are not understood as it does not elicit classical chemokine receptor signaling. Here we report that the procancerous cytokine IL-8 (interleukin-8) upregulates CXCR7 expression along with ligand-independent functions of CXCR7 that promote the growth and proliferation of human prostate cancer cells (CaP cells). In cell culture, ectopic expression or addition of IL-8 selectively increased expression of CXCR7 at the level of mRNA and protein production. Conversely, suppressing IL-8 signaling abolished the ability of IL-8 to upregulate CXCR7. RNAi-mediated knockdown of CXCR7 in CaP cells caused multiple antitumor effects, including decreased cell proliferation, cell-cycle arrest in G1 phase, and decreased expression of proteins involved in G1 to S phase progression. In contrast, addition of the CXCR7 ligand SDF-1a and CXCL11 to CaP cells did not affect cell proliferation. Over expression of CXCR7 in normal prostate cells increased their proliferation in a manner associated with increased levels of phospho-EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor; pY1110) and phospho-ERK1/2. Notably, coimmunoprecipitation studies established a physical association of CXCR7 with EGFR, linking CXCR7-mediated cell proliferation to EGFR activation. Consistent with these findings, CXCR7-depleted CaP tumors grew more slowly than control tumors, expressing decreased tumor-associated expression of VEGF, cyclin D1, and p-EGFR. Together, these results reveal a novel mechanism of ligand-independent growth promotion by CXCR7 and its coregulation by the proinflammatory factor IL-8 in prostate cancer. ©2011 AACR.


Bonasio R.,University of Pennsylvania | Shiekhattar R.,University of Miami
Annual Review of Genetics | Year: 2014

Over the past decade there has been a greater understanding of genomic complexity in eukaryotes ushered in by the immense technological advances in high-throughput sequencing of DNA and its corresponding RNA transcripts. This has resulted in the realization that beyond protein-coding genes, there are a large number of transcripts that do not encode for proteins and, therefore, may perform their function through RNA sequences and/or through secondary and tertiary structural determinants. This review is focused on the latest findings on a class of noncoding RNAs that are relatively large (>200 nucleotides), display nuclear localization, and use different strategies to regulate transcription. These are exciting times for discovering the biological scope and the mechanism of action for these RNA molecules, which have roles in dosage compensation, imprinting, enhancer function, and transcriptional regulation, with a great impact on development and disease. © 2014 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Mesri E.A.,University of Miami | Cesarman E.,New York Medical College | Boshoff C.,University College London
Nature Reviews Cancer | Year: 2010

Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the most common cancer in HIV-infected untreated individuals. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV; also known as human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8)) is the infectious cause of this neoplasm. In this Review we describe the epidemiology of KS and KSHV, and the insights into the remarkable mechanisms through which KSHV can induce KS that have been gained in the past 16 years. KSHV latent transcripts, such as latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), viral cyclin, viral FLIP and viral-encoded microRNAs, drive cell proliferation and prevent apoptosis, whereas KSHV lytic proteins, such as viral G protein-coupled receptor, K1 and virally encoded cytokines (viral interleukin-6 and viral chemokines) further contribute to the unique angioproliferative and inflammatory KS lesions through a mechanism called paracrine neoplasia. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Reiser J.,University of Miami | Adair B.,Harvard University | Reinheckel T.,Albert Ludwigs University of Freiburg
Journal of Clinical Investigation | Year: 2010

Cathepsins were originally identified as proteases that act in the lysosome. Recent work has uncovered nontraditional roles for cathepsins in the extracellular space as well as in the cytosol and nucleus. There is strong evidence that subspecialized and compartmentalized cathepsins participate in many physiologic and pathophysiologic cellular processes, in which they can act as both digestive and regulatory proteases. In this review, we discuss the transcriptional and translational control of cathepsin expression, the regulation of intracellular sorting of cathepsins, and the structural basis of cathepsin activation and inhibition. In particular, we highlight the emerging roles of various cathepsin forms in disease, particularly those of the cardiac and renal systems.


Patent
University of Miami and Hoffmann-La Roche | Date: 2011-02-04

This invention relates to the staging, diagnosis, and treatment of cancerous diseases, particularly to the use of monoclonal antibodies, antigen binding fragments thereof, and/or cancerous disease modifying antibodies (CDMAB), optionally in combination with one or more CDMAB, chemotherapeutic agents, and conjugates thereof, as a means for initiating a cytotoxic response to human head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. The invention further relates to binding assays, which utilize the monoclonal antibodies, antigen binding fragments thereof, and/or CDMAB of the instant invention. The cancerous disease modifying antibodies can be conjugated to toxins, enzymes, radioactive compounds, cytokines, interferons, target or reporter moieties and hematogenous cells. In particular aspects, the CDMAB used in the methods of the invention is an anti-CD44 antibody, which may be the antibody produced by the hybridoma deposited with the ATCC having accession number PTA-4621 and/or a chimeric or humanized version thereof.


Patent
University of Miami and University of Pennsylvania | Date: 2013-03-05

Methods and compositions are provided for diagnosing an abnormal early pregnancy in a mammalian subject by contacting a biological sample of the subject with a reagent that enables measurement of certain biomarker targets, e.g., human placental lactogen (hPL) and/or human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). In one embodiment, the mRNA of these biomarkers is measured in a biological sample, e.g., serum. The absolute levels of mRNA or protein levels, a ratio of mRNA to protein levels, or a pattern of multiple biomarker mRNA and/or protein levels or ratios are measured and a relation to the ratio or pattern of expression levels of the same biomarkers in the same biological fluid of a reference or control female mammalian subject having a normal intrauterine pregnancy (IUP) is determined. The presence of, absence of, or changes in expression levels, ratios or patterns of the biomarker(s) in relation to those of the reference or control correlates with a diagnosis of abnormal pregnancy, i.e., miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy. Various reagents for use in kits and panels for such diagnosis include PCR primer-probe sets or ligands, labeled or immobilized, which are capable of detecting the changes in expression or translation of these biomarker targets.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Diagnostic Center for Women has announced that Dr. Michael J. Plaza expands use of cryoablation treatment of fibroadenoma to include early stage breast cancer with the Visica® 2 Treatment System. Developed by Sanarus Technologies, the Visica 2 Treatment System is a cryoablation device that uses extreme cold (cryo) to destroy tissue (ablation). The device destroys the tumor by freezing and damaging the adjacent vasculature that fuels tumor growth. Dr. Michael J. Plaza is board-certified by the American Board of Radiology in Diagnostic Radiology. He completed his residency at University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital and breast imaging fellowship at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Dr. Plaza has become the first radiologist in Miami to provide cryoablation for early stage breast cancer with the Visica 2 Treatment System. Cryoablation—also referred to as tumor freezing—is a minimally invasive procedure done under ultrasound guidance in the doctor’s office or radiology suite. After injection of local anesthesia, a thin probe is inserted through the skin directly into the tumor. Liquid nitrogen is pumped into the probe to form an “ice ball” around the lesion. Freezing destroys the tumor cells, which are then reabsorbed by the body over time. The procedure can be done in less than an hour with most patients reporting minimal discomfort and a resumption of normal activity right away. Little, if any, visible scarring occurs. Because no breast tissue is removed during the procedure, the natural shape of the breast is maintained. Dr. Plaza began using cryoablation for fibroadenoma in February 2016, and expanded to treating early stage breast cancer in October 2016. “We saw great results in treating benign breast tumors, and with the growing evidence in the medical literature, especially the National Cancer Institute Z1072 Trial we decided to expand our practice to include cryoablation of early stage breast cancer,” said Dr. Plaza. In a 5-year multicenter study funded by the National Cancer Institute and sponsored by the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology, cryoablation with the Visica 2 Treatment System was shown to be 100% effective for complete ablation of invasive ductal breast cancer tumors <1.0 cm. The Visica 2 Treatment System was the exclusive device used in the Z1072 study and showed cryoablation to be effective in 92% of the targeted lesions. Results from this breast cancer study (ACOSOG Z1072), which included a 5-year follow-up, were published in the Annals of Surgical Oncology. “Cryoablation is an evolution in the treatment of early stage breast cancer. Unlike surgery, it is a minimally invasive procedure that preserves the shape of the breast and can be performed in the office under 30 minutes while the patient is awake” Dr. Plaza explains. “Patients can typically return to work the next day. I am excited to bring this modality to the patients in Miami.” Cryoablation with the Visica 2 Treatment System is a nonsurgical option for patients that have been diagnosed with early stage breast cancer, is visible on sonogram and has been confirmed with a biopsy. About Diagnostic Center for Women The Diagnostic Center For Women is a premier imaging facility focused on fostering female wellness. Established in 1999, they are committed to providing the most reliable and comprehensive testing available. Their facility is accredited in mammography, breast and body MRI and obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound by the following organizations: American College of Radiology (ACR), Mammography, Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC), Breast MRI, Body MRI, and American Institute of Ultrasound Medicine (AIUM), Obstetric and Gynecologic Ultrasound. “At the Diagnostic Center for Women, we understand your unique health needs.” Find out more at http://www.dxforwomen.com About Sanarus Technologies In 2001, the Visica® 2 Treatment System was the first available for cryoablation of fibroadenomas. Since then, our system has been used to successfully treat thousands of patients. The Visica 2 Treatment System is FDA-cleared for the ablation of cancerous or malignant tissue and benign tumors. At Sanarus, we develop innovative solutions for the nonsurgical treatment of breast tumors. We are headquartered in Pleasanton, CA, and all of our products are manufactured in the USA. Find out more at http://www.sanarus.com


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has ranked the best schools with online programs in the state of Florida for 2017. A total of 45 schools received honors for their online education offerings, with University of Florida, University of Miami, Florida State University, University of South Florida-Main Campus, Jacksonville University, Tallahassee Community College and Florida Keys Community College earning top spots overall. More than a dozen unique data points were evaluated to determine each school’s score. “The schools on our Best Online Schools list for Florida all meet high standards of excellence for students who want to succeed outside of a brick-and-mortar classroom,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. Colleges and universities on the Best Online Schools list must meet specific base requirements to be included. Qualifications include being institutionally accredited and holding public or private not-for-profit status. Each college was also scored based on additional criteria that includes the student/teacher ratio, graduation rate, employment services and financial aid availability. For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: Florida’s Best Online Schools for 2017 include the following: Adventist University of Health Sciences Ave Maria University Barry University Bethune-Cookman University Broward College City College-Fort Lauderdale Daytona State College Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University-Worldwide Everglades University Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University Florida Atlantic University Florida Gulf Coast University Florida Institute of Technology Florida International University Florida Keys Community College Florida SouthWestern State College Florida State College at Jacksonville Florida State University Hobe Sound Bible College Hodges University Indian River State College Jacksonville University Johnson & Wales University-North Miami Keiser University-Ft. Lauderdale Lynn University Nova Southeastern University Palm Beach Atlantic University Saint Leo University South Florida Bible College and Theological Seminary Southeastern University St. Petersburg College St. Thomas University State College of Florida-Manatee-Sarasota Stetson University Tallahassee Community College The Baptist College of Florida The University of West Florida Trinity College of Florida University of Central Florida University of Florida University of Miami University of North Florida University of South Florida-Main Campus Warner University Webber International University ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) is launching operations this month of one of the world's most powerful and energy-efficient supercomputers, providing the nation with a major new tool to advance understanding of the atmospheric and related Earth system sciences. Named "Cheyenne," the 5.34-petaflop system is capable of more than triple the amount of scientific computing performed by the previous NCAR supercomputer, Yellowstone. It also is three times more energy efficient. Scientists across the country will use Cheyenne to study phenomena ranging from wildfires and seismic activity to gusts that generate power at wind farms. Their findings will lay the groundwork for better protecting society from natural disasters, lead to more detailed projections of seasonal and longer-term weather and climate variability and change, and improve weather and water forecasts that are needed by economic sectors from agriculture and energy to transportation and tourism. "Cheyenne will help us advance the knowledge needed for saving lives, protecting property, and enabling U.S. businesses to better compete in the global marketplace," said Antonio J. Busalacchi, president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. "This system is turbocharging our science." UCAR manages NCAR on behalf of the National Science Foundation (NSF). Cheyenne currently ranks as the 20th fastest supercomputer in the world and the fastest in the Mountain West, although such rankings change as new and more powerful machines begin operations. It is funded by NSF as well as by the state of Wyoming through an appropriation to the University of Wyoming. Cheyenne is housed in the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center (NWSC), one of the nation's premier supercomputing facilities for research. Since the NWSC opened in 2012, more than 2,200 scientists from more than 300 universities and federal labs have used its resources. "Through our work at the NWSC, we have a better understanding of such important processes as surface and subsurface hydrology, physics of flow in reservoir rock, and weather modification and precipitation stimulation," said William Gern, vice president of research and economic development at the University of Wyoming. "Importantly, we are also introducing Wyoming’s school-age students to the significance and power of computing." The NWSC is located in Cheyenne, and the name of the new system was chosen to honor the support the center has received from the people of that city. The name also commemorates the upcoming 150th anniversary of the city, which was founded in 1867 and named for the American Indian Cheyenne Nation. Cheyenne was built by Silicon Graphics International, or SGI (now part of Hewlett Packard Enterprise Co.), with DataDirect Networks (DDN) providing centralized file system and data storage components. Cheyenne is capable of 5.34 quadrillion calculations per second (5.34 petaflops, or floating point operations per second). The new system has a peak computation rate of more than 3 billion calculations per second for every watt of energy consumed. That is three times more energy efficient than the Yellowstone supercomputer, which is also highly efficient. The data storage system for Cheyenne provides an initial capacity of 20 petabytes, expandable to 40 petabytes with the addition of extra drives.  The new DDN system also transfers data at the rate of 220 gigabytes per second, which is more than twice as fast as the previous file system’s rate of 90 gigabytes per second. Cheyenne is the latest in a long and successful history of supercomputers supported by the NSF and NCAR to advance the atmospheric and related sciences. “We’re excited to provide the research community with more supercomputing power,” said Anke Kamrath, interim director of NCAR’s Computational and Information Systems Laboratory, which oversees operations at the NWSC. “Scientists have access to increasingly large amounts of data about our planet. The enhanced capabilities of the NWSC will enable them to tackle problems that used to be out of reach and obtain results at far greater speeds than ever.” High-performance computers such as Cheyenne allow researchers to run increasingly detailed models that simulate complex events and predict how they might unfold in the future. With more supercomputing power, scientists can capture additional processes, run their models at a higher resolution, and conduct an ensemble of modeling runs that provide a fuller picture of the same time period. "Providing next-generation supercomputing is vital to better understanding the Earth system that affects us all, " said NCAR Director James W. Hurrell. "We're delighted that this powerful resource is now available to the nation's scientists, and we're looking forward to new discoveries in climate, weather, space weather, renewable energy, and other critical areas of research." Some of the initial projects on Cheyenne include: Long-range, seasonal to decadal forecasting: Several studies led by George Mason University, the University of Miami, and NCAR aim to improve prediction of weather patterns months to years in advance. Researchers will use Cheyenne's capabilities to generate more comprehensive simulations of finer-scale processes in the ocean, atmosphere, and sea ice. This research will help scientists refine computer models for improved long-term predictions, including how year-to-year changes in Arctic sea ice extent may affect the likelihood of extreme weather events thousands of miles away. Wind energy: Projecting electricity output at a wind farm is extraordinarily challenging as it involves predicting variable gusts and complex wind eddies at the height of turbines, which are hundreds of feet above the sensors used for weather forecasting. University of Wyoming researchers will use Cheyenne to simulate wind conditions on different scales, from across the continent down to the tiny space near a wind turbine blade, as well as the vibrations within an individual turbine itself. In addition, an NCAR-led project will create high-resolution, 3-D simulations of vertical and horizontal drafts to provide more information about winds over complex terrain. This type of research is critical as utilities seek to make wind farms as efficient as possible. Space weather: Scientists are working to better understand solar disturbances that buffet Earth's atmosphere and threaten the operation of satellites, communications, and power grids. New projects led by the University of Delaware and NCAR are using Cheyenne to gain more insight into how solar activity leads to damaging geomagnetic storms. The scientists plan to develop detailed simulations of the emergence of the magnetic field from the subsurface of the Sun into its atmosphere, as well as gain a three-dimensional view of plasma turbulence and magnetic reconnection in space that lead to plasma heating. Extreme weather: One of the leading questions about climate change is how it could affect the frequency and severity of major storms and other types of severe weather. An NCAR-led project will explore how climate interacts with the land surface and hydrology over the United States, and how extreme weather events can be expected to change in the future. It will use advanced modeling approaches at high resolution (down to just a few miles) in ways that can help scientists configure future climate models to better simulate extreme events. Climate engineering: To counter the effects of heat-trapping greenhouse gases, some experts have proposed artificially cooling the planet by injecting sulfates into the stratosphere, which would mimic the effects of a major volcanic eruption. But if society ever tried to engage in such climate engineering, or geoengineering, the results could alter the world's climate in unintended ways. An NCAR-led project is using Cheyenne's computing power to run an ensemble of climate engineering simulations to show how hypothetical sulfate injections could affect regional temperatures and precipitation. Smoke and global climate: A study led by the University of Wyoming will look into emissions from wildfires and how they affect stratocumulus clouds over the southeastern Atlantic Ocean. This research is needed for a better understanding of the global climate system, as stratocumulus clouds, which cover 23 percent of Earth's surface, play a key role in reflecting sunlight back into space. The work will help reveal the extent to which particles emitted during biomass burning influence cloud processes in ways that affect global temperatures.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Tompkins International is pleased to announce that Gene Tyndall, currently Executive Vice President, Chief Solutions and Business and Development Officer, is appointed President, MonarchFx, the Division of Tompkins International that provides eFulfillment services to sellers of products online. MonarchFx is a special alliance of logistics services providers, the leading supply chain technology, and transportation service providers, that provides sellers one-stop eFulfillment with reasonable pricing and high levels of service. Jim Tompkins, Chairman and CEO, MonarchFx, states, “We are excited to have Tyndall in this new role. His deep experience and knowledge will add value to the Alliance and to its customers.” Tyndall is a highly respected supply chain consultant, industry veteran, and thought leader. Prior to joining Tompkins International, he was President of Ryder Global Supply Chain Solutions, Global Leader and Senior Partner of the Ernst & Young Supply Chain Management Consulting Practice, and a United States Navy Officer. He has over 30 years experience with over a hundred multinational corporations and domestic companies, in strategy development, new process design, technology, and leading practices. Many of the best practices in place today across all industries are due to his thought leadership and leadership. Tyndall has co-authored several books and written numerous articles on supply chain management, as well as being quoted by business and public media. His book, Supercharging Supply Chains: New Ways to Increase Value Through Global Operational Excellence, is recognized as a leading guide for managers seeking to achieve higher levels of performance and thus stronger stakeholder value. Tyndall holds graduate degrees from The George Washington University and his bachelors from the University of Maryland. He is also a graduate of the Institute for Advanced International Management in Switzerland and has attended advanced management programs at Harvard University, Stanford University, and the University of Miami. He was elected to the Global Logistics Hall of Fame and has been honored as “Innovator of the Year” by Information Management. MonarchFx is honored to have Tyndall as its President.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

This story was updated Feb. 2 at 11:30 a.m. EST. A wild octopus surprised an Australian diver this week by suddenly, and quite dramatically, inflating itself with water, ballooning up like a parachute. Later, when the diver posted a video of the interaction online, she wondered whether the octopus was trying to intimidate her with its grandiose size. That's possible, marine biologists said, but they can't agree on what caused the curious behavior. One idea is that the octopus was hunting for food, said Kathleen Sullivan Sealey, an associate professor of biology at the University of Miami, who doesn't know the diver but watched the video online. [8 Crazy Facts About Octopuses] In the video post, the diver noted how the octopus "blew itself up like a parachute multiple times," turning its body and eight legs into a giant net as the animal traversed the rocky and sponge-filled ocean floor off the coast of Melbourne, Australia. It makes sense that the octopus was swimming across the ocean floor like a giant parachute, Sullivan Sealey said. Small prey was likely hiding among the rocks along the seafloor. The octopus was likely pushing water downward so it could flush out prey, catch the meal with its net-like body and eat it with its beak, she said. "It's shooting water out of its mantle [head]," Sullivan Sealey told Live Science. "It was using that water to chase little shrimp out from the rocks so that they would get caught in its legs and the webbing between its legs." This hunting behavior is fairly common among octopuses (also called octopodes or octopi), Sullivan Sealey said. "They eat a broad variety of things [for energy], because they have a big brain — they eat mollusks, snails, crabs and small fish," she said. "They require a lot of protein and food." However, another explanation for the animal's ballooning is more likely, said marine biologists at the Birch Aquarium at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego. The video shows how the octopus used camouflage to blend its color and body texture with its habitat, the Scripps team said. When the animal sees the diver, the octopus spreads out its arms twice, likely to make itself look larger, the scientists added. "This behavior is used to say, 'Look how big I am. You don't want to eat me,' to a predator," said Caitlin Scully, a spokesperson at the aquarium. "Then, the octopus went back to trying to hide and use camouflage, only to eventually swim away." The Scripps team added that the octopus is likely a common Sydney octopus (Octopus tetricus), but that it's difficult to say from just watching the video. The diver who recorded the video, PT Hirschfield, is a filmmaker and writer who lives in Victoria, Australia. Hirschfield said she has OCD — obsessive-compulsive diving — and dives because of the "serenity and tranquility" it offers her as she lives with terminal cancer, according to an interview posted by the Professional Association of Diving Instructors. Perhaps the octopus was both hunting for prey and intimidating her at the same time, she said. "At first, the octopus seemed as surprised to see me as I was to see it," Hirschfield wrote in an email to Live Science. "Then it just continued to hunt crustaceans while I followed it around for a while. But towards the end of 10 minutes it definitely seemed to 'want its own space' and made no apologies for hunting for crabs right next to my body in a way that I'll admit was a bit intimidating!"


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

SEATTLE--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Nativis Inc., a clinical stage life science bio-electronic company developing non-invasive, safe and highly effective treatments for cancers and other serious diseases, today announced that Dr. Una Ryan has been appointed to its board of directors effective immediately. Ryan is a biologist and seasoned healthcare executive with extensive experience serving on the boards of public, private and non-profit companies. She is currently a limited partner at Breakout Ventures, Managing Director of Golden Seeds, an investment firm empowering women entrepreneurs, and a partner in Astia Angel, investing in women-led ventures. Ryan currently serves on the boards of AMRI, a global contract research and manufacturing company and RenovoRx, a medical device company. She was previously the President and CEO at Diagnostics for All, Inc., a developer of inexpensive diagnostic tools for global health and agriculture; Waltham Technologies, a cleantech start-up; and AVANT Immunotherapeutics Inc. (now Celldex), a company developing vaccines for cancer and global health. Throughout her career, Ryan has successfully translated science into successful businesses, driving growth and overseeing multiple M&A’s in order to create robust and diverse organizations. Ryan spent more than 20 years as a Professor of Medicine at the University of Miami, Washington University, St. Louis and Boston University where she conducted research on vascular biology. She holds a Ph.D. in Cellular and Molecular Biology from Cambridge University and BS degrees in Zoology, Microbiology and Chemistry from Bristol University. She received an Honorary Doctor of Science degree from Bristol University in 2009. “We are thrilled to be able to continue to diversify our board of directors and welcome Una, a distinguished entrepreneur, biologist and healthcare executive,” said Nativis CEO Chris Rivera. “Una brings a broad range of experience in the life science and investment arenas to the board, and her insight will be of great value to Nativis as we continue to develop and seek long term partners for of our novel ulRFE technology. Una’s background in global health and developing medical technologies adds significantly to the diversity of our other Directors’ extensive industry experience, which includes, for example; cyber-security, disruptive technologies, financial management, venture capital and bio-pharmaceutical development.” Ryan added, “I am excited to join the Nativis team, and look forward to helping guide the company through the development of its unique technology platform. Nativis’ ulRFE technology represents an unprecedented opportunity to advance a new wave of treatment for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme and other health care indications, and I believe that with the right resources and strategies, the company can position itself for future success.” Founded in 2002 and headquartered in Seattle, WA, Nativis is a clinical-stage bio-electronics company. Nativis has invented and patented a groundbreaking technology that utilizes precisely targeted, ultra-low radio frequency energy (ulRFE™) to specifically regulate metabolic pathways on the molecular and genetic levels – without chemicals, radiation or drugs – delivered via a simple-to-use non-invasive device called Nativis Voyager®. The company’s goal is to transform disease treatment on a global scale with ulRFE that can potentially be applied to a wide range of conditions and other health-related needs (including agriculture, bio-fuels and veterinary medicine, to name a few). Nativis’ initial focus is on the treatment of patients with brain cancer (initially, recurrent glioblastoma), who are not well served by conventional standard of care therapies, which often result in poor outcomes and devastating side effects. Additional pre-clinical work is being completed for melanoma, lung cancer, liver cancer, inflammatory disease and chronic pain.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

MIAMI--Last year's devastating category-5 hurricane--Matthew--may be one of many past examples of a tropical storm fueled by massive rings of warm water that exist in the upper reaches of the Caribbean Sea. In a study conducted in the region two years prior to when Matthew's trekked across the Caribbean Sea, the research team in the Upper Ocean Dynamics Laboratory at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science deployed 55 aircraft ocean instruments from the National Oceanographic Atmospheric Administration's WP-3D aircraft. The purpose of the scientific mission was to measure ocean temperature, salinity, and currents to understand the structure of these warm-water eddies. The science team obtained vital information about the physical characteristics within one large warm-water eddy, which likely originated from the North Brazil Current, and analyzed its potential influence on sub-surface ocean conditions during the passage of tropical cyclones. When analyzing the data, they found a barrier layer, an upper ocean feature created by the Amazon-Orinoco freshwater river outflow, that makes mixing in the upper ocean waters less efficient during wind events. This feature, and the fact that warm ocean eddies are known to assist in the intensification of hurricanes due to deep warm thermal layers, lead the researchers to theorize that the barrier layer within a warm ocean eddy may result in an even more favorable upper ocean environment for hurricane intensification. "Our study is important because tropical cyclone intensity forecasts for several past hurricanes over the Caribbean Sea have under-predicted rapid intensification events over warm oceanic features," said Johna Rudzin, a PhD student at the UM Rosenstiel School and lead author of the study. Tropical storms receive energy from their surrounding ocean waters. As a storm moves across the water, it may interact with rings of warm water known as eddies. As the storm moves forward over these eddies, the warm ocean waters below help fuel the storm's intensity through enhanced and sustained heat and moisture fluxes. Similar warm ocean eddies exist in the Gulf of Mexico, a result of their separation from the warm-water Loop Current, are also of interest to the research team involved in this study. Last year, Hurricane Matthew rapidly intensified from a tropical storm to hurricane status as it moved over the Caribbean Sea in the location where a warm ocean eddy exists, and in close proximity to where these measurements were taken for this study two years prior. Matthew continued to intensify to a category-5 storm and into one of the strongest in Atlantic basin history, which made landfall and devastated portions of Haiti, Cuba, and the eastern United States. According to the researchers, to better understand if Matthew's intensification was aided by the warm-water eddies and the residing barrier layer in the Caribbean Sea's upper ocean, more ambient and in-storm upper ocean observations in this basin are needed to improve forecast models for the region. The study, titled "Upper Ocean Observations in Eastern Caribbean Sea Reveal Barrier Layer within a Warm Core Eddy," as published Feb. 10 in Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, DOI: 10.1002/2016JC012339. The study's authors include: Johna E. Rudzin, Lynn "Nick" Shay, Benjamin Jaimes, and Jodi K. Brewster of the UM Rosenstiel School. Support was provided by National Aeronautical Space Agency (NASA) through grant # NNX15AG43G. The University of Miami is one of the largest private research institutions in the southeastern United States. The University's mission is to provide quality education, attract and retain outstanding students, support the faculty and their research, and build an endowment for University initiatives. Founded in the 1940's, the Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science has grown into one of the world's premier marine and atmospheric research institutions. Offering dynamic interdisciplinary academics, the Rosenstiel School is dedicated to helping communities to better understand the planet, participating in the establishment of environmental policies, and aiding in the improvement of society and quality of life. For more information, visit: http://www. and Twitter:UMiamiRSMAS


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Golden Gate BPO Solutions, a global provider of customer management and business process outsourcing solutions, has announced that Stephen Ferber, CEO and Managing Partner, has been appointed to the University of Maryland Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship’s Board of Advisors. The Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business is one of the country’s most distinguished learning organizations where the education and methods of entrepreneurship are dynamically practiced and instilled. The development and execution of their programs foster thought leadership, experiential learning and innovative entrepreneurial approaches and practices to the startup community, leveraged by their network of leaders and the Smith School. Every initiative is created to support the Dingman Center’s mission of preparing the next generation to launch and support ventures that advance industry and society; to connect the University of Maryland to the innovation economy; and to leverage thought leadership and the Dingman network to make entrepreneurs of all kinds more successful. “I am very grateful to be appointed to the Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship Board of Advisors for many reasons, starting with the fact that my own passion for business and entrepreneurship was ignited during my time as an undergraduate at the University of Maryland’s Smith School of Business,” stated Stephen Ferber. “The Dingman Center has evolved into one of the top entrepreneurship centers in the country by bringing its unique educational curriculum to the Smith School of Business and providing University of Maryland student entrepreneurs with the business, legal and financial support necessary to successfully launch their ventures and connect them with the innovation economy. I look forward to giving back to the school that had a life-changing impact on me and my career. As an active participant on the board of advisors, my main charge will be to help our wonderful institution, professional staff and students reach all of their goals.” “The Dingman Center Board of Advisors includes prominent alumni and regional entrepreneurs, executives and leaders who enhance our Center through advice and action,” adds Elana Fine, the Executive Director of the Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship. “We’re honored that Stephen has joined this important group and know that he’ll be a passionate advocate and ambassador for our young entrepreneurs.” Stephen is the CEO and Founder of Golden Gate BPO Solutions (Golden Gate BPO), a global provider of business process outsourcing solutions. Founded in 2006, Golden Gate BPO’s business model and method of service delivery have proven to be innovative in the outsourcing industry, and the company was recently recognized by Inc. Magazine as one of America’s Fastest-Growing Private Companies. In addition to his role as CEO of Golden Gate BPO, Stephen practices corporate, business and employment law as a sole practitioner and serves as a Senior Advisor to Cross Keys Capital, a middle-market investment banking firm. Prior to founding Golden Gate BPO, Mr. Ferber served as Executive Vice President and General Counsel for one of the fastest growing providers of outsourced customer care and IT services, playing a key role in the company’s evolution from a privately-held small business to a publicly-traded middle market entity, followed by a sale and integration with a Fortune 500 company. Before that, Stephen was a senior associate in the Financial Advisory Services Group of PricewaterhouseCoopers, specializing in bankruptcy and reorganizations, mergers/acquisitions, business valuations and capital sourcing. Mr. Ferber sits on the board of directors of the Professional Association for Customer Engagement (“PACE”) and Mount Sinai Hospital’s Young Presidents Club. In addition, he is a member of the American Bar Association, Florida Bar Association, AICPA, Society of Consumer Affairs Professionals, University of Maryland Alumni Association, University of Miami School of Law Alumni Association and M-Club at the University of Maryland. Stephen earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Accounting from the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business in 1990. He received a Juris Doctorate from the University of Miami School of Law in 1993, specializing in corporate, international and tax law. In addition to holding the currently inactive designation of Certified Public Accountant (CPA), Stephen is licensed to practice law in the State of Florida. For more information on Mr. Ferber and Golden Gate BPO Solutions, visit http://www.goldengatebpo.com. About the Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship One of the oldest entrepreneur centers in the country, the Dingman Center has established itself as a national catalyst for entrepreneurship. It is one of the nation’s pre-eminent institutions where the research, education and practice of entrepreneurship are pursued vigorously. The Dingman Center develops and executes curricular and non-curricular programs that uniquely leverage Smith School thought leadership, experiential learning and their network of practitioners to provide maximum resources to the startup community. For more information on the Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship, visit http://www.rhsmith.umd.edu/centers-excellence/dingman-center-entrepreneurship.


CORAL GABLES, Fla., Feb. 17, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The University of Miami School of Business Administration today announced a $500,000 gift from longtime New York Yankees All-Star Alex Rodriguez. The gift will establish the Graduate Entrepreneurship and Innovation Endowed Fund...

Loading University of Miami collaborators
Loading University of Miami collaborators