Coral Gables, FL, United States
Coral Gables, FL, United States

The University of Miami is a private, nonsectarian university located in Coral Gables, Florida, United States. As of 2012, the university currently enrolls 15,613 students in 12 separate colleges, including a medical school located in Miami's Civic Center neighborhood, a law school on the main campus, and a school focused on the study of oceanography and atmospheric science on Virginia Key. These colleges offer approximately 115 undergraduate, 114 master's, 51 doctoral, and two professional areas of study. Over the years, the University's students have represented all 50 states and close to 150 foreign countries. With more than 13,000 full and part-time faculty and staff, UM is the sixth largest employer in Miami-Dade County.Research is a component of each academic division, with UM attracting $346.6 million per year in sponsored research grants. UM offers a large library system with over 3.1 million volumes and exceptional holdings in Cuban heritage and music. UM also offers a wide range of student activities, including fraternities and sororities, a student newspaper and radio station. UM's intercollegiate athletic teams, collectively known as the Miami Hurricanes, compete in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, and its football team has won five national championships since 1983. Wikipedia.


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Patent
University of Miami | Date: 2016-09-02

A dual, imaging and radiation system provides for finely aligned movement of a subject through the use of a computer controlled mounting stage having separate, non-gantry translational and rotational controllable movement. The system cycles a subject tissue between a treatment position where radiation doses are applied and an imaging position where high-quality computed tomography (CT) imaging is performed. Selective dose profiles and dose depths are achievable around an isocenter of the system.


Red blood cell membrane derived microparticles (RMP) are safe, economical, effective hemostatic agents in the treatment of a wide range of bleeding conditions and can, therefore, be considered as universal hemostatic agents. Effective RMP are produced from red blood cells using a high-pressure extrusion membrane shear process. The RMP can be lyophilized after production and retain activity even when stored at room temperature. RMP can be administered to original donors (autologous treatment), thus avoiding transfusion complications, or can be administered to blood type compatible recipients. RMP produced from type O, Rh negative red cells can be given to any person regardless of blood type. RMP can be administered to reduce excessive bleeding resulting from trauma, surgeries, invasive procedures and various bleeding disorders such as platelet disorders, either congenital or acquired, and coagulation disorders, either congenital or acquired. Administration of RMP prepared according to the invention demonstrates effectiveness in safely reducing bleeding.


Patent
The Regents Of The University Of California and University of Miami | Date: 2015-03-05

Described here is a test strip for detection of melamine, comprising: a support configured for capillary flow of a fluid sample from a first end of the support to a second end of the support that is downstream from the first end; a conjugation pad disposed adjacent to the first end of the support and including nanoparticles configured for suspension in the sample flowing past the conjugation pad, the nanoparticles configured to produce a colorimetric effect when exposed to melamine; and a test portion downstream of the conjugation pad and including a molecular recognition agent immobilized on the support and having an affinity for melamine.


A slotted microfilter is coated with a phase changeable material having a hydrophobic state under a first temperature and a hydrophilic state under a second temperature. An example coating material is poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PIPAAm). The microfilter can be controlled to switch between a capture state where circulating tumor cells are captured by the microfilter and a release state, where viable tumor cells are released from capture for analysis, e.g., single cell phenotypic and genomic analysis, or for ex vivo culture growth.


Rossi G.A.,Instituto G Gaslini | Colin A.A.,University of Miami
European Respiratory Journal | Year: 2015

There is evidence that respiratory viruses play a key role in the development and exacerbation of obstructive respiratory diseases in children. This review attempts to juxtapose the separate profiles and prototypes of pathogenenetic mechanisms represented by the two most common amongst such viruses: respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human rhinovirus (HRV). RSV represents the most common agent of severe airway disease in infants and young children, and is predominant in winter months. Large epidemiological studies have revealed an unequivocal relationship between RSV infection and subsequent wheezing into childhood, thought to be related to long-term changes in neuroimmune control of the airways rather than allergic sensitisation. HRV is a highly diverse group of viruses that affect subjects of all ages, is ubiquitous and occurs yearround. In contrast to RSV, infections with HRV cause minimal cytotoxicity but induce a rapid production of cytokines and chemokines with amplification of the inflammatory response. The susceptibility to HRV-induced bronchiolitis and subsequent wheezing appears to be linked to individual predisposition since it is often associated with a family or personal history of asthma/atopy. Thus, RSV probably serves as an "inducer" rather than a "trigger" . Conversely, HRVs seem to serve as a "trigger" rather than an "inducer" in predisposed individuals. Copyright ©ERS 2015.


The large and systematic negative shifts in the δ13C values (>12%) of carbonate-dominated rocks that preceded Neoproterozoic glacial successions have been interpreted to record a dramatic series of global environmental and evolutionary events. These values are widely considered to be marine rather than diagenetic in origin because stratigraphic patterns of change are systematic and reproducible from basin to basin, distinct in magnitude, and associated with recognizable stratigraphic markers such as glacial deposits. In contrast, diagenetic systems are commonly considered to have a more local and stochastic influence on δ13C values. Cores taken in Quaternary carbonate platform sediments, however, reveal a curious similarity in magnitude, thickness, and core to core reproducibility where diagenetic alteration has occurred in response to sea-level fall. Sealevel changes produced similar δ13C and δ18O stratigraphic records at globally disparate locations, which are unrelated to the global marine δ13C signal and bear no relation to the global carbon cycle. By analogy with the Pliocene-Pleistocene, we propose that spatial reproducibility of δ13C in some Neoproterozoic successions might be attributed to causes other than secular variation of the global carbon cycle, including diagenesis. This observation does not negate the stratigraphic utility of the carbon isotopic values, only the origin of the signal. © 2012 Geological Society of America.


Zijdewind I.,University of Groningen | Thomas C.K.,University of Miami
Journal of Physiology | Year: 2012

Involuntary motor unit activity at low rates is common in hand muscles paralysed by spinal cord injury. Our aim was to describe these patterns of motor unit behaviour in relation to motoneurone and motor unit properties. Intramuscular electromyographic activity (EMG), surface EMG and force were recorded for 30 min from thenar muscles of nine men with chronic cervical SCI. Motor units fired for sustained periods (>10 min) at regular (coefficient of variation ≤ 0.15, CV, n= 19 units) or irregular intervals (CV > 0.15, n= 14). Regularly firing units started and stopped firing independently suggesting that intrinsic motoneurone properties were important for recruitment and derecruitment. Recruitment (3.6 Hz, SD 1.2), maximal (10.2 Hz, SD 2.3, range: 7.5-15.4 Hz) and derecruitment frequencies were low (3.3 Hz, SD 1.6), as were firing rate increases after recruitment (~20 intervals in 3 s). Once active, firing often covaried, promoting the idea that units received common inputs. Half of the regularly firing units showed a very slow decline (>40 s) in discharge before derecruitment and had interspike intervals longer than their estimated afterhyperpolarisation potential (AHP) duration (estimated by death rate and breakpoint analyses). The other units were derecruited more abruptly and had shorter estimated AHP durations. Overall, regularly firing units had longer estimated AHP durations and were weaker than irregularly firing units, suggesting they were lower threshold units. Sustained firing of units at regular rates may reflect activation of persistent inward currents, visible here in the absence of voluntary drive, whereas irregularly firing units may only respond to synaptic noise. © 2012 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2012 The Physiological Society.


Patent
University of Miami | Date: 2010-06-23

There is provided a method of treating human hepatomas utilizing bombesin antagonist pseudopeptides of Formula I: X-A^(1)-A^(2)-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Leu--A^(9) -Q(SEQ ID NO: 32)wherein X is hydrogen, Hca, Hna, Hpp, Mpp or Naa,A^(1) is a D-, L- or DL-amino acid residue selected from the group consisting of Phe, p-HI-Phe, pGlu, Nal, Pal, Tpi, unsubstituted Trp or Trp substituted in the benzene ring by one or more members selected from the group consisting of F, Cl, Br, NH_(2) or C_(1-3) alkyl; or a peptide bond linking the acyl moiety of X (where present) to the alpha amino moiety of A^(2),A^(2) is Gin, Glu [-], Glu (Y), or His, wherein[-] is a single bond, linking the gamma carboxyl moiety or the 3-propionyl moiety of A^(2) with the alpha amino moiety of A^(1),Y isa) -OR^(5) wherein R^(5) is hydrogen, C_(3) alkyl or phenyl; orb) R_(6)^(6) is hydrogen or C_(1-3) alkyl; R^(7) is hydrogen, C_(1-3) alkyl or-NHCONH_(2). Leu-- is a reduced form of Leu wherein the C = O moiety of Leu is instead -CH_(2)- such that the bond of this -CH_(2)- moiety with the alpha amino moiety of the adjacent A^(9) residue is a pseudopeptide bond. Suitably A^(9) is Tac, MTac, or DMTac,Q is NH_(2) or -OQ where Q is hydrogen, C_(1-10) alkyl, phenyl or phenyl-C_(1-10) -alkyl; and the pharmaceutically acceptable acids or salts thereof.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.8.0 | Award Amount: 2.85M | Year: 2010

Scientists develop computer models of real, complex systems to increase understanding of their behaviour and make predictions. A prime example is the Earths climate. Complex climate models are used to compute the climate change in response to expected changes in the composition of the atmosphere due to man-made emissions. Years of research have improved the ability to simulate the climate of the recent past but these models are still far from perfect. The model projections of the globally averaged temperature increase by the end of this century differ by as much as a factor of two, and differ completely in regard to projections for specific regions of the globe.\n\nCurrent practice commonly averages the predictions of the separate models. Our proposed approach is instead to form a consensus by combining the models into one super model. The super model has learned from past observations how to optimally exchange information among individual models at every moment in time. Results in nonlinear dynamics suggest that the models can be made to synchronize with each other even if only a small amount of information is exchanged, forming a consensus that best represents reality. This innovative approach to reduce uncertainty might be compared to a group of scientists resolving their differences through dialogue, rather than simply voting or averaging their opinions.\n\nExperts from non-linear dynamics, machine-learning and climate science are brought together within SUMO to produce a climate change simulation with a super model combining state-of-the-art climate models. The super-modelling concept has the potential to provide improved estimates of global and regional climate change, so as to motivate and inform policy decisions. The approach is applicable in other situations where a small number of alternative models exist of the same real-world complex system, as in economy, ecology or biology.


Patent
University of Miami, U.S. Department Of Veterans Affairs, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Date: 2011-09-16

Agonists of growth hormone releasing hormone promote islet graft growth and proliferation in patients. Methods of treating patients comprise the use of these agonists.


Patent
University of Miami and NOGRA PHARMA Ltd | Date: 2013-04-18

Disclosed herein are methods for treating/and or preventing diabetes using a specific inhibitor of SMAD7 expression or function. Also disclosed are methods of promoting organ and/or cell, e.g., pancreatic islet cell, survival after transplantation using a specific inhibitor of SMAD7 expression or function.


FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla., Feb. 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Paymeon, Inc. (OTC MARKETS:PAYM) today announced that its Basalt America subsidiary has supplied its RockMesh® concrete reinforcement product for delivery on its first government contract.  The end customer, the City of Miami, will use the product in a new skateboard park currently under construction.  Vincent L. Celentano, a Director and the Company’s largest shareholder said "Though it is a small project, relative to our goals of reinforcing all bridges, roads and commercial buildings in the future, I compare it to Neil Armstrong's famous words, ‘One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.’  I see this as a catalyst and our gateway to other projects we are currently seeking out." The first bridge to incorporate the Company’s suite of products is on the campus of the University of Miami.  See the University of Miami’s Innovation Bridge video here.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xy3ISYNJfOI Disclaimers Forward-Looking Statements:  Except for statements of historical fact, this news release contains certain "forward-looking statements" as defined by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, including, without limitation expectations, beliefs, plans and objectives regarding the development, use and marketability of products and partnerships, as well as potential transactions the Company may be considering or may have closed. Such forward-looking statements are based on present circumstances and on PAYM's predictions with respect to events that have not occurred, that may not occur, or that may occur with different consequences and timing than those now assumed or anticipated. Such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, and are not guarantees of future performance or results and involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual events or results to differ materially from the events or results expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Such factors include general economic and business conditions, the ability to successfully develop and market products, consumer and business consumption habits, the ability to fund operations, reliance on representations from third parties that may not execute as planned, development of new markets, and other factors over which PAYM has little or no control. Such forward-looking statements are made only as of the date of this release, and PAYM assumes no obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect subsequent events or circumstances. Readers should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Risks, uncertainties and other factors are discussed in documents filed from time to time by PAYM with the Securities and Exchange Commission. This press release does not and shall not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of any offer to buy any securities.  For additional information and potential risk factors, readers should review PAYM’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, which can be found at www.sec.gov.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

MIAMI--A new study on how ocean currents transport floating marine debris is helping to explain how garbage patches form in the world's oceans. Researchers from the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and colleagues developed a mathematical model that simulates the motion of small spherical objects floating at the ocean surface. The researchers feed the model data on currents and winds to simulate the movement of marine debris. The model's results were then compared with data from satellite-tracked surface buoys from the NOAA Global Drifter Program's database. Data from both anchored buoys and those that become unanchored, or undrogued, over time were used to see how each accumulated in the five ocean gyres over a roughly 20-year timeframe. "We found that undrogued drifters accumulate in the centers of the gyres precisely where plastic debris accumulate to form the great garbage patches," said Francisco Beron-Vera, a research associate professor in the UM Rosenstiel School's Department of Atmospheric Sciences and lead author of the study. "While anchored drifters, which are designed to closely follow water motion, take a much longer time to accumulate in the center of the gyres." The study, which takes into account the combined effects of water and wind-induced drag on these objects, found that the accumulation of marine debris in the subtropical gyres is too fast to be due solely to the effect of trade winds that converge in these regions. "We show that the size and weight of the drifters must be taken into account to fully explain the accumulation," said Maria Josefina Olascoaga, an associate professor in the UM Rosenstiel School's Department of Ocean Sciences and a co-author of the study. The model could be used to track shipwrecks, airplane debris, sea ice and pollution among the many practical applications according to the researchers. The study, titled "Inertia-induced accumulation of flotsam in the subtropical gyres," was published in Geophysical Research Letters. The study's authors are: Francisco Beron-Vera, Maria Josefina Olascoaga, and Rick Lumpkin from the NOAA Atlantic Oceanic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML). The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative, NOAA/AOML, and the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS), a joint enterprise between NOAA/AOML and the University of Miami Rosenstiel School, supported the work. The University of Miami is one of the largest private research institutions in the southeastern United States. The University's mission is to provide quality education, attract and retain outstanding students, support the faculty and their research, and build an endowment for University initiatives. Founded in the 1940's, the Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science has grown into one of the world's premier marine and atmospheric research institutions. Offering dynamic interdisciplinary academics, the Rosenstiel School is dedicated to helping communities to better understand the planet, participating in the establishment of environmental policies, and aiding in the improvement of society and quality of life. For more information, visit: http://www. . Twitter:UMiamiRSMAS


Company to Begin Selling its Innovative Infrastructure Products Utilizing “Green” Substitute for Steel under the name Basalt America FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla., Feb. 21, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Paymeon, Inc. (OTC MARKETS:PAYM) today announced it has completed its acquisition of Rockstar Acquisitions, LLC.  Going forward, Rockstar Acquisitions will conduct business under the name “Basalt America.” Basalt America holds an exclusive license to produce, market and sell basalt fiber reinforced polymer products aimed at the $1 trillion steel component of the construction industry.  Basalt America leverages its licensed intellectual property, technology and processes to produce Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer products that are superior to anything in the market today and that are used as replacements for steel products that reinforce concrete such as rebar.  Basalt America’s licensed products, which include RockRebar®, RockStirrups®, RockStaples™ and RockMesh® are two to three times stronger and 75% lighter than steel.  Unlike steel, Basalt America’s products never rust, create virtually no carbon footprint and have lifespans of more than a century.  These characteristics will redefine the standards that the construction industry adheres to.  Basalt America’s materials are more fully described at www.basaltamerica.com. Paymeon will issue restricted common shares valued at approximately $35.5 million in exchange for 100% of the membership interests of Basalt America.  Basalt America will immediately begin operations as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Paymeon, Inc.  Paymeon expects that sales will commence towards the end of the first quarter, 2017. According to Ed Cespedes, CEO of Paymeon, “We believe these products represent a paradigm shift in how the construction industry will look at concrete reinforcement going forward.  We believe that demand for these products will be driven by a number of factors, including new regulatory requirements to consider the lifespan of projects, as well as substantial increases in infrastructure spending expected in the near future.  We expect demand for our products to come from a broad range of customers ranging from small retail contractors, to very large government entities.” Prior to its acquisition by Paymeon, Basalt America was privately funded with more than $1.3 million from accredited investors, including affiliates of our Chairman and CEO, Ed Cespedes and our Director and largest shareholder, Vincent L. Celentano.  Proceeds were used primarily to secure a license for exclusive manufacture and distribution of RockRebar®, RockStirrups®, RockStaples™ and RockMesh® in the United States, excluding California and Hawaii, for 18 months, and rights of first refusal for other parts of the world.  Upon expiration, Basalt America will continue to have rights of first refusal for any undeveloped territories within the United States, and around the world. Basalt America’s products are the first of their kind to be used in conjunction with the construction of projects that formerly were exclusively steel.  In 2016, the University of Miami, working with standards from the Florida Department of Transportation and the US Army Corps of Engineers, constructed the Innovation Bridge, a 70 foot bridge on the University of Miami’s campus made exclusively out of fiber reinforced polymers and without any steel at all.  A summary of the work done on the Innovation Bridge can be seen here:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xy3ISYNJfOI&t=44s According to Vincent L. Celentano, member of Paymeon’s Board of Directors and the Company’s largest shareholder, “We see Basalt America’s products as disruptors of today’s modern steel industry and believe their characteristics will create a dramatic shift in construction that will lead to the next industrial revolution. Given the expected increase in infrastructure spending, Basalt America is well positioned to participate in what is expected to be a high-growth industry by offering its green technology solutions, which compare favorably with steel in many aspects.  Steel rusts and always will.  Our basalt products last virtually forever.” Mr. Celentano continued, “Steel had a good run and dominated the 20th century, but it’s tired and old and is the reason for the failing infrastructure today.  Products made of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymers or ‘BFRP’ will lead the 21st century.” Disclaimers Forward-Looking Statements:  Except for statements of historical fact, this news release contains certain "forward-looking statements" as defined by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, including, without limitation expectations, beliefs, plans and objectives regarding the development, use and marketability of products and partnerships, as well as potential transactions the Company may be considering or may have closed. Such forward-looking statements are based on present circumstances and on PAYM's predictions with respect to events that have not occurred, that may not occur, or that may occur with different consequences and timing than those now assumed or anticipated. Such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, and are not guarantees of future performance or results and involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual events or results to differ materially from the events or results expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Such factors include general economic and business conditions, the ability to successfully develop and market products, consumer and business consumption habits, the ability to fund operations, reliance on representations from third parties that may not execute as planned, development of new markets, and other factors over which PAYM has little or no control. Such forward-looking statements are made only as of the date of this release, and PAYM assumes no obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect subsequent events or circumstances. Readers should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Risks, uncertainties and other factors are discussed in documents filed from time to time by PAYM with the Securities and Exchange Commission. This press release does not and shall not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of any offer to buy any securities.  For additional information and potential risk factors, readers should review PAYM’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, which can be found at www.sec.gov.


FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla., Feb. 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Paymeon, Inc. (OTC MARKETS:PAYM) today announced that its Basalt America subsidiary has supplied its RockMesh® concrete reinforcement product for delivery on its first government contract.  The end customer, the City of Miami, will use the product in a new skateboard park currently under construction.  Vincent L. Celentano, a Director and the Company’s largest shareholder said "Though it is a small project, relative to our goals of reinforcing all bridges, roads and commercial buildings in the future, I compare it to Neil Armstrong's famous words, ‘One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.’  I see this as a catalyst and our gateway to other projects we are currently seeking out." The first bridge to incorporate the Company’s suite of products is on the campus of the University of Miami.  See the University of Miami’s Innovation Bridge video here.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xy3ISYNJfOI Disclaimers Forward-Looking Statements:  Except for statements of historical fact, this news release contains certain "forward-looking statements" as defined by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, including, without limitation expectations, beliefs, plans and objectives regarding the development, use and marketability of products and partnerships, as well as potential transactions the Company may be considering or may have closed. Such forward-looking statements are based on present circumstances and on PAYM's predictions with respect to events that have not occurred, that may not occur, or that may occur with different consequences and timing than those now assumed or anticipated. Such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, and are not guarantees of future performance or results and involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual events or results to differ materially from the events or results expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Such factors include general economic and business conditions, the ability to successfully develop and market products, consumer and business consumption habits, the ability to fund operations, reliance on representations from third parties that may not execute as planned, development of new markets, and other factors over which PAYM has little or no control. Such forward-looking statements are made only as of the date of this release, and PAYM assumes no obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect subsequent events or circumstances. Readers should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Risks, uncertainties and other factors are discussed in documents filed from time to time by PAYM with the Securities and Exchange Commission. This press release does not and shall not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of any offer to buy any securities.  For additional information and potential risk factors, readers should review PAYM’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, which can be found at www.sec.gov.


BOSTON, Feb. 15, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- BERG LLC, a biopharmaceutical company uncovering health solutions through a data-driven, biological research approach, today announced that it has initiated a Phase I/II monotherapy clinical trial for its drug candidate BPM 31510-IV for the potential treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. The compound was guided in development by BERG's unique AI-based Interrogative Biology® platform that combines patient biology and artificial intelligence-based analytics to better understand the differences between healthy and disease environments. "Glioblastoma is one of the deadliest and most insidious forms of cancer and we are working to make a much-needed difference in the lives of patients with glioblastoma to improve survival, and quality of life," said Niven R. Narain, BERG Co-Founder, President and Chief Executive Officer of BERG. "The initiation of this Phase I/II trial marks the continued advancement of BPM 31510-IV, and further demonstrates BERG's Interrogative Biology® platform." Currently, there are minimal treatment options for patients with GBM and with the five-year relative survival rate at only 5.1 percent new treatment strategies are urgently needed (National Brain Tumor Society). Standard of care treatment options are limited, often resulting in recurrence of the disease after multiple lines of therapy. As such, patients with GBM are in critical need of an effective and tolerable treatment option to increase rates of survival and quality of life. The Phase I/II open-label, non-randomized clinical trial is designed to evaluate the safety and tolerability of BPM 31510-IV in subjects with glioblastoma multiforme that has recurred on a bevacizumab-containing regimen. Secondary outcome measures are to characterize the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of BPM31510-IV in subjects with glioblastoma multiforme that has recurred on a bevacizumab-containing regimen. The trial is initially being conducted at the Stanford University School of Medicine by principal investigators Dr. Seema Nagpal and Dr. Lawrence Recht. BPM 31510-IV was previously demonstrated to be safe in patients in a Phase I clinical trial in solid tumors. Additionally, preclinical studies conducted by BERG, the Stanford University School of Medicine and the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine suggest the therapeutic efficacy of BPM 31510-IV as single agent in GBM. These studies also demonstrate the possible beneficial effect of BPM 31510-IV in combination with temozolamide (TMZ), the existing standard of care for GBM. In pre-clinical models, pretreatment with BPM 31510-IV followed by TMZ showed reduced cancer cell proliferation when compared to monotherapy. For more detail regarding this trial, please visit: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03020602 BPM 31510-IV has the potential to slow or stop cancer cell growth by reversing the compromised metabolism of cancer cells, which is hypothesized to be a fundamental driver of many different types of cancer.  BERG has also initiated a Phase II clinical trial for BPM 31510-IV in advanced pancreatic cancer in combination with a common cancer drug, among other ongoing and planned trials for BPM31510-IV in various oncological indications. According to the National Brain Tumor Society, glioblastoma multiforme is the most common and deadliest of malignant primary brain tumors in adults. GBM accounts for 45% of all brain cancers, with nearly 11,000 men, women, and children diagnosed each year. About BERG  BERG is a clinical-stage company disrupting and redefining the approach to drug discovery, research and development through its Interrogative Biology® platform.  Its platform identifies therapies and biomarkers by applying algorithm and probability based artificial intelligence to analyze large numbers of patients' genotypic, phenotypic and other characteristics.  BERG believes this allows the company to better understand patients' disease profiles and consequently to reveal molecular signatures that guide and accelerate product candidate selection and development. By identifying biomarkers and patient characteristics that are unique to disease states, BERG is able to identify novel therapeutic product candidates and develop companion diagnostics to enhance specificity in its drug development process. BERG has leveraged its Interrogative Biology® platform to develop a robust pipeline of therapeutic product candidates and diagnostics in cancer, diabetes and neurology.


FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla., Feb. 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Paymeon, Inc. (OTC MARKETS:PAYM) today announced that its Basalt America subsidiary has supplied its RockMesh® concrete reinforcement product for delivery on its first government contract.  The end customer, the City of Miami, will use the product in a new skateboard park currently under construction.  Vincent L. Celentano, a Director and the Company’s largest shareholder said "Though it is a small project, relative to our goals of reinforcing all bridges, roads and commercial buildings in the future, I compare it to Neil Armstrong's famous words, ‘One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.’  I see this as a catalyst and our gateway to other projects we are currently seeking out." The first bridge to incorporate the Company’s suite of products is on the campus of the University of Miami.  See the University of Miami’s Innovation Bridge video here.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xy3ISYNJfOI Disclaimers Forward-Looking Statements:  Except for statements of historical fact, this news release contains certain "forward-looking statements" as defined by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, including, without limitation expectations, beliefs, plans and objectives regarding the development, use and marketability of products and partnerships, as well as potential transactions the Company may be considering or may have closed. Such forward-looking statements are based on present circumstances and on PAYM's predictions with respect to events that have not occurred, that may not occur, or that may occur with different consequences and timing than those now assumed or anticipated. Such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, and are not guarantees of future performance or results and involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual events or results to differ materially from the events or results expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Such factors include general economic and business conditions, the ability to successfully develop and market products, consumer and business consumption habits, the ability to fund operations, reliance on representations from third parties that may not execute as planned, development of new markets, and other factors over which PAYM has little or no control. Such forward-looking statements are made only as of the date of this release, and PAYM assumes no obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect subsequent events or circumstances. Readers should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Risks, uncertainties and other factors are discussed in documents filed from time to time by PAYM with the Securities and Exchange Commission. This press release does not and shall not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of any offer to buy any securities.  For additional information and potential risk factors, readers should review PAYM’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, which can be found at www.sec.gov.


Company to Begin Selling its Innovative Infrastructure Products Utilizing “Green” Substitute for Steel under the name Basalt America FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla., Feb. 21, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Paymeon, Inc. (OTC MARKETS:PAYM) today announced it has completed its acquisition of Rockstar Acquisitions, LLC.  Going forward, Rockstar Acquisitions will conduct business under the name “Basalt America.” Basalt America holds an exclusive license to produce, market and sell basalt fiber reinforced polymer products aimed at the $1 trillion steel component of the construction industry.  Basalt America leverages its licensed intellectual property, technology and processes to produce Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer products that are superior to anything in the market today and that are used as replacements for steel products that reinforce concrete such as rebar.  Basalt America’s licensed products, which include RockRebar®, RockStirrups®, RockStaples™ and RockMesh® are two to three times stronger and 75% lighter than steel.  Unlike steel, Basalt America’s products never rust, create virtually no carbon footprint and have lifespans of more than a century.  These characteristics will redefine the standards that the construction industry adheres to.  Basalt America’s materials are more fully described at www.basaltamerica.com. Paymeon will issue restricted common shares valued at approximately $35.5 million in exchange for 100% of the membership interests of Basalt America.  Basalt America will immediately begin operations as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Paymeon, Inc.  Paymeon expects that sales will commence towards the end of the first quarter, 2017. According to Ed Cespedes, CEO of Paymeon, “We believe these products represent a paradigm shift in how the construction industry will look at concrete reinforcement going forward.  We believe that demand for these products will be driven by a number of factors, including new regulatory requirements to consider the lifespan of projects, as well as substantial increases in infrastructure spending expected in the near future.  We expect demand for our products to come from a broad range of customers ranging from small retail contractors, to very large government entities.” Prior to its acquisition by Paymeon, Basalt America was privately funded with more than $1.3 million from accredited investors, including affiliates of our Chairman and CEO, Ed Cespedes and our Director and largest shareholder, Vincent L. Celentano.  Proceeds were used primarily to secure a license for exclusive manufacture and distribution of RockRebar®, RockStirrups®, RockStaples™ and RockMesh® in the United States, excluding California and Hawaii, for 18 months, and rights of first refusal for other parts of the world.  Upon expiration, Basalt America will continue to have rights of first refusal for any undeveloped territories within the United States, and around the world. Basalt America’s products are the first of their kind to be used in conjunction with the construction of projects that formerly were exclusively steel.  In 2016, the University of Miami, working with standards from the Florida Department of Transportation and the US Army Corps of Engineers, constructed the Innovation Bridge, a 70 foot bridge on the University of Miami’s campus made exclusively out of fiber reinforced polymers and without any steel at all.  A summary of the work done on the Innovation Bridge can be seen here:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xy3ISYNJfOI&t=44s According to Vincent L. Celentano, member of Paymeon’s Board of Directors and the Company’s largest shareholder, “We see Basalt America’s products as disruptors of today’s modern steel industry and believe their characteristics will create a dramatic shift in construction that will lead to the next industrial revolution. Given the expected increase in infrastructure spending, Basalt America is well positioned to participate in what is expected to be a high-growth industry by offering its green technology solutions, which compare favorably with steel in many aspects.  Steel rusts and always will.  Our basalt products last virtually forever.” Mr. Celentano continued, “Steel had a good run and dominated the 20th century, but it’s tired and old and is the reason for the failing infrastructure today.  Products made of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymers or ‘BFRP’ will lead the 21st century.” Disclaimers Forward-Looking Statements:  Except for statements of historical fact, this news release contains certain "forward-looking statements" as defined by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, including, without limitation expectations, beliefs, plans and objectives regarding the development, use and marketability of products and partnerships, as well as potential transactions the Company may be considering or may have closed. Such forward-looking statements are based on present circumstances and on PAYM's predictions with respect to events that have not occurred, that may not occur, or that may occur with different consequences and timing than those now assumed or anticipated. Such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, and are not guarantees of future performance or results and involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual events or results to differ materially from the events or results expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Such factors include general economic and business conditions, the ability to successfully develop and market products, consumer and business consumption habits, the ability to fund operations, reliance on representations from third parties that may not execute as planned, development of new markets, and other factors over which PAYM has little or no control. Such forward-looking statements are made only as of the date of this release, and PAYM assumes no obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect subsequent events or circumstances. Readers should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Risks, uncertainties and other factors are discussed in documents filed from time to time by PAYM with the Securities and Exchange Commission. This press release does not and shall not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of any offer to buy any securities.  For additional information and potential risk factors, readers should review PAYM’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, which can be found at www.sec.gov.


News Article | October 13, 2016
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

A new study published in the international journal PLOS One today reveals how scientists use Twitter to communicate. The study is the first to survey scientists on their attitudes towards social media and show how they are using digital channels to communicate their research with both the public and one another. Led by Kimberley Collins and Jenny Rock of New Zealand's University of Otago and David Shiffman of the University of Miami, it surveyed 587 scientists from a range of academic disciplines. The survey found that while scientists are yet to widely adopt social media, the ones that do see many possible advantages to using it in the workplace. "Most scientists saw the benefit in using Twitter - they said it was a good way to access a large and diverse audience. They also appreciate the ease of communicating in snippets, how little time it takes, and how accessible it is." says Collins, who undertook the research for her Master of Science Communication thesis at Otago. The study also found that scientists mostly use Twitter to communicate with colleagues and share peer-reviewed literature within the scholarly community. "Many scientists said they use Twitter to communicate specifically with other scientists. Some used it as a forum to share their research directly with the public and media, but most saw it as a tool to share research within their field and to stay updated with science outreach and communication," says Collins. Despite the professional benefits associated with social media use, relatively few academic scientists currently use these tools. Misunderstandings of the disadvantages of social media use may contribute to their relatively limited use, which could be corrected by professional development training workshops or clearer departmental social media usage policies, she says. Collins says the results of this study add to our general understanding of the use of social media by academic scientists and act as a baseline on which to assess future trends in social media use within the science academy.


News Article | November 7, 2016
Site: co.newswire.com

As part of the dermMentors™ Resident of Distinction Award program, sponsored by Beiersdorf Inc., five dermatology residents attended the 12th Annual Coastal Dermatology Symposium, held in Monterey, California from September 29 - October 1, 2016. As part of the dermMentors™ Resident of Distinction Award program, sponsored by Beiersdorf Inc., five dermatology residents attended the 12th Annual Coastal Dermatology Symposium, held in Monterey, California from September 29 - October 1, 2016. The dermMentors™ Resident of Distinction awardees – Lucy Chen, MD, of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Robert Gathings, MD, of The Medical University of South Carolina, Shawn Kwatra, MD, of Johns Hopkins Medicine, Julia Schwartz, MD, of The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, and Kelly Tyler, MD, of The Ohio State University College of Medicine – attended the Coastal Dermatology Symposium scientific sessions as well as networking events with top thought leaders in dermatology. The residents presented new scientific research during an independent mentoring session that was held on Friday, September 30. Julia Schwartz, MD, a third-year resident in dermatology at The George Washington University, was awarded the overall grand prize for her presentation, entitled: “Prevalence and comorbidities of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) in a large patient care database.” DermMentors.org and the dermMentors™ Resident of Distinction Award program are sponsored by Beiersdorf Inc., and administered by DermEd, Inc. and Evince Communications, LLC. Now in its 7th year, The dermMentors™ Resident of Distinction Award has recognized top residents in dermatology with sponsorship to attend the Caribbean Dermatology Symposium and the Coastal Dermatology Symposium, and offers selected residents Virtual Mentorship and Mentor Meet-up award opportunities. The dermMentors.org website is dedicated to helping residents during their training and throughout their careers, by providing insights from respected thought leaders, and facilitating and fostering relationships between residents and mentors in dermatology. For more information, visit www.dermMentors.org, or contact Daniel Romanowitz at (203) 354-6953.


Company to Begin Selling its Innovative Infrastructure Products Utilizing “Green” Substitute for Steel under the name Basalt America FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla., Feb. 21, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Paymeon, Inc. (OTC MARKETS:PAYM) today announced it has completed its acquisition of Rockstar Acquisitions, LLC.  Going forward, Rockstar Acquisitions will conduct business under the name “Basalt America.” Basalt America holds an exclusive license to produce, market and sell basalt fiber reinforced polymer products aimed at the $1 trillion steel component of the construction industry.  Basalt America leverages its licensed intellectual property, technology and processes to produce Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer products that are superior to anything in the market today and that are used as replacements for steel products that reinforce concrete such as rebar.  Basalt America’s licensed products, which include RockRebar®, RockStirrups®, RockStaples™ and RockMesh® are two to three times stronger and 75% lighter than steel.  Unlike steel, Basalt America’s products never rust, create virtually no carbon footprint and have lifespans of more than a century.  These characteristics will redefine the standards that the construction industry adheres to.  Basalt America’s materials are more fully described at www.basaltamerica.com. Paymeon will issue restricted common shares valued at approximately $35.5 million in exchange for 100% of the membership interests of Basalt America.  Basalt America will immediately begin operations as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Paymeon, Inc.  Paymeon expects that sales will commence towards the end of the first quarter, 2017. According to Ed Cespedes, CEO of Paymeon, “We believe these products represent a paradigm shift in how the construction industry will look at concrete reinforcement going forward.  We believe that demand for these products will be driven by a number of factors, including new regulatory requirements to consider the lifespan of projects, as well as substantial increases in infrastructure spending expected in the near future.  We expect demand for our products to come from a broad range of customers ranging from small retail contractors, to very large government entities.” Prior to its acquisition by Paymeon, Basalt America was privately funded with more than $1.3 million from accredited investors, including affiliates of our Chairman and CEO, Ed Cespedes and our Director and largest shareholder, Vincent L. Celentano.  Proceeds were used primarily to secure a license for exclusive manufacture and distribution of RockRebar®, RockStirrups®, RockStaples™ and RockMesh® in the United States, excluding California and Hawaii, for 18 months, and rights of first refusal for other parts of the world.  Upon expiration, Basalt America will continue to have rights of first refusal for any undeveloped territories within the United States, and around the world. Basalt America’s products are the first of their kind to be used in conjunction with the construction of projects that formerly were exclusively steel.  In 2016, the University of Miami, working with standards from the Florida Department of Transportation and the US Army Corps of Engineers, constructed the Innovation Bridge, a 70 foot bridge on the University of Miami’s campus made exclusively out of fiber reinforced polymers and without any steel at all.  A summary of the work done on the Innovation Bridge can be seen here:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xy3ISYNJfOI&t=44s According to Vincent L. Celentano, member of Paymeon’s Board of Directors and the Company’s largest shareholder, “We see Basalt America’s products as disruptors of today’s modern steel industry and believe their characteristics will create a dramatic shift in construction that will lead to the next industrial revolution. Given the expected increase in infrastructure spending, Basalt America is well positioned to participate in what is expected to be a high-growth industry by offering its green technology solutions, which compare favorably with steel in many aspects.  Steel rusts and always will.  Our basalt products last virtually forever.” Mr. Celentano continued, “Steel had a good run and dominated the 20th century, but it’s tired and old and is the reason for the failing infrastructure today.  Products made of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymers or ‘BFRP’ will lead the 21st century.” Disclaimers Forward-Looking Statements:  Except for statements of historical fact, this news release contains certain "forward-looking statements" as defined by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, including, without limitation expectations, beliefs, plans and objectives regarding the development, use and marketability of products and partnerships, as well as potential transactions the Company may be considering or may have closed. Such forward-looking statements are based on present circumstances and on PAYM's predictions with respect to events that have not occurred, that may not occur, or that may occur with different consequences and timing than those now assumed or anticipated. Such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, and are not guarantees of future performance or results and involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual events or results to differ materially from the events or results expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Such factors include general economic and business conditions, the ability to successfully develop and market products, consumer and business consumption habits, the ability to fund operations, reliance on representations from third parties that may not execute as planned, development of new markets, and other factors over which PAYM has little or no control. Such forward-looking statements are made only as of the date of this release, and PAYM assumes no obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect subsequent events or circumstances. Readers should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Risks, uncertainties and other factors are discussed in documents filed from time to time by PAYM with the Securities and Exchange Commission. This press release does not and shall not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of any offer to buy any securities.  For additional information and potential risk factors, readers should review PAYM’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, which can be found at www.sec.gov.


News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

TORONTO, Nov. 30, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Patricio Stocker, President and CEO of PharmaCielo Ltd., announced the company has appointed a Medical Advisory Board (MAB) to provide guidance on the development of medicinal-grade cannabis oil extracts and related products appropriate for use by clinical practitioners. “Under the guidance of Dr. Delon Human, PharmaCielo Board of Directors member and Chair of the MAB, appointees will be able to provide significant input in the development of our medicinal-grade products through their ability to provide global expertise in the areas of healthcare policy, regulation, medical science and patient insights in addition to their clinical experience,” said Dr. Stocker. Dr. Human has assembled an experienced team of international medical clinicians whose expertise will be leveraged to provide guidance in the development of medicinal-grade cannabis oil based products, as well as international insight and understanding of worldwide healthcare policy and its implications for this emerging global industry. “The Medical Advisory Board will oversee PharmaCielo’s practices and processes, ensuring they are UN-aligned and performed ethically and according to Good Manufacturing and Good Medical Practice,” said Dr. Human.  “During the April 2016 UN General Assembly Special Session on Drugs, the UN and its member states strongly endorsed the need to ensure the accessibility and availability of internationally controlled drugs for medical and scientific purposes, including substances such as cannabinoids. In developing a global framework, this should be promoted within national legal systems, while simultaneously preventing diversion, abuse and trafficking. PharmaCielo has the opportunity to develop the world’s finest quality, naturally grown, pharma-grade cannabis oils.” Four appointees to the MAB were introduced (full biographies are available at www.pharmacielo.com): Dr. Delon Human is the president and CEO of Health Diplomats, a health advisory and consulting practice, providing strategic and technical advice on global health issues to Fortune 500 companies in the pharmaceutical, food, tobacco, nicotine and medical device industries as well as NGOs, governments and foundations. He has acted as adviser to WHO Director-Generals and UN Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon. He is a published author and specializes in global health strategy, corporate and product transformation, harm reduction and health communication. Formerly, he served as the Secretary-General of the International Food and Beverage Alliance (IFBA), which brings together the top food companies in the world. From 1997 to 2005, Dr. Human served as secretary general of the World Medical Association (WMA), the global representative body for physicians. He was instrumental in the establishment of the World Health Professions Alliance, an alliance of the global representative bodies of physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dentists and physical therapists. Dr. Human qualified as a physician in South Africa and completed his postgraduate studies in family medicine and child health in South Africa and Oxford, England. He was a clinician for two decades, part of the pediatric endocrinology research unit at the John Radcliffe Hospital and was involved in the establishment of several medical centers, a hospital and emergency clinic in South Africa. His business studies (MBA) were completed at the Edinburgh Business School. A former chair of the World Medical Association, Dr. Anders Milton is a highly sought-after consultant within the healthcare sector and has served as president of the European Regional Network on HIV/AIDS (ERNA) and as president of the Swedish Red Cross among a number of other positions, including appointment by the Swedish government as chairman of a committee on Swedish HIV/AIDS policies and a member of the Catastrophe Commission formed following the December 2004 tsunami. Recently he led a select committee studying organ donation and transplantation. Previously, Dr. Milton served as president and CEO of the Swedish Medical Association. A director of several public and privately held companies and foundations, Dr. Milton originally studied economics before turning to medicine, and after graduating university as a medical doctor and PhD he served as a clinician at the Department of Nephrology at the University Hospital at Uppsala. Throughout his career he has been engaged in work in support of human rights, ethics of medical practice and safe health care, of which effective pharmacotherapy is an integral part. Dr. Gutiérrez is a neuroradiologist in private practice and Director of the Neuroradiology Division at Centro Avanzado de Diagnostíco Médico (CEDIMED) in Colombia. Previously, Dr. Gutiérrez served at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, TX as Associate Professor of Radiology, Vice Chair of Clinical Operations, Medical Director and Director of the Clinical Trials Division at the Radiology Department. He was formerly Director of Medical Development, Diagnostic Imaging and Associate Director of Clinical Development, Diagnostic Imaging for Bayer Healthcare (formerly Berlex Laboratories) in Montville, NJ. Dr. Gutiérrez also served as a medical monitor with Novartis (formerly Ciba-Geigy Labs) in Medellin. Dr. Gutiérrez has been the recipient of several awards for his work, and has been the lead researcher, international researcher and co-investigator on numerous clinical trials.  Regularly published, he has co-edited five medical books and authored or co-authored over 25 book chapters as well as 17 peer-reviewed articles and scores of abstracts and articles published in scientific research journals. Dr. Gutiérrez received a Doctorate in Medicine and Surgery from CES University in Medellin and Specialist in Clinical Radiology from Pontifical Xavierian University / San Ignacio Hospital in Bogota. He completed a research fellowship in Neuroradiology at Thomas Jefferson University / TJU Hospital in Philadelphia, PA and a visiting fellowship in Interventional Neuroradiology at the University of Miami / Jackson Memorial Hospital. Dr. Soto is Chairman of the Department of Radiology at Boston Medical Center and a Professor of Radiology at the Boston University School of Medicine. He has previously served as a general medical practitioner with the Hospital San Antonio de Prado in Colombia, section head of Body Imaging at University of San Vicente de Paúl Hospital, radiologist at CEDIMED in Medellin, assistant professor of Radiology at the University of Antioquia and was vice chairman of Boston Medical Center’s Department of Radiology for ten years. A native of Medellin with citizenship in both Colombia and the United States, Dr. Soto received his Doctor in Medicine and Surgery and Specialist in Diagnostic Radiology from CES University’s Health Sciences Institute in Medellin, and completed a Radiology Body Imaging Fellowship at Boston University Medical Center. Dr. Soto has received honors and awards from the Colombian Ministry of Education, Medellin Medicine Academy, Boston University Medical Center and numerous professional societies.  An extensively published researcher, Dr. Soto is a member of the editorial boards of Radiology and Abdominal Imaging, has edited seven books and has published over 85 original research papers and more than 35 reviews, book chapters and case reports. PharmaCielo Ltd. (the “Company”) is a global company privately held and headquartered in Canada, with a focus on processing and supplying all natural, medicinal-grade cannabis oil extracts and related products to large channel distributors.  The Company’s principal (and wholly-owned) subsidiary is PharmaCielo Colombia Holdings S.A.S., headquartered at its Nursery and Propagation Centre located in Rionegro, Colombia. The boards of directors and executive teams of both PharmaCielo and PharmaCielo Colombia Holdings are comprised of a diversely talented group of international business executives and specialists with relevant and varied expertise.  PharmaCielo recognized the significant role that Colombia’s ideal location will play in building a sustainable business in the medical cannabis industry, and the Company, together with its directors and executives, has built a compelling business plan focused on supplying the international marketplace. This press release contains forward-looking statements. Often, but not always, forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of words such as “plans”, “expects” or “does not expect”, “is expected”, “estimates”, “intends”, “anticipates” or “does not anticipate”, or “believes”, or “recurring” or variations of such words and phrases or state that certain actions, events or results “may”, “could”, “would”, “might” or “will” be taken, occur or be achieved. Forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, such as demand for the Company’s products, currency exchange changes and risks, internal funding and the financial condition of the Company, product roll-out, competition, technological changes, and other commercial matters involving the Company, its products, and the markets in which the Company operates, as well as general economic conditions, which may cause the actual results, performance or achievements of the Company to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. Actual results and developments are likely to differ, and may differ materially, from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements contained in this press release. There can be no assurance that forward-looking statements will prove to be accurate, as actual results and future events could differ materially from those anticipated in such statements. Accordingly, readers should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements. Except as required by law, we undertake no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. However, any further disclosures made on related subjects in subsequent reports should be consulted.


News Article | November 23, 2016
Site: news.yahoo.com

Coal mines have the canary, endangered species have the panda bear, melting ice has the polar bear, and now sea level rise has … the octopus? Climate change's impact on sea levels has made tidal flooding in Miami more severe, according to scientists. After the "supermoon" earlier this month triggered high tides, parts of Miami flooded and at least one sea creature was left far from home: an octopus that became stranded in a flooded parking garage, reported the Miami Herald. Miami resident Richard Conlin discovered the octopus, and shared images of the displaced sea creature on Facebook. According to Conlin, the octopus was brought home by building security officers, who returned the animal to the ocean in a bucket of water. [Supermoon Photos: Full Moon Rises Across the Globe] Marine biologist Kathleen Sullivan Sealey, from the University of Miami, told the Miami Herald that the cyclical "king tides" — a period of especially high tides caused by the alignment of the sun, Earth and moon's gravitational forces — were intensified by the supermoon and likely washed the octopus out of pipes underneath the garage. "When that much sea water comes in, the octopus is like 'What's this?' and goes to explore and ends up in a bad place," Sealey told the Miami Herald after examining the photos. She said the marooned octopus was either a small Caribbean reef octopus or a large Atlantic pygmy octopus. Though the building's drainage pipes were designed safely above high-water marks, Sealey said rising sea levels have left some of the pipes partially submerged during very high tides, such as the king tide. These submerged pipes combine two of an octopus’ favorite things, Sealey said: a cramped, dark space with fish to eat. In his Facebook posts, Conlin noted that his building has been flooding more frequently. "This flooding to this extreme is new and gets worse each moon," he wrote. "In the past the floor of the garage would be ‘damp’ but this extreme flooding is new." Conlin added that every day for the past six months there has been "some type of water seepage in the garage." Florida is especially at risk of flooding due to climate change. A recent study by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) determined that about 13 million Americans could be affected by rising seas caused by climate change, and nearly half of them live in Florida. In Miami alone, a third of the county could be forced to relocate, according to the NOAA study. And sea creatures that wash ashore may become a more common occurrence, Sealey said, because ocean waters will be pushed deeper onto land more frequently due to rising seas. "The sea is moving in, so we have to share the space," Sealey said.


Company to Begin Selling its Innovative Infrastructure Products Utilizing “Green” Substitute for Steel under the name Basalt America FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla., Feb. 21, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Paymeon, Inc. (OTC MARKETS:PAYM) today announced it has completed its acquisition of Rockstar Acquisitions, LLC.  Going forward, Rockstar Acquisitions will conduct business under the name “Basalt America.” Basalt America holds an exclusive license to produce, market and sell basalt fiber reinforced polymer products aimed at the $1 trillion steel component of the construction industry.  Basalt America leverages its licensed intellectual property, technology and processes to produce Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer products that are superior to anything in the market today and that are used as replacements for steel products that reinforce concrete such as rebar.  Basalt America’s licensed products, which include RockRebar®, RockStirrups®, RockStaples™ and RockMesh® are two to three times stronger and 75% lighter than steel.  Unlike steel, Basalt America’s products never rust, create virtually no carbon footprint and have lifespans of more than a century.  These characteristics will redefine the standards that the construction industry adheres to.  Basalt America’s materials are more fully described at www.basaltamerica.com. Paymeon will issue restricted common shares valued at approximately $35.5 million in exchange for 100% of the membership interests of Basalt America.  Basalt America will immediately begin operations as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Paymeon, Inc.  Paymeon expects that sales will commence towards the end of the first quarter, 2017. According to Ed Cespedes, CEO of Paymeon, “We believe these products represent a paradigm shift in how the construction industry will look at concrete reinforcement going forward.  We believe that demand for these products will be driven by a number of factors, including new regulatory requirements to consider the lifespan of projects, as well as substantial increases in infrastructure spending expected in the near future.  We expect demand for our products to come from a broad range of customers ranging from small retail contractors, to very large government entities.” Prior to its acquisition by Paymeon, Basalt America was privately funded with more than $1.3 million from accredited investors, including affiliates of our Chairman and CEO, Ed Cespedes and our Director and largest shareholder, Vincent L. Celentano.  Proceeds were used primarily to secure a license for exclusive manufacture and distribution of RockRebar®, RockStirrups®, RockStaples™ and RockMesh® in the United States, excluding California and Hawaii, for 18 months, and rights of first refusal for other parts of the world.  Upon expiration, Basalt America will continue to have rights of first refusal for any undeveloped territories within the United States, and around the world. Basalt America’s products are the first of their kind to be used in conjunction with the construction of projects that formerly were exclusively steel.  In 2016, the University of Miami, working with standards from the Florida Department of Transportation and the US Army Corps of Engineers, constructed the Innovation Bridge, a 70 foot bridge on the University of Miami’s campus made exclusively out of fiber reinforced polymers and without any steel at all.  A summary of the work done on the Innovation Bridge can be seen here:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xy3ISYNJfOI&t=44s According to Vincent L. Celentano, member of Paymeon’s Board of Directors and the Company’s largest shareholder, “We see Basalt America’s products as disruptors of today’s modern steel industry and believe their characteristics will create a dramatic shift in construction that will lead to the next industrial revolution. Given the expected increase in infrastructure spending, Basalt America is well positioned to participate in what is expected to be a high-growth industry by offering its green technology solutions, which compare favorably with steel in many aspects.  Steel rusts and always will.  Our basalt products last virtually forever.” Mr. Celentano continued, “Steel had a good run and dominated the 20th century, but it’s tired and old and is the reason for the failing infrastructure today.  Products made of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymers or ‘BFRP’ will lead the 21st century.” Disclaimers Forward-Looking Statements:  Except for statements of historical fact, this news release contains certain "forward-looking statements" as defined by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, including, without limitation expectations, beliefs, plans and objectives regarding the development, use and marketability of products and partnerships, as well as potential transactions the Company may be considering or may have closed. Such forward-looking statements are based on present circumstances and on PAYM's predictions with respect to events that have not occurred, that may not occur, or that may occur with different consequences and timing than those now assumed or anticipated. Such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, and are not guarantees of future performance or results and involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual events or results to differ materially from the events or results expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Such factors include general economic and business conditions, the ability to successfully develop and market products, consumer and business consumption habits, the ability to fund operations, reliance on representations from third parties that may not execute as planned, development of new markets, and other factors over which PAYM has little or no control. Such forward-looking statements are made only as of the date of this release, and PAYM assumes no obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect subsequent events or circumstances. Readers should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Risks, uncertainties and other factors are discussed in documents filed from time to time by PAYM with the Securities and Exchange Commission. This press release does not and shall not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of any offer to buy any securities.  For additional information and potential risk factors, readers should review PAYM’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, which can be found at www.sec.gov.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

MastersinAccounting.info, a leading career and education website focused on graduate programs in accounting and finance, has released its ranking of the Top Online Master’s in Accounting Programs. To be considered for the list, schools with an online master’s in accounting program were checked for not-for-profit status and accreditation from one of the six regional accreditation agencies in the US recognized by the US Department of Education. The online degrees from the schools on the list are also the same degrees granted to traditional, on-campus students. The rankings were based on factors measuring academic quality, student experience, and graduate success. The ranking uses a unique methodology that considers such factors as the average tuition cost per online credit hour; program accreditation by the AACSB, ACBSP, or IACBE; the average mid-career pay of alumni; and school rankings according to US News & World Report in the regional, national, and online categories. Rob Voce, founder of MastersinAccounting.info, said about the list: “Enrollment in online degree programs is increasing and schools are responding by offering more distance education programs at the graduate level - which can be particularly convenient for those who are already working full-time. Our ranking is designed to help these prospective students learn about and compare first-rate online master’s in accounting programs that offer long-term value.” Overall, 37 schools with online master’s in accounting programs satisfied the inclusion requirements and ranked on this list. Auburn University, in Auburn, Alabama, captured the top spot on the list, followed by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the second spot. As well as providing schools’ results on ranking factors, the Top Online Master’s in Accounting Programs list includes detailed information on schools’ admissions statistics and requirements as well as tuition comparisons. For the top-ranking schools the list also provides: The top schools on this year’s list are: 1. Auburn University Raymond J. Harbert College of Business (Auburn, AL) 2. University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler Business School (Chapel Hill, NC) 3. University of Connecticut School of Business (Storrs, CT) 4. University of Massachusetts Amherst Isenberg School of Management (Amherst, MA) 5. Pennsylvania State University World Campus (State College, PA) 6. University of Southern California Marshall School of Business (Los Angeles, CA) 7. Emporia State University School of Business (Emporia, KS) 8. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey Business School (New Brunswick, NJ) 9. Colorado State University College of Business (Fort Collins, CO) 10. University of Alabama at Birmingham Collat School of Business (Birmingham, AL) 11. University of Texas at Dallas Naveen Jindal School of Business (Richardson, TX) 12. St. John’s University Peter J. Tobin College of Business (Jamaica, NY) 13. Georgia Southern University College of Business Administration (Statesboro, GA) 14. Northeastern University D’Amore-McKim School of Business (Boston, MA) 15. DePaul University Kellstadt Graduate School of Business (Chicago, IL) 16. Golden Gate University Edward S. Ageno School of Business (San Francisco, CA) 17. Southern New Hampshire University College of Online and Continuing Education (Hooksett, NH) 18. California State University, Sacramento College of Business Administration (Sacramento, CA) 19. University of Scranton Kania School of Management (Scranton, PA) 20. Syracuse University Martin J. Whitman School of Management (Syracuse, NY) 21. University of Hartford Barney School of Business (West Hartford, CT) 22. University of Miami School of Business Administration (Coral Gables, FL) 23. George Mason University School of Business (Fairfax, VA) 24. University of South Dakota Beacom School of Business (Vermillion, SD) 25. Florida Atlantic University College of Business (Boca Raton, FL) 26. Stetson University M.E. Rinker Sr. Institute of Tax and Accountancy (DeLand, FL) 27. Rider University College of Business Administration (Lawrenceville, NJ) 28. New England College School of Graduate and Professional Studies (Henniker, NH) 29. Western Governors University (Salt Lake City, UT) 30. Indiana Wesleyan University DeVoe School of Business (Marion, IN) 31. Plymouth State University College of Business Administration (Plymouth, NH) 32. Bellevue University College of Business (Bellevue, NE) 33. Loyola University Chicago Quinlan School of Business (Chicago, IL) 34. Franklin University Ross College of Business (Columbus, OH) 35. Nova Southeastern University Huizenga College of Business (Fort Lauderdale, FL) 36. Saint Mary’s University Graduate School of Business and Technology (Winona, MN) 37. Baypath University School of Science & Management (Longmeadow, MA) *See the full rankings and program details here: http://www.mastersinaccounting.info/online-masters-in-accounting/ About MastersinAccounting.info: MastersinAccounting.info is a free online resource focused on providing accurate and up-to-date information on degrees, programs, and schools for prospective master’s in accounting students. The site also provides additional resources such as career outlooks, graduate student guides, scholarships, and more. MastersinAccounting.info’s goal is to be best in class.


News Article | December 15, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (Dec. 15, 2016) - A research team led by University of South Florida College of Marine Science professor Dr. Steven Murawski has been awarded a $1 million grant to explore how oil spills, such as the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) in 2010, impact the economic, ecological and social system aspects of fishing communities. The Gulf Research Program (GRP) of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine announced Thursday a total of $2.1 million in grants. Murawski's team, which also includes Dr. Claire Paris, a bio-physical modeler from the University of Miami, and an environmental science and policy expert Dr. James Sanchirico from the University of California, Davis, will receive the grant funding over two years. "We are deeply appreciative of the grant by the Gulf Research Program of the National Academies to pursue this important research. Our team represents expertise in biology, economics and oceanography and will provide information relevant to assess these real-world problems," said Murawski. The DWH spill released approximately two million barrels of oil into the water, resulting in significant impacts on coastal communities, especially in the western and northern Gulf, where many towns are co-dependent on both commercial fishing and the petroleum industries. Concern for the integrity and safety of the seafood supply during the DWH spill resulted in large-scale fishery closures, causing fishers to either travel long distances from ports to reach open grounds or re-locate to other ports adjacent to open fishing areas. Using high-resolution, fishery-dependent datasets, Murawski's multidisciplinary team will identify how individual communities were affected by the DWH spill, specifically those communities in coastal Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and Alabama. Working with key fisheries stakeholders and local decision makers, the team plans to identify adaptive strategies that communities could use to mitigate the effects of future oil spills. This project has the potential to transform disaster planning and fisheries management responses to such disasters in the Gulf of Mexico and elsewhere. All three Gulf Research Program grants awarded Thursday support projects that will generate new insights, address critical questions, or lead to new approaches to interpreting data by bringing together concepts and methods from different disciplines. The grants also advance study design, tools, models and technologies for assessing human exposure to environmental contaminants, including acute or chronic exposures related to oil spills and other sudden and large-scale environmental disasters, and related impacts on individuals and populations. "We're pleased to support innovative scientific syntheses that can help us better understand the interdisciplinary challenges coastal communities face," said Evonne Tang, GRP's director of external funding opportunities. "The new tools and products that the project teams develop would make existing data usable for stakeholders and decision makers." The proposals were selected after an external peer-review process. These awards are part of a broad portfolio of GRP funding opportunities outlined at http://www. . The Gulf Research Program of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine was established in 2013 as a result of the DWH oil spill. It seeks to improve understanding of the interconnecting human, environmental, and energy systems of the Gulf of Mexico and other U.S. outer continental shelf areas. The program funds studies, projects, and other activities using three broad approaches: research and development, education and training, and environmental monitoring. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine are private, nonprofit institutions that provide independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation to solve complex problems and inform public policy decisions related to science, technology, and medicine. The Academies operate under an 1863 congressional charter to the National Academy of Sciences, signed by President Lincoln.


News Article | December 21, 2016
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

In a first-in-children randomized clinical study, medical researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) and the Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute (ISCI) at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have begun testing to see whether adult stem cells derived from bone marrow benefit children with the congenital heart defect hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). UM SOM surgeons are injecting the cells into the babies’ hearts during open-heart operations at the University of Maryland Medical Center. ISCI is supplying the stem cells for the procedures. Even with extensive surgical treatments, HLHS babies still do not have optimal outcomes. The researchers hope the cells will increase the babies’ chances of survival as HLHS limits the heart's ability to pump blood from the heart to the body. “The premise of this clinical trial is to boost or regenerate the right ventricle, the only ventricle in these babies, to make it pump as strongly as a normal left ventricle,” says lead researcher Sunjay Kaushal, MD, PhD, associate professor of surgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine and director, pediatric cardiac surgery, University of Maryland Medical Center. “We are hoping this therapy will be a game-changer for these patients.” Kaushal says the first two patients, who were both four-months-old when the stem cells were injected, are doing well after their surgery. This is the first HLHS research in the United States to use stem cells known as allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Allogeneic cells can be used in other human beings without creating an immune response, which could cause the body to reject the cells. Additionally, these cells are a type of adult stem cell (found in both children and adults), unspecialized cells that can develop into tissue- or organ-specific cells. MSCs can be harvested in advance, expanded in culture, and stored for use later. The allogeneic nature of the MSCs makes it possible for stem cells from one bone marrow donor to provide all the stem cells for this study. Researchers elsewhere are taking a different approach to strengthen the HLHS heart, with autologous cells, stem cells taken from the HLHS patient's own umbilical cord, for use in that specific patient. In adult patients, MSCs in the heart have been shown to reduce scar tissue, reduce inflammation, cause new small vessels to grow, and stimulate the heart to regenerate itself, causing heart muscle cells and cardiac stem cells to grow. "We've had incredible results in using mesenchymal stem cells to regenerate damaged heart muscle in adults," says Joshua M. Hare, MD, ISCI founding director and sponsor of the study. “This is the first time these types of cells are being used in infants, so this is very exciting.” The Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute has grown from a local research center to a national cell manufacturing facility. ISCI provides cells for the Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network, has been named a Production Assistance for Cellular Therapies Center by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, and has been conducting research in stem cell use for cardiovascular repair since 2008. HLHS is one of the most challenging and complex congenital heart diseases to treat. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that about 960 babies in the United States are born each year with HLHS. For unknown reasons, the heart’s main pumping chamber, the left ventricle, does not develop completely during a critical growth period just prior to birth. The right ventricle normally pumps blood to the lungs at low pressure to be oxygenated, while the left ventricle pushes blood at high pressure through the aorta to the entire body. In children with HLHS, the right heart assumes the extra workload, temporarily supporting the circulation to both the lungs and body. That stress can cause the right heart to fail and the baby to die. Current HLHS treatment options are either a heart transplant or a series of three open-heart reconstructive surgical procedures to connect the left and right sides of the heart. However, even with a transplant or the reconstructive surgical series, children with HLHS have an average five-year survival of only 50 to 60 percent. In this Phase 1 safety and efficacy study, allogeneic MSCs are injected into the heart muscle during the second of the three reconstructive surgeries, typically performed at approximately four months of age. A total of 30 patients with HLHS will be enrolled in the study. Fifteen patients will receive six-to-eight stem cell injections each, based on the size of the heart, while 15 control patients will not receive the cells. This is an open-label trial, in which researchers and participant families will know whether or not the cells are administered. Kaushal laid the groundwork for this trial eight years ago as he began exploring the possibilities of stem cells to strengthen children’s hearts. Kaushal says he and his team developed many models trying to understand how these cells work in the laboratory before moving to a clinical application. “There’s a lot of basic science behind what we’re doing. I want to make sure that what we pursue is rigorous in the laboratory, to make sure that we’re providing the best therapy for these little kids.” Several researchers at the School of Medicine’s University of Maryland Center for Stem Cell Biology & Regenerative Medicine have added their expertise to the effort, collaborating with Dr. Kaushal to understand and develop stem cell therapy for children with heart failure. “Dr. Kaushal and colleagues have discovered that the failing neonatal heart is actually a rich source of cardiac stem cells, but the existing stem cells in the hearts of these babies are not sufficient to overcome HLHS,” says Curt I. Civin, MD, professor of pediatrics and physiology, director of the Center for Stem Cell Biology & Regenerative Medicine, and Associate Dean for Research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. “We are close to understanding one mechanism underlying this insufficiency. This line of research is a key part of our quest to use stem cells to repair, cure and prevent severe diseases in children and adults.” In previously published research, Kaushal demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells can restore function in a pre-clinical model replicating many of the features of HLHS. The stem cells remodeled the heart muscle (myocardium) similar to normal myocardium. Stem cells in the heart may also secrete growth factors conducive to forming heart muscle and keeping the muscle from dying. “These key findings suggested these cells would work for HLHS patients,” says Kaushal. While stem cells have been used to regenerate adult hearts, Kaushal says improvements have been marginal. His research suggests results may be better in pediatric hearts: “The heart is able to remodel better in a younger patient than an older patient, because the body is still growing, good things are going on, and things are not deteriorating.” Civin, a pediatric oncologist, says his very first patient as a pediatric intern-in-training years ago was an infant with HLHS. “I’ve seen how devastating HLHS can be for babies and their families. I’m thrilled with the launch of this first-in-children stem cell therapeutic trial, and look forward to the patient outcomes.” The Department of Surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine is providing funding for the clinical costs associated with this trial.


WEST PALM BEACH, FL--(Marketwired - November 29, 2016) - Organizers of the Equine World Stem Cell Summit (EWSCS) are pleased to announce a partnership with the North American Veterinary Regenerative Medicine Association (NAVRMA). The Equine World Stem Cell Summit will be held as a dedicated showcase track of the esteemed World Stem Cell Summit on December 7-9 at the Palm Beach County Convention Center in West Palm Beach, FL. Riders, owners, trainers, veterinarians, and more are welcome to attend and learn more about this exciting and wide-ranging topic. Bernie Siegel, Founder & Chair of the World Stem Cell Summit, stated, "We are excited to partner with NAVRMA. They are a committee of some of the most respected research scientists and veterinary practitioners in the industry, and they share our mission to accelerate regenerative medicine to improve health and deliver cures, whether for humans or animals." The EWSCS will welcome Dr. Alan Nixon, Chair of the Board of Directors at NAVRMA, as a speaker at the summit. Dr. Nixon is the Director of the Comparative Orthopaedics Laboratory at Cornell University. Dr. Nixon obtained his veterinary degree from the University of Sydney in 1978 and completed a surgical residency and research degree at Colorado State University in 1983. After five years in the Department of Surgical Sciences at the University of Florida, Dr. Nixon moved to New York in 1988, where he is currently a professor in the Department of Clinical Sciences at Cornell University. Dr. Nixon's research includes joint pathobiology and cartilage repair with growth factor gene-enhanced chondrocyte and stem cell transplantation techniques, genetic characterization of OCD in animals and man using microarray expression studies, and clinical application of growth factor recombinant proteins and gene therapy for improved joint, tendon, and bone repair. "We are excited to participate in the Equine World Stem Cell Summit and believe NAVRMA and EWSCS is a natural partnership," said Dr. Nixon. "We encourage professional improvement and the exchange of knowledge and ideas among people interested in veterinary regenerative medicine. The summit is the perfect place to share information and encourage learning not only for veterinarians and researchers, but for interested owners, riders, trainers, and breeders in the equine industry." Throughout the three-day conference, produced by the non-profit Regenerative Medicine Foundation, attendees will hear from industry-leading veterinarians and researchers. As the single conference uniting the global stem cell community, the WSCS provides a platform for the equine community to interact with leading researchers and institutions, as well as industry, investor, and philanthropic groups. The conference attracts approximately 1,000 attendees from 40 countries with 225 speakers and program participants. Registration for the Equine World Stem Cell Summit is $500 for the three-day track. Sign up online and use the code "EQUINERM" today! To learn more about the 12th Annual World Stem Cell Summit and the Equine World Stem Cell Summit and to find out how you can get involved as a sponsor or attendee, visit www.worldstemcellsummit.com or email Alan Fernandez at alan@regmedfoundation.org. The Equine World Stem Cell Summit is a dedicated track of the World Stem Cell Summit, to be held December 6-9 at the Palm Beach County Convention Center in West Palm Beach, FL. Throughout the conference, leading scientists and veterinarians will present fellow researchers, veterinarians, owners, trainers, riders, and interested public with the latest information on the regenerative medicine that is transforming the care and treatment of horses. The World Stem Cell Summit, produced by the Regenerative Medicine Foundation strives to unite, educate, and empower the global stem cell and regenerative medicine communities and to create a supportive environment for the field. The principal organizing partners for the 2016 World Stem Cell Summit include the Regenerative Medicine Foundation, Mayo Clinic, Kyoto University Institute for Integrated Cell Material Science, Center for Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS), Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Nova Southeastern University, CCRM and the Cure Alliance. To learn more, visit www.worldstemcellsummit.com.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

A new study published this month in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine indicates that treating heart patients with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) does not increase their risk of irregular heart beat (arrhythmia). In fact, the MSCs had the opposite effect and showed promise of improving the condition. “This could be an important breakthrough for many heart patients, as proarrhythmia – which is a new or more frequent occurrence of pre-existing arrhythmia – unfortunately can be a side effect of some of the drugs we’re using to treat these patients,” said the study’s lead author, Raul Mitrani, M.D., of the University of Miami School of Medicine’s Division of Cardiology (Miami, Florida). Arrhythmia is a common condition resulting when electrical impulses in the heart do not work properly, causing the heart to beat either too fast, too slow or erratically. This in turn interferes with blood flow throughout the body and can potentially damage or shut down organs. While some experience no symptoms and their arrhythmia is harmless, in others it can be life threatening. Treatments include anti-arrhythmic drugs; implantable devices such as a pacemaker; surgery; or catheter ablation (a procedure that uses radiofrequency energy to destroy a small area of heart tissue that is causing the off-kilter beats). As more studies are showing the potential of stem cells to repair damage caused by heart disease, Dr. Mitrani and his colleagues at UM wondered whether the stem cells – specifically MSCs, which are 'adult' stem cells that can produce more than one type of specialized cell of the body – would follow the path of some of the anti-arrhythmia drugs and worsen the condition. Previous studies had indicated that perhaps was the case with certain other types of stem cells, but no studies had focused on MSCs. To find the answer, they analyzed the results of 88 patients enrolled in two clinical trials testing the potential of MSCs in treating ischemic cardiomyopathy. This is a common condition in which the heart's ability to pump blood is decreased because its main pumping chamber, the left ventricle, is enlarged, dilated and weak. The patients had an average age of 61 years and were divided into groups treated with either MSCs, bone marrow stem cells (BMCs) or placebo. A year after their treatments, those who received MSCs all showed no signs of arrhythmia. “We were encouraged by what we saw,” Dr. Mitrani said. “Even better, in a group of patients with low ventricular ectopy burden – what some call ‘heart hiccups’ or ‘skipped beats’ – there were definite signs of improvement while in the BMC and placebo groups, no similar signal for improvement was noted. “This leads us to believe that prospective studies might clarify the role of MSCs to reduce ventricular arrhythmias.” “By combining data from two studies, the authors were able to study this question in one of the largest groups of patients to date,” said Anthony Atala, Editor-in-Chief of STEM CELLS Translational Medicine and director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine. “These findings are important because they emphasize the need for further large prospective studies to evaluate the anti-arrhythmic potential of mesenchymal and other newer cell-based therapies.” The full article, “Effects of Transendocardial Stem Cell Injection on Ventricular Proarrhythmia in Patients with Ischemic Cardiomyopathy: Results from the POSEIDON and TAC-HFT Trials,” can be accessed at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/sctm.16-0328/full. About STEM CELLS Translational Medicine: STEM CELLS Translational Medicine (SCTM), published by AlphaMed Press, is a monthly peer-reviewed publication dedicated to significantly advancing the clinical utilization of stem cell molecular and cellular biology. By bridging stem cell research and clinical trials, SCTM will help move applications of these critical investigations closer to accepted best practices. About AlphaMed Press: Established in 1983, AlphaMed Press with offices in Durham, NC, San Francisco, CA, and Belfast, Northern Ireland, publishes two other internationally renowned peer-reviewed journals: STEM CELLS® (http://www.StemCells.com), celebrating its 35th year, is the world's first journal devoted to this fast paced field of research. The Oncologist® (http://www.TheOncologist.com), also a monthly peer-reviewed publication, entering its 22nd year, is devoted to community and hospital-based oncologists and physicians entrusted with cancer patient care. All three journals are premier periodicals with globally recognized editorial boards dedicated to advancing knowledge and education in their focused disciplines.


News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

TORONTO, Nov. 30, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Patricio Stocker, President and CEO of PharmaCielo Ltd., announced the company has appointed a Medical Advisory Board (MAB) to provide guidance on the development of medicinal-grade cannabis oil extracts and related products appropriate for use by clinical practitioners. “Under the guidance of Dr. Delon Human, PharmaCielo Board of Directors member and Chair of the MAB, appointees will be able to provide significant input in the development of our medicinal-grade products through their ability to provide global expertise in the areas of healthcare policy, regulation, medical science and patient insights in addition to their clinical experience,” said Dr. Stocker. Dr. Human has assembled an experienced team of international medical clinicians whose expertise will be leveraged to provide guidance in the development of medicinal-grade cannabis oil based products, as well as international insight and understanding of worldwide healthcare policy and its implications for this emerging global industry. “The Medical Advisory Board will oversee PharmaCielo’s practices and processes, ensuring they are UN-aligned and performed ethically and according to Good Manufacturing and Good Medical Practice,” said Dr. Human.  “During the April 2016 UN General Assembly Special Session on Drugs, the UN and its member states strongly endorsed the need to ensure the accessibility and availability of internationally controlled drugs for medical and scientific purposes, including substances such as cannabinoids. In developing a global framework, this should be promoted within national legal systems, while simultaneously preventing diversion, abuse and trafficking. PharmaCielo has the opportunity to develop the world’s finest quality, naturally grown, pharma-grade cannabis oils.” Four appointees to the MAB were introduced (full biographies are available at www.pharmacielo.com): Dr. Delon Human is the president and CEO of Health Diplomats, a health advisory and consulting practice, providing strategic and technical advice on global health issues to Fortune 500 companies in the pharmaceutical, food, tobacco, nicotine and medical device industries as well as NGOs, governments and foundations. He has acted as adviser to WHO Director-Generals and UN Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon. He is a published author and specializes in global health strategy, corporate and product transformation, harm reduction and health communication. Formerly, he served as the Secretary-General of the International Food and Beverage Alliance (IFBA), which brings together the top food companies in the world. From 1997 to 2005, Dr. Human served as secretary general of the World Medical Association (WMA), the global representative body for physicians. He was instrumental in the establishment of the World Health Professions Alliance, an alliance of the global representative bodies of physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dentists and physical therapists. Dr. Human qualified as a physician in South Africa and completed his postgraduate studies in family medicine and child health in South Africa and Oxford, England. He was a clinician for two decades, part of the pediatric endocrinology research unit at the John Radcliffe Hospital and was involved in the establishment of several medical centers, a hospital and emergency clinic in South Africa. His business studies (MBA) were completed at the Edinburgh Business School. A former chair of the World Medical Association, Dr. Anders Milton is a highly sought-after consultant within the healthcare sector and has served as president of the European Regional Network on HIV/AIDS (ERNA) and as president of the Swedish Red Cross among a number of other positions, including appointment by the Swedish government as chairman of a committee on Swedish HIV/AIDS policies and a member of the Catastrophe Commission formed following the December 2004 tsunami. Recently he led a select committee studying organ donation and transplantation. Previously, Dr. Milton served as president and CEO of the Swedish Medical Association. A director of several public and privately held companies and foundations, Dr. Milton originally studied economics before turning to medicine, and after graduating university as a medical doctor and PhD he served as a clinician at the Department of Nephrology at the University Hospital at Uppsala. Throughout his career he has been engaged in work in support of human rights, ethics of medical practice and safe health care, of which effective pharmacotherapy is an integral part. Dr. Gutiérrez is a neuroradiologist in private practice and Director of the Neuroradiology Division at Centro Avanzado de Diagnostíco Médico (CEDIMED) in Colombia. Previously, Dr. Gutiérrez served at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, TX as Associate Professor of Radiology, Vice Chair of Clinical Operations, Medical Director and Director of the Clinical Trials Division at the Radiology Department. He was formerly Director of Medical Development, Diagnostic Imaging and Associate Director of Clinical Development, Diagnostic Imaging for Bayer Healthcare (formerly Berlex Laboratories) in Montville, NJ. Dr. Gutiérrez also served as a medical monitor with Novartis (formerly Ciba-Geigy Labs) in Medellin. Dr. Gutiérrez has been the recipient of several awards for his work, and has been the lead researcher, international researcher and co-investigator on numerous clinical trials.  Regularly published, he has co-edited five medical books and authored or co-authored over 25 book chapters as well as 17 peer-reviewed articles and scores of abstracts and articles published in scientific research journals. Dr. Gutiérrez received a Doctorate in Medicine and Surgery from CES University in Medellin and Specialist in Clinical Radiology from Pontifical Xavierian University / San Ignacio Hospital in Bogota. He completed a research fellowship in Neuroradiology at Thomas Jefferson University / TJU Hospital in Philadelphia, PA and a visiting fellowship in Interventional Neuroradiology at the University of Miami / Jackson Memorial Hospital. Dr. Soto is Chairman of the Department of Radiology at Boston Medical Center and a Professor of Radiology at the Boston University School of Medicine. He has previously served as a general medical practitioner with the Hospital San Antonio de Prado in Colombia, section head of Body Imaging at University of San Vicente de Paúl Hospital, radiologist at CEDIMED in Medellin, assistant professor of Radiology at the University of Antioquia and was vice chairman of Boston Medical Center’s Department of Radiology for ten years. A native of Medellin with citizenship in both Colombia and the United States, Dr. Soto received his Doctor in Medicine and Surgery and Specialist in Diagnostic Radiology from CES University’s Health Sciences Institute in Medellin, and completed a Radiology Body Imaging Fellowship at Boston University Medical Center. Dr. Soto has received honors and awards from the Colombian Ministry of Education, Medellin Medicine Academy, Boston University Medical Center and numerous professional societies.  An extensively published researcher, Dr. Soto is a member of the editorial boards of Radiology and Abdominal Imaging, has edited seven books and has published over 85 original research papers and more than 35 reviews, book chapters and case reports. PharmaCielo Ltd. (the “Company”) is a global company privately held and headquartered in Canada, with a focus on processing and supplying all natural, medicinal-grade cannabis oil extracts and related products to large channel distributors.  The Company’s principal (and wholly-owned) subsidiary is PharmaCielo Colombia Holdings S.A.S., headquartered at its Nursery and Propagation Centre located in Rionegro, Colombia. The boards of directors and executive teams of both PharmaCielo and PharmaCielo Colombia Holdings are comprised of a diversely talented group of international business executives and specialists with relevant and varied expertise.  PharmaCielo recognized the significant role that Colombia’s ideal location will play in building a sustainable business in the medical cannabis industry, and the Company, together with its directors and executives, has built a compelling business plan focused on supplying the international marketplace. This press release contains forward-looking statements. Often, but not always, forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of words such as “plans”, “expects” or “does not expect”, “is expected”, “estimates”, “intends”, “anticipates” or “does not anticipate”, or “believes”, or “recurring” or variations of such words and phrases or state that certain actions, events or results “may”, “could”, “would”, “might” or “will” be taken, occur or be achieved. Forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, such as demand for the Company’s products, currency exchange changes and risks, internal funding and the financial condition of the Company, product roll-out, competition, technological changes, and other commercial matters involving the Company, its products, and the markets in which the Company operates, as well as general economic conditions, which may cause the actual results, performance or achievements of the Company to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. Actual results and developments are likely to differ, and may differ materially, from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements contained in this press release. There can be no assurance that forward-looking statements will prove to be accurate, as actual results and future events could differ materially from those anticipated in such statements. Accordingly, readers should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements. Except as required by law, we undertake no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. However, any further disclosures made on related subjects in subsequent reports should be consulted.


MINNEAPOLIS, Dec. 07, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Sun BioPharma, Inc. (OTCQB:SNBP), a biopharmaceutical company developing disruptive therapeutics for the treatment of patients with pancreatic diseases, today announced that the Data Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB), an independent group of medical experts closely monitoring the Company’s clinical study, has completed its safety review of the data from cycle 1 dosing of the fourth cohort of patients. As a result of this review by the DSMB, Sun Biopharma has begun recruiting patients for the fifth patient cohort in the dose escalation phase of the study. The Company currently expects to begin dosing patients in the fifth cohort as early as December 12, 2016, which is approximately 60 days after the fourth patient cohort commenced dosing. “Our safety data from this Phase 1 Study continue to be encouraging,” said Suzanne Gagnon, M.D., Sun BioPharma’s Chief Medical Officer. “Once again there were no dose-limiting toxicities in the fourth group and no drug-related serious adverse events occurred. Patients are tolerating SBP-101 very well! We continued to see no evidence of bone marrow toxicity. Based on the unconditional approval by the DSMB we will immediately commence with the recruitment of the fifth cohort of patients using a higher dose of SBP-101.” “We are encouraged by the enthusiasm for our Phase 1 trial at the study sites as we continued the rapid pace of enrollment with our fourth cohort allowing us to move quickly into the fifth cohort. Through our first four cohorts, we have dosed and captured data from 15 patients, some of whom have completed multiple dosing cycles. This represents a significant base of safety data for SBP-101,” commented David B. Kaysen, President and CEO of Sun BioPharma. “We are extremely grateful for the dedication of the clinical teams at our study sites and for the patients who have volunteered to be part of our study.” Two of the Company’s study sites are in the United States: Mayo Clinic Scottsdale and HonorHealth, both in Scottsdale, AZ and three study sites are in Australia: The Ashford Cancer Centre in Adelaide, the Olivia Newton-John Cancer & Wellness Centre and Box Hill Hospital at Monash University, both in Melbourne. About SBP-101 SBP-101 is a first-in-class, proprietary, polyamine compound designed to exert therapeutic effects in a mechanism specific to the pancreas. Sun BioPharma originally licensed SBP-101 from the University of Florida in 2011. The molecule has been shown to be highly effective in human pancreatic cancer models, demonstrating superior activity to existing FDA approved chemotherapy agents. Combination therapy potential has also been shown for pancreatic cancer. SBP-101 is expected to differ from current pancreatic cancer therapies in that it specifically targets the exocrine pancreas and has shown efficacy against primary and metastatic disease in animal models of human pancreatic cancer. Therefore management believes that SBP-101 may effectively treat both primary and metastatic pancreatic cancer, while leaving the insulin-producing islet cells and non-pancreatic tissue unharmed. About the Phase 1 Safety Study of SBP-101 in Patients with Previously Treated Pancreatic Cancer Sun BioPharma is currently conducting a clinical trial of SBP-101 in patients with previously treated locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. This is a Phase 1, first-in-human study with a dose-escalation phase and an expansion phase at the anticipated recommended treatment dose. This study is being conducted at clinical sites in both the United States and Australia including Mayo Clinic Scottsdale and HonorHealth in Scottsdale, AZ, the Austin Health Cancer Trials Centre and the Box Hill Hospital in Melbourne, Australia and the Ashford Cancer Centre in Adelaide, Australia. About Sun BioPharma Sun BioPharma Inc. is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing disruptive therapeutics for urgent unmet medical needs. The Company’s development programs target diseases of the pancreas, including pancreatic cancer and pancreatitis; the Company’s initial product candidate is SBP-101 for the treatment of patients with pancreatic cancer. SBP-101 was invented by Ray Bergeron, Ph.D. Distinguished Professor Emeritus, University of Florida. Sun BioPharma has scientific collaborations with pancreatic disease experts at Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, the University of Miami, the University of Florida, the Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, the Austin Health Cancer Trials Centre and the Box Hill Hospital in Melbourne, Australia and the Ashford Cancer Centre in Adelaide, Australia. Further information can be found at: www.sunbiopharma.com. Sun BioPharma’s common stock is currently quoted on the OTCQB tier of the over-the-counter markets administered by the OTC Markets Group, Inc. under the symbol: SNBP. Forward-Looking Statements Safe Harbor Statements pertaining to future financial and/or operating results, future growth in research, technology, clinical development, and potential opportunities for Sun BioPharma, along with other statements about the future expectations, beliefs, goals, plans, or prospects expressed by management constitute “forward-looking statements” For purposes of the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1955. Any statements that are not historical fact (including, but not limited to statements that contain words such as “will,” “believes,” “may,” “anticipates,” “expects,” “estimates” or “plans”) should also be considered to be forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, including, without limitation, our need to obtain additional capital to support our business plan, which may not be available on acceptable terms or at all, risks inherent in the development and/or commercialization of potential products, uncertainty in the pace of enrollment and results of clinical trials or regulatory approvals and maintenance of intellectual property rights. Actual results may differ materially from the results anticipated in these forward-looking statements and as such should be evaluated together with the many uncertainties that affect Sun BioPharma and its business, particularly those disclosed from time to time in Sun BioPharma’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Shareholders and other readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date on which they are made. Sun BioPharma disclaims any intent or obligation to update these forward-looking statements.


FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla., Feb. 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Paymeon, Inc. (OTC MARKETS:PAYM) today announced that its Basalt America subsidiary has supplied its RockMesh® concrete reinforcement product for delivery on its first government contract.  The end customer, the City of Miami, will use the product in a new skateboard park currently under construction.  Vincent L. Celentano, a Director and the Company’s largest shareholder said "Though it is a small project, relative to our goals of reinforcing all bridges, roads and commercial buildings in the future, I compare it to Neil Armstrong's famous words, ‘One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.’  I see this as a catalyst and our gateway to other projects we are currently seeking out." The first bridge to incorporate the Company’s suite of products is on the campus of the University of Miami.  See the University of Miami’s Innovation Bridge video here.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xy3ISYNJfOI Disclaimers Forward-Looking Statements:  Except for statements of historical fact, this news release contains certain "forward-looking statements" as defined by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, including, without limitation expectations, beliefs, plans and objectives regarding the development, use and marketability of products and partnerships, as well as potential transactions the Company may be considering or may have closed. Such forward-looking statements are based on present circumstances and on PAYM's predictions with respect to events that have not occurred, that may not occur, or that may occur with different consequences and timing than those now assumed or anticipated. Such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, and are not guarantees of future performance or results and involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual events or results to differ materially from the events or results expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Such factors include general economic and business conditions, the ability to successfully develop and market products, consumer and business consumption habits, the ability to fund operations, reliance on representations from third parties that may not execute as planned, development of new markets, and other factors over which PAYM has little or no control. Such forward-looking statements are made only as of the date of this release, and PAYM assumes no obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect subsequent events or circumstances. Readers should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Risks, uncertainties and other factors are discussed in documents filed from time to time by PAYM with the Securities and Exchange Commission. This press release does not and shall not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of any offer to buy any securities.  For additional information and potential risk factors, readers should review PAYM’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, which can be found at www.sec.gov.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

HONOLULU--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Bank of Hawaii Corp. (NYSE:BOH) announced that its shareholders have elected Alicia Moy to serve on its board of directors, effective Feb. 24. Moy is president and chief executive officer of Hawai‘i Gas, which was established in 1904 as the state’s only government-franchised, full-service gas company. With the addition of Moy, Bank of Hawaii Corporation’s board of directors increases from 12 to 13. “On behalf of Bank of Hawaii, I am delighted to welcome Alicia Moy to our board,” said Peter Ho, chairman, president and chief executive officer of Bank of Hawaii Corp. “Alicia’s expertise in utilities and energy has given her a unique perspective on Hawaii’s energy ecosystem and how it is transforming to meet the state’s renewable energy goals. Given the importance of energy in Hawaii and how it impacts all consumers in the state, Alicia’s strong executive leadership in finance and strategic planning will bring valuable insights to our board.” Moy joined Hawai‘i Gas in 2013, after serving 12 years as senior vice president at Hawai‘i Gas’s management company, Macquarie Infrastructure and Real Assets, where she oversaw corporate strategy, strategic planning, funding and management of several utility companies, including Hawai‘i Gas. Prior to that, she worked for Morgan Stanley in the Investment Banking division, where she was involved in corporate finance and mergers and acquisitions for private equity clients from 1999 to 2001. Moy holds a bachelor’s degree in finance and marketing from the University of Miami and a master’s degree in finance from INSEAD. A member of the Hawai‘i Gas board of directors since 2011, Moy also serves on the boards of Aloha United Way, the Chamber of Commerce of Hawaii, the Western Energy Institute and MIC Renewable Energy Holdings. She also sits on advisory boards for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative and Women in Renewable Energy and is a member of the Hawaii Business Roundtable.


FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla., Feb. 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Paymeon, Inc. (OTC MARKETS:PAYM) today announced that its Basalt America subsidiary has supplied its RockMesh® concrete reinforcement product for delivery on its first government contract.  The end customer, the City of Miami, will use the product in a new skateboard park currently under construction.  Vincent L. Celentano, a Director and the Company’s largest shareholder said "Though it is a small project, relative to our goals of reinforcing all bridges, roads and commercial buildings in the future, I compare it to Neil Armstrong's famous words, ‘One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.’  I see this as a catalyst and our gateway to other projects we are currently seeking out." The first bridge to incorporate the Company’s suite of products is on the campus of the University of Miami.  See the University of Miami’s Innovation Bridge video here.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xy3ISYNJfOI Disclaimers Forward-Looking Statements:  Except for statements of historical fact, this news release contains certain "forward-looking statements" as defined by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, including, without limitation expectations, beliefs, plans and objectives regarding the development, use and marketability of products and partnerships, as well as potential transactions the Company may be considering or may have closed. Such forward-looking statements are based on present circumstances and on PAYM's predictions with respect to events that have not occurred, that may not occur, or that may occur with different consequences and timing than those now assumed or anticipated. Such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, and are not guarantees of future performance or results and involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual events or results to differ materially from the events or results expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Such factors include general economic and business conditions, the ability to successfully develop and market products, consumer and business consumption habits, the ability to fund operations, reliance on representations from third parties that may not execute as planned, development of new markets, and other factors over which PAYM has little or no control. Such forward-looking statements are made only as of the date of this release, and PAYM assumes no obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect subsequent events or circumstances. Readers should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Risks, uncertainties and other factors are discussed in documents filed from time to time by PAYM with the Securities and Exchange Commission. This press release does not and shall not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of any offer to buy any securities.  For additional information and potential risk factors, readers should review PAYM’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, which can be found at www.sec.gov.


Scythian Biosciences Inc is developing a proprietary Cannabinoid (CBD) combination therapy for the prevention and treatment of concussions and traumatic brain injury NOT FOR DISSEMINATION IN THE UNITED STATES OR FOR DISTRIBUTION TO U.S. NEWSWIRE SERVICES Kitrinor Metals Inc. (TSX VENTURE:KIT) (the "Company") is pleased to announce that it has entered into a non-binding letter of intent dated February 17, 2017 (the "Letter of Intent") with Scythian Biosciences Inc., a private Canadian corporation ("Scythian"), in connection with a proposed reverse take-over of the Company (the "Proposed Transaction"), subject to approval of the TSX Venture Exchange ("TSXV"), to list the shares of the resulting entity (the "Resulting Issuer") on the TSXV. The Resulting Issuer will operate as a life sciences issuer continuing the business of Scythian. Aphria Inc. (TSX VENTURE:APH)(OTCQB:APHQF) is expected to be a lead investor in the Offering as defined below. The Letter of Intent provides that the Company and Scythian will negotiate and enter into a definitive agreement in respect of the Proposed Transaction on or before March 10, 2017 (the "Definitive Agreement"). Pursuant to the terms of the Letter of Intent, completion of the Proposed Transaction will be subject to a number of conditions, including completion of an Offering (described below), shareholder approval, if required, completion or waiver of sponsorship, receipt of all required regulatory approvals, including the approval of the TSXV, completion of satisfactory due diligence reviews, satisfaction of the initial listing requirements of the TSXV and all requirements under the policies of the TSXV relating to the completion of the Proposed Transaction, and execution of the Definitive Agreement. The Company and Scythian will complete the Proposed Transaction by way of a three-cornered amalgamation whereby a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company will amalgamate with Scythian to form a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Resulting Issuer. The Proposed Transaction is an arm's length transaction. Prior to or contemporaneously with the completion of the Proposed Transaction, Scythian will complete a consolidation of its issued and outstanding common shares on a 4 for 1 basis. The anticipated completion date for the Proposed Transaction is May 31, 2017. A filing statement or management information circular, as applicable, will be prepared and filed in accordance with the policies of the TSXV. As a condition to the completion of the Proposed Transaction, Scythian will complete a brokered subscription receipt financing, through a syndicate of agents led by Clarus Securities Inc. and including Haywood Securities Inc. and Canaccord Genuity Corp. (the "Agents"), for aggregate gross proceeds of up to $10,000,000 through the issuance of up to 25,000,000 subscription receipts ("Subscription Receipts") at a price of $0.40 per Subscription Receipt (the "Offering"), subject to the rules of, and approval by, the TSXV. Upon satisfaction of the escrow release conditions, including all conditions precedent to the Proposed Transaction being satisfied, each Subscription Receipt will automatically convert without any further action on the part of the holder into one (1) common share of the Resulting Issuer. Should the escrow release conditions not be satisfied, the Subscription Receipts will be cancelled and all proceeds from the sale of Subscription Receipts will be returned to subscribers without interest. As compensation for the services provided in connection with the Offering, the Agents will receive a cash commission equal to 7% of the gross proceeds raised in connection with the Offering and broker warrants equal to 7% of the Resulting Issuer shares. Upon completion of the Proposed Transaction, the proceeds of the Offering will be used to further develop the business of the Resulting Issuer and for general working capital purposes. Sponsorship of the Proposed Transaction may be required by the TSXV unless an exemption or waiver from this requirement can be obtained in accordance with the policies of the TSXV. The Company intends to apply for a waiver of the sponsorship requirement. There is no assurance that a waiver from this requirement can or will be obtained. Scythian is a research and development company committed to finding a solution for the prevention and treatment of concussions and traumatic brain injury ("TBI") with its proprietary Cannabinoid ("CBD") combination. Scythian's mission is to be the first accepted drug regimen for concussive treatment. Scythian has recently formed a collaboration with the University of Miami and its world renowned neuroscientific team to conduct pre-clinical and clinical trials of its drug regimen. The University of Miami believes that Scythian's scientific approach shows significant promise and differs from previous approaches to treat this growing problem. The collaboration with the University of Miami allows access to their extensive knowledge base in the fields of traumatic brain injury and concussions and allows for Scythian's clinical studies to be undertaken at their world-class facilities. Gillian A. Hotz, PhD, is leading Scythian's program at the University of Miami. Dr. Hotz is a nationally recognized behavioral neuroscientist and expert in neurotrauma, concussion management, and neurorehabilitation. She has extensive experience in neurocognitive testing. Dr. Hotz has been the co-director of University of Miami Miller School of Medicine's Concussion Program since 1995. Scythian is also endorsed by the NFL Alumni Association and the World Boxing Association on its mission. Kitrinor is a junior mining exploration company engaged in the acquisition, exploration and development of mineral resource properties in Canada. The Company's activities are currently focused on the exploration and development of the Culroc Property located in the Township of Sothman, Ontario. The common shares of the Company are currently halted from trading pending completion of the Proposed Transaction. A comprehensive press release with further particulars relating to the Proposed Transaction, financial particulars and descriptions of the proposed board of directors and management of the Resulting Issuer will follow in accordance with the policies of the TSXV. All information contained in this press release with respect to the Company and Scythian was supplied by the parties respectively, for inclusion herein, and each party and its directors and officers have relied on the other party for any information concerning the other party. Completion of the Proposed Transaction is subject to a number of conditions including, but not limited to, completion of satisfactory due diligence, completion of the Offering, execution of the Definitive Agreement in respect of the Proposed Transaction, TSXV acceptance and, if applicable, pursuant to policies of the TSXV, majority of the minority shareholder approval. Where applicable, the Proposed Transaction cannot close until the required shareholder approval is obtained. There can be no assurance that the Proposed Transaction will be completed as proposed, or at all. Investors are cautioned that, except as disclosed in the management information circular or filing statement to be prepared in connection with the Proposed Transaction, any information released or received with respect to the Proposed Transaction may not be accurate or complete and should not be relied upon. Trading in the securities of the Company should be considered highly speculative. Neither the TSXV nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSXV) has in any way passed upon the merits of the Proposed Transaction and associated transactions and neither of the foregoing entities has in any way approved or disapproved of the contents of this press release. Neither the TSXV nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSXV) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this press release. The common shares of the Company have not been and will not be registered under the United States Securities Act of 1933, as amended and may not be offered or sold in the United States absent registration or an applicable exemption from the registration requirement. This press release shall not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy nor shall there be any sale of the securities in any jurisdiction in which such offer, solicitation or sale would be unlawful. This news release contains "forward-looking information" within the meaning of applicable securities laws relating to the Proposed Transaction including statements regarding the terms and conditions of the Proposed Transaction and the Letter of Intent, as well as information relating to Scythian. The information about Scythian contained in the press release has not been independently verified by the Company. Although the Company believes in light of the experience of its officers and directors, current conditions and expected future developments and other factors that have been considered appropriate, that the expectations reflected in this forward-looking information are reasonable, undue reliance should not be placed on them because the Company can give no assurance that they will prove to be correct. Readers are cautioned to not place undue reliance on forward-looking information. Actual results and developments may differ materially from those contemplated by these statements depending on, among other things, the risks that the parties will not proceed with the Proposed Transaction and the Letter of Intent; that the ultimate terms of the Proposed Transaction and the Letter of Intent will differ from those that currently are contemplated; and that the Proposed Transaction and the Letter of Intent will not be successfully completed for any reason (including the failure to obtain the required approvals or clearances from regulatory authorities). The terms and conditions of the Proposed Transaction may change based on the Company's due diligence and the receipt of tax, corporate and securities law advice for both the Company and Scythian. The statements in this press release are made as of the date of this release. The Company undertakes no obligation to comment on analyses, expectations or statements made by third-parties in respect of the Company, Scythian, their securities, or their respective financial or operating results (as applicable).


WALTHAM, Mass., Feb. 21, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Minerva Neurosciences, Inc. (Nasdaq:NERV), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of therapies to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders, will host a Research and Development Day to highlight unmet needs, including negative symptoms and cognitive impairment, and emerging treatment strategies in schizophrenia in New York City on March 2, 2017 from 8:00 am to 9:30 am Eastern Time. The meeting will feature presentations by key opinion leaders Philip Harvey, PhD (University of Miami) and René Kahn, MD, PhD (Mount Sinai), who will discuss the current treatment landscape for schizophrenia. Dr. Remy Luthringer, president and chief executive officer of Minerva, will provide an overview of the Company’s ongoing clinical development work with MIN-101, including the Company’s clinical strategy moving forward.  The presenters will be available to answer questions following the breakfast. Philip D. Harvey, PhD is Leonard M. Miller Professor of Psychiatry and director of the Division of Psychology at the University Of Miami Miller School Of Medicine and a VA Senior Health Scientist.  Dr. Harvey’s research has focused on cognition and functioning, and he has written extensively on aging in schizophrenia, negative symptoms in schizophrenia, functional impairments in severe mental illness, the cognitive effects of typical and atypical antipsychotics, and the effects of cognitive enhancing agents and cognitive training in various conditions.  Dr. Harvey is a widely cited author who was repeatedly designated by Thomson-Reuters as being in the top 1% of all researchers in citations in mental health each year since 2010. He has received numerous awards for his research in schizophrenia. Dr. René Kahn is the Esther and Joseph Klingenstein Professor and System Chair of Psychiatry at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Over the last 30 years, Dr. Kahn and his research group have been instrumental in showing that brain changes in schizophrenia are progressive over time and have helped educate the medical community on the clinical relevance of these changes on cognitive function.  He has served as principal investigator on several clinical trials for schizophrenia and has published over 800 research papers. He was Treasurer and Vice President of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology and is currently past-President of The Schizophrenia International Research Society. He is a fellow of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. This event is intended for institutional investors, sell-side analysts, investment bankers and business development professionals only.  Please RSVP in advance if you plan to attend, as space is limited. To reserve a spot, please reply to this email or contact LifeSci Advisors, LLC at Mac@LifeSciAdvisors.com. A live and archived webcast of the event, with slides, will be available at http://lifesci.rampard.com/20170302/reg.jsp and on the Investors section of the Company’s website at http://ir.minervaneurosciences.com. MIN-101 is a drug candidate with equipotent affinities for sigma 2 and 5‑hydroxytryptamine-2A (5-HT ) and lower affinity at α1-adrenergic receptors. MIN-101 has no direct dopaminergic post-synaptic blocking effects, known to be involved in some side effects like extrapyramidal symptoms, sedation, prolactin increases and weight gain. As described by the National Institute of Mental Health, schizophrenia is a chronic and severe disorder that affects how a person thinks, feels and acts1.  In 2015 approximately 3.2 million people suffered from schizophrenia in the U.S., Japan and the five major European markets.  Schizophrenic patients suffer from positive, negative and cognitive symptoms.  Negative symptoms are disruptions to normal emotions and behaviors that may signal social withdrawal.  Patients may be socially inhibited, lack the ability to begin and sustain planned activities, or speak little even when forced to interact.  Negative symptoms account for a substantial portion of the morbidity associated with schizophrenia2.  They persist chronically throughout an individual patient’s lifetime and increase with severity over time.  Similar to negative symptoms, cognitive symptoms may be difficult to recognize and often are detected only when specific testing is performed.  Cognitive symptoms include: poor “executive functioning,” or the ability to understand information and use it to make decisions; trouble focusing or paying attention; problems with “working memory,” or the ability to use information immediately after learning it.  Poor cognition is related to worse employment and social outcomes for patients with schizophrenia. Minerva Neurosciences, Inc. is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of a portfolio of product candidates to treat CNS diseases.  Minerva’s proprietary compounds include: MIN-101, in clinical development for schizophrenia; MIN-117, in clinical development for major depressive disorder (MDD); MIN-202 (JNJ-42847922), in clinical development for insomnia and MDD; and MIN-301, in pre-clinical development for Parkinson’s disease.  Minerva’s common stock is listed on the NASDAQ Global Market under the symbol “NERV.”  For more information, please visit www.minervaneurosciences.com. 2 Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, American Psychiatric Association.


WALTHAM, Mass., Feb. 21, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Minerva Neurosciences, Inc. (Nasdaq:NERV), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of therapies to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders, will host a Research and Development Day to highlight unmet needs, including negative symptoms and cognitive impairment, and emerging treatment strategies in schizophrenia in New York City on March 2, 2017 from 8:00 am to 9:30 am Eastern Time. The meeting will feature presentations by key opinion leaders Philip Harvey, PhD (University of Miami) and René Kahn, MD, PhD (Mount Sinai), who will discuss the current treatment landscape for schizophrenia. Dr. Remy Luthringer, president and chief executive officer of Minerva, will provide an overview of the Company’s ongoing clinical development work with MIN-101, including the Company’s clinical strategy moving forward.  The presenters will be available to answer questions following the breakfast. Philip D. Harvey, PhD is Leonard M. Miller Professor of Psychiatry and director of the Division of Psychology at the University Of Miami Miller School Of Medicine and a VA Senior Health Scientist.  Dr. Harvey’s research has focused on cognition and functioning, and he has written extensively on aging in schizophrenia, negative symptoms in schizophrenia, functional impairments in severe mental illness, the cognitive effects of typical and atypical antipsychotics, and the effects of cognitive enhancing agents and cognitive training in various conditions.  Dr. Harvey is a widely cited author who was repeatedly designated by Thomson-Reuters as being in the top 1% of all researchers in citations in mental health each year since 2010. He has received numerous awards for his research in schizophrenia. Dr. René Kahn is the Esther and Joseph Klingenstein Professor and System Chair of Psychiatry at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Over the last 30 years, Dr. Kahn and his research group have been instrumental in showing that brain changes in schizophrenia are progressive over time and have helped educate the medical community on the clinical relevance of these changes on cognitive function.  He has served as principal investigator on several clinical trials for schizophrenia and has published over 800 research papers. He was Treasurer and Vice President of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology and is currently past-President of The Schizophrenia International Research Society. He is a fellow of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. This event is intended for institutional investors, sell-side analysts, investment bankers and business development professionals only.  Please RSVP in advance if you plan to attend, as space is limited. To reserve a spot, please reply to this email or contact LifeSci Advisors, LLC at Mac@LifeSciAdvisors.com. A live and archived webcast of the event, with slides, will be available at http://lifesci.rampard.com/20170302/reg.jsp and on the Investors section of the Company’s website at http://ir.minervaneurosciences.com. MIN-101 is a drug candidate with equipotent affinities for sigma 2 and 5‑hydroxytryptamine-2A (5-HT ) and lower affinity at α1-adrenergic receptors. MIN-101 has no direct dopaminergic post-synaptic blocking effects, known to be involved in some side effects like extrapyramidal symptoms, sedation, prolactin increases and weight gain. As described by the National Institute of Mental Health, schizophrenia is a chronic and severe disorder that affects how a person thinks, feels and acts1.  In 2015 approximately 3.2 million people suffered from schizophrenia in the U.S., Japan and the five major European markets.  Schizophrenic patients suffer from positive, negative and cognitive symptoms.  Negative symptoms are disruptions to normal emotions and behaviors that may signal social withdrawal.  Patients may be socially inhibited, lack the ability to begin and sustain planned activities, or speak little even when forced to interact.  Negative symptoms account for a substantial portion of the morbidity associated with schizophrenia2.  They persist chronically throughout an individual patient’s lifetime and increase with severity over time.  Similar to negative symptoms, cognitive symptoms may be difficult to recognize and often are detected only when specific testing is performed.  Cognitive symptoms include: poor “executive functioning,” or the ability to understand information and use it to make decisions; trouble focusing or paying attention; problems with “working memory,” or the ability to use information immediately after learning it.  Poor cognition is related to worse employment and social outcomes for patients with schizophrenia. Minerva Neurosciences, Inc. is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of a portfolio of product candidates to treat CNS diseases.  Minerva’s proprietary compounds include: MIN-101, in clinical development for schizophrenia; MIN-117, in clinical development for major depressive disorder (MDD); MIN-202 (JNJ-42847922), in clinical development for insomnia and MDD; and MIN-301, in pre-clinical development for Parkinson’s disease.  Minerva’s common stock is listed on the NASDAQ Global Market under the symbol “NERV.”  For more information, please visit www.minervaneurosciences.com. 2 Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, American Psychiatric Association.


WALTHAM, Mass., Feb. 21, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Minerva Neurosciences, Inc. (Nasdaq:NERV), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of therapies to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders, will host a Research and Development Day to highlight unmet needs, including negative symptoms and cognitive impairment, and emerging treatment strategies in schizophrenia in New York City on March 2, 2017 from 8:00 am to 9:30 am Eastern Time. The meeting will feature presentations by key opinion leaders Philip Harvey, PhD (University of Miami) and René Kahn, MD, PhD (Mount Sinai), who will discuss the current treatment landscape for schizophrenia. Dr. Remy Luthringer, president and chief executive officer of Minerva, will provide an overview of the Company’s ongoing clinical development work with MIN-101, including the Company’s clinical strategy moving forward.  The presenters will be available to answer questions following the breakfast. Philip D. Harvey, PhD is Leonard M. Miller Professor of Psychiatry and director of the Division of Psychology at the University Of Miami Miller School Of Medicine and a VA Senior Health Scientist.  Dr. Harvey’s research has focused on cognition and functioning, and he has written extensively on aging in schizophrenia, negative symptoms in schizophrenia, functional impairments in severe mental illness, the cognitive effects of typical and atypical antipsychotics, and the effects of cognitive enhancing agents and cognitive training in various conditions.  Dr. Harvey is a widely cited author who was repeatedly designated by Thomson-Reuters as being in the top 1% of all researchers in citations in mental health each year since 2010. He has received numerous awards for his research in schizophrenia. Dr. René Kahn is the Esther and Joseph Klingenstein Professor and System Chair of Psychiatry at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Over the last 30 years, Dr. Kahn and his research group have been instrumental in showing that brain changes in schizophrenia are progressive over time and have helped educate the medical community on the clinical relevance of these changes on cognitive function.  He has served as principal investigator on several clinical trials for schizophrenia and has published over 800 research papers. He was Treasurer and Vice President of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology and is currently past-President of The Schizophrenia International Research Society. He is a fellow of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. This event is intended for institutional investors, sell-side analysts, investment bankers and business development professionals only.  Please RSVP in advance if you plan to attend, as space is limited. To reserve a spot, please reply to this email or contact LifeSci Advisors, LLC at Mac@LifeSciAdvisors.com. A live and archived webcast of the event, with slides, will be available at http://lifesci.rampard.com/20170302/reg.jsp and on the Investors section of the Company’s website at http://ir.minervaneurosciences.com. MIN-101 is a drug candidate with equipotent affinities for sigma 2 and 5‑hydroxytryptamine-2A (5-HT ) and lower affinity at α1-adrenergic receptors. MIN-101 has no direct dopaminergic post-synaptic blocking effects, known to be involved in some side effects like extrapyramidal symptoms, sedation, prolactin increases and weight gain. As described by the National Institute of Mental Health, schizophrenia is a chronic and severe disorder that affects how a person thinks, feels and acts1.  In 2015 approximately 3.2 million people suffered from schizophrenia in the U.S., Japan and the five major European markets.  Schizophrenic patients suffer from positive, negative and cognitive symptoms.  Negative symptoms are disruptions to normal emotions and behaviors that may signal social withdrawal.  Patients may be socially inhibited, lack the ability to begin and sustain planned activities, or speak little even when forced to interact.  Negative symptoms account for a substantial portion of the morbidity associated with schizophrenia2.  They persist chronically throughout an individual patient’s lifetime and increase with severity over time.  Similar to negative symptoms, cognitive symptoms may be difficult to recognize and often are detected only when specific testing is performed.  Cognitive symptoms include: poor “executive functioning,” or the ability to understand information and use it to make decisions; trouble focusing or paying attention; problems with “working memory,” or the ability to use information immediately after learning it.  Poor cognition is related to worse employment and social outcomes for patients with schizophrenia. Minerva Neurosciences, Inc. is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of a portfolio of product candidates to treat CNS diseases.  Minerva’s proprietary compounds include: MIN-101, in clinical development for schizophrenia; MIN-117, in clinical development for major depressive disorder (MDD); MIN-202 (JNJ-42847922), in clinical development for insomnia and MDD; and MIN-301, in pre-clinical development for Parkinson’s disease.  Minerva’s common stock is listed on the NASDAQ Global Market under the symbol “NERV.”  For more information, please visit www.minervaneurosciences.com. 2 Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, American Psychiatric Association.


WALTHAM, Mass., Feb. 21, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Minerva Neurosciences, Inc. (Nasdaq:NERV), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of therapies to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders, will host a Research and Development Day to highlight unmet needs, including negative symptoms and cognitive impairment, and emerging treatment strategies in schizophrenia in New York City on March 2, 2017 from 8:00 am to 9:30 am Eastern Time. The meeting will feature presentations by key opinion leaders Philip Harvey, PhD (University of Miami) and René Kahn, MD, PhD (Mount Sinai), who will discuss the current treatment landscape for schizophrenia. Dr. Remy Luthringer, president and chief executive officer of Minerva, will provide an overview of the Company’s ongoing clinical development work with MIN-101, including the Company’s clinical strategy moving forward.  The presenters will be available to answer questions following the breakfast. Philip D. Harvey, PhD is Leonard M. Miller Professor of Psychiatry and director of the Division of Psychology at the University Of Miami Miller School Of Medicine and a VA Senior Health Scientist.  Dr. Harvey’s research has focused on cognition and functioning, and he has written extensively on aging in schizophrenia, negative symptoms in schizophrenia, functional impairments in severe mental illness, the cognitive effects of typical and atypical antipsychotics, and the effects of cognitive enhancing agents and cognitive training in various conditions.  Dr. Harvey is a widely cited author who was repeatedly designated by Thomson-Reuters as being in the top 1% of all researchers in citations in mental health each year since 2010. He has received numerous awards for his research in schizophrenia. Dr. René Kahn is the Esther and Joseph Klingenstein Professor and System Chair of Psychiatry at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Over the last 30 years, Dr. Kahn and his research group have been instrumental in showing that brain changes in schizophrenia are progressive over time and have helped educate the medical community on the clinical relevance of these changes on cognitive function.  He has served as principal investigator on several clinical trials for schizophrenia and has published over 800 research papers. He was Treasurer and Vice President of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology and is currently past-President of The Schizophrenia International Research Society. He is a fellow of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. This event is intended for institutional investors, sell-side analysts, investment bankers and business development professionals only.  Please RSVP in advance if you plan to attend, as space is limited. To reserve a spot, please reply to this email or contact LifeSci Advisors, LLC at Mac@LifeSciAdvisors.com. A live and archived webcast of the event, with slides, will be available at http://lifesci.rampard.com/20170302/reg.jsp and on the Investors section of the Company’s website at http://ir.minervaneurosciences.com. MIN-101 is a drug candidate with equipotent affinities for sigma 2 and 5‑hydroxytryptamine-2A (5-HT ) and lower affinity at α1-adrenergic receptors. MIN-101 has no direct dopaminergic post-synaptic blocking effects, known to be involved in some side effects like extrapyramidal symptoms, sedation, prolactin increases and weight gain. As described by the National Institute of Mental Health, schizophrenia is a chronic and severe disorder that affects how a person thinks, feels and acts1.  In 2015 approximately 3.2 million people suffered from schizophrenia in the U.S., Japan and the five major European markets.  Schizophrenic patients suffer from positive, negative and cognitive symptoms.  Negative symptoms are disruptions to normal emotions and behaviors that may signal social withdrawal.  Patients may be socially inhibited, lack the ability to begin and sustain planned activities, or speak little even when forced to interact.  Negative symptoms account for a substantial portion of the morbidity associated with schizophrenia2.  They persist chronically throughout an individual patient’s lifetime and increase with severity over time.  Similar to negative symptoms, cognitive symptoms may be difficult to recognize and often are detected only when specific testing is performed.  Cognitive symptoms include: poor “executive functioning,” or the ability to understand information and use it to make decisions; trouble focusing or paying attention; problems with “working memory,” or the ability to use information immediately after learning it.  Poor cognition is related to worse employment and social outcomes for patients with schizophrenia. Minerva Neurosciences, Inc. is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of a portfolio of product candidates to treat CNS diseases.  Minerva’s proprietary compounds include: MIN-101, in clinical development for schizophrenia; MIN-117, in clinical development for major depressive disorder (MDD); MIN-202 (JNJ-42847922), in clinical development for insomnia and MDD; and MIN-301, in pre-clinical development for Parkinson’s disease.  Minerva’s common stock is listed on the NASDAQ Global Market under the symbol “NERV.”  For more information, please visit www.minervaneurosciences.com. 2 Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, American Psychiatric Association.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Sustainable Petroleum Group Inc. (the "Company") (OTCQB SPGX) is pleased to announce the appointment of additional officers and directors to further strengthen its management team and the implementation of its business strategy. Effective February 13, 2017, Christian Winzenried was appointed by the board of directors as the new President and CEO of SPGX. During the past five years, Mr. Winzenried has been an entrepreneur and executive officer in several companies in IT, Financial Services, Banking, Consulting and Lifestyle; most notably with zeb/ (a top management consultancy focusing on strategy, marketing, pricing and sales) where he was responsible for the development of business projects in the regional markets of Germany, Switzerland and Austria. For more than 20 years, Mr. Winzenried has taught Management and Leadership as well as SME Startup Founding processes at several Business Management Schools. He graduated with degrees in Leadership, Management of MIS/IT, Marketing and Economics. Also, on February 13, 2017 both Christian Winzenried and Stefan Mühlbauer were appointed as additional directors of SPGX. The board of directors of SPGX currently consists of Christian Winzenried (President and CEO), Suha Hächler (CFO, Treasurer, and Corporate Secretary), Stefan Mühlbauer (Chief Communications Officer), and Dr. Philip Grothe. Suha Hächler has been an entrepreneur and executive officer in several companies, including Xerox AG, where he was involved with the development and implementation of printing systems. Mr. Hächler is currently teaching business management consultancy at the international school Gustav Käser in Switzerland and also studied economics at the international school HSG St. Gallen in Switzerland. Dr. Philip Grothe has served as the CEO of alimex Group, a leading aluminum company, since 2014. Prior to joining alimex Dr. Grothe was partner and shareholder of Simon, Kucher & Partners, a top management consultancy focusing on strategy, marketing, pricing and sales. Dr. Grothe began his career at Deloitte Consulting where he worked as a manager and project leader in numerous marketing and sales projects. Dr. Grothe graduated with a degree in Economics and obtained his PhD in Strategic Management. Stefan Mühlbauer has served as CEO of Arma Communications Inc, a business development and marketing Agency in Naples, Florida since 2013. Additionally Mr. Mühlbauer serves as managing partner for Eagle Run Capital Inc. Previously, Mr. Mühlbauer held positions with various leading investment banks in Europe. Mr. Mühlbauer was the Chief Operating Officer at Silvia Quandt & Cie AG where he was responsible for building up the institution's research and corporate finance activities. Mr. Mühlbauer received his degree in Finance from the University of Miami. Christian Winzenried, the CEO of SPGX stated: "Together we are a very diverse management team with many years of expertise in leadership roles across a broad range of industries. As a team we look forward to developing continued shareholder value." About Sustainable Petroleum Group Inc. SPGX as a member of SP Group is positioned to become a world leading natural resources holding and development company through value based investments and collaborative partnerships with global leaders across the natural resources sector. SP Group has initiated its goals by pursuing investment and partnerships with some of the most diversified and integrated companies available on the market. On behalf of Sustainable Petroleum Group Inc. Christian Winzenried Chief Executive Officer CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS This press release contains statements that plan for or anticipate the future, called "forward-looking statements." In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as "may," "will," "should," "could," "expects," "plans," "intends," "anticipates," "believes," "estimates," "predicts," "potential" or "continue" or the negative of those terms and other comparable terminology. These forward-looking statements appear in a number of places in this press release and include, but are not limited to, statements about: our market opportunity; revenue generation; our strategies; competition; expected activities and expenditures as we pursue our business plan; the adequacy of our available cash resources; our ability to acquire assets or projects on commercially viable terms; challenges to our title to our assets; operating or technical difficulties in connection with our development activities; currency fluctuations; and governmental regulations. Many of these contingencies and uncertainties can affect our actual results and could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied in any forward-looking statements made by, or on behalf of, us. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance. All of the forward-looking statements made in this press release are qualified by these cautionary statements. Specific reference is made to our most recent annual report on Form 10-KSB and other filings made by us with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission for more detailed discussions of the contingencies and uncertainties enumerated above and the factors underlying the forward-looking statements. These reports and filings may be inspected and copied at the Public Reference Room maintained by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. You can obtain information about operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission at 1-800-SEC-0330. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission also maintains an Internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission at http://www.sec.gov. We disclaim any intention or obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except to the extent required by applicable laws. This press release is for informational purposes only and is not and should not be construed as an offer to solicit, buy, or sell any security.


DURHAM, N.C., March 02, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Heat Biologics, Inc. (“Heat”) (Nasdaq:HTBX), a leader in the development of immunotherapies designed to activate a patient’s immune system against cancer, announced that it will present a poster on its ComPACT platform technology at the AACR Annual Meeting being held on April 1-5, 2017 in Washington, DC.  The details for the poster presentation at the AACR Annual Meeting are as follows: Title: Potency of Gp96-Ig/Fc-OX40L cell-based combination vaccine in cancer immunotherapy Date and Time: April 2, 2017 at 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. ET Location: Convention Center, Halls A-C, Poster Section 26 Session Title: T-cell Immunity to Cancer: New Progress Poster Board Number: 9 Abstract Number: 605 Copies of the abstract are available and can be viewed online through the AACR website at www.aacr.org.  The poster will be uploaded to the Publications section of Heat’s corporate website in line with the conference’s embargo policy. About Heat Biologics, Inc. Heat Biologics, Inc. (Nasdaq:HTBX) is an immuno-oncology company developing novel therapies that are designed to activate a patient’s immune system against cancer utilizing an engineered form of gp96, a protein that activates the immune system when cells die. Heat’s highly specific T cell-stimulating therapeutic vaccine platform technologies, ImPACT and ComPACT, form the basis of its product candidates. These platforms, in combination with other therapies, such as checkpoint inhibitors, are designed to address three distinct but synergistic mechanisms of action: robust activation of CD8+ “killer” T cells (one of the human immune system’s most potent weapons against cancer); reversal of tumor-induced immune suppression; and T cell co-stimulation to further enhance patients’ immune response.  Currently, Heat is conducting a Phase 1b trial with HS-110 (viagenpumatucel-L) in combination with an anti-PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor to treat patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and a Phase 2 trial with HS-410 (vesigenurtacel-L) in patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Heat’s wholly-owned subsidiary, Zolovax, Inc., is developing therapeutic and preventative vaccines to treat infectious diseases based on Heat’s gp96 vaccine technology, with a current focus on the development of a Zika vaccine in conjunction with the University of Miami. For more information, please visit www.heatbio.com. Forward Looking Statements This press release includes forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 on our current expectations and projections about future events.  In some cases, forward-looking statements can be identified by terminology such as "may," "should," "potential," "continue," "expects," "anticipates," "intends," "plans," "believes," "estimates," and similar expressions.  These statements are based upon current beliefs, expectations and assumptions and include statements regarding the potential of Heat’s ImPACT and ComPACT therapies.  These statements are based on management’s expectations and assumptions as of the date of this press release and are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, many of which are difficult to predict that could cause actual results to differ materially from current expectations and assumptions from those set forth or implied by any forward-looking statements, including the ability of Heat's ImPACT and ComPACT therapies to perform as designed, to demonstrate safety and efficacy, as well as results that are consistent with prior results, the ability to enroll patients and complete the clinical trials on time and achieve desired results and benefits, the company’s ability to obtain regulatory approvals for commercialization of product candidates or to comply with ongoing regulatory requirements, regulatory limitations relating to the company’s  ability to promote or commercialize its product candidates for specific indications, acceptance of its product candidates in the marketplace and the successful development, marketing or sale of products, the Company’s ability to maintain its license agreements, the continued maintenance and growth of its patent estate, its ability to establish and maintain collaborations, its  ability to obtain or maintain the capital or grants necessary to fund its research and development activities, and its ability to retain its key scientists or management personnel and the other factors described in the company’s annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2015 and other filings with the SEC.  The information in this release is provided only as of the date of this release and the company undertakes no obligation to update any forward-looking statements contained in this release based on new information, future events, or otherwise, except as required by law.


DURHAM, N.C., March 02, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Heat Biologics, Inc. (“Heat”) (Nasdaq:HTBX), a leader in the development of immunotherapies designed to activate a patient’s immune system against cancer, announced that it will present a poster on its ComPACT platform technology at the AACR Annual Meeting being held on April 1-5, 2017 in Washington, DC.  The details for the poster presentation at the AACR Annual Meeting are as follows: Title: Potency of Gp96-Ig/Fc-OX40L cell-based combination vaccine in cancer immunotherapy Date and Time: April 2, 2017 at 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. ET Location: Convention Center, Halls A-C, Poster Section 26 Session Title: T-cell Immunity to Cancer: New Progress Poster Board Number: 9 Abstract Number: 605 Copies of the abstract are available and can be viewed online through the AACR website at www.aacr.org.  The poster will be uploaded to the Publications section of Heat’s corporate website in line with the conference’s embargo policy. About Heat Biologics, Inc. Heat Biologics, Inc. (Nasdaq:HTBX) is an immuno-oncology company developing novel therapies that are designed to activate a patient’s immune system against cancer utilizing an engineered form of gp96, a protein that activates the immune system when cells die. Heat’s highly specific T cell-stimulating therapeutic vaccine platform technologies, ImPACT and ComPACT, form the basis of its product candidates. These platforms, in combination with other therapies, such as checkpoint inhibitors, are designed to address three distinct but synergistic mechanisms of action: robust activation of CD8+ “killer” T cells (one of the human immune system’s most potent weapons against cancer); reversal of tumor-induced immune suppression; and T cell co-stimulation to further enhance patients’ immune response.  Currently, Heat is conducting a Phase 1b trial with HS-110 (viagenpumatucel-L) in combination with an anti-PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor to treat patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and a Phase 2 trial with HS-410 (vesigenurtacel-L) in patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Heat’s wholly-owned subsidiary, Zolovax, Inc., is developing therapeutic and preventative vaccines to treat infectious diseases based on Heat’s gp96 vaccine technology, with a current focus on the development of a Zika vaccine in conjunction with the University of Miami. For more information, please visit www.heatbio.com. Forward Looking Statements This press release includes forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 on our current expectations and projections about future events.  In some cases, forward-looking statements can be identified by terminology such as "may," "should," "potential," "continue," "expects," "anticipates," "intends," "plans," "believes," "estimates," and similar expressions.  These statements are based upon current beliefs, expectations and assumptions and include statements regarding the potential of Heat’s ImPACT and ComPACT therapies.  These statements are based on management’s expectations and assumptions as of the date of this press release and are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, many of which are difficult to predict that could cause actual results to differ materially from current expectations and assumptions from those set forth or implied by any forward-looking statements, including the ability of Heat's ImPACT and ComPACT therapies to perform as designed, to demonstrate safety and efficacy, as well as results that are consistent with prior results, the ability to enroll patients and complete the clinical trials on time and achieve desired results and benefits, the company’s ability to obtain regulatory approvals for commercialization of product candidates or to comply with ongoing regulatory requirements, regulatory limitations relating to the company’s  ability to promote or commercialize its product candidates for specific indications, acceptance of its product candidates in the marketplace and the successful development, marketing or sale of products, the Company’s ability to maintain its license agreements, the continued maintenance and growth of its patent estate, its ability to establish and maintain collaborations, its  ability to obtain or maintain the capital or grants necessary to fund its research and development activities, and its ability to retain its key scientists or management personnel and the other factors described in the company’s annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2015 and other filings with the SEC.  The information in this release is provided only as of the date of this release and the company undertakes no obligation to update any forward-looking statements contained in this release based on new information, future events, or otherwise, except as required by law.


SHAPE, the Society for Heart Attack Prevention and Eradication (http://www.shapesociety.org), a nonprofit grassroots organization dedicated to the mission of eradicating heart attacks, today announced the agenda of its first focus group meeting on prediction of near-future heart attacks using artificial intelligence. The meeting is led by Dr. Morteza Naghavi the founder and executive director of SHAPE and features leading cardiovascular researchers from around the world.. This will be the 20th scientific meeting held by SHAPE since 2001. Detailed agenda of the meeting is shown below. The First Machine Learning Vulnerable Patient Symposium A Focus Group Meeting on Developing an Artificial Intelligence-based Forecast System A Satellite Event in Conjunction with 2016 Annual Scientific Sessions of American Heart Association This event is open to public. Participation via GoToMeeting can be requested. Dinner will be served 7:30 PM. This is the 20th Vulnerable Plaque & Vulnerable Patient Symposium held by SHAPE since 2001. Welcome: Morteza Naghavi, M.D. Founder of SHAPE and Executive Chairman of the SHAPE Task Force Opening Remarks: Valentin Fuster, M.D., Ph.D. Professor of Medicine and Physician-in-Chief, Mount Sinai Hospital and Icahn School of Medicine Jagat Narula M.D., Ph.D. Chief of Cardiology, Mount Sinai West & St. Luke’s Hospitals Associate, Dean, Arnhold Institute for Global Health at Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine Ioannis Kakadiaris, Ph.D. Professor of Computer Science and Biomedical Engineering, Director of Machine Learning Laboratory University of Houston Topic: What is Machine Learning and How Can It Shape the Future of Healthcare? Invited Online Presentations: Two Examples of Machine Learning Studies in CVD Risk Assessment (10 minutes each) CVD prediction using support vector machine in a large Australian cohort. Dinesh Kumar, Ph.D. and Sridhar Arjunan, Ph.D. Biosignals Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia (2) Prediction of revascularization after myocardial perfusion SPECT by machine learning in a large clinical population Piotr Slomka, Ph.D. Chief Scientist, Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Program, Department of Imaging Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Professor, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA Moderated Discussions on the Vulnerable Patient Project Machine Learning for Prediction of Near-Term CHD Events All investigators will be asked to give a very brief introduction of their study and how it can fit in Background: Imagine instead of the existing daily weather forecasts and hurricane alerts we were told the probability of a storm within the next 10 years! This is how heart attacks are predicted today. We teach our physicians to calculate the 10-year probability of a heart attack and sudden cardiac death based on their patients’ risk factors. Long term predictions do not trigger immediate preventive actions. Although some people develop warning symptoms, half of men and two-thirds of women who die suddenly of coronary heart disease (CHD) have no previous symptoms. Imagine if we could alert people months, weeks, or even days before a heart attack and trigger immediate preventive actions. The Idea: Use machine learning to create new algorithms to detect who will experience a CHD event within a year (The Vulnerable Patient). Algorithms will be based on banked biospecimen and information collected days up to 12 months prior to the event. We will utilize existing cohorts such as MESA, Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study, Framingham Heart Study, BioImage Study and the Dallas Heart Study. External validation to test for discrimination and calibration will be conducted using other longitudinal observational studies that provide adjudicated cardiovascular event information such as the MiHeart, JHS, DANRISK and ROBINSCA. Additionally, we will use machine learning to characterize individuals who, despite high conventional risk, have lived over 80 years with no CHD events (The Invulnerable ). We expect to discover new targets for drug and possibly vaccine development. We will make the algorithms available as an open source tool to collect additional data over time and increase its predictive value. Organizers: SHAPE as the originating and organizing center for the entire project, recruiting new studies and biobanks, conducting workshops with researchers from each study, fundraising, creating an open source platform community for future enhancement and collaborations. Stanford as the coordinating center for collecting data and samples, and basic science labs. Mount Sinai as the data review and publication center. Machine Learning Lab to be decided, either Google, Apple, IBM, Facebook, Amazon or wherever we find a strong industry partner or sponsor. Director, Cardiac Computed Tomography, Associate Professor of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University Division of Cardiology, The Johns Hopkins Hospital Imagine the new machine learning Vulnerable Patient detection algorithm (heart attack forecaster) is created and validated. If studies confirm the algorithm is able to detect the Vulnerable Patient with 50% or more certainty. In other words, 1 out of 2 patients classified as Vulnerable Patient goes to have an ASCVD event in the following 12 months. Now the questions are: A)    What preventive actions would you take if your asymptomatic patient tested positive as a Vulnerable Patient? B)    What preventive actions would you take if the patient was you?! (This question is meant to circumvent regulatory and financial limitations that may apply to your patients but may not hold you back). Moderators will invite comments from all participants in the meeting. Invited Key Opinion Leaders (Alphabetic Order) Arthur Agatston, M.D. Founder of South Beach Diet, Director of Wellness at Baptist Hospital and Professor of Medicine at University of Miami, FL Daniel Berman, M.D. Professor of Medicine at UCLA, Director of Cardiac Imaging and Nuclear Cardiology at Cedars-Sinai, Los Angeles, CA Michael Blaha, M.D., M.P.H., Director of Clinical Research, Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD Mathew Budoff, M.D. Professor of Medicine and Director of Preventive Cardiology, UCLA Harbor, Los Angeles, CA Adolfo Correa, M.D., Ph.D. Chief Science Officer, Jackson Heart Study, Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics, University of Mississippi, Jackson, MS Rahul Deo, M.D., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA Raimund Erbel, M.D. Professor of Medicine, Chief of Cardiology and Director of West German Heart Centre, University Essen, Germany Sergio Fazio, M.D., Ph.D. Chair of Preventive Cardiology and Professor of Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR Zahi Fayad, M.D. Professor of Radiology and Medicine (Cardiology), Director of the Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY Philip Greenland, M.D., Professor of Cardiology, Director, Institute for Public Health and Medicine, Center for Population Health Sciences, Chicago, IL Robert Harrington, M.D. Chair of the Department of Medicine, Professor of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA Harvey Hecht, M.D., Director of Cardiac CT Imaging Laboratory, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY Karl-Heinz Jöckel, Ph.D. Institute for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany Ioannis Kakadiaris, Ph.D. Professor of Computer Science and Biomedical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX Stanley Kleis, Ph.D. Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX Tatiana Kuznetsova, M.D. Professor and Director, Hypertension and Cardiovascular Epidemiology, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium Daniel Levy, M.D. Director of Framingham Heart Study, and Intramural Investigator, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD Roxana Mehran, M.D. Professor of Medicine and Director of Interventional Clinical Trials, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY Ralph Metcalfe, Ph.D. Professor of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX Susanne Moebus, Ph.D., M.P.H. Biologist & Epidemiologist, Head of the Centre for Urban Epidemiology, University Essen, Germany Morteza Naghavi, M.D. Founder and Executive Chairman of the SHAPE Task Force, President of MEDITEX, Houston, TX Tasneem Z. Naqvi, M.D. Professor of Medicine and Director of Echocardiography, College of Medicine, May Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ Jagat Narula, M.D., Ph.D. Associate Dean for Global Affairs, Professor of Medicine (Cardiology), Mount Sinai Hospital and School of Medicine, New York, NY Ulla Roggenbuck, Ph.D. Institute for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, University Hospital of Essen, Germany Henrik Sillesen, M.D. Professor and Head of Dept. of Vascular Surgery, Rigs Hospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Robert Superko, M.D. Professor of Medicine and President at Cholesterol, Genetics, and Heart Disease Institute, Carmel, CA Pierre-Jean Touboul, M.D. Professor of Neurology, Department of Neurology and Stroke Center, AP-HP Bichat University Hospital, Neurology and Stroke Center, Paris, France Nathan Wong, M.P.H., Ph.D. Professor of Epidemiology and Director, Heart Disease Prevention Program, University of California, Irvine, CA Symposium Registration http://shapesociety.org/the-first-machine-learning-heart-attack-forecast-symposium/ About SHAPE The Society for Heart Attack Prevention and Eradication (SHAPE) is a non-profit organization that promotes education and research related to prevention, detection, and treatment of heart attacks. SHAPE is committed to raising public awareness about revolutionary discoveries that are opening exciting avenues that can lead to the eradication of heart attacks. SHAPE's mission is to eradicate heart attacks in the 21st century. SHAPE has recently embarked on “Machine Learning Heart Attack Forecast System (Vulnerable Patient Project)” Project which is a collaborative effort between world’s leading cardiovascular researchers to develop a new Heart Attack Forecast System empowered by artificial intelligence. Additional information on this innovative project will be announced soon. To learn more about SHAPE visit http://www.shapesociety.org. Contact information: 1-877-SHAPE11 and info(at)shapesociety(dot)org. Learn more about the Vulnerable Patient http://shapesociety.org/the-first-machine-learning-heart-attack-forecast-symposium About SHAPE Task Force The SHAPE Task Force, an international group of leading cardiovascular physicians and researchers, has created the SHAPE Guidelines, which educates physicians on how to identify asymptomatic atherosclerosis (hidden plaques) and implement proper therapies to prevent a future heart attack. According to the SHAPE Guidelines, men 45-75 and women 55-75 need to be tested for hidden plaques in coronary or carotid arteries. Individuals with high risk atherosclerosis (high plaque score) should be treated even if their cholesterol level is within statistical “normal range.” If they have plaques, the so-called normal is not normal for them. The higher the amount of plaque burden in the arteries the higher the risk and the more vulnerable to heart attack. SHAPE Guideline aims to identify the asymptomatic “Vulnerable Patient” and offer them intensive preventive therapy to prevent a future heart attack. Knowing one's plaque score can be a matter of life and death. The SHAPE Task Force includes the following: Click below to learn about SHAPE Centers of Excellence http://shapesociety.org/centers-of-excellence/ Drs Naghavi, PK Shah, Daniel Berman, and Mathew Budoff members of the SHAPE Task Force explain how hospitals and community clinics can become a SHAPE Center of Excellence and establish themselves a leader in preventive health.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Mentice, the endovascular training solutions specialists, today announced the release of the world’s first simulation training software module for prostatic artery embolization (PAE). The software has been developed together with two of the world’s leading PAE authorities: Dr. Shivank Bhatia Associate Professor of Interventional Radiology and Urology at University of Miami Hospital, and Dr. Marc Sapoval, Professor of Clinical Radiology at the Hôpital Européen George-Pompidou in Paris. “The Mentice software, created from real patients’ data, will allow interventional radiologists (IRs) to train for PAE, and will help reduce the steep learning curve associated with this technically challenging and complex procedure,” says Dr. Bhatia. “Collaborating with Mentice has resulted in a training innovation that I am personally very proud of.” PAE is a novel procedure that was first presented at SIR 2011. A minimally invasive endovascular procedure, PAE has been shown to be safe and efficacious. PAE scores highly in terms of patient satisfaction, and dramatically reduces length of hospital stays compared to transurethral resection of the prostate. “PAE,” comments Dr. Sapoval, “is a demanding procedure performed by experienced IRs. The anatomy is highly variable, the microcatheter and microwire skills required are advanced, and a high degree of technical competence in various areas is essential. Simulation training aims to facilitate the learning curve for performing PAE.” Mentice will formally release and demonstrate the PAE simulation training software at SIR 2017, the Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society of Interventional Radiology, to be held March 4-9 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Washington, D.C. “Mentice is proud to collaborate with these two world-class experts,” says Göran Malmberg, Mentice CEO. “We are offering a unique training environment for experienced physicians. PAE has great potential, it is a challenging procedure with a significant learning process. Realistic, hands-on training is a must—and that’s what the new Mentice software module delivers.” Mentice will present and demonstrate the PAE simulation training module at booth 302 March 5-8. About Mentice Mentice is a world leader in medical simulation, providing qualified solutions for training, education and assessment opportunities. With a focus on minimally invasive techniques and procedures, Mentice develops simulation systems for training in a safe environment within the fields of endovascular intervention and minimally invasive surgery. The advantages of training with Mentice solutions are well documented enhancing clinical performance, reducing cost, and, in the long term, improving patient safety. For more information please visit http://www.mentice.com.


News Article | November 29, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

PITTSBURGH, PA (November 29, 2016) -- Neuro Kinetics, Inc. (NKI), the leader in clinical eye-tracking and non-invasive neuro-otologic diagnostic testing, announced today the publication of an important study in the field of concussion detection that illustrates the potential clinical utility of an integrated, multi-modal battery of oculomotor, vestibular, and reaction time (OVRT) tests. The paper, titled "Oculomotor, Vestibular, and Reaction Time Tests in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury," is jointly authored by investigators from the University of Pittsburgh, San Diego Naval Medical Center, Madigan Army Medical Center, NKI, and the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. The results of this novel study indicate the value of a clinical tool that can aid doctors in the timely and objective detection of concussive symptoms. "Objective diagnosis is vital in the management of concussion. This study will pave the way for tools that can be used at the point of injury, as well as in the emergency room or a provider's office," says Michael E. Hoffer, M.D., co-lead author and Professor of Otolaryngology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Concussions and mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) are diagnosed following a head injury when the Glasgow Coma Scale is 13 or greater and the loss of consciousness and/or confusion is less than 30 minutes. Most TBIs that occur each year are mild, commonly called concussions. According to a 2016 report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC), TBIs accounted for approximately 2.5 million emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations, or deaths in the U.S. in 2010. Concussions contributed to approximately 50,000 deaths in 2010. The number of mTBIs is believed to be higher than 2.5 million annually, however, given that ED visits for a TBI have trended up in recent years (CDC cites a 70% increase during the period 2001-2010), and many who are injured do not visit an ED or hospital for assessment or treatment. Individuals with mTBI can complain of short-term or long-term cognitive problems, headaches, attention deficits, sleeping issues, and/or light sensitivity. While any one concussion may not be debilitating, multiple concussions -- particularly if repeat concussions happen before the patient has recovered -- can "add up," and cumulative effects can be devastating. The 18-to-45-year-old male and female population on whom data were collected participated in a battery of OVRT tests on I-Portal® NOTC's (Neuro-Otologic Test Centers) at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, San Diego, and Madigan Army Medical Center. The researchers evaluated and compared one set of 100 controls to 50 concussions (mTBI), "Cohort 1", and a second set of 100 controls to 50 concussions, "Cohort 2". The subjects had all been diagnosed as concussed by an emergency room doctor. Testing occurred approximately 2.6 days post-concussive event on average. The study results reveal promising sensitivities and specificities exceeding 97% and 89%, respectively. "It is no surprise that no single test was able to generate results that clearly identify a concussion. Rather, successful separation of controls from concussions required a combination of tests," says Howison Schroeder, CEO of Neuro Kinetics. The study protocol included sixteen OVRT tests, ten of which are already cleared by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) for vestibular and neuro-otologic evaluation. Lead author Dr. Carey Balaban, Professor of Otolaryngology, Neurobiology, Communication Sciences & Disorders, and Bioengineering at the University of Pittsburgh, states: "This study provides a basis for a new generation of objective diagnostic tools for concussion that uses traditional oculomotor and vestibular tests. It offers the considerable advantage of not requiring baseline testing." "We are excited by such highly sensitive and specific results, and thank the Department of Defense for supporting such a transformational study," says Schroeder. Majority funding for this study was provided by the Department of Defense's Army Medical Research and Material Command and its Hearing Center of Excellence under Contract No. W81XWH-12-C-0205. Additional funding was awarded by the Head Health Challenge II sponsors, which include the National Football League, Under Armour, Inc., and General Electric Company. To learn more about NKI, please visit http://www. . Jennifer Smith Director of Media Relations University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Office: 305-243-3018 jennifer.smith@med.miami.edu Neuro Kinetics, Inc. (NKI) is the leader in clinical eye-tracking and non-invasive neuro-otologic diagnostic testing. The eye is the portal to the brain and research has shown the detection of abnormal eye responses are used to diagnose more than 200 diseases and medical conditions. With over 140 I-Portal installations, NKI's FDA cleared I-Portal® devices are sold to audiologists, ENT's, neurotologists, neuro-ophthalmologists and neurologists around the globe. The company's cleared patented diagnostic platforms include the I-Portal® NOTC (Neuro-Otologic Test Center), I-Portal® VNG (Video Nystagmography) and I-Portal® VOG (Video Oculography), along with related accessories, software, training and support services.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

UK Scientists, in collaboration with groups in Europe and the US, have discovered why the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) is one of the most destructive pests to many of our most important crops. Their research will inform industry and research programmes to support pest control and aid global food security. Unlike most plant-colonising insects, which have adapted to live on a small range of closely related plants, green peach aphids can colonise over four hundred plant species. Developing resistance to over 70 different pesticides, coupled with the ever changing climate affecting crop losses in the EU and UK, the pest wreaks havoc on crop yields. The green peach aphid transmits over a hundred different plant viruses and this notorious insect feeds on essential crops such as oilseed rape, sugar beet, tomato and potato, as well as wild plant species, which may serve as sources of the plant viruses. An example being the Turnip yellows virus (TuYV) and related viruses, which if left uncontrolled can reduce yields of multiple crops, such as oilseed rape and sugar beet, by up to 30%, rendering some crops unprofitable in the UK. The aphids spend winter living on host plants such as peach, apricot or plum, but in the summer months can colonise a huge range of vegetables -- from potatoes to spinach, squash, parsley and parsnip. Generally, the insect parasites that live on a certain species are genetically very well adapted to live on just that plant. Yet, research led by the Earlham Institute (EI) and the John Innes Centre (JIC), has found that the green peach aphid foregoes this specialisation for a more flexible approach involving turning gene activity 'up' or 'down' in response to different plant hosts and environments. Dr David Swarbreck, Group Leader at the Earlham Institute, said: "Our study has shed light on the genetic plasticity1 that allows the green peach aphid to survive so well on a multitude of plant species, giving us a greater insight into the survival strategies of one of the most challenging of crop pests." More intriguing about the insect's strategy is that aphids can reproduce clonally -- i.e. they produce genetically identical lineages. This allows biologists to compare individual aphids with the same genetic background and see precisely what genes are more active than others in aphids living on different plant species. By growing aphid clones on three different plant species, it was possible for the scientists to find the specific genes that were involved in colonising the different host plants. It appears that the genes responsible for helping aphids adjust to different plants are found in clusters within the genome and are rapidly increased or decreased in two days of transfer to a new host plant species. Dr Yazhou Chen, Postdoctoral Scientist at the John Innes Centre, said: "The genes rapidly turn up or down in single aphids in just two days upon transfer to a new host plant. Given that a single aphid can produce her own offspring, and a lot of it, new aphid infestations may start with just a single aphid." The team found that rapid changes in gene expression were vital for the green peach aphid's generalist lifestyle. Interfering with the expression of one particular gene family, cathepsin B, reduced aphid offspring production, but only on the host plant where the expression of these genes is increased. Thomas Mathers, Postdoctoral Scientist at the Earlham Institute, said: "Surprisingly, many of the genes involved in host adjustment arose during aphid diversification and are not specific to the green peach aphid. This suggests that it may be the ability to rapidly adjust the expression of key genes in a coordinated fashion that enables generalism, rather than the presence of an expanded genomic toolbox of genes." Professor Saskia Hogenhout at the John Innes Centre, added: "Future research is expected to reveal mechanisms involved in the amazing plasticity of the green peach aphid leading to new ways to control this notorious pest. More generally, the research will help understand how some organisms are able to adjust quickly to a broad range of environmental conditions, whereas others are pickier and go extinct more easily, research that is central given our rapidly changing environment due to, for instance, climate change." The scientific paper, titled: "Rapid transcriptional plasticity of duplicated gene clusters enables a clonally reproducing aphid to colonize diverse plant species" is published in Genome Biology. This research project was led by the Earlham Institute (Norwich, UK) and the John Innes Centre (Norwich, UK) in collaboration with the University of East Anglia (Norwich, UK), INRA Rennes (France), University of Miami (USA) and Boyce Thomspon Institute for Plant Research (New York, USA). This project was funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the National Institute for Food in Agriculture (NIFA), (USA). For further information, read our feature: Aphids - the versatile agricultural nuisance. Watch Genome Biology's video on Gene regulation, the secret to aphid's wide-ranging crop diet. 1. The ability of one genotype to produce more than one phenotype when exposed to different environments - phenotypic plasticity allows an organism to change its phenotype in response to changes in the environment. 2. Paper DOI: 10.1186/s13059-016-1145-3 (Paper PDF available on request). Link to paper title goes live after embargo has lifted. 3. Accompanying images can be accessed here: https:/ 4. David Swarbreck and Tom Mathers (joint first author), Earlham Institute project leads are available for interview. 5. Saskia Hogenhout, JIC lead is available for interview. Please contact: Formerly The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC), the Earlham Institute is a leading research institute focusing on the development of genomics and computational biology. The Earlham Institute is based within the Norwich Research Park and is one of eight institutes that receive strategic funding from Biotechnology and Biological Science Research Council (BBSRC) -- £6.45M in 2015/2016 -- as well as support from other research funders. The Earlham Institute operates a National Capability to promote the application of genomics and bioinformatics to advance bioscience research and innovation. The Earlham Institute offers a state of the art DNA sequencing facility, unique by its operation of multiple complementary technologies for data generation. The Institute is a UK hub for innovative bioinformatics through research, analysis and interpretation of multiple, complex data sets. It hosts one of the largest computing hardware facilities dedicated to life science research in Europe. It is also actively involved in developing novel platforms to provide access to computational tools and processing capacity for multiple academic and industrial users and promoting applications of computational Bioscience. Additionally, the Institute offers a training programme through courses and workshops, and an outreach programme targeting key stakeholders, and wider public audiences through dialogue and science communication activities. The John Innes Centre is an independent, international centre of excellence in plant science and microbiology. Our mission is to generate knowledge of plants and microbes through innovative research, to train scientists for the future, to apply our knowledge of nature's diversity to benefit agriculture, the environment, human health and wellbeing, and engage with policy makers and the public. To achieve these goals we establish pioneering long-term research objectives in plant and microbial science, with a focus on genetics. These objectives include promoting the translation of research through partnerships to develop improved crops and to make new products from microbes and plants for human health and other applications. We also create new approaches, technologies and resources that enable research advances and help industry to make new products. The knowledge, resources and trained researchers we generate help global societies address important challenges including providing sufficient and affordable food, making new products for human health and industrial applications, and developing sustainable bio-based manufacturing. This provides a fertile environment for training the next generation of plant and microbial scientists, many of whom go on to careers in industry and academia, around the world. The John Innes Centre is strategically funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). In 2015-2016 the John Innes Centre received a total of £30.1 million from the BBSRC. The John Innes Centre is also supported by the John Innes Foundation through provision of research accommodation and long term support of the Rotation PhD programme. The John Innes Centre is the winner of the BBSRC's 2013 - 2016 Excellence With Impact award. The Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) invests in world-class bioscience research and training on behalf of the UK public. Our aim is to further scientific knowledge, to promote economic growth, wealth and job creation and to improve quality of life in the UK and beyond. Funded by Government, BBSRC invested over £509M in world-class bioscience in 2014-15 and is the leading funder of wheat research in the UK (over£100M investment on UK wheat research in the last 10 years). We support research and training in universities and strategically funded institutes. BBSRC research and the people we fund are helping society to meet major challenges, including food security, green energy and healthier, longer lives. Our investments underpin important UK economic sectors, such as farming, food, industrial biotechnology and pharmaceuticals. For more information about BBSRC, our science and our impact see: http://www. For more information about BBSRC strategically funded institutes see: http://www.


PHILADELPHIA -- (Feb. 27, 2017) -- Scientists at The Wistar Institute in collaboration with Roswell Park Cancer Institute found a significant association between a rare genetic variant of the p53 gene present in African American women and their risk of developing breast cancer in premenopausal age. The study was published online by the journal NPJ Breast Cancer. TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer. The p53 protein is a critical tumor suppressor in the cell and genetic mutations that occur in cancer cause a loss of its function in regulating proliferation arrest and cell death. In addition to these changes, there are several minor, naturally occurring genetic variants of the p53 gene, also known as polymorphisms, and some of them are associated with an increased risk of cancer. The rare p53 polymorphism analyzed in this study is found almost exclusively in populations of African descent. Wistar scientists have previously shown that this polymorphism impairs the ability of p53 to induce cell death in vitro and significantly increases cancer risk when recreated in a mouse model. The new study analyzed the statistical association of this variant with the risk of developing breast cancer in African American women. "Based on our previous studies on the functional effects of this genetic variant on the p53 protein, we sought to verify if it alters cancer risk in human carriers," said Maureen Murphy, Ph.D., professor and program leader of the Molecular and Cellular Oncogenesis Program at Wistar and senior author of the study. "This genetic variant is present exclusively in people of African descent, so our study addresses cancer disparities in African American women, a historically underrepresented group in research studies." "Our results show that the risk of developing breast cancer is increased by nearly 70 percent in premenopausal women who carry this polymorphism," Murphy said. "Because its frequency is very low in the African American population, larger studies will be needed to confirm our observations." Murphy and colleagues conducted statistical studies on a cohort of more than 14,000 women of African descent and didn't find any association of the polymorphism with increased breast cancer risk overall. However, as previously observed with other genetic variants of p53, a significant association was present in women in premenopausal age. Elucidating the effects of p53 polymorphisms on cancer risk is a challenging task, especially due to the limited availability of sample cohorts from specific populations. This study provides a strong suggestion that the genetic variant considered might be associated with a significant increase in breast cancer risk, although this association will need to be confirmed in a larger sample set. This work was supported by National Institutes of Health grants R01 CA102184, CA201430, P01 CA151135, R01 CA092447, R01 CA135288, P01 CA82707, R25-CA57726, NICHD-N01-HD-3-3175, NCO-N01-PC-67010, NIEHS-ES07084, R01 CA142996, P50 CA125183, R01 CA89085, and U01 CA161032; National Cancer Institute grant UM1CA164974 and the Intramural Research Program of the National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research; grants from the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, the University Cancer Research Fund of North Carolina, the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, the Era of Hope Scholar Award Program W81XWH-08-1-0383, the Komen Foundation for the Cure, and the Stacy Goldstein Faculty Scholar Award. Core support for The Wistar Institute and the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey was provided by the Cancer Center Support Grants P30CA010815 and P30CA072720, respectively. Qin Liu is a co-author of this study from The Wistar Institute. Other co-authors include: Song Liu, Chi-Chen Hong, Qiang Hu and Christine B. Ambrosone from Roswell Park Cancer Institute; Dezheng Huo and Olufunmilayo I. Olopade from the University of Chicago; Sonia C. Dolfi and Kim M. Hirshfield from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey; Andrew F. Olshan and Sarah Nyante from University of North Carolina; Temidayo O. Ogundiran from University of Ibadan, Nigeria; Clement Adebamowo from University of Maryland; Susan M. Domchek and Katherine L. Nathanson from the University of Pennsylvania; Barbara Nemesure from Stony Brook University; Stefan Ambs and Regina G. Ziegler from National Cancer Institute; William J. Blot, Wei Zheng and Sandra L. Deming from Vanderbilt University; Ye Feng, Sue A. Ingles, Michael F. Press and Christopher A. Haiman from University of Southern California; Esther M. John from Stanford University; Leslie Bernstein from Beckman Research Institute; Jennifer J. Hu and Jorge L. Rodriguez-Gil from University of Miami; Kathryn L. Lunetta and Julie R. Palmer from Boston University. The Wistar Institute is an international leader in biomedical research with special expertise in cancer research and vaccine development. Founded in 1892 as the first independent nonprofit biomedical research institute in the United States, Wistar has held the prestigious Cancer Center designation from the National Cancer Institute since 1972. The Institute works actively to ensure that research advances move from the laboratory to the clinic as quickly as possible. wistar.org.


Yoneyama K.,Japan Agency for Marine - Earth Science and Technology | Zhang C.,University of Miami | Long C.N.,Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society | Year: 2013

A field campaign in the Indian Ocean region collected unprecedented observations during October 2011'March 2012 to help advance knowledge of physical processes of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO). Studies on the MJO mean seasonal cycle indicated that main MJO initiation activity takes place in the central IO from October to March, with the highest occurrence probability near the equator in October-January. The special observing period (SOP) was designed to obtain high-resolution data to capture the diurnal cycle of convective activity with the maximum observing capacity. All other instruments continued to operate after the SOP until the end of the intensive observing period (IOP). Accompanying the sounding arrays and equally essential to the field campaign was a radar network. The 2011-12 MJO field campaign provided observations that are unique in several aspects in comparison to previous tropical field campaigns that aimed at interactions between atmospheric convection and its large-scale environment and between the atmosphere and ocean.


Harhaj E.W.,University of Miami | Dixit V.M.,Genentech
Cell Research | Year: 2011

Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is a critical regulator of multiple biological functions including innate and adaptive immunity and cell survival. Activation of NF-κB is tightly regulated to preclude chronic signaling that may lead to persistent inflammation and cancer. Ubiquitination of key signaling molecules by E3 ubiquitin ligases has emerged as an important regulatory mechanism for NF-κB signaling. Deubiquitinases (DUBs) counteract E3 ligases and therefore play a prominent role in the downregulation of NF-κB signaling and homeostasis. Understanding the mechanisms of NF-κB downregulation by specific DUBs such as A20 and CYLD may provide therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. © 2011 IBCB, SIBS, CAS All rights reserved.


Toonkel R.L.,University of Miami | Hare J.M.,University of Miami | Matthay M.A.,University of California at San Francisco | Glassberg M.K.,University of Miami
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine | Year: 2013

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive, debilitating, and fatal lung disease characterized by interstitial fibrosis with decreasing lung volumes and hypoxemic respiratory failure. The prognosis for patients with IPF is poor and the quest to find effective therapies has been unsuccessful. Despite several clinical trials over the past decade, there are no U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved treatments for patients with IPF and thus no standard of care. In terms of pathogenesis, IPF is characterized by alveolar epithelial cell injury and activation with interstitial inflammation, fibroblast proliferation with extracellular matrix collagen deposition, and loss of lung function. Becausemesenchymalstemcells (MSCs)hometo sites of injury, inhibit inflammation, and contribute to epithelial tissue repair, their use has been suggested as a therapy for the treatment of IPF. MSCs have potential as a novel therapeutic agent in multiple diseases and they have been safely administered in a number of clinical trials. Some, but not all, preclinical studies in animal models of lung fibrosis suggest that MSCs might be effective in the treatment of IPF. Given the safety and ease of MSC administration in other patient populations, the results in preclinical animal models of IPF, and the major need for novel therapeutic options in this devastating disease, we propose that carefully designed clinical trials of MSCs for the treatment of patients with IPF are appropriate. Establishing safety in the setting of IPF is the first priority in early clinical trials followed by clinical and biological measures of efficacy. Copyright © 2013 by the American Thoracic Society.


Harhaj E.W.,University of Miami | Dixit V.M.,Genentech
Immunological Reviews | Year: 2012

The nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway is a critical regulator of innate and adaptive immunity. Noncanonical K63-linked polyubiquitination plays a key regulatory role in NF-κB signaling pathways by functioning as a scaffold to recruit kinase complexes containing ubiquitin-binding domains. Ubiquitination is balanced by deubiquitinases that cleave polyubiquitin chains and oppose the function of E3 ubiquitin ligases. Deubiquitinases therefore play an important role in the termination of NF-κB signaling and the resolution of inflammation. In this review, we focus on NF-κB regulation by deubiquitinases with an emphasis on A20 and CYLD. Deubiquitinases and the ubiquitin/proteasome components that regulate NF-κB may serve as novel therapeutic targets for inflammatory diseases and cancer. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.


Shembade N.,University of Miami | Ma A.,University of California at San Francisco | Harhaj E.W.,University of Miami
Science | Year: 2010

A20 negatively regulates inflammation by inhibiting the nuclear factor kB (NF-kB) transcription factor in the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways. A20 contains deubiquitinase and E3 ligase domains and thus has been proposed to function as a ubiquitin-editing enzyme downstream of TNFRl by inactivating ubiquitinated RIP1. However, it remains unclear how A20 terminates NF-kB signaling downstream of TLRs. We have shown that A20 inhibited the E3 ligase activities of TRAF6, TRAF2, and clAPl by antagonizing interactions with the E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzymes Ubd3 and UbcH5c. A20, together with the regulatory molecule TAXlBPl, interacted with Ubc13 and UbcH5c and triggered their ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation. These findings suggest a mechanism of A20 action in the inhibition of inflammatory signaling pathways.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 389.56K | Year: 2012

This research applies methods and tools from mathematical knowledge management and theorem proving to theoretical economics, by working with a class of cooperative games called pillage games. Pillage games, introduced by Jordan in 2006, provide a formal way of thinking about the ability of powerful coalitions to take resources from less powerful ones. While their name suggests primitive, violent interactions, pillage games are more applicable to advanced democracies, in which coalitions seek to form governments to alter the distribution of societys resources in their favour. If, for some allocation of societys resources, the coalition preferring another allocation is stronger than that preferring the status quo, the other allocation `dominates the status quo. The most conceptually intriguing, and the most computationally intractable solution concept for cooperative games is the `stable set. A stable set, has two features: no allocation in the set dominates another; each allocation outside the set is dominated by an allocation in the set. For pillage games with three agents under a few additional conditions, we have determined when stable sets exist, that they are unique and contain no more than 15 allocations, and how to determine them for a given power function. In this research, we first formally represent the mathematical knowledge developed in Jordans and our work using sTeX, a mathematical knowledge management tool. This allows, e.g., automatic identification of how various results depend on each other. We then use two modern automated theorem provers (ATPs), Isabelle and Theorema, to formally prove these results. Theorem proving is a hard task and if not provided with domain specific knowledge ATPs have to search through big search spaces in order to find proofs. To increase their reasoning power, we shall seek to identify recurring patterns in proofs, and extract proof tactics, reducing the interactions necessary to prove the theorems interactively. As important results in pillage games can be summarised in pseudo-algorithms, containing both computational and non-computational steps, we shall study such pseudo-algorithms, seeking to push them towards the much more efficient computational steps. Finally, we shall use the identified proof tactics to help the ATPs prove new results in order evaluate their true value. The research seeks to make a number of contributions. For theorem proving, pillage games form a new set of challenge problems. As the study of pillage games is new, and the canon of applicable knowledge small, this gives an unprecedented opportunity to encode most of it. The research will expand the tractable problem domain for ATPs; and - by identifying successful tactics - increase both the efficiency with which ATPs search for proofs, and - ideally - their ability to establish new results. For economics, this is the first major application of formal knowledge management and theorem proving techniques. The few previous applications of ATP to economics have formalised isolated results without engaging economists and have thus largely gone unnoticed by the discipline. As cooperative games are a known hard class of economic problems, and pillage games known to be tractable, this research therefore presents a strong `proof of concept for the use of ATP within economics. Cooperative game theory is formally similar to graph theory, the techniques and insights developed may be applicable to matching problems, network economics, operations research, and combinatorial optimisation more generally. Additionally, the researchers will introduce ATP techniques to the leading PhD summer school in computational economics, and are working in collaboration with economic theorists with strong computational backgrounds. Thus, the research seeks to form a focal point for formal knowledge management and theorem proving efforts in economics.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 299.02K | Year: 2015

DESCRIPTION provided by applicant Pathological cardiac remodeling including myocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis and myocardial interstitial fibrosis constitutes a common pathway to heart failure in disease Despite current pharmacologic therapy and other advances that attenuate remodeling mortality due to heart failure remains high New more effective therapeutic options are desperately needed in an increasing patient population to improve both the survival and quality of life for patients with or susceptible to heart failure We recently discovered that the protein kinase p ribosomal S kinase type RSK plays a critical role in the regulation of pathological cardiac remodeling In Anchored RSK Inhibitors LLC was founded by Dr Michael Kapiloff to develop novel therapeutics based upon RSK inhibition that will prevent and or treat heart failure RSK was required for pathological remodeling even though RSK is less abundant in the cardiac myocyte than other members of the RSK protein kinase family We found that in myocytes RSK andapos s unique N terminal domain conferred high affinity regulated binding to the scaffold protein muscle A kinase anchoring protein mAKAP This novel protein protein interaction explained the selective binding of that kinase isoform to the scaffold New preliminary data show that expression both in vitro and in vivo of an anchoring disruptor peptide that blocks mAKAP RSK binding will attenuate pathological remodeling preventing the development of heart failure in response to pressure overload The goal of this STTR application is to support the development of a new adeno associated virus AAV gene therapy vector that expresses the RSK anchoring disruptor peptide The proposed research will provide proof of concept for a new therapeutic approach for the treatment and or prevention of heart failure based upon RSK displacement within the myocyte SPECIFIC AIM Treatment of Pressure Overload induced Heart Failure by Anchoring Disruptor Therapy Cardiac myocyte selective expression of a mAKAP RSK binding peptide RBD using AAV prevents transverse aortic constriction induced heart failure in vivo In this Aim we will test whether RSK anchoring disruptor therapy can induce reverse remodeling and treat heart failure in mice with established pathology due to pressure overload SPECIFIC AIM Prevention of Myocardial Infarction induced Heart Failure by Anchoring Disruptor Therapy In this Aim we will test whether AAV RBD can block remodeling following myocardial infarction without having deleterious effects on infarct size or scar formation Results obtained through this phase I STTR grant will provide insight into how broadly AAV RBD therapy may be applied in cardiovascular disease and inform the choice of subsequent large animal studies necessary to progress to a FDA Investigational New Drug Application PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE Heart failure is a syndrome of major public heath significance that is the cause of death for about in Americans accountable for nearly deaths each year Despite a range of existing therapies the mortality rate for patients with heart failur remains very high with about of patients dying within years of a diagnosis In this application we aim to develop a new therapy for heart failure based upon the selective targeting of RSK


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.4.4-2 | Award Amount: 3.85M | Year: 2012

Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare genetically heterogeneous disorder which results from dysfunction of motile hair-like organelles (cilia) that results in severe, chronic airways disease. Due to other cilia-related disease mechanisms several other organ systems like the heart can be affected. The complexity of the disease phenotype, late diagnosis, as well as lack of evidence based management guidelines contribute to a high burden of disease and cause high health care costs. Therefore, there is a great need for observational trials as well as well-designed randomised controlled trials to put evidence-based diagnostic and treatment approaches into effect. The main objective of our project is to improve diagnosis and treatment of PCD patients. To accomplish this, we propose to: 1) Establish widespread, early diagnosis by introduction of nasal Nitric Oxide measurement as screening tool, and by introduction of high-speed videomicroscopy as diagnostic tool; 2) Develop new outcome criteria, especially a PCD-specific quality of life questionnaire, as a prerequisite for controlled PCD trials; 3) Establish a PCD registry for both cross-sectional analysis of current disease status and longitudinal observational analysis of disease progression under different regimens; 4) Generate evidence-based treatment guidelines by conducting two prospective randomized trials on the inhalation of hypertonic saline and long term azithromycin therapy. To achieve these goals members of the European Respiratory Societys PCD task force will join forces with members of the NIH-funded US-PCD-network. In our multi-national project, we will for the first time establish evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis, clinical management and therapy. We expect that in a high proportion of children the diagnosis will be established before irreversible lung damage has occurred. In later diagnosed individuals the disease burden will be reduced and chronic respiratory failure retarded.


Patent
University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign, Northwestern University and University of Miami | Date: 2014-04-03

The present invention provides methods for purifying a layer of carbon nanotubes comprising providing a precursor layer of substantially aligned carbon nanotubes supported by a substrate, wherein the precursor layer comprises a mixture of first carbon nanotubes and second carbon nanotubes; selectively heating the first carbon nanotubes; and separating the first carbon nanotubes from the second carbon nanotubes, thereby generating a purified layer of carbon nanotubes. Devices benefiting from enhanced electrical properties enabled by the purified layer of carbon nanotubes are also described.


With an upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare, Alberto J. Fernandez, RN, BSN, joins the prestigious ranks of the International Nurses Association. Alberto J. Fernandez is a Registered Nurse with seven years of experience in his field and an extensive expertise in all facets of nursing, especially Neuro-Stepdown unit and Stroke Rehabilitation nursing. Alberto is currently serving patients within Baptist Health South Florida, a faith based, non profit healthcare organization and clinical care network in Southern Florida. Alberto attended the University of Phoenix, where he graduated with his Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing in 2014. An advocate for continuing education, he is currently pursuing his Master of Science Degree in Nursing with a Family Practice Nurse concentration at the University of Miami with a projected graduation in 2018. To keep up to date with the latest advances and developments in the challenging nursing field, Alberto maintains a professional membership with the American Nurses Association. Learn more about Alberto J. Fernandez here: http://inanurse.org/network/index.php?do=/4135265/info/ and be sure to read his upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare.


News Article | October 10, 2016
Site: www.medicalnewstoday.com

A study published by researchers at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine describes that certain proteins playing a role in cancer progression and metastasis are stored as amyloid bodies in dormant cancer cells. Once the amyloid bodies disaggregate, the cancer cells become active again. The findings were published in the journal Developmental Cell. Amyloid bodies are known to play a role in the development of neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease but their contributions to the progression of cancer have been largely unknown. This discovery points to a new avenue for the treatment of various types of cancers by applying knowledge we have gained from neuroscience to tumor biology. "The amyloid state of protein organization is typically associated with debilitating human neuropathies and rarely observed in physiology," said Stephen Lee, Ph.D., director of the Tumor Biology Program at Sylvester, professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at the Miller School, and corresponding author of the study. "Yet, we found that a large number of proteins are stored as amyloid bodies in cancer cells that are dormant. The heat shock chaperone pathway can disaggregate the amyloid bodies and turn the dormant cancer cells into active, progressing cancer cells." The team of researchers found that ribosomal intergenic noncoding RNA regulates the process of amyloid formation in cancer cells, making it a target for drug discovery and development. "If we can stop the amyloid bodies from disaggregating in cancer cells, the hope is that they will remain dormant indefinitely," said Lee. "In addition, we may also be able to turn active cancer cells into dormant ones by encouraging them to store the proteins as amyloid bodies." Amyloidogenesis enables cells to remain viable during prolonged periods of extracellular stress, highlighting the non-toxic and protective nature of the process, not just in cancer cells. "Following this approach, we wouldn't necessarily rid the body of cancer cells, but we would keep them inactive - shut off, if you will - and not allow them to become active again," said Lee. "I am optimistic this could become a novel way of treating cancer. There are already drugs on the market, and others are being studied, that target the ribosomal intergenic noncoding RNA as well as the heat shock chaperone pathway." This research was supported by grants from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (R01GM115342) and the National Cancer Institute (R01CA200676) of the National Institutes of Health, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.


SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., Feb. 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Achaogen, Inc. (NASDAQ:AKAO), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company discovering and developing novel antibacterials addressing multi-drug resistant (MDR) gram-negative infections, today reported that it will host a Research & Development Day to highlight advances in the Company’s pipeline, in New York City on March 1, 2017 from 12:00pm to 2:30pm ET. The meeting will feature presentations by key opinion leaders Yoav Golan, MD, MS, FIDSA (Tufts Medical Center) and Thomas M. Hooton, MD (University of Miami School of Medicine), who will discuss the current treatment landscape for MDR gram-negative infections and novel treatments under development. Both experts will be available to answer questions. Achaogen will provide an overview of its lead product candidate, plazomicin, which is being developed to treat serious bacterial infections due to MDR Enterobacteriaceae, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). Management will also outline notable progress on the research and preclinical pipeline, including an overview of a new program that is planned to commence human clinical trials in 2017, and advances with their antibody discovery platform. Yoav Golan, MD, MS, FIDSA is currently an attending physician in the Division of Geographic Medicine and Infectious Diseases at Tufts Medical Center and Associate Professor of Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine. His fields of professional expertise include hospital-acquired infections, antibiotic resistance and its impact on patient outcomes and pharmacoeconomics. Over the past 10 years, Dr. Golan has been involved in the pre-clinical and clinical development of several antibiotics, including Cubicin, Dificid and Teflaro. Dr. Golan has a comprehensive understanding of clinical research methodologies and, as a clinician and researcher, he is familiar first-hand with current unmet medical needs. Thomas M. Hooton, MD is a Professor of Clinical Medicine at University of Miami School of Medicine, and Medical Director for Infection Control and Occupational Health at the University of Miami Health System. He has devoted his 30-year career to clinical care and research in infectious diseases. Considered one of the nation’s leading experts in the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of urinary tract infection (UTI), Dr. Hooton has chaired and served on several committees of the Infectious Diseases Society of America that publish guidelines on screening and treating asymptomatic bacteriuria, catheter-associated and uncomplicated urinary tract infection, and antimicrobial stewardship. Dr. Hooton received his medical degree from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas. This event is intended for institutional investors, sell-side analysts, investment bankers, and business development professionals only. Please RSVP in advance if you plan to attend, as space is limited. To reserve attendance, email or contact LifeSci Advisors, LLC at Mac@LifeSciAdvisors.com.  A live and archived webcast of the event, with slides, will be available at http://lifesci.rampard.com/20170301/reg.jsp and on the Investors section of the Company’s website at www.achaogen.com. About Achaogen Achaogen is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company passionately committed to the discovery, development, and commercialization of novel antibacterials to treat MDR gram-negative infections. Achaogen is developing plazomicin, Achaogen's lead product candidate, for the treatment of serious bacterial infections due to MDR Enterobacteriaceae, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Achaogen's plazomicin program is funded in part with a contract from the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority. Plazomicin is the first clinical candidate from Achaogen's gram-negative antibiotic discovery engine, and Achaogen has other programs in early and late preclinical stages focused on other MDR gram-negative infections. For more information, please visit www.achaogen.com.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Researchers from the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine and the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have shown that a neuroprotective compound tested in rats provides two-pronged protection for brain cells during stroke and improves physical and cognitive outcomes in the treated animals. Every year, nearly 800,000 Americans have a stroke and almost 130,000 die. Survivors often are left with long-term physical and cognitive disability that significantly alters their lives. When a stroke interrupts the brain's blood supply, mature brain cells (neurons) die. In addition, reestablishing blood flow, known as reperfusion, also leads to processes that cause cell death. A part of the brain's natural response to stroke injury is to increase production of new brain cells in two specific regions (the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles), which normally make a smaller number of new brain cells every day. Unfortunately, the vast majority of these newborn cells die within one to two weeks, limiting the benefit of this potential repair process. Minimizing the loss of brain cells is a primary goal for new stroke therapies. "If we could prevent the mature brain cells from dying that would be beneficial," says Andrew Pieper, MD, PhD, professor of psychiatry in the UI Carver College of Medicine and co-senior study author. "But if we could also support or enhance this surge in neurogenesis (birth of new neurons), we might be able to further foster recovery, especially in terms of cognitive function, which is critically dependent on the hippocampus." Using rats, Pieper and his colleagues Zachary B. Loris and W. Dalton Dietrich, PhD, tested the effects of a compound called P7C3-A20 on these two aspects of neuroprotection following ischemic stroke. Blood flow to the rats' brains was interrupted for 90 minutes and then the blockage was cleared allowing reperfusion. One group of rats was given the P7C3-A20 compound twice daily for seven days following the stroke. P7C3-A20 has previously been shown to prevent brain cell death in other animal models of neurologic injury, including Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stress-associated depression, and traumatic brain injury. In terms of the brain itself, the P7C3-A20 compound reduced loss of brain tissue (atrophy) and increased survival of newborn neurons six weeks after stroke. In addition to the improved survival of both mature and newborn neurons, rats that received the P7C3-A20 compound for seven days after stroke also had better physical and cognitive outcomes than untreated rats. Treated rats had improved balance and coordination one week after stroke, and improved learning and memory one month after stroke. The findings were published recently in the journal Experimental Neurology. "There is no previous demonstration of a pharmacologic agent that both protects mature neurons from dying and also boosts the net magnitude of neurogenesis," Pieper says. "Our compound is beneficial in this animal model of stroke, and we're hopeful that it might eventually benefit patients." "Currently there are limited treatments for acute stroke that make a real difference in patient's lives. There is an urgent need to identify, test, and translate new therapies to the clinic," adds Dietrich, co-senior study author and Scientific Director of The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, professor of neurological surgery, neurology, biomedical engineering and cell biology at the University of Miami where the studies were conducted. "The ability to both protect and repair the injured nervous system has major implications on how we think about improving outcomes in millions of people each year with acute neurological injuries." The neuronal protection provided by the P7C3-A20 compound was also associated with a boost in the levels of a substance called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) in the rats' brains. NAD is emerging as an important player in neuronal health and survival. Levels of this substance are depleted during stroke, and it has been proposed that increasing NAD levels may be a therapeutic target for treating stroke. In this study, P7C3-A20 treatment restored NAD to normal levels in the rats' cortex after a stroke. Importantly, the study examined the effects of P7C3-A20 on cognitive and physical outcomes well beyond the time of the initial stroke. The sustained physical and cognitive improvement seen in the rats up to one month after the stroke suggests that the P7C3-A20 compound provides a long-term benefit. "We found we can give the compound in this critical period immediately after the stroke and it has a lasting effect," notes Pieper, who also is a professor of neurology, radiation oncology, and a psychiatrist with the Iowa City Veterans Affairs Health Care System. In recent years, advances in treatments that break up or remove stroke-causing blood clots have reduced the death rate for stroke and are improving outcomes for patients. The researchers hope that a treatment based on P7C3-A20 used in addition to the clot-clearing therapies might further improve outcomes by protecting brain cells during the traumatic ischemia/reperfusion period. The research was supported by funding from the American Heart Association, The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, the Mary Alice Smith Fund for Neuropsychiatry Research, the Titan Neurologic Research fund, and the University of Iowa and the Department of Veterans Affairs.


News Article | February 20, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

We know you love your pet because he or she is cute, loyal, and entertaining, too. But scientific evidence suggests that you might want to show your pet some gratitude for your good health. Pet ownership can boost your health and your social life, says Erika Friedmann, Ph.D., associate dean of research at the University of Maryland School of Nursing, who has conducted several studies on pets and well-being. So today, on National Love Your Pet Day, here are three reasons to give Scruffy a little extra affection: Of all the research in the field, the strongest evidence suggests, unsurprisingly, that people with pets, especially dogs, tend to be more active than their pet-free counterparts. “Exercising more is probably one of the best things that people can do in general,” says Evan Paul Cherniak, M.D., the lead author of a 2014 review of the benefits of pet ownership in the elderly, and director of the Geriatric Evaluation and Management unit at the University of Miami. “And because dog owners have to walk their dog, they’re forced to get outside and exercise.” One study published in the Journal of Physical Activity and Health assessed the walking patterns of 41,514 adults living in California. They found that dog owners walked about 20 minutes more per week than people with cats, or those who had no pet. An additional 20 minutes per week may not seem like a lot, but even modest increases in physical activity can be beneficial, according to the study authors, and can help you hit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendation of at least 2.5 hours of moderate-intensity physical activity (which includes brisk walking) per week. According to the CDC, pet ownership is associated with decreases in blood pressure, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels—all factors that play a role in heart disease. Even after a heart attack, people with pets seem to do better. For example, in a study that followed 460 people aged 33 to 84 beginning six months after they had a heart attack, Friedmann and her colleagues from the University of Maryland School of Nursing found that pet owners were 67 percent less likely to die during the study period than those who did not have a pet. “We think it’s the social support that may explain the benefits,” says Friedmann. Pets help reduce feelings of loneliness and depression, the latter of which has been linked to an increased risk of heart disease. Pet ownership, and animal therapy dog visits in particular, might boost mental health by counteracting anxiety and depression, says Friedmann, especially among the elderly. One study published in 2013 in the the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry found that among 65 nursing home residents with moderate to severe dementia, those who participated in one 45-minute session of petting and grooming a therapy dog each week were less depressed and agitated over the two and a half months of the study than those who did not. “There’s quite a bit of evidence showing that when a pet is present, people may be less stressed, and feel safer and more comfortable in the environments they’re in,” says Friedmann. For example, she says, walking with your dog in your neighborhood might make you feel safer than if you were walking alone. And there have even been studies that show that other people are more likely to be friendly—smiling at you, or striking up a conversation for example—when you’re accompanied by an animal. Of course, not all pet owners will experience these benefits, say Friedmann and Cherniak, and pet ownership isn’t right for everyone. Caring for an animal can be expensive and require a lot of time, and pets could even pose a danger for the immune-compromised. But for people who have the time, means, and desire to own a pet, there’s lots to love. More from Consumer Reports: Top pick tires for 2016 Best used cars for $25,000 and less 7 best mattresses for couples Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. Copyright © 2006-2017 Consumers Union of U.S.


News Article | December 22, 2016
Site: www.npr.org

The federal government has cut payments to 769 hospitals with high rates of patient injuries, for the first time counting the spread of antibiotic-resistant germs in assessing penalties. The punishments come in the third year of Medicare penalties for hospitals with patients most frequently suffering from potentially avoidable complications, including various types of infections, blood clots, bed sores and falls. This year the government also examined the prevalence of two types of bacteria resistant to drugs. Based on rates of all these complications, the hospitals identified by federal officials this week will lose 1 percent of all Medicare payments for a year — with that time frame beginning this past October. While the government did not release the dollar amount of the penalties, it will exceed a million dollars for many larger hospitals. In total, hospitals will lose about $430 million, 18 percent more than they lost last year, according to an estimate from the Association of American Medical Colleges. The reductions apply not only to patient stays but also will reduce the amount of money hospitals get to teach medical residents and care for low-income people. Forty percent of the hospitals penalized this year escaped punishment in the first two years of the program, a Kaiser Health News analysis shows. Those 306 hospitals include the University of Miami Hospital in Florida, Cambridge Health Alliance in Massachusetts, the University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor and Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Nationally, hospital-acquired conditions declined by 21 percent between 2010 and 2015, according to the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, or AHRQ. The biggest reductions were for bad reactions to medicines, catheter infections and post-surgical blood clots. Still, hospital harm remains a threat. AHRQ estimates there were 3.8 million hospital injuries last year, which translates to 115 injuries during every 1,000 patient hospital stays during that period. Each year, at least 2 million people become infected with bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics, including nearly a quarter-million cases in hospitals. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates 23,000 people die from them. Between 20 and 50 percent of all antibiotics prescribed in hospitals are either not needed or inappropriate, studies have found. The proliferation of antibiotic use — inside hospitals, among outpatients and in farm animals sold for food — has hastened the spread of stubborn bacterial strains that can be risky for patients. One resistant bacterium that Medicare included into its formula for determining financial penalties for hospitals is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, which can cause pneumonia and bloodstream and skin infections. MRSA is prevalent outside of hospitals and sometimes people with it show no signs of disease. But these people can bring the germ into a hospital, where it can be spread by health care providers and be especially dangerous for older or sick patients whose immune system cannot fight the infection. Hospitals have had some success in reducing MRSA infections, which dropped by 13 percent between 2011 and 2014, according to the CDC. AHRQ estimates there were 6,300 cases in hospitals last year. The second bacterium measured for the penalties is Clostridium difficile, known as C. diff, a germ that can multiply in the gut and colon when patients take some antibiotics to kill off other germs. It can also spread through contaminated surfaces or hands. While it can be treated by antibiotics, C. diff can also become so serious that some patients need to have part of their intestines surgically removed. C. diff can cause diarrhea and can be deadly for the elderly and other vulnerable patients. C. diff has challenged infection control efforts. While hospital infections dropped 8 percent from 2008 to 2014, there was a "significant increase" in C. diff that final year, the CDC says. AHRQ estimated there were 100,000 hospital cases last year. "The reality is we don't know how to prevent all these infections," said Dr. Louise Dembry, a professor at the Yale School of Medicine and president of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. The Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program also factors in rates of infections from hysterectomies, colon surgeries, urinary tract catheters and central line tubes. Those infections carry the most weight in determining penalties, but the formula also takes into account the frequency of bed sores, hip fractures, blood clots and four other complications. Specialized hospitals, such as those that treat psychiatric patients, veterans and children, are exempted from the penalties, as are hospitals with the "critical access" designation for being the only provider in an area. Of the remaining hospitals, the Affordable Care Act requires that Medicare penalize the 25 percent that perform the worst on these measures, even if they have reduced infection rates from previous years. That inflexible quota is one objection the hospital industry has with the penalties. In addition, many hospitals complain that they are penalized because of their vigilance in detecting infections, even ones that do not cause any symptoms in patients. Academic medical centers in particular have been frequently punished. "The HAC penalty payment program is regarded as rather arbitrary, so other than people getting upset when they incur a penalty, it is not in and of itself changing behavior," said Nancy Foster, vice president for quality and patient safety at the American Hospital Association. Federal records show that 347 hospitals penalized last year will not have payments reduced because their performance was better than others. Those include Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles, the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore and the University of Tennessee Medical Center in Knoxville. Over the lifetime of the penalty program, 241 hospitals have been punished in all three years, including the Cleveland Clinic; Intermountain Medical Center in Murray, Utah; Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles; Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta; Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago; and Brigham & Women's Hospital in Boston. The penalties come as the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services also launches new requirements for hospitals to ensure that the use of antibiotics is limited to cases where they are necessary and be circumspect in determining which of the drugs are most likely to work for a given infection. Hospitals will have to establish these antibiotic stewardship programs as a condition of receiving Medicare funding under a regulation the government drafted last summer. Lisa McGiffert, who directs Consumers Union's Safe Patient Project, said that as a result of Medicare's penalties and other efforts, "more hospitals are thinking more about appropriate use of antibiotics." However, she said, "I think most hospitals do not have effective antibiotic stewardship programs yet." Kaiser Health News is an editorially independent news service supported by the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation. You can follow Jordan Rau on Twitter: @jordanrau.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Polyglass U.S.A., Inc. announced today that it is a funding partner of the 2017 Dolphins Cancer Challenge (DCC), the Miami Dolphins’ signature health initiative. The $50,000 sponsorship represents part of Polyglass’ commitment to this charity, along with its team of employees who will raise funds and participate in the DCC event scheduled for February 11, 2017. “Everyone has been touched by cancer in some way and the Polyglass organization wants to help find a cure,” said Director of Strategic Marketing, Scott Lelling. “The money raised at the DCC has made a difference in the lives of many people affected by cancer and Polyglass is proud to be a funding partner of this worthy initiative for the second year.” Since founded by the Miami Dolphins organization in 2010, the DCC has raised $16.5 million to further cancer research at the University of Miami, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center. One hundred percent of the participant-raised funds has been used by Sylvester to make life-changing discoveries leading to more individualized treatments, better outcomes and more hope for cancer patients. The allocation of the donations include translational research, clinical trials, pediatric oncology treatment, breast cancer research, genitourinary cancer research and radiation oncology research. At the DCC event in February, Polyglass employees will join other bikers, runners and walkers in a race to beat cancer. All participants will end their race at the Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens, Fla. The event closes with a concert at the finish line. DCC has announced that multiplatinum musicians Counting Crows will headline the 2017 DCC Finish Line Celebration. The DCC has also incorporated the hashtag #CancerFighters as part of its campaign. About the Dolphins Cancer Challenge (DCC): The DCC is dedicated to improving people’s lives through the financial support of innovative cancer research at the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center. Launched in 2010 as the signature initiative of the Miami Dolphins Foundation, the DCC is a way all of us can be cancer fighters! 100% of participant-raised funds go to innovative cancer research at the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center. About Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center: Sylvester serves as the hub for cancer diagnosis and treatment for UHealth -University of Miami Health System. In 2003, Sylvester expanded its cancer services to patients in Broward and Palm Beach with the opening of Sylvester at Deerfield Beach. A third facility, Sylvester at Kendall, was opened in 2009 to serve patients in southern Miami-Dade county. About Polyglass: Polyglass U.S.A. Inc. is a leading manufacturer of modified bitumen roof membranes. Known for its self-adhered roofing systems based on the company’s patented ADESO® technology and its new patent-pending CURE Technology®, Polyglass also produces a full line of premium roof coatings and roof maintenance systems. Providing quality, innovation and service at its best, Polyglass adds value worldwide. For more information about the premium products and services offered by Polyglass, call 800.222.9782 or visit http://www.polyglass.us.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

One of the least-understood yet least-researched pediatric cancers — osteosarcoma — will be the focus of a first-ever conference, February 23–25 at The Biltmore Hotel in Miami, Florida. The event will bring patients, families, doctors and researchers together to explore ways to boost research and funding for this devastating disease. Osteosarcoma is a primary bone cancer that typically affects kids and teenagers aged 10 to 19. It requires aggressive treatment that can involve chemotherapy combinations plus limb-salvage surgery and/or amputation of the affected limb. No new treatments for this disease have been developed in 30+ years — a reality that profoundly frustrates osteosarcoma patients and their families in this era of comparative progress against some other forms of cancer. “With research for all pediatric cancers, including osteosarcoma, receiving less than four percent of the national research budget, Osteosarcoma is considered an “orphan cancer” with less than 200,000 cases per year,” says Ann Graham, President & Founder of MIB Agents. Organized by a team of volunteers with the 501(c)(3) national nonprofit osteosarcoma support organization MIB (Make It Better) Agents, this inaugural conference — dubbed FACTOR, which stands for Funding-Awareness-Collaboration-Trials-Osteosarcoma-Research — aims to help improve education, increase collaboration, raise awareness, increase the number of clinical trials, discover better therapies, advance research efforts, and much more. The MIB FACTOR 2017 Conference will feature 34 distinguished speakers, including doctors from leading cancer treatment and research centers around the U.S., such as: Cleveland Clinic, Taussig Cancer Institute Johns Hopkins, All Children's Hospital Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute Stanford University School of Medicine University of Kansas Medical Center University of Miami, Sylvester Cancer Center University of Minnesota, Masonic Cancer Center University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center University of Utah UT Southwestern Medical Center Speakers are volunteering their time and have been invited directly by their patients to attend and present. See the complete speaker list at http://www.mibagents.org/factor-speakers.html. Following the event, MIB Agents intends to help fund the most promising research presented at the conference, selected by a vote of the conference attendees. In addition to the research focus, conference-goers will have a wide array of sessions and activities to participate in, from coping skills therapy to relationship-building social, and recreational opportunities. The conference is being funded by family and friends of osteosarcoma patients and a handful of nonprofit organizations — honoring requests from three young adults who have since passed away from this disease asking that posthumous donations be made on their behalf to MIB Agents to make the conference happen. The conference organizing team was led by Theresa Beech and Ann Graham, two women whose lives have been personally affected by osteosarcoma. Beech is the mother of two children, Sarah (18) and Daniel. Daniel died from osteosarcoma in August 2016 at the age of 13. She developed a research database that is now the second largest in the U.S. and was an inspiration for this conference. Graham, founder of MIB Agents, was herself diagnosed with osteosarcoma at the age of 43, becoming the only adult to be treated on the pediatric floor at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. MIB Agents Background Ann Graham started MIB Agents when her fellow osteosarcoma patient, 10-year-old Alyssa, a dancer, discovered a recurrence. Alyssa’s leg was amputated and she began a clinical trial, which failed. Alyssa was sent home on hospice care and Ann wanted to make her final days special. She planned a NYC trip for Alyssa, which consisted of seeing the Rockettes, Mary Poppins on Broadway, visiting the American Girl Doll store, and watching the Nutcracker at Lincoln Center where she was allowed to dance on stage after the show. Alyssa passed away two weeks later, but Ann was inspired to improve the final days of other children like Alyssa. The missions continued and were self-funded, until becoming an official 501(c)(3) in February 2016. MIB Agents Mission MIB Agents offers love and support for kids with osteosarcoma in several ways by: pairing a child in active treatment with a child who survived (through letters of hope & support and gaming); providing items of comfort and entertainment (iTunes Cards, iPads, noise canceling headphones, etc.); arranging end-of-life experiences or comfort items (chairs to sleep in while sitting upright to a home viewing of Star Wars movies); and providing a platform for collaboration and research (such as the FACTOR Conference). Visit http://www.mibagents.org for more information and to get involved.


SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., Feb. 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Achaogen, Inc. (NASDAQ:AKAO), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company discovering and developing novel antibacterials addressing multi-drug resistant (MDR) gram-negative infections, today reported that it will host a Research & Development Day to highlight advances in the Company’s pipeline, in New York City on March 1, 2017 from 12:00pm to 2:30pm ET. The meeting will feature presentations by key opinion leaders Yoav Golan, MD, MS, FIDSA (Tufts Medical Center) and Thomas M. Hooton, MD (University of Miami School of Medicine), who will discuss the current treatment landscape for MDR gram-negative infections and novel treatments under development. Both experts will be available to answer questions. Achaogen will provide an overview of its lead product candidate, plazomicin, which is being developed to treat serious bacterial infections due to MDR Enterobacteriaceae, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). Management will also outline notable progress on the research and preclinical pipeline, including an overview of a new program that is planned to commence human clinical trials in 2017, and advances with their antibody discovery platform. Yoav Golan, MD, MS, FIDSA is currently an attending physician in the Division of Geographic Medicine and Infectious Diseases at Tufts Medical Center and Associate Professor of Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine. His fields of professional expertise include hospital-acquired infections, antibiotic resistance and its impact on patient outcomes and pharmacoeconomics. Over the past 10 years, Dr. Golan has been involved in the pre-clinical and clinical development of several antibiotics, including Cubicin, Dificid and Teflaro. Dr. Golan has a comprehensive understanding of clinical research methodologies and, as a clinician and researcher, he is familiar first-hand with current unmet medical needs. Thomas M. Hooton, MD is a Professor of Clinical Medicine at University of Miami School of Medicine, and Medical Director for Infection Control and Occupational Health at the University of Miami Health System. He has devoted his 30-year career to clinical care and research in infectious diseases. Considered one of the nation’s leading experts in the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of urinary tract infection (UTI), Dr. Hooton has chaired and served on several committees of the Infectious Diseases Society of America that publish guidelines on screening and treating asymptomatic bacteriuria, catheter-associated and uncomplicated urinary tract infection, and antimicrobial stewardship. Dr. Hooton received his medical degree from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas. This event is intended for institutional investors, sell-side analysts, investment bankers, and business development professionals only. Please RSVP in advance if you plan to attend, as space is limited. To reserve attendance, email or contact LifeSci Advisors, LLC at Mac@LifeSciAdvisors.com.  A live and archived webcast of the event, with slides, will be available at http://lifesci.rampard.com/20170301/reg.jsp and on the Investors section of the Company’s website at www.achaogen.com. About Achaogen Achaogen is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company passionately committed to the discovery, development, and commercialization of novel antibacterials to treat MDR gram-negative infections. Achaogen is developing plazomicin, Achaogen's lead product candidate, for the treatment of serious bacterial infections due to MDR Enterobacteriaceae, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Achaogen's plazomicin program is funded in part with a contract from the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority. Plazomicin is the first clinical candidate from Achaogen's gram-negative antibiotic discovery engine, and Achaogen has other programs in early and late preclinical stages focused on other MDR gram-negative infections. For more information, please visit www.achaogen.com.


SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., Feb. 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Achaogen, Inc. (NASDAQ:AKAO), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company discovering and developing novel antibacterials addressing multi-drug resistant (MDR) gram-negative infections, today reported that it will host a Research & Development Day to highlight advances in the Company’s pipeline, in New York City on March 1, 2017 from 12:00pm to 2:30pm ET. The meeting will feature presentations by key opinion leaders Yoav Golan, MD, MS, FIDSA (Tufts Medical Center) and Thomas M. Hooton, MD (University of Miami School of Medicine), who will discuss the current treatment landscape for MDR gram-negative infections and novel treatments under development. Both experts will be available to answer questions. Achaogen will provide an overview of its lead product candidate, plazomicin, which is being developed to treat serious bacterial infections due to MDR Enterobacteriaceae, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). Management will also outline notable progress on the research and preclinical pipeline, including an overview of a new program that is planned to commence human clinical trials in 2017, and advances with their antibody discovery platform. Yoav Golan, MD, MS, FIDSA is currently an attending physician in the Division of Geographic Medicine and Infectious Diseases at Tufts Medical Center and Associate Professor of Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine. His fields of professional expertise include hospital-acquired infections, antibiotic resistance and its impact on patient outcomes and pharmacoeconomics. Over the past 10 years, Dr. Golan has been involved in the pre-clinical and clinical development of several antibiotics, including Cubicin, Dificid and Teflaro. Dr. Golan has a comprehensive understanding of clinical research methodologies and, as a clinician and researcher, he is familiar first-hand with current unmet medical needs. Thomas M. Hooton, MD is a Professor of Clinical Medicine at University of Miami School of Medicine, and Medical Director for Infection Control and Occupational Health at the University of Miami Health System. He has devoted his 30-year career to clinical care and research in infectious diseases. Considered one of the nation’s leading experts in the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of urinary tract infection (UTI), Dr. Hooton has chaired and served on several committees of the Infectious Diseases Society of America that publish guidelines on screening and treating asymptomatic bacteriuria, catheter-associated and uncomplicated urinary tract infection, and antimicrobial stewardship. Dr. Hooton received his medical degree from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas. This event is intended for institutional investors, sell-side analysts, investment bankers, and business development professionals only. Please RSVP in advance if you plan to attend, as space is limited. To reserve attendance, email or contact LifeSci Advisors, LLC at Mac@LifeSciAdvisors.com.  A live and archived webcast of the event, with slides, will be available at http://lifesci.rampard.com/20170301/reg.jsp and on the Investors section of the Company’s website at www.achaogen.com. About Achaogen Achaogen is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company passionately committed to the discovery, development, and commercialization of novel antibacterials to treat MDR gram-negative infections. Achaogen is developing plazomicin, Achaogen's lead product candidate, for the treatment of serious bacterial infections due to MDR Enterobacteriaceae, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Achaogen's plazomicin program is funded in part with a contract from the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority. Plazomicin is the first clinical candidate from Achaogen's gram-negative antibiotic discovery engine, and Achaogen has other programs in early and late preclinical stages focused on other MDR gram-negative infections. For more information, please visit www.achaogen.com.


SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., Feb. 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Achaogen, Inc. (NASDAQ:AKAO), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company discovering and developing novel antibacterials addressing multi-drug resistant (MDR) gram-negative infections, today reported that it will host a Research & Development Day to highlight advances in the Company’s pipeline, in New York City on March 1, 2017 from 12:00pm to 2:30pm ET. The meeting will feature presentations by key opinion leaders Yoav Golan, MD, MS, FIDSA (Tufts Medical Center) and Thomas M. Hooton, MD (University of Miami School of Medicine), who will discuss the current treatment landscape for MDR gram-negative infections and novel treatments under development. Both experts will be available to answer questions. Achaogen will provide an overview of its lead product candidate, plazomicin, which is being developed to treat serious bacterial infections due to MDR Enterobacteriaceae, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). Management will also outline notable progress on the research and preclinical pipeline, including an overview of a new program that is planned to commence human clinical trials in 2017, and advances with their antibody discovery platform. Yoav Golan, MD, MS, FIDSA is currently an attending physician in the Division of Geographic Medicine and Infectious Diseases at Tufts Medical Center and Associate Professor of Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine. His fields of professional expertise include hospital-acquired infections, antibiotic resistance and its impact on patient outcomes and pharmacoeconomics. Over the past 10 years, Dr. Golan has been involved in the pre-clinical and clinical development of several antibiotics, including Cubicin, Dificid and Teflaro. Dr. Golan has a comprehensive understanding of clinical research methodologies and, as a clinician and researcher, he is familiar first-hand with current unmet medical needs. Thomas M. Hooton, MD is a Professor of Clinical Medicine at University of Miami School of Medicine, and Medical Director for Infection Control and Occupational Health at the University of Miami Health System. He has devoted his 30-year career to clinical care and research in infectious diseases. Considered one of the nation’s leading experts in the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of urinary tract infection (UTI), Dr. Hooton has chaired and served on several committees of the Infectious Diseases Society of America that publish guidelines on screening and treating asymptomatic bacteriuria, catheter-associated and uncomplicated urinary tract infection, and antimicrobial stewardship. Dr. Hooton received his medical degree from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas. This event is intended for institutional investors, sell-side analysts, investment bankers, and business development professionals only. Please RSVP in advance if you plan to attend, as space is limited. To reserve attendance, email or contact LifeSci Advisors, LLC at Mac@LifeSciAdvisors.com.  A live and archived webcast of the event, with slides, will be available at http://lifesci.rampard.com/20170301/reg.jsp and on the Investors section of the Company’s website at www.achaogen.com. About Achaogen Achaogen is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company passionately committed to the discovery, development, and commercialization of novel antibacterials to treat MDR gram-negative infections. Achaogen is developing plazomicin, Achaogen's lead product candidate, for the treatment of serious bacterial infections due to MDR Enterobacteriaceae, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Achaogen's plazomicin program is funded in part with a contract from the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority. Plazomicin is the first clinical candidate from Achaogen's gram-negative antibiotic discovery engine, and Achaogen has other programs in early and late preclinical stages focused on other MDR gram-negative infections. For more information, please visit www.achaogen.com.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The BMT Tandem Meetings of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) and the Center for International Blood & Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) will take place Feb. 22-26, 2017 at the Gaylord Palms Convention Center in Orlando, Fla. The combined scientific sessions offer investigators, clinicians, laboratory technicians, clinical research professionals, nurses, pharmacists, administrators, and allied health professionals the latest medical instruction in hematopoietic cell transplantation. Alongside the scientific education being offered will be posters and abstracts highlighting the best new research in the field, including: The ASBMT and CIBMTR will also honor a few of its members with awards and named lectures on Friday evening, Feb. 24, 2017 beginning at 5:00 PM. The ASBMT will induct Krishna Komanduri, MD of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine as its new president. The CIBMTR welcomes its new Chair, Robert J. Soiffer, MD, of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. For complete details about the meeting, please visit http://bit.ly/2017Tandem. For a full list of best abstracts, visit http://bit.ly/BestAbs17 or for late breaking abstracts, visit http://bit.ly/BreakingAbs17. The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) is a professional society of more than 2,200 individuals from over 45 countries. The Society is dedicated to advancing the science and clinical care for patients who require blood and marrow transplants for blood cancers and other deadly diseases. The CIBMTR® (Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research®) is a research collaboration between the National Marrow Donor Program® (NMDP)/Be The Match® and the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW). The CIBMTR collaborates with the global scientific community to advance hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and cellular therapy worldwide to increase survival and enrich quality of life for patients.


SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., Feb. 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Achaogen, Inc. (NASDAQ:AKAO), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company discovering and developing novel antibacterials addressing multi-drug resistant (MDR) gram-negative infections, today reported that it will host a Research & Development Day to highlight advances in the Company’s pipeline, in New York City on March 1, 2017 from 12:00pm to 2:30pm ET. The meeting will feature presentations by key opinion leaders Yoav Golan, MD, MS, FIDSA (Tufts Medical Center) and Thomas M. Hooton, MD (University of Miami School of Medicine), who will discuss the current treatment landscape for MDR gram-negative infections and novel treatments under development. Both experts will be available to answer questions. Achaogen will provide an overview of its lead product candidate, plazomicin, which is being developed to treat serious bacterial infections due to MDR Enterobacteriaceae, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). Management will also outline notable progress on the research and preclinical pipeline, including an overview of a new program that is planned to commence human clinical trials in 2017, and advances with their antibody discovery platform. Yoav Golan, MD, MS, FIDSA is currently an attending physician in the Division of Geographic Medicine and Infectious Diseases at Tufts Medical Center and Associate Professor of Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine. His fields of professional expertise include hospital-acquired infections, antibiotic resistance and its impact on patient outcomes and pharmacoeconomics. Over the past 10 years, Dr. Golan has been involved in the pre-clinical and clinical development of several antibiotics, including Cubicin, Dificid and Teflaro. Dr. Golan has a comprehensive understanding of clinical research methodologies and, as a clinician and researcher, he is familiar first-hand with current unmet medical needs. Thomas M. Hooton, MD is a Professor of Clinical Medicine at University of Miami School of Medicine, and Medical Director for Infection Control and Occupational Health at the University of Miami Health System. He has devoted his 30-year career to clinical care and research in infectious diseases. Considered one of the nation’s leading experts in the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of urinary tract infection (UTI), Dr. Hooton has chaired and served on several committees of the Infectious Diseases Society of America that publish guidelines on screening and treating asymptomatic bacteriuria, catheter-associated and uncomplicated urinary tract infection, and antimicrobial stewardship. Dr. Hooton received his medical degree from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas. This event is intended for institutional investors, sell-side analysts, investment bankers, and business development professionals only. Please RSVP in advance if you plan to attend, as space is limited. To reserve attendance, email or contact LifeSci Advisors, LLC at Mac@LifeSciAdvisors.com.  A live and archived webcast of the event, with slides, will be available at http://lifesci.rampard.com/20170301/reg.jsp and on the Investors section of the Company’s website at www.achaogen.com. About Achaogen Achaogen is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company passionately committed to the discovery, development, and commercialization of novel antibacterials to treat MDR gram-negative infections. Achaogen is developing plazomicin, Achaogen's lead product candidate, for the treatment of serious bacterial infections due to MDR Enterobacteriaceae, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Achaogen's plazomicin program is funded in part with a contract from the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority. Plazomicin is the first clinical candidate from Achaogen's gram-negative antibiotic discovery engine, and Achaogen has other programs in early and late preclinical stages focused on other MDR gram-negative infections. For more information, please visit www.achaogen.com.


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

WASHINGTON, DC--(Marketwired - November 17, 2016) - The United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (USHCC) congratulates Geisha Williams for being elected as the new CEO and President of PG&E Corporation. She is the first woman to take such a position at the company, and will assume the role in March 2017. "We applaud Geisha Williams for breaking a glass ceiling in corporate America and being elected as CEO and President of PG&E Corporation. She is the first woman, who happens to be Hispanic, to be named to this position," said USHCC President & CEO Javier Palomarez. "This signals a new beginning for the utility industry. It shows that Latinas too can earn command of Fortune 200 companies. Geisha's lengthy track record of reliability and strategic leadership in the energy and utility industries, both at PG&E and Florida Power and Light, makes her incredibly qualified for the role. When you harness the power of women, you unleash success for your business. The USHCC is thrilled that PG&E Corporation has recognized this truth, and is proud of Geisha for this incredible achievement." "Geisha Williams has been at the forefront of promoting clean energy within PG&E, and will continue to promote this transformational goal," said USHCC Chairman Don Salazar. "She played a significant part in shifting the company to getting 30% of its energy from renewable resources. Additionally, Geisha's experience as President of Electric at PG&E will help guide her as she maintains the company's electrical grid, which serves Northern and Central California. We believe that her 21st century leadership is what will bring even greater success to PG&E Corporation. The USHCC commends PG&E Corporation for naming Geisha as CEO, and cannot wait to work with her in the future." Geisha Williams joined PG&E in 2007, and was named Executive Vice President, Electric Operations in 2011. In 2015, she was named President, Electric and a member of PG&E's board. Williams also took on additional responsibilities, taking charge of the enterprise-wide Customer Care organization, and playing a key role in handling the shutdown of the Diablo Canyon nuclear plant. Before her tenure at PG&E, she held officer level positions leading electric distribution, as well as a variety of positions in the fields of customer service, marketing, external affairs, and electric operations at Florida Power and Light Company, the third-largest electric utility in the United States. Williams obtained a Bachelor's degree in Engineering from University of Miami, and a Master's degree in Business Administration from Nova Southeastern University. She also serves as the Board Chair for the Center for Energy and Workforce Development, as a trustee at the California Academy of Sciences, and as a Director at the Edison Electric Institute, the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, and the Association of Edison Illuminating Companies. She is also a member of the University of Miami President's Council, and of Executive women in Energy. PG&E Corporation is a Fortune 200 energy-based holding company headquartered in San Francisco. It is the parent company of Pacific Gas and Electric Company, California's largest investor-owned utility. PG&E serves nearly 16 million Californians across a 70,000-square-mile service area in Northern and Central California. The USHCC actively promotes the economic growth, development and interests of more than 4.2 million Hispanic-owned businesses that, combined, contribute over $668 billion to the American economy every year. It also advocates on behalf of 260 major American corporations and serves as the umbrella organization for more than 200 local chambers and business associations nationwide. For more information, visit ushcc.com. Follow the USHCC on Twitter @USHCC.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

BOSTON, MA, February 21, 2017-- Bascom Palmer Eye Institute has installed the Ceeable Visual Field Analyzer (CVFA) digital health technology. Bascom Palmer Eye Institute is a world class teaching and research institution for ophthalmology. CVFA was designed to offer caregivers the ability to perform visual field testing of patients in non-traditional test locations such as, primary clinics, geriatric clinics, and adult care centers.The CVFA is a cloud-based digital platform for the detection and characterization of visual field distortions due to retinal disease, which includes patients with AMD and diabetic retinopathy. Moreover, CVFA allows monitoring progression of diseases affecting vision. The CVFA will deliver rapid, accurate and low-cost visual field testing to patient populations that may not have access to traditional vision testing services."We have selected the Ceeable system to deliver visual field testing technology to a large portion of the patient population who are unable to access care at traditional test locations," says Dr. Delia DeBuc, research associate professor of ophthalmology at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute. CVFA will be used in a clinical research study sponsored by the Finker Frenkel Legacy Foundation, Inc. The study is investigating retinal features that have been associated with cognitive decline and brain alternations in relation to aging and brain abnormalities in early Alzheimer's disease.CVFA has successfully tested thousands of patients in the United States and across the globe, delivering and enabling much-needed efficient and effective eye care services to a diverse patient population.Bascom Palmer Eye Institute is ranked the nation's best in ophthalmology by U.S. News & World Report, for 12 consecutive years. The Institute serves as the Department of Ophthalmology for the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, www.bascompalmer.org About CeeableCeeable, Inc. is a leader in digital mobile health for ophthalmology. The Ceeable Visual Field Analyzer (CVFA) is cloud-based digital platform used to detect and diagnose retinal disease. There are more than 300 million people worldwide that suffer from retinal disease. The Ceeable technology can reach more people worldwide than any currently available retinal diagnostic technology. Better patient management of eye disease will reduce healthcare costs and help prevent blindness, www.ceeable.com


Focke P.J.,Oregon Health And Science University | Wang X.,University of Miami | Larsson H.P.,University of Miami
Structure | Year: 2013

At synapses, sodium-coupled transporters remove released neurotransmitters, thereby recycling them and maintaining a low extracellular concentration of the neurotransmitter. The molecular mechanism underlying sodium-coupled neurotransmitter uptake is not completely understood. Several structures of homologs of human neurotransmitter transporters have been solved with X-ray crystallography. These crystal structures have spurred a plethora of computational and experimental work to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying sodium-coupled transport. Here, we compare the structures of Glt Ph, a glutamate transporter homolog, and LeuT, a homolog of neurotransmitter transporters for the biogenic amines and inhibitory molecules GABA and glycine. We relate these structures to data obtained from experiments and computational simulations, to draw conclusions about the mechanism of uptake by sodium-coupled neurotransmitter transporters. Here, we propose how sodium and substrate binding is coupled and how binding of sodium and substrate opens and closes the gates in these transporters, thereby leading to an efficient coupled transport. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Lebwohl M.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine | Swanson N.,Oregon Health And Science University | Anderson L.L.,Dermatology Associates of Tyler | Melgaard A.,Data Management | And 2 more authors.
New England Journal of Medicine | Year: 2012

BACKGROUND: Actinic keratosis is a common precursor to sun-related squamous-cell carcinoma. Treating actinic keratoses and the surrounding skin area (i.e., field therapy) can eradicate clinical and subclinical actinic keratoses. Topical field therapy currently requires weeks or months of treatment. We investigated the efficacy and safety of a new topical field therapy for actinic keratosis, ingenol mebutate gel (0.015% for face and scalp and 0.05% for trunk and extremities). METHODS: In four multicenter, randomized, double-blind studies, we randomly assigned patients with actinic keratoses on the face or scalp or on the trunk or extremities to receive ingenol mebutate or placebo (vehicle), self-applied to a 25-cm 2 contiguous field once daily for 3 consecutive days for lesions on the face or scalp or for 2 consecutive days for the trunk or extremities. Complete clearance (primary outcome) was assessed at 57 days, and local reactions were quantitatively measured. RESULTS: In a pooled analysis of the two trials involving the face and scalp, the rate of complete clearance was higher with ingenol mebutate than with placebo (42.2% vs. 3.7%, P<0.001). Local reactions peaked at day 4, with a mean maximum composite score of 9.1 on the local-skin-response scale (which ranges from 0 to 4 for six types of reaction, yielding a composite score of 0 to 24, with higher numbers indicating more severe reactions), rapidly decreased by day 8, and continued to decrease, approaching baseline scores by day 29. In a pooled analysis of the two trials involving the trunk and extremities, the rate of complete clearance was also higher with ingenol mebutate than with placebo (34.1% vs. 4.7%, P<0.001). Local skin reactions peaked between days 3 and 8 and declined rapidly, approaching baseline by day 29, with a mean maximum score of 6.8. Adverse events were generally mild to moderate in intensity and resolved without sequelae. CONCLUSIONS: Ingenol mebutate gel applied topically for 2 to 3 days is effective for field treatment of actinic keratoses. (Funded by LEO Pharma; ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT00742391, NCT00916006, NCT00915551, and NCT00942604.) Copyright © 2012 Massachusetts Medical Society.


Singh R.K.,University of Miami | Lokeshwar B.L.,University of Miami | Lokeshwar B.L.,VA Hospital
Cancer Research | Year: 2011

The proinflammatory chemokine receptor CXCR7 that binds the ligands CXCL11 and CXCL12 (SDF-1a) is elevated in a variety of human cancers, but its functions are not understood as it does not elicit classical chemokine receptor signaling. Here we report that the procancerous cytokine IL-8 (interleukin-8) upregulates CXCR7 expression along with ligand-independent functions of CXCR7 that promote the growth and proliferation of human prostate cancer cells (CaP cells). In cell culture, ectopic expression or addition of IL-8 selectively increased expression of CXCR7 at the level of mRNA and protein production. Conversely, suppressing IL-8 signaling abolished the ability of IL-8 to upregulate CXCR7. RNAi-mediated knockdown of CXCR7 in CaP cells caused multiple antitumor effects, including decreased cell proliferation, cell-cycle arrest in G1 phase, and decreased expression of proteins involved in G1 to S phase progression. In contrast, addition of the CXCR7 ligand SDF-1a and CXCL11 to CaP cells did not affect cell proliferation. Over expression of CXCR7 in normal prostate cells increased their proliferation in a manner associated with increased levels of phospho-EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor; pY1110) and phospho-ERK1/2. Notably, coimmunoprecipitation studies established a physical association of CXCR7 with EGFR, linking CXCR7-mediated cell proliferation to EGFR activation. Consistent with these findings, CXCR7-depleted CaP tumors grew more slowly than control tumors, expressing decreased tumor-associated expression of VEGF, cyclin D1, and p-EGFR. Together, these results reveal a novel mechanism of ligand-independent growth promotion by CXCR7 and its coregulation by the proinflammatory factor IL-8 in prostate cancer. ©2011 AACR.


Bonasio R.,University of Pennsylvania | Shiekhattar R.,University of Miami
Annual Review of Genetics | Year: 2014

Over the past decade there has been a greater understanding of genomic complexity in eukaryotes ushered in by the immense technological advances in high-throughput sequencing of DNA and its corresponding RNA transcripts. This has resulted in the realization that beyond protein-coding genes, there are a large number of transcripts that do not encode for proteins and, therefore, may perform their function through RNA sequences and/or through secondary and tertiary structural determinants. This review is focused on the latest findings on a class of noncoding RNAs that are relatively large (>200 nucleotides), display nuclear localization, and use different strategies to regulate transcription. These are exciting times for discovering the biological scope and the mechanism of action for these RNA molecules, which have roles in dosage compensation, imprinting, enhancer function, and transcriptional regulation, with a great impact on development and disease. © 2014 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Mesri E.A.,University of Miami | Cesarman E.,New York Medical College | Boshoff C.,University College London
Nature Reviews Cancer | Year: 2010

Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the most common cancer in HIV-infected untreated individuals. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV; also known as human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8)) is the infectious cause of this neoplasm. In this Review we describe the epidemiology of KS and KSHV, and the insights into the remarkable mechanisms through which KSHV can induce KS that have been gained in the past 16 years. KSHV latent transcripts, such as latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), viral cyclin, viral FLIP and viral-encoded microRNAs, drive cell proliferation and prevent apoptosis, whereas KSHV lytic proteins, such as viral G protein-coupled receptor, K1 and virally encoded cytokines (viral interleukin-6 and viral chemokines) further contribute to the unique angioproliferative and inflammatory KS lesions through a mechanism called paracrine neoplasia. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Reiser J.,University of Miami | Adair B.,Harvard University | Reinheckel T.,Albert Ludwigs University of Freiburg
Journal of Clinical Investigation | Year: 2010

Cathepsins were originally identified as proteases that act in the lysosome. Recent work has uncovered nontraditional roles for cathepsins in the extracellular space as well as in the cytosol and nucleus. There is strong evidence that subspecialized and compartmentalized cathepsins participate in many physiologic and pathophysiologic cellular processes, in which they can act as both digestive and regulatory proteases. In this review, we discuss the transcriptional and translational control of cathepsin expression, the regulation of intracellular sorting of cathepsins, and the structural basis of cathepsin activation and inhibition. In particular, we highlight the emerging roles of various cathepsin forms in disease, particularly those of the cardiac and renal systems.


Patent
University of Miami and Hoffmann-La Roche | Date: 2011-02-04

This invention relates to the staging, diagnosis, and treatment of cancerous diseases, particularly to the use of monoclonal antibodies, antigen binding fragments thereof, and/or cancerous disease modifying antibodies (CDMAB), optionally in combination with one or more CDMAB, chemotherapeutic agents, and conjugates thereof, as a means for initiating a cytotoxic response to human head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. The invention further relates to binding assays, which utilize the monoclonal antibodies, antigen binding fragments thereof, and/or CDMAB of the instant invention. The cancerous disease modifying antibodies can be conjugated to toxins, enzymes, radioactive compounds, cytokines, interferons, target or reporter moieties and hematogenous cells. In particular aspects, the CDMAB used in the methods of the invention is an anti-CD44 antibody, which may be the antibody produced by the hybridoma deposited with the ATCC having accession number PTA-4621 and/or a chimeric or humanized version thereof.


Patent
University of Miami and University of Pennsylvania | Date: 2013-03-05

Methods and compositions are provided for diagnosing an abnormal early pregnancy in a mammalian subject by contacting a biological sample of the subject with a reagent that enables measurement of certain biomarker targets, e.g., human placental lactogen (hPL) and/or human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). In one embodiment, the mRNA of these biomarkers is measured in a biological sample, e.g., serum. The absolute levels of mRNA or protein levels, a ratio of mRNA to protein levels, or a pattern of multiple biomarker mRNA and/or protein levels or ratios are measured and a relation to the ratio or pattern of expression levels of the same biomarkers in the same biological fluid of a reference or control female mammalian subject having a normal intrauterine pregnancy (IUP) is determined. The presence of, absence of, or changes in expression levels, ratios or patterns of the biomarker(s) in relation to those of the reference or control correlates with a diagnosis of abnormal pregnancy, i.e., miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy. Various reagents for use in kits and panels for such diagnosis include PCR primer-probe sets or ligands, labeled or immobilized, which are capable of detecting the changes in expression or translation of these biomarker targets.


News Article | November 22, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

Press Registration & Interviews: To apply for press registration credentials, visit worldstemcellsummit.com/media/. Advance registration is requested. On-site and remote interviews can be arranged. What: A full day of stem cell education designed for patients, doctors, the general public and students. Price for the day is $30 for general admission. Free admission for students. Learn how stem cell scientists conduct research in space; meet an astronaut; enjoy dazzling art created by youth inspired by cell biology; and discover anti-aging technologies, possible cures for macular degeneration, insights into clinical trials, rescuing species from extinction with stem cell technology, and more! What: Celebrating its 12th year, the 2016 World Stem Cell Summit (#wscs16) brings scientists, clinicians, philanthropists, investors and patient advocates from more than 30 countries to share breakthroughs that were once thought impossible. The Summit meets to accelerate the discovery and development of lifesaving cures and therapies. This is an ideal event for health, science, biotech and business reporters to interview the world's stem cell leaders and pioneers. Some interviews may be able to be scheduled in advance of the Summit. The World Stem Cell Summit is a project of the nonprofit Regenerative Medicine Foundation. Since 2003, Regenerative Medicine Foundation and its predecessor Genetics Policy Institute have built the strongest, most comprehensive and trusted global network of Regenerative Medicine stakeholders, uniting the world's leading researchers, medical centers, universities, labs, businesses, funders, policymakers, experts in law, regulation and ethics, medical philanthropies and patient organizations. Our mission is to accelerate regenerative medicine to improve health and deliver cures. We are committed to the ethical advancement of innovative medicine powered by regenerative, restorative, and curative technologies. Learn more at www.regmedfoundation.org. The World Stem Cell Summit is the "window to the world" to stem cell research and regenerative medicine. It is the original, translation-focused global meeting of stakeholders, now celebrating its 12th year. With 1,200+ attendees, 225+ speakers and 90+ hours of programming it is no surprise that attendees travel from 30+ countries in order to attend. WSCS16 is organized by the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS), the sole manager of the International Space Station U.S. National Laboratory; Centre For Commercialization Of Regenerative Medicine (Canada); Diabetes Research Institute Foundation; Kyoto University Institute for Integrated Cell Material Science; Mayo Clinic; NOVA Southeastern University Cell Therapy Institute; The Cure Alliance; University of Miami Miller School of Medicine ISCI (Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute); and Wake Forest School of Medicine Institute for Regenerative Medicine. Learn more at www.worldstemcellsummit.com.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Diagnostic Center for Women has announced that Dr. Michael J. Plaza expands use of cryoablation treatment of fibroadenoma to include early stage breast cancer with the Visica® 2 Treatment System. Developed by Sanarus Technologies, the Visica 2 Treatment System is a cryoablation device that uses extreme cold (cryo) to destroy tissue (ablation). The device destroys the tumor by freezing and damaging the adjacent vasculature that fuels tumor growth. Dr. Michael J. Plaza is board-certified by the American Board of Radiology in Diagnostic Radiology. He completed his residency at University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital and breast imaging fellowship at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Dr. Plaza has become the first radiologist in Miami to provide cryoablation for early stage breast cancer with the Visica 2 Treatment System. Cryoablation—also referred to as tumor freezing—is a minimally invasive procedure done under ultrasound guidance in the doctor’s office or radiology suite. After injection of local anesthesia, a thin probe is inserted through the skin directly into the tumor. Liquid nitrogen is pumped into the probe to form an “ice ball” around the lesion. Freezing destroys the tumor cells, which are then reabsorbed by the body over time. The procedure can be done in less than an hour with most patients reporting minimal discomfort and a resumption of normal activity right away. Little, if any, visible scarring occurs. Because no breast tissue is removed during the procedure, the natural shape of the breast is maintained. Dr. Plaza began using cryoablation for fibroadenoma in February 2016, and expanded to treating early stage breast cancer in October 2016. “We saw great results in treating benign breast tumors, and with the growing evidence in the medical literature, especially the National Cancer Institute Z1072 Trial we decided to expand our practice to include cryoablation of early stage breast cancer,” said Dr. Plaza. In a 5-year multicenter study funded by the National Cancer Institute and sponsored by the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology, cryoablation with the Visica 2 Treatment System was shown to be 100% effective for complete ablation of invasive ductal breast cancer tumors <1.0 cm. The Visica 2 Treatment System was the exclusive device used in the Z1072 study and showed cryoablation to be effective in 92% of the targeted lesions. Results from this breast cancer study (ACOSOG Z1072), which included a 5-year follow-up, were published in the Annals of Surgical Oncology. “Cryoablation is an evolution in the treatment of early stage breast cancer. Unlike surgery, it is a minimally invasive procedure that preserves the shape of the breast and can be performed in the office under 30 minutes while the patient is awake” Dr. Plaza explains. “Patients can typically return to work the next day. I am excited to bring this modality to the patients in Miami.” Cryoablation with the Visica 2 Treatment System is a nonsurgical option for patients that have been diagnosed with early stage breast cancer, is visible on sonogram and has been confirmed with a biopsy. About Diagnostic Center for Women The Diagnostic Center For Women is a premier imaging facility focused on fostering female wellness. Established in 1999, they are committed to providing the most reliable and comprehensive testing available. Their facility is accredited in mammography, breast and body MRI and obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound by the following organizations: American College of Radiology (ACR), Mammography, Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC), Breast MRI, Body MRI, and American Institute of Ultrasound Medicine (AIUM), Obstetric and Gynecologic Ultrasound. “At the Diagnostic Center for Women, we understand your unique health needs.” Find out more at http://www.dxforwomen.com About Sanarus Technologies In 2001, the Visica® 2 Treatment System was the first available for cryoablation of fibroadenomas. Since then, our system has been used to successfully treat thousands of patients. The Visica 2 Treatment System is FDA-cleared for the ablation of cancerous or malignant tissue and benign tumors. At Sanarus, we develop innovative solutions for the nonsurgical treatment of breast tumors. We are headquartered in Pleasanton, CA, and all of our products are manufactured in the USA. Find out more at http://www.sanarus.com


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has ranked the best schools with online programs in the state of Florida for 2017. A total of 45 schools received honors for their online education offerings, with University of Florida, University of Miami, Florida State University, University of South Florida-Main Campus, Jacksonville University, Tallahassee Community College and Florida Keys Community College earning top spots overall. More than a dozen unique data points were evaluated to determine each school’s score. “The schools on our Best Online Schools list for Florida all meet high standards of excellence for students who want to succeed outside of a brick-and-mortar classroom,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. Colleges and universities on the Best Online Schools list must meet specific base requirements to be included. Qualifications include being institutionally accredited and holding public or private not-for-profit status. Each college was also scored based on additional criteria that includes the student/teacher ratio, graduation rate, employment services and financial aid availability. For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: Florida’s Best Online Schools for 2017 include the following: Adventist University of Health Sciences Ave Maria University Barry University Bethune-Cookman University Broward College City College-Fort Lauderdale Daytona State College Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University-Worldwide Everglades University Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University Florida Atlantic University Florida Gulf Coast University Florida Institute of Technology Florida International University Florida Keys Community College Florida SouthWestern State College Florida State College at Jacksonville Florida State University Hobe Sound Bible College Hodges University Indian River State College Jacksonville University Johnson & Wales University-North Miami Keiser University-Ft. Lauderdale Lynn University Nova Southeastern University Palm Beach Atlantic University Saint Leo University South Florida Bible College and Theological Seminary Southeastern University St. Petersburg College St. Thomas University State College of Florida-Manatee-Sarasota Stetson University Tallahassee Community College The Baptist College of Florida The University of West Florida Trinity College of Florida University of Central Florida University of Florida University of Miami University of North Florida University of South Florida-Main Campus Warner University Webber International University ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) is launching operations this month of one of the world's most powerful and energy-efficient supercomputers, providing the nation with a major new tool to advance understanding of the atmospheric and related Earth system sciences. Named "Cheyenne," the 5.34-petaflop system is capable of more than triple the amount of scientific computing performed by the previous NCAR supercomputer, Yellowstone. It also is three times more energy efficient. Scientists across the country will use Cheyenne to study phenomena ranging from wildfires and seismic activity to gusts that generate power at wind farms. Their findings will lay the groundwork for better protecting society from natural disasters, lead to more detailed projections of seasonal and longer-term weather and climate variability and change, and improve weather and water forecasts that are needed by economic sectors from agriculture and energy to transportation and tourism. "Cheyenne will help us advance the knowledge needed for saving lives, protecting property, and enabling U.S. businesses to better compete in the global marketplace," said Antonio J. Busalacchi, president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. "This system is turbocharging our science." UCAR manages NCAR on behalf of the National Science Foundation (NSF). Cheyenne currently ranks as the 20th fastest supercomputer in the world and the fastest in the Mountain West, although such rankings change as new and more powerful machines begin operations. It is funded by NSF as well as by the state of Wyoming through an appropriation to the University of Wyoming. Cheyenne is housed in the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center (NWSC), one of the nation's premier supercomputing facilities for research. Since the NWSC opened in 2012, more than 2,200 scientists from more than 300 universities and federal labs have used its resources. "Through our work at the NWSC, we have a better understanding of such important processes as surface and subsurface hydrology, physics of flow in reservoir rock, and weather modification and precipitation stimulation," said William Gern, vice president of research and economic development at the University of Wyoming. "Importantly, we are also introducing Wyoming’s school-age students to the significance and power of computing." The NWSC is located in Cheyenne, and the name of the new system was chosen to honor the support the center has received from the people of that city. The name also commemorates the upcoming 150th anniversary of the city, which was founded in 1867 and named for the American Indian Cheyenne Nation. Cheyenne was built by Silicon Graphics International, or SGI (now part of Hewlett Packard Enterprise Co.), with DataDirect Networks (DDN) providing centralized file system and data storage components. Cheyenne is capable of 5.34 quadrillion calculations per second (5.34 petaflops, or floating point operations per second). The new system has a peak computation rate of more than 3 billion calculations per second for every watt of energy consumed. That is three times more energy efficient than the Yellowstone supercomputer, which is also highly efficient. The data storage system for Cheyenne provides an initial capacity of 20 petabytes, expandable to 40 petabytes with the addition of extra drives.  The new DDN system also transfers data at the rate of 220 gigabytes per second, which is more than twice as fast as the previous file system’s rate of 90 gigabytes per second. Cheyenne is the latest in a long and successful history of supercomputers supported by the NSF and NCAR to advance the atmospheric and related sciences. “We’re excited to provide the research community with more supercomputing power,” said Anke Kamrath, interim director of NCAR’s Computational and Information Systems Laboratory, which oversees operations at the NWSC. “Scientists have access to increasingly large amounts of data about our planet. The enhanced capabilities of the NWSC will enable them to tackle problems that used to be out of reach and obtain results at far greater speeds than ever.” High-performance computers such as Cheyenne allow researchers to run increasingly detailed models that simulate complex events and predict how they might unfold in the future. With more supercomputing power, scientists can capture additional processes, run their models at a higher resolution, and conduct an ensemble of modeling runs that provide a fuller picture of the same time period. "Providing next-generation supercomputing is vital to better understanding the Earth system that affects us all, " said NCAR Director James W. Hurrell. "We're delighted that this powerful resource is now available to the nation's scientists, and we're looking forward to new discoveries in climate, weather, space weather, renewable energy, and other critical areas of research." Some of the initial projects on Cheyenne include: Long-range, seasonal to decadal forecasting: Several studies led by George Mason University, the University of Miami, and NCAR aim to improve prediction of weather patterns months to years in advance. Researchers will use Cheyenne's capabilities to generate more comprehensive simulations of finer-scale processes in the ocean, atmosphere, and sea ice. This research will help scientists refine computer models for improved long-term predictions, including how year-to-year changes in Arctic sea ice extent may affect the likelihood of extreme weather events thousands of miles away. Wind energy: Projecting electricity output at a wind farm is extraordinarily challenging as it involves predicting variable gusts and complex wind eddies at the height of turbines, which are hundreds of feet above the sensors used for weather forecasting. University of Wyoming researchers will use Cheyenne to simulate wind conditions on different scales, from across the continent down to the tiny space near a wind turbine blade, as well as the vibrations within an individual turbine itself. In addition, an NCAR-led project will create high-resolution, 3-D simulations of vertical and horizontal drafts to provide more information about winds over complex terrain. This type of research is critical as utilities seek to make wind farms as efficient as possible. Space weather: Scientists are working to better understand solar disturbances that buffet Earth's atmosphere and threaten the operation of satellites, communications, and power grids. New projects led by the University of Delaware and NCAR are using Cheyenne to gain more insight into how solar activity leads to damaging geomagnetic storms. The scientists plan to develop detailed simulations of the emergence of the magnetic field from the subsurface of the Sun into its atmosphere, as well as gain a three-dimensional view of plasma turbulence and magnetic reconnection in space that lead to plasma heating. Extreme weather: One of the leading questions about climate change is how it could affect the frequency and severity of major storms and other types of severe weather. An NCAR-led project will explore how climate interacts with the land surface and hydrology over the United States, and how extreme weather events can be expected to change in the future. It will use advanced modeling approaches at high resolution (down to just a few miles) in ways that can help scientists configure future climate models to better simulate extreme events. Climate engineering: To counter the effects of heat-trapping greenhouse gases, some experts have proposed artificially cooling the planet by injecting sulfates into the stratosphere, which would mimic the effects of a major volcanic eruption. But if society ever tried to engage in such climate engineering, or geoengineering, the results could alter the world's climate in unintended ways. An NCAR-led project is using Cheyenne's computing power to run an ensemble of climate engineering simulations to show how hypothetical sulfate injections could affect regional temperatures and precipitation. Smoke and global climate: A study led by the University of Wyoming will look into emissions from wildfires and how they affect stratocumulus clouds over the southeastern Atlantic Ocean. This research is needed for a better understanding of the global climate system, as stratocumulus clouds, which cover 23 percent of Earth's surface, play a key role in reflecting sunlight back into space. The work will help reveal the extent to which particles emitted during biomass burning influence cloud processes in ways that affect global temperatures.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Tompkins International is pleased to announce that Gene Tyndall, currently Executive Vice President, Chief Solutions and Business and Development Officer, is appointed President, MonarchFx, the Division of Tompkins International that provides eFulfillment services to sellers of products online. MonarchFx is a special alliance of logistics services providers, the leading supply chain technology, and transportation service providers, that provides sellers one-stop eFulfillment with reasonable pricing and high levels of service. Jim Tompkins, Chairman and CEO, MonarchFx, states, “We are excited to have Tyndall in this new role. His deep experience and knowledge will add value to the Alliance and to its customers.” Tyndall is a highly respected supply chain consultant, industry veteran, and thought leader. Prior to joining Tompkins International, he was President of Ryder Global Supply Chain Solutions, Global Leader and Senior Partner of the Ernst & Young Supply Chain Management Consulting Practice, and a United States Navy Officer. He has over 30 years experience with over a hundred multinational corporations and domestic companies, in strategy development, new process design, technology, and leading practices. Many of the best practices in place today across all industries are due to his thought leadership and leadership. Tyndall has co-authored several books and written numerous articles on supply chain management, as well as being quoted by business and public media. His book, Supercharging Supply Chains: New Ways to Increase Value Through Global Operational Excellence, is recognized as a leading guide for managers seeking to achieve higher levels of performance and thus stronger stakeholder value. Tyndall holds graduate degrees from The George Washington University and his bachelors from the University of Maryland. He is also a graduate of the Institute for Advanced International Management in Switzerland and has attended advanced management programs at Harvard University, Stanford University, and the University of Miami. He was elected to the Global Logistics Hall of Fame and has been honored as “Innovator of the Year” by Information Management. MonarchFx is honored to have Tyndall as its President.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

This story was updated Feb. 2 at 11:30 a.m. EST. A wild octopus surprised an Australian diver this week by suddenly, and quite dramatically, inflating itself with water, ballooning up like a parachute. Later, when the diver posted a video of the interaction online, she wondered whether the octopus was trying to intimidate her with its grandiose size. That's possible, marine biologists said, but they can't agree on what caused the curious behavior. One idea is that the octopus was hunting for food, said Kathleen Sullivan Sealey, an associate professor of biology at the University of Miami, who doesn't know the diver but watched the video online. [8 Crazy Facts About Octopuses] In the video post, the diver noted how the octopus "blew itself up like a parachute multiple times," turning its body and eight legs into a giant net as the animal traversed the rocky and sponge-filled ocean floor off the coast of Melbourne, Australia. It makes sense that the octopus was swimming across the ocean floor like a giant parachute, Sullivan Sealey said. Small prey was likely hiding among the rocks along the seafloor. The octopus was likely pushing water downward so it could flush out prey, catch the meal with its net-like body and eat it with its beak, she said. "It's shooting water out of its mantle [head]," Sullivan Sealey told Live Science. "It was using that water to chase little shrimp out from the rocks so that they would get caught in its legs and the webbing between its legs." This hunting behavior is fairly common among octopuses (also called octopodes or octopi), Sullivan Sealey said. "They eat a broad variety of things [for energy], because they have a big brain — they eat mollusks, snails, crabs and small fish," she said. "They require a lot of protein and food." However, another explanation for the animal's ballooning is more likely, said marine biologists at the Birch Aquarium at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego. The video shows how the octopus used camouflage to blend its color and body texture with its habitat, the Scripps team said. When the animal sees the diver, the octopus spreads out its arms twice, likely to make itself look larger, the scientists added. "This behavior is used to say, 'Look how big I am. You don't want to eat me,' to a predator," said Caitlin Scully, a spokesperson at the aquarium. "Then, the octopus went back to trying to hide and use camouflage, only to eventually swim away." The Scripps team added that the octopus is likely a common Sydney octopus (Octopus tetricus), but that it's difficult to say from just watching the video. The diver who recorded the video, PT Hirschfield, is a filmmaker and writer who lives in Victoria, Australia. Hirschfield said she has OCD — obsessive-compulsive diving — and dives because of the "serenity and tranquility" it offers her as she lives with terminal cancer, according to an interview posted by the Professional Association of Diving Instructors. Perhaps the octopus was both hunting for prey and intimidating her at the same time, she said. "At first, the octopus seemed as surprised to see me as I was to see it," Hirschfield wrote in an email to Live Science. "Then it just continued to hunt crustaceans while I followed it around for a while. But towards the end of 10 minutes it definitely seemed to 'want its own space' and made no apologies for hunting for crabs right next to my body in a way that I'll admit was a bit intimidating!"


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) is launching operations this month of one of the world's most powerful and energy-efficient supercomputers, providing the nation with a major new tool to advance understanding of the atmospheric and related Earth system sciences. Named "Cheyenne," the 5.34-petaflop system is capable of more than triple the amount of scientific computing performed by the previous NCAR supercomputer, Yellowstone. It also is three times more energy efficient. Scientists across the country will use Cheyenne to study phenomena ranging from wildfires and seismic activity to gusts that generate power at wind farms. Their findings will lay the groundwork for better protecting society from natural disasters, lead to more detailed projections of seasonal and longer-term weather and climate variability and change, and improve weather and water forecasts that are needed by economic sectors from agriculture and energy to transportation and tourism. "Cheyenne will help us advance the knowledge needed for saving lives, protecting property, and enabling U.S. businesses to better compete in the global marketplace," said Antonio J. Busalacchi, president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. "This system is turbocharging our science." UCAR manages NCAR on behalf of the National Science Foundation (NSF). Cheyenne currently ranks as the 20th fastest supercomputer in the world and the fastest in the Mountain West, although such rankings change as new and more powerful machines begin operations. It is funded by NSF as well as by the state of Wyoming through an appropriation to the University of Wyoming. Cheyenne is housed in the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center (NWSC), one of the nation's premier supercomputing facilities for research. Since the NWSC opened in 2012, more than 2,200 scientists from more than 300 universities and federal labs have used its resources. "Through our work at the NWSC, we have a better understanding of such important processes as surface and subsurface hydrology, physics of flow in reservoir rock, and weather modification and precipitation stimulation," said William Gern, vice president of research and economic development at the University of Wyoming. "Importantly, we are also introducing Wyoming’s school-age students to the significance and power of computing." The NWSC is located in Cheyenne, and the name of the new system was chosen to honor the support the center has received from the people of that city. The name also commemorates the upcoming 150th anniversary of the city, which was founded in 1867 and named for the American Indian Cheyenne Nation. Cheyenne was built by Silicon Graphics International, or SGI (now part of Hewlett Packard Enterprise Co.), with DataDirect Networks (DDN) providing centralized file system and data storage components. Cheyenne is capable of 5.34 quadrillion calculations per second (5.34 petaflops, or floating point operations per second). The new system has a peak computation rate of more than 3 billion calculations per second for every watt of energy consumed. That is three times more energy efficient than the Yellowstone supercomputer, which is also highly efficient. The data storage system for Cheyenne provides an initial capacity of 20 petabytes, expandable to 40 petabytes with the addition of extra drives.  The new DDN system also transfers data at the rate of 220 gigabytes per second, which is more than twice as fast as the previous file system’s rate of 90 gigabytes per second. Cheyenne is the latest in a long and successful history of supercomputers supported by the NSF and NCAR to advance the atmospheric and related sciences. “We’re excited to provide the research community with more supercomputing power,” said Anke Kamrath, interim director of NCAR’s Computational and Information Systems Laboratory, which oversees operations at the NWSC. “Scientists have access to increasingly large amounts of data about our planet. The enhanced capabilities of the NWSC will enable them to tackle problems that used to be out of reach and obtain results at far greater speeds than ever.” High-performance computers such as Cheyenne allow researchers to run increasingly detailed models that simulate complex events and predict how they might unfold in the future. With more supercomputing power, scientists can capture additional processes, run their models at a higher resolution, and conduct an ensemble of modeling runs that provide a fuller picture of the same time period. "Providing next-generation supercomputing is vital to better understanding the Earth system that affects us all, " said NCAR Director James W. Hurrell. "We're delighted that this powerful resource is now available to the nation's scientists, and we're looking forward to new discoveries in climate, weather, space weather, renewable energy, and other critical areas of research." Some of the initial projects on Cheyenne include: Long-range, seasonal to decadal forecasting: Several studies led by George Mason University, the University of Miami, and NCAR aim to improve prediction of weather patterns months to years in advance. Researchers will use Cheyenne's capabilities to generate more comprehensive simulations of finer-scale processes in the ocean, atmosphere, and sea ice. This research will help scientists refine computer models for improved long-term predictions, including how year-to-year changes in Arctic sea ice extent may affect the likelihood of extreme weather events thousands of miles away. Wind energy: Projecting electricity output at a wind farm is extraordinarily challenging as it involves predicting variable gusts and complex wind eddies at the height of turbines, which are hundreds of feet above the sensors used for weather forecasting. University of Wyoming researchers will use Cheyenne to simulate wind conditions on different scales, from across the continent down to the tiny space near a wind turbine blade, as well as the vibrations within an individual turbine itself. In addition, an NCAR-led project will create high-resolution, 3-D simulations of vertical and horizontal drafts to provide more information about winds over complex terrain. This type of research is critical as utilities seek to make wind farms as efficient as possible. Space weather: Scientists are working to better understand solar disturbances that buffet Earth's atmosphere and threaten the operation of satellites, communications, and power grids. New projects led by the University of Delaware and NCAR are using Cheyenne to gain more insight into how solar activity leads to damaging geomagnetic storms. The scientists plan to develop detailed simulations of the emergence of the magnetic field from the subsurface of the Sun into its atmosphere, as well as gain a three-dimensional view of plasma turbulence and magnetic reconnection in space that lead to plasma heating. Extreme weather: One of the leading questions about climate change is how it could affect the frequency and severity of major storms and other types of severe weather. An NCAR-led project will explore how climate interacts with the land surface and hydrology over the United States, and how extreme weather events can be expected to change in the future. It will use advanced modeling approaches at high resolution (down to just a few miles) in ways that can help scientists configure future climate models to better simulate extreme events. Climate engineering: To counter the effects of heat-trapping greenhouse gases, some experts have proposed artificially cooling the planet by injecting sulfates into the stratosphere, which would mimic the effects of a major volcanic eruption. But if society ever tried to engage in such climate engineering, or geoengineering, the results could alter the world's climate in unintended ways. An NCAR-led project is using Cheyenne's computing power to run an ensemble of climate engineering simulations to show how hypothetical sulfate injections could affect regional temperatures and precipitation. Smoke and global climate: A study led by the University of Wyoming will look into emissions from wildfires and how they affect stratocumulus clouds over the southeastern Atlantic Ocean. This research is needed for a better understanding of the global climate system, as stratocumulus clouds, which cover 23 percent of Earth's surface, play a key role in reflecting sunlight back into space. The work will help reveal the extent to which particles emitted during biomass burning influence cloud processes in ways that affect global temperatures.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

SEATTLE--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Nativis Inc., a clinical stage life science bio-electronic company developing non-invasive, safe and highly effective treatments for cancers and other serious diseases, today announced that Dr. Una Ryan has been appointed to its board of directors effective immediately. Ryan is a biologist and seasoned healthcare executive with extensive experience serving on the boards of public, private and non-profit companies. She is currently a limited partner at Breakout Ventures, Managing Director of Golden Seeds, an investment firm empowering women entrepreneurs, and a partner in Astia Angel, investing in women-led ventures. Ryan currently serves on the boards of AMRI, a global contract research and manufacturing company and RenovoRx, a medical device company. She was previously the President and CEO at Diagnostics for All, Inc., a developer of inexpensive diagnostic tools for global health and agriculture; Waltham Technologies, a cleantech start-up; and AVANT Immunotherapeutics Inc. (now Celldex), a company developing vaccines for cancer and global health. Throughout her career, Ryan has successfully translated science into successful businesses, driving growth and overseeing multiple M&A’s in order to create robust and diverse organizations. Ryan spent more than 20 years as a Professor of Medicine at the University of Miami, Washington University, St. Louis and Boston University where she conducted research on vascular biology. She holds a Ph.D. in Cellular and Molecular Biology from Cambridge University and BS degrees in Zoology, Microbiology and Chemistry from Bristol University. She received an Honorary Doctor of Science degree from Bristol University in 2009. “We are thrilled to be able to continue to diversify our board of directors and welcome Una, a distinguished entrepreneur, biologist and healthcare executive,” said Nativis CEO Chris Rivera. “Una brings a broad range of experience in the life science and investment arenas to the board, and her insight will be of great value to Nativis as we continue to develop and seek long term partners for of our novel ulRFE technology. Una’s background in global health and developing medical technologies adds significantly to the diversity of our other Directors’ extensive industry experience, which includes, for example; cyber-security, disruptive technologies, financial management, venture capital and bio-pharmaceutical development.” Ryan added, “I am excited to join the Nativis team, and look forward to helping guide the company through the development of its unique technology platform. Nativis’ ulRFE technology represents an unprecedented opportunity to advance a new wave of treatment for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme and other health care indications, and I believe that with the right resources and strategies, the company can position itself for future success.” Founded in 2002 and headquartered in Seattle, WA, Nativis is a clinical-stage bio-electronics company. Nativis has invented and patented a groundbreaking technology that utilizes precisely targeted, ultra-low radio frequency energy (ulRFE™) to specifically regulate metabolic pathways on the molecular and genetic levels – without chemicals, radiation or drugs – delivered via a simple-to-use non-invasive device called Nativis Voyager®. The company’s goal is to transform disease treatment on a global scale with ulRFE that can potentially be applied to a wide range of conditions and other health-related needs (including agriculture, bio-fuels and veterinary medicine, to name a few). Nativis’ initial focus is on the treatment of patients with brain cancer (initially, recurrent glioblastoma), who are not well served by conventional standard of care therapies, which often result in poor outcomes and devastating side effects. Additional pre-clinical work is being completed for melanoma, lung cancer, liver cancer, inflammatory disease and chronic pain.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

MIAMI--Last year's devastating category-5 hurricane--Matthew--may be one of many past examples of a tropical storm fueled by massive rings of warm water that exist in the upper reaches of the Caribbean Sea. In a study conducted in the region two years prior to when Matthew's trekked across the Caribbean Sea, the research team in the Upper Ocean Dynamics Laboratory at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science deployed 55 aircraft ocean instruments from the National Oceanographic Atmospheric Administration's WP-3D aircraft. The purpose of the scientific mission was to measure ocean temperature, salinity, and currents to understand the structure of these warm-water eddies. The science team obtained vital information about the physical characteristics within one large warm-water eddy, which likely originated from the North Brazil Current, and analyzed its potential influence on sub-surface ocean conditions during the passage of tropical cyclones. When analyzing the data, they found a barrier layer, an upper ocean feature created by the Amazon-Orinoco freshwater river outflow, that makes mixing in the upper ocean waters less efficient during wind events. This feature, and the fact that warm ocean eddies are known to assist in the intensification of hurricanes due to deep warm thermal layers, lead the researchers to theorize that the barrier layer within a warm ocean eddy may result in an even more favorable upper ocean environment for hurricane intensification. "Our study is important because tropical cyclone intensity forecasts for several past hurricanes over the Caribbean Sea have under-predicted rapid intensification events over warm oceanic features," said Johna Rudzin, a PhD student at the UM Rosenstiel School and lead author of the study. Tropical storms receive energy from their surrounding ocean waters. As a storm moves across the water, it may interact with rings of warm water known as eddies. As the storm moves forward over these eddies, the warm ocean waters below help fuel the storm's intensity through enhanced and sustained heat and moisture fluxes. Similar warm ocean eddies exist in the Gulf of Mexico, a result of their separation from the warm-water Loop Current, are also of interest to the research team involved in this study. Last year, Hurricane Matthew rapidly intensified from a tropical storm to hurricane status as it moved over the Caribbean Sea in the location where a warm ocean eddy exists, and in close proximity to where these measurements were taken for this study two years prior. Matthew continued to intensify to a category-5 storm and into one of the strongest in Atlantic basin history, which made landfall and devastated portions of Haiti, Cuba, and the eastern United States. According to the researchers, to better understand if Matthew's intensification was aided by the warm-water eddies and the residing barrier layer in the Caribbean Sea's upper ocean, more ambient and in-storm upper ocean observations in this basin are needed to improve forecast models for the region. The study, titled "Upper Ocean Observations in Eastern Caribbean Sea Reveal Barrier Layer within a Warm Core Eddy," as published Feb. 10 in Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, DOI: 10.1002/2016JC012339. The study's authors include: Johna E. Rudzin, Lynn "Nick" Shay, Benjamin Jaimes, and Jodi K. Brewster of the UM Rosenstiel School. Support was provided by National Aeronautical Space Agency (NASA) through grant # NNX15AG43G. The University of Miami is one of the largest private research institutions in the southeastern United States. The University's mission is to provide quality education, attract and retain outstanding students, support the faculty and their research, and build an endowment for University initiatives. Founded in the 1940's, the Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science has grown into one of the world's premier marine and atmospheric research institutions. Offering dynamic interdisciplinary academics, the Rosenstiel School is dedicated to helping communities to better understand the planet, participating in the establishment of environmental policies, and aiding in the improvement of society and quality of life. For more information, visit: http://www. and Twitter:UMiamiRSMAS


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Golden Gate BPO Solutions, a global provider of customer management and business process outsourcing solutions, has announced that Stephen Ferber, CEO and Managing Partner, has been appointed to the University of Maryland Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship’s Board of Advisors. The Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business is one of the country’s most distinguished learning organizations where the education and methods of entrepreneurship are dynamically practiced and instilled. The development and execution of their programs foster thought leadership, experiential learning and innovative entrepreneurial approaches and practices to the startup community, leveraged by their network of leaders and the Smith School. Every initiative is created to support the Dingman Center’s mission of preparing the next generation to launch and support ventures that advance industry and society; to connect the University of Maryland to the innovation economy; and to leverage thought leadership and the Dingman network to make entrepreneurs of all kinds more successful. “I am very grateful to be appointed to the Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship Board of Advisors for many reasons, starting with the fact that my own passion for business and entrepreneurship was ignited during my time as an undergraduate at the University of Maryland’s Smith School of Business,” stated Stephen Ferber. “The Dingman Center has evolved into one of the top entrepreneurship centers in the country by bringing its unique educational curriculum to the Smith School of Business and providing University of Maryland student entrepreneurs with the business, legal and financial support necessary to successfully launch their ventures and connect them with the innovation economy. I look forward to giving back to the school that had a life-changing impact on me and my career. As an active participant on the board of advisors, my main charge will be to help our wonderful institution, professional staff and students reach all of their goals.” “The Dingman Center Board of Advisors includes prominent alumni and regional entrepreneurs, executives and leaders who enhance our Center through advice and action,” adds Elana Fine, the Executive Director of the Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship. “We’re honored that Stephen has joined this important group and know that he’ll be a passionate advocate and ambassador for our young entrepreneurs.” Stephen is the CEO and Founder of Golden Gate BPO Solutions (Golden Gate BPO), a global provider of business process outsourcing solutions. Founded in 2006, Golden Gate BPO’s business model and method of service delivery have proven to be innovative in the outsourcing industry, and the company was recently recognized by Inc. Magazine as one of America’s Fastest-Growing Private Companies. In addition to his role as CEO of Golden Gate BPO, Stephen practices corporate, business and employment law as a sole practitioner and serves as a Senior Advisor to Cross Keys Capital, a middle-market investment banking firm. Prior to founding Golden Gate BPO, Mr. Ferber served as Executive Vice President and General Counsel for one of the fastest growing providers of outsourced customer care and IT services, playing a key role in the company’s evolution from a privately-held small business to a publicly-traded middle market entity, followed by a sale and integration with a Fortune 500 company. Before that, Stephen was a senior associate in the Financial Advisory Services Group of PricewaterhouseCoopers, specializing in bankruptcy and reorganizations, mergers/acquisitions, business valuations and capital sourcing. Mr. Ferber sits on the board of directors of the Professional Association for Customer Engagement (“PACE”) and Mount Sinai Hospital’s Young Presidents Club. In addition, he is a member of the American Bar Association, Florida Bar Association, AICPA, Society of Consumer Affairs Professionals, University of Maryland Alumni Association, University of Miami School of Law Alumni Association and M-Club at the University of Maryland. Stephen earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Accounting from the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business in 1990. He received a Juris Doctorate from the University of Miami School of Law in 1993, specializing in corporate, international and tax law. In addition to holding the currently inactive designation of Certified Public Accountant (CPA), Stephen is licensed to practice law in the State of Florida. For more information on Mr. Ferber and Golden Gate BPO Solutions, visit http://www.goldengatebpo.com. About the Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship One of the oldest entrepreneur centers in the country, the Dingman Center has established itself as a national catalyst for entrepreneurship. It is one of the nation’s pre-eminent institutions where the research, education and practice of entrepreneurship are pursued vigorously. The Dingman Center develops and executes curricular and non-curricular programs that uniquely leverage Smith School thought leadership, experiential learning and their network of practitioners to provide maximum resources to the startup community. For more information on the Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship, visit http://www.rhsmith.umd.edu/centers-excellence/dingman-center-entrepreneurship.


CORAL GABLES, Fla., Feb. 17, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The University of Miami School of Business Administration today announced a $500,000 gift from longtime New York Yankees All-Star Alex Rodriguez. The gift will establish the Graduate Entrepreneurship and Innovation Endowed Fund...


Robbins D.J.,University of Miami | Fei D.L.,University of Miami | Riobo N.A.,Thomas Jefferson University
Science Signaling | Year: 2012

Hedgehog (Hh) proteins regulate the development of a wide range of metazoan embryonic and adult structures, and disruption of Hh signaling pathways results in various human diseases. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the signaling pathways regulated by Hh, consolidating data from a diverse array of organisms in a variety of scientific disciplines. Similar to the elucidation of many other signaling pathways, our knowledge of Hh signaling developed in a sequential manner centered on its earliest discoveries. Thus, our knowledge of Hh signaling has for the most part focused on elucidating the mechanism by which Hh regulates the Gli family of transcription factors, the so-called "canonical" Hh signaling pathway. However, in the past few years, numerous studies have shown that Hh proteins can also signal through Gli-independent mechanisms collectively referred to as "noncanonical" signaling pathways. Noncanonical Hh signaling is itself subdivided into two distinct signaling modules: (i) those not requiring Smoothened (Smo) and (ii) those downstream of Smo that do not require Gli transcription factors. Thus, Hh signaling is now proposed to occur through a variety of distinct context-dependent signaling modules that have the ability to crosstalk with one another to form an interacting, dynamic Hh signaling network.


Rincon F.,Thomas Jefferson University | Wright C.B.,University of Miami
Current Opinion in Neurology | Year: 2013

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Clinically apparent and subclinical forms of vascular disease including stroke are important causes of cognitive dysfunction. In this review, we will describe the current nomenclature for vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) from the histopathological and clinical perspectives to raise awareness among practitioners about the interaction between conventional and novel vascular risk factors and VCI, with an emphasis on the prevention and risk factor modification. RECENT FINDINGS: There is substantial evidence from observational studies and clinical trials that conventional risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, smoking, and atrial fibrillation play a role in the development of VCI. Additional novel risk factors such as the metabolic syndrome have been associated with cognitive dysfunction as well. Targeting these risk factors will minimize the burden of VCI in our aging population. SUMMARY: The concept of VCI has evolved to describe a continuum of cognitive disorders in which vascular brain injury plays a role, ranging from mild cognitive impairment to dementia. Future research is needed to clarify the role of risk factor modification in limiting vascular brain injury to prevent VCI and progression to dementia. © 2013 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams &Wilkins.


Fukata M.,University of Miami | Arditi M.,University of California at Los Angeles
Mucosal Immunology | Year: 2013

Recognition of microorganisms by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) is the primary component of innate immunity that is responsible for the maintenance of host-microbial interactions in intestinal mucosa. Dysregulation in host-commensal interactions has been implicated as the central pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which predisposes to developing colorectal cancer. Recent animal studies have begun to outline some unique physiology and pathology involving each PRR signaling in the intestine. The major roles played by PRRs in the gut appear to be the regulation of the number and the composition of commensal bacteria, epithelial proliferation, and mucosal permeability in response to epithelial injury. In addition, PRR signaling in lamina propria immune cells may be involved in induction of inflammation in response to invasion of pathogens. Because some PRR-deficient mice have shown variable susceptibility to colitis, the outcome of intestinal inflammation may be modified depending on PRR signaling in epithelial cells, immune cells, and the composition of commensal flora. Through recent findings in animal models of IBD, this review will discuss how abnormal PRR signaling may contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammation and inflammation-associated tumorigenesis in the intestine.


News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: www.nature.com

Douglas Melton allowed himself a brief moment of celebration. After 23 years of trying, he had finally managed to grow tissue in the laboratory that could replace the cell clusters, or islets, in the pancreas that are destroyed by type 1 diabetes (T1D) — the autoimmune disease that affects two of his children. Melton, co-director of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts, had transformed embryonic stem cells into the specialized β-cells found in islets that sense glucose and secrete insulin to help to control blood sugar1. The ramifications were huge. The ability to produce a potentially limitless supply of β-cells meant that people with T1D would no longer need to receive islet transplants from deceased donors — an option that can help only a few hundred patients per year because of the dearth of donor organs. Most of the millions of adults and children living with T1D have to monitor their glucose levels continually and inject themselves with insulin every day. But after throwing a party for his lab group — at which Melton gave everyone blue winter hats emblazoned with his signature 'Skittle diagram', a schematic of colourful circles showing the developmental progression from stem cell to β-cell — reality set in. Even though he could now grow millions of β-cells in a single flask, an achievement for which he would be recognized with the 2016 Ogawa-Yamanaka Stem Cell Prize, Melton now faced a new challenge: how to protect implanted cells from the autoimmune attack that had destroyed the original cells. “Suddenly that problem loomed very large,” says Melton, “because now it was the problem. To prevent rejection of the islets — both because the cells come from unrelated donors and because of the recipients' islet-directed autoimmunity — patients have to take life-long courses of immune-suppressing drugs. But these medicines come with serious side effects, including increased risk of infection and cancer. Melton wanted to avoid these agents, which meant he needed some sort of device or material that would shield implanted β-cells — lab-grown or donor — from the immune system, while allowing nutrients such as glucose, insulin and oxygen into and out of these cells. “The dream is to be able to build some kind of immuno-isolation device that will allow people to get the benefit of the cells without having to suppress their immune system,” explains one of Melton's collaborators, Daniel Anderson, a bioengineer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge. That dream has eluded academics, entrepreneurs and big pharmaceutical companies for more than 40 years. Thanks to the new-found ability to make β-cells from scratch, however, researchers now have a consistent and reliable cell source. This means that they can methodically compare different encapsulation systems side by side, rather than tinkering through trial and error with whatever leftover β-cells they could get their hands on — the “dregs of material”, as Melton puts it. And this rational engineering approach is leading to improvements in the design of both large and small cell-safeguarding techniques. Some companies, including the regenerative-medicine heavyweight ViaCyte, based in San Diego, California, are loading thousands of β-cells into macroencapsulation devices that are as big as the palm of your hand. Others, like the start-up Sigilon, based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, are parcelling up individual bundles of β-cells into microscopic shells smaller than a mustard seed. With both strategies, “we're at this inflection point” where success is within reach, says Julia Greenstein, vice-president of discovery research at JDRF in New York City, a non-profit formerly known as the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. “We've seen a much more scientifically directed approach to the problem than ever before.” For many years, the most popular capsule material for transplanted β-cells has been a seaweed extract called alginate. It's been tested in rodents, dogs, monkeys and even humans in a few pilot clinical studies. The human trials showed that the material was safe, even in people who were not taking immunosuppressant drugs. But the therapeutic benefit was marginal because, within weeks of implantation, the alginate would usually begin to attract immune cells such as macrophages and neutrophils. This led to the deposition of fibrotic scar tissue that gummed up the capsules, choking off the cells inside. This type of immune reaction was different from the one that originally destroyed the patients' β-cells, but it was equally damaging to the prospects of this therapeutic approach. Seeking a derivative of alginate that could evade immune detection altogether, Anderson teamed up with his MIT colleague Robert Langer. The researchers systematically screened close to 800 chemical offshoots of alginate in mice. They found one variety — triazole–thiomorpholine dioxide alginate — that seemed to go completely unnoticed by the immune system2. Tiny spheres of this super-alginate survived for up to six months when implanted in macaques. And, when loaded with Melton's stem-cell-derived β-cells, the capsules could restore typical levels of blood sugar in a mouse model of T1D, with no signs of an immune reaction3. “We demonstrated, for the first time, a material that remains fibrosis-free when implanted in the body,” says Omid Veiseh, a biomaterials researcher who worked on the project as a postdoc at MIT. “There hasn't been anything like this.” Veiseh will start his own lab in 2017 at Rice University in Houston, Texas. But until then, he is sticking around in Cambridge to help get Sigilon off the ground. Named after the Spanish word for stealth, Sigilon launched this year with US$37.5 million in funding to commercialize the new alginate for a variety of biomedical applications. These include two potential ways to treat T1D. One is microencapsulated cell therapy. By 2018, Sigilon intends to show that this technology works in people using donor islets, and it is looking to partner with cell-therapy companies about then testing a stem-cell-derived β-cell enveloped in its alginate. The second approach is to use the material to coat parts of bionic pancreas systems that enter the body (see 'Bionic versus beta'). “One way or another,” says Sigilon president and chief executive Paul Wotton, patients with T1D will “benefit from this platform.” In the microencapsulation field, size matters. In tests with the super-alginate, the MIT team used capsules with a diameter of 1.5 millimetres, which it has demonstrated are much less immunogenic than the 0.5-mm capsules that researchers in the diabetes cell-therapy field have conventionally used4. But a tripling of the diameter means a nearly 30-fold increase in the volume of each capsule. And given the large number of capsules required to contain the hundreds of millions of β-cells needed to control a person's diabetes, there are few places in the body where the therapy could be implanted. The capsules probably won't fit under the skin or in another easily retrievable location — and regulatory agencies have insisted, as a safety measure, that any stem-cell-derived diabetes therapy implanted in patients should be fully recoverable. That's why Alice Tomei, a bioengineer at the University of Miami in Florida, has developed what she calls a “shrink-wrapping technology”, which uses microfluidics to apply a thin biocompatible coating to clusters of cells to make the smallest possible capsule — one that's only about 0.2 mm across5. Her material of choice, polyethylene glycol, may be more immune-reactive than Sigilon's super-alginate, but Tomei argues that her thinly wrapped cells will be small enough to implant in more accessible spots in the body. Tomei is evaluating her technology using Melton's stem-cell-derived β-cells, in collaboration with start-up Semma Therapeutics in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Melton launched Semma in 2015 with the biotech investor and entrepreneur Robert Millman. (Millman's wife came up with the name: a combination of Sam and Emma, the names of Melton's two diabetic children.) Although Semma has its own encapsulation technology through the acquisition of drug-delivery-technology company Cytosolv, it is also looking for partners such as Tomei to test a range of encapsulation systems with the company's stem cells. “Anyone who's got a device, we'll work with them,” says Millman, Semma's chief executive, “because even with the best cells, if we don't have the right device it'll fail.” Another of Semma's collaborators is Beta-O Technologies, a company based in Rosh-Haayin, Israel, that has been working on encapsulated cell therapies for T1D for more than a decade. As the name suggests, Beta-O was created to develop a way of delivering oxygen to implanted cells — a problem that's especially acute with larger macroencapsulation devices, which impose a larger barrier than capsule technologies between the blood supply that carries the oxygen and the energetically hungry β-cells. The company's initial prototype was a chamber about the size of a hockey puck that is implanted under the skin and requires daily injections with oxygen. As proof of principle, Beta-O tested this device by loading it with donor islets and implanting it in five patients in Germany6 and Sweden. The results were encouraging: the cells remained alive and healthy for months. Beta-O is working on its second-generation device, which, according to chief executive Yuval Avni, will be able to hold more cells and require oxygen injections only once a week. But the company needs a more reliable cell source, and Avni has high hopes for Melton's cells. Melton's original recipe for making β-cells was cumbersome. It took 35 days of carefully swapping 5 different growth media and mixing in 11 different factors, including sugars and proteins. According to Felicia Pagliuca, a former postdoc in Melton's lab who now leads cell-biology research and development at Semma, she and her team have dramatically streamlined the protocol. “We are leaps and bounds further from where we were,” she says. And they have a strategy for getting the cells into clinical trials, even before an encapsulation device is ready. The plan is to make β-cells from induced pluripotent stem cells created from people who need insulin, but whose bodies don't attack their own cells, which happens in people with T1D. Since there would be no tissue mismatch or chance of autoimmune reaction, those cells could then be implanted back into the patients without any immune-suppressing drugs or barrier technologies. Semma is focused on three patient populations, none of which have autoimmunity: people with a form of type 2 diabetes called lean diabetes, in which β-cells have stopped working; individuals who have had their pancreases surgically removed because of problems such as chronic inflammation; and patients with an insulin-dependent form of cystic fibrosis. The company hopes to test its cells in one of these populations in three to four years; trials with any sort of encapsulated device for people with T1D will follow at a later point. But this means that Semma might be playing catch-up with its competitor ViaCyte. Earlier this year, the firm absorbed one of its chief rivals, a division of Johnson & Johnson called BetaLogics, while also announcing promising early data from the first human trial of an encapsulated stem-cell-derived product for T1D. ViaCyte's PEC-EnCap device is made up of a semi-permeable pouch, about the size of a sticking plaster, that contains thousands of pancreatic precursor cells, each derived from embryonic stem cells. The company uses precursor cells, rather than fully mature β-cells, because these cells are hardier under the low-oxygen conditions that follow implantation, when the packets haven't yet integrated with the blood system. Over the past 2 years, ViaCyte has implanted its devices under the skin of about 20 patients without immunosuppression. In many recipients, the pancreatic precursors have grown into insulin-producing β-cells — although these cells often die after a few months, owing to a fibrotic immune reaction on the device exterior. “That's a proof of feasibility that this is achievable, but we still have a lot of work to do,” says ViaCyte's chief executive, Paul Laikind. “The goal now is to reduce or delay that foreign-body response long enough for the cells to engraft.” ViaCyte hopes to achieve this by modifying either the encapsulation device or some other aspect of the treatment protocol before it moves into the next phase of testing with a full therapeutic doses of its product. By then, perhaps, Melton's β-cells could also be ready for testing in patients with T1D. Melton is confident that with the right delivery system, these cells can cure his children's illness. “It just makes sense to me,” Melton says, “that if you can make the cell that's missing in a person we ought to be able to find a way to put that cell back into people.”


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Charif Abdul Rahman Sidani, MD, Radiologist, to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. He is a highly trained and qualified radiologist with an extensive expertise in all facets of his work especially diagnostic radiology and neuroradiology. Dr. Sidani has been in practice for more than 13 years and is currently serving as Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology within the University of Miami-Miller School of Medicine in Miami, Florida. He is also affiliated with Jackson Memorial Hospital. Dr. Sidani attended the American University of Beirut in Beirut, Lebanon, graduating with his Medical Degree in 2003. He subsequently completed an internship and Radiology residency within the same educational, before relocating to the United States and undertaking his fellowship training at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center. Dr. Sidani is double board certified in Neuroradiology and in Diagnostic Radiology by the American Board of Radiology. To keep up to date with the latest advances and developments in his field, Dr. Sidani maintains professional memberships with the American College of Radiology, the American Society for Neuroradiology, and the Lebanese Order of Physicians. With his wealth of experience and knowledge, Dr. Sidani is the recipient of numerous awards and recognitions, including the Henry H. Lerner MD Award for Teaching Excellence in 2014. He attributes his success to the support of his family, his excellent mentors, and hard work. When he is not assisting patients, Dr. Sidani enjoys playing soccer and spending time with his family. Learn more about Dr. Sidani here: http://www.med.miami.edu/ and be sure to read his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Dickinson Wright PLLC is pleased to announce that Attorney Nicole R. Avallone has joined the firm’s Ft. Lauderdale office as a Member. Ms. Avallone has been practicing law for over 15 years and has extensive experience in both residential and commercial real estate transactions representing institutional lenders, real estate investors, private owners, and developers in the acquisition, development, leasing, construction, finance, and disposition of office, retail, hotel, apartment, and residential properties. She received her B.B.A. from Florida Atlantic University majoring in Finance and Management, and her J.D. from the University of Miami, graduating both Cum Laude. Since 2010, she has served as lead counsel for a national institutional lender on complex loan originations for permanent, leasehold, and construction financing throughout the Southeastern United States. About Dickinson Wright PLLC Dickinson Wright PLLC is a general practice business law firm with more than 425 attorneys among more than 40 practice areas and 16 industry groups. Headquartered in Detroit and founded in 1878, the firm has seventeen offices, including six in Michigan (Detroit, Troy, Ann Arbor, Lansing, Grand Rapids, and Saginaw) and ten other domestic offices in Austin, Texas; Columbus, Ohio; Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.; Lexington, Ky.; Nashville and Music Row, Tenn.; Las Vegas and Reno, Nev.; Phoenix, Ariz.; and Washington, D.C. The firm’s Canada office is located in Toronto. Dickinson Wright offers our clients a distinctive combination of superb client service, exceptional quality, value for fees, industry expertise and business acumen. As one of the few law firms with ISO/IEC 27001:2013 certification, Dickinson Wright has built state-of-the-art, independently-verified risk management controls and security processes for our commercial transactions. Dickinson Wright lawyers are known for delivering commercially-oriented advice on sophisticated transactions and have a remarkable record of wins in high-stakes litigation. Dickinson Wright lawyers are regularly cited for their expertise and experience by Chambers, Best Lawyers, Super Lawyers, and other leading independent law firm evaluating organizations.


News Article | October 29, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Duck proved to be on the mind of many chefs and culinary students as the 2016 Discover Duck Recipe Contest sponsored by Maple Leaf Farms attracted a record number of entries (285). Professional chefs and culinary students from various foodservice business segments, including restaurants, catering, college/university, healthcare and education, competed for $21,000 in prize money in the annual recipe contest. This year’s contest challenged culinary professionals to create original appetizers or first course offerings featuring Maple Leaf Farms duck products. Competition was fierce, especially among professional chefs. Eljesa Haxhiu, Executive Sous Chef from Gwinnett Technical College in Lawrenceville, GA, narrowly edged out the competition with her recipe, Mole Duck Taco with Puffed Rice, Avocado Cilantro Puree, Pineapple Radish Salsa and Cotija, earning the $10,000 Grand Prize. In the student division, Rebecca Alarcon from Houston Community College, captured the $5,000 Grand Prize with her original recipe for Butternut Squash Duck Lasagna. Recipes were judged on flavor and creativity, as well as accuracy and method. Four additional professional chefs were awarded $1,000 each as finalists. Chef Branden Baldwin, Sous Chef at SMG/Savor Chesapeake Arena in Oklahoma City, created Mushroom Duck Confit Ravioli with Roasted Butternut Squash Puree and Blood Orange Reduction. Anthony Lauri, Executive Chef for Chartwells Dining Services at University of Miami, wowed judges with his Duck Confit Turnover with Green Spicy Papaya Slaw and Orange Blossom Vinegar Syrup. Marylou Tate, Assistant Professor, Nashville State Community College, was recognized for her Nashville Hot Duck, a twist on the Southern classic, while Richard Carter, Executive Chef for Catering Works in Raleigh, NC, gained honors for Duck Puppies with Sorghum Bourbon Glaze. “Duck, with its rich flavor is especially well suited for appetizers and first course offerings,” said Cindy Turk, Maple Leaf Farms marketing director. "And it is a natural fit for today’s global cooking culture as demonstrated by the many ethnic influences in this year’s winning recipes.” The three Master Chef judges were especially impressed by the creativity demonstrated by students. Carly Rapp, Southern New Hampshire University, was recognized for Seared Duck Breast Blini with a Plum and Rhubarb Compote and Quinoa Confit; Alvin Lawe, Johnson & Wales University, for Duck Croquettes and Sweet Pea Pure; Florian Schwartz, Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts, for Duck Breast Sliders on Crispy Potato Skins, and Cuong Hoang, Houston Community College, for Roasted Duck on Crispy Rice Cake with Spicy Mango Chutney. Each student chef finalist received $500 and a knife set. Prize winning recipes and photos may be viewed on the contest web pages at http://www.mapleleaffarms.com/chefcontest/. About Maple Leaf Farms: Maple Leaf Farms, Inc. is America’s leading producer of quality duck products, supplying retail and foodservice markets throughout the world with innovative, value-added foods. Founded in 1958, Maple Leaf Farms is a fourth generation family-owned company. For more information, contact Maple Leaf Farms at 1-800-348-2812 or visit: http://www.mapleleaffarms.com.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

ATLANTA--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Church's Chicken®, the global quick-service hand-battered fried chicken restaurant chain, today announced that Hector Munoz has been named Chief Global Marketing Officer for the Company. Munoz, who has spent his career in the restaurant industry, returns to the brand where he began in the early 90s. He takes the marketing helm on March 6th. Munoz will be responsible for the global marketing organization including the Company’s internationally-known Texas Chicken® brand. His areas of responsibility include new product development, calendar planning, consumer insights, advertising, multi-cultural marketing, brand equity, positioning, media buying and planning, packaging, field and promotional marketing, social and media relations and guest engagement and strategic direction on promotional and product innovation. He will serve as a member of the Church’s Global Leadership Team and will report to Joe Christina, Chief Executive Officer. He will also work closely with the Church’s International Franchisee Association (CIFA) board. “I have known Hector for over 15 years. He has a guest-centric mindset and believes it takes a team to get results. He is a terrific fit for our culture. He understands our guests and, more importantly, has proven that he knows how to deliver great experiences that guests love,” Christina said. “I clearly know chicken and the quick-service industry,” said Munoz, the former Chief Marketing Officer for Popeyes Louisiana Chicken since 2014. “It’s terrific to rejoin an organization with the legacy and heritage of such an iconic brand as Church’s. I am excited to rejoin the brand where I learned my craft and to work with a team dedicated to becoming the global franchisor of choice and veteran franchisees who have worked to make the brand what it is today.” Munoz joined Popeyes in 2011 where he led U.S. marketing efforts, including brand strategy and product innovation, achieving year over year increases in same store sales and over twenty-five quarters of consecutive same-store sales gain. He worked for nearly ten years in a variety of field and corporate leadership roles at Burger King Corporation including brand image and strategy and retail marketing and merchandising. He previously served Long John Silver’s®, Taco Bell®, and Bruegger’s Bagels®. Munoz earned a Bachelor’s degree in Marketing from Cal Poly University and an MBA from the University of Miami. Founded in San Antonio, TX in 1952 by George W. Church, Church's Chicken® is one of the largest quick service restaurant chicken chains in the world. Church's® specializes in Original and Spicy Chicken freshly prepared throughout the day in small batches that are hand-battered and double-breaded, Tender Strips®, sandwiches, honey-butter biscuits made from scratch and freshly baked, and classic, home-style sides all for a great value. Church's® (along with its sister brand Texas Chicken® outside the Americas) has more than 1,600 locations in 27 countries and international territories and system-wide sales of more than $1 billion.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Asti Gallina, left, a volunteer law student from the University of Washington, sits at a station near where passengers arrive on international flights at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017, in Seattle. Gallina was volunteering with the group Airport Lawyer, which also offers a secure website and mobile phone app that alerts volunteer lawyers to ensure travelers make it through customs without trouble. Airport officials and civil rights lawyers around the country are getting ready for President Donald Trump's new travel ban, which is expected to be released as soon as Wednesday. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren) SEATTLE (AP) — Airport officials and civil rights lawyers around the country are getting ready for President Donald Trump's new travel ban — mindful of the chaos that accompanied his initial executive order but hopeful the forthcoming version will be rolled out in a more orderly way. The new order was expected as soon as Wednesday. A draft suggested it would target people from the same seven predominantly Muslim countries but would exempt travelers who already have visas to come to the U.S. Since last month's ban, which courts have put on hold, a section of the international arrivals area at Dulles International Airport outside the nation's capital has been transformed into a virtual law firm, with legal volunteers ready to greet travelers from affected countries and ask if they saw anyone being detained. Similar efforts are underway at other airports, including Seattle-Tacoma International, where officials have drawn up plans for crowd control after thousands crammed the baggage claim area to protest the original ban. "The plan is to be as ready as possible," said Lindsay Nash, an immigration law professor at Cardozo School of Law in New York who has been helping prepare emergency petitions on behalf of those who might be detained. Trump's initial action, issued Jan. 27, temporarily barred citizens of Iran, Iraq, Syria, Yemen, Somalia, Sudan and Libya from coming to the U.S. and halted acceptance of all refugees. The president said his administration would review vetting procedures amid concerns about terrorism in those seven nations. Protesters flooded U.S. airports that weekend, seeking to free travelers detained by customs officials amid confusion about who could enter the country, including U.S. permanent residents known as green-card holders. Attorneys also challenged the order in court, including officials from Washington state. That lawsuit, which Minnesota joined, resulted in a federal judge temporarily blocking the government from enforcing the travel ban, a decision unanimously upheld by a panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Many civil rights lawyers and activists have said they don't believe a new order would cure all the constitutional problems of the original, including the claim that it was motivated by anti-Muslim discrimination. Trump has said he singled out the seven countries because they had already been deemed a security concern by the Obama administration. In his first address to Congress on Tuesday night, Trump said his administration "is taking strong measures to protect our nation from radical Islamic terrorism" and is working on improved vetting procedures. "And we will shortly take new steps to keep our nation safe — and to keep out those who would do us harm," Trump said. Last week, analysts at the Homeland Security Department's intelligence arm found insufficient evidence that citizens of the seven Muslim-majority countries pose a terror threat to the United States. "It's not enough to just tweak an order and not change the nature of why it was issued in the first place," said Rula Aoun, director of the Arab American Civil Rights League in Dearborn, Michigan, which sued over the initial ban and is prepared to do the same with the rewrite if necessary. In New York, American Civil Liberties Union attorney Lee Gelernt said the organization was ready to go to court if the administration tries to immediately enforce its new order. "The primary focus is being able to respond immediately to any request by the government to lift any of the injunctions, before the courts have had a chance to examine the new order," he said. Activists and airport officials alike said they hoped it would be phased in to give travelers fair warning, which might preclude any detentions from arriving flights. "We are prepared and willing," said Rebecca Sharpless, who runs the immigration clinic at the University of Miami School of Law. "But it's unlikely to cause the same kind of chaos of last time." At Dulles, Sea-Tac, Minneapolis-St. Paul and other airports, legal volunteers have greeted arriving travelers in shifts every day since the initial ban, wearing name tags or posting signs in different languages to identify themselves. The legal-services nonprofit OneJustice was ready to send email alerts to 3,000 volunteers in California if needed, deploying them to San Francisco and Los Angeles airports for people affected by any new order, chief executive Julia Wilson said.


News Article | March 3, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Asti Gallina, left, a volunteer law student from the University of Washington, sits at a station near where passengers arrive on international flights at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017, in Seattle. Gallina was volunteering with the group Airport Lawyer, which also offers a secure website and mobile phone app that alerts volunteer lawyers to ensure travelers make it through customs without trouble. Airport officials and civil rights lawyers around the country are getting ready for President Donald Trump's new travel ban, which is expected to be released as soon as Wednesday. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren) SEATTLE (AP) — Airport officials and civil rights lawyers around the country are getting ready for President Donald Trump's new travel ban — mindful of the chaos that accompanied his initial executive order but hopeful the forthcoming version will be rolled out in a more orderly way. The new order is expected to be issued in the coming days. A draft suggested it would target people from six of the original seven predominantly Muslim countries but would exempt travelers who already have visas to come to the U.S. The latest draft in circulation no longer includes Iraq. Since last month's ban, which courts have put on hold, a section of the international arrivals area at Dulles International Airport outside the nation's capital has been transformed into a virtual law firm, with legal volunteers ready to greet travelers from affected countries and ask if they saw anyone being detained. Similar efforts are underway at other airports, including Seattle-Tacoma International, where officials have drawn up plans for crowd control after thousands crammed the baggage claim area to protest the original ban. "The plan is to be as ready as possible," said Lindsay Nash, an immigration law professor at Cardozo School of Law in New York who has been helping prepare emergency petitions on behalf of those who might be detained. Trump's initial action, issued Jan. 27, temporarily barred citizens of Iran, Iraq, Syria, Yemen, Somalia, Sudan and Libya from coming to the U.S. and halted acceptance of all refugees. The president said his administration would review vetting procedures amid concerns about terrorism in those seven nations. Protesters flooded U.S. airports that weekend, seeking to free travelers detained by customs officials amid confusion about who could enter the country, including U.S. permanent residents known as green-card holders. Attorneys also challenged the order in court, including officials from Washington state. That lawsuit, which Minnesota joined, resulted in a federal judge temporarily blocking the government from enforcing the travel ban, a decision unanimously upheld by a panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Many civil rights lawyers and activists have said they don't believe a new order would cure all the constitutional problems of the original, including the claim that it was motivated by anti-Muslim discrimination. Trump has said he singled out the seven countries because they had already been deemed a security concern by the Obama administration. In his first address to Congress on Tuesday night, Trump said his administration "is taking strong measures to protect our nation from radical Islamic terrorism" and is working on improved vetting procedures. "And we will shortly take new steps to keep our nation safe — and to keep out those who would do us harm," Trump said. Last week, analysts at the Homeland Security Department's intelligence arm found insufficient evidence that citizens of the seven Muslim-majority countries pose a terror threat to the United States. "It's not enough to just tweak an order and not change the nature of why it was issued in the first place," said Rula Aoun, director of the Arab American Civil Rights League in Dearborn, Michigan, which sued over the initial ban and is prepared to do the same with the rewrite if necessary. In New York, American Civil Liberties Union attorney Lee Gelernt said the organization was ready to go to court if the administration tries to immediately enforce its new order. "The primary focus is being able to respond immediately to any request by the government to lift any of the injunctions, before the courts have had a chance to examine the new order," he said. Activists and airport officials alike said they hoped it would be phased in to give travelers fair warning, which might preclude any detentions from arriving flights. "We are prepared and willing," said Rebecca Sharpless, who runs the immigration clinic at the University of Miami School of Law. "But it's unlikely to cause the same kind of chaos of last time." At Dulles, Sea-Tac, Minneapolis-St. Paul and other airports, legal volunteers have greeted arriving travelers in shifts every day since the initial ban, wearing name tags or posting signs in different languages to identify themselves.


News Article | December 2, 2016
Site: marketersmedia.com

— The most recent report released by EDsmart ranks the fastest online degree programs at the associates, bachelor’s, master’s, and doctorate degree-levels. A total of 20 online degree programs were ranked by the duration and cost of program. Data was gathered from each schools’ website. Along with rankings, EDsmart includes pertinent information about each ranked school’s accelerated online program offerings. For the associates degree, Azusa Pacific University leads with a 12-month, $24,000 Associates of Art in Health Sciences. For the bachelor’s degree, Mercy College offers a 12-month, $89,760 Bachelor of Science in Organizational Management. For the Master’s degree, Trine University offers a 12-month, $14,000 Master of Science with a major in Criminal Justice program. At the Doctorate degree-level, Breyer State University offers a 12-month, $3,500 Doctoral Degree in Grief Counseling. In ranking order, here are fastest accelerated online degree programs for the 2016-2017 academic year: 1. Trine University 2. Southern New Hampshire University 3. University of North Texas 4. University of Miami 5. Ball State University 1. Breyer State University 2. University of Florida 3. University of Arkansas 4. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 5. University of Southern California *See the full rankings here According to Tyson Stevens, managing editor for EDsmart, “If a student is ambitious and wants to speed up the process of obtaining a degree, there are now programs that can fulfill that need.” He concludes, “Not only are these programs fast, they are very affordable and can be completed from the comfort of one’s own home if wanted. I wouldn’t be surprised if more schools follow suit in the near future.” EDsmart reviews publicly available data to produce independent ranking assessments of various educational programs, in addition to student guides and resources. The site is regularly updated by a committed team of writers and researchers, who produce college rankings and resources that will help prospective and current college students make informed decisions. For more information, please visit http://www.edsmart.org/


News Article | November 2, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

GERMANTOWN, Md., Nov. 02, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Neuralstem, Inc. (Nasdaq:CUR), a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of central nervous system therapies based on its neural stem cell technology, announced poster presentations at two upcoming scientific conferences.  Presentations include preclinical data in both of the company’s stem cell and small molecule platforms at the Society for Neurosciences Annual Meeting, as well as the American College of Toxicology Annual Meeting. Following is a schedule of relevant presentations: Title:  “Comprehensive In Vivo Nonclinical Safety Assessment of NSI-189, a Small Molecule New Chemical Entity for the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder” Date:  Monday, November 7          Time: 5:30-7 PM EST Presenter: Grace Furman, PhD, CEO Paracelsus, Inc Location:  Baltimore Marriott Waterfront,  Baltimore, MD Title:  "NSI-189, a neurogenic compound enhances short-term and long-term potentiation in C57BL/6 mice and reverses LTP impairment in a mouse model of Angelman Syndrome” Date:  Sunday, November 13        Time:  1-5 PM PT Presenter: Michel Baudry, PhD, Graduate College of Biomedical Sciences, Western University of Health  Location: San Diego Convention Center (San Diego, CA) Title:  “Durable engraftment, neuronal differentiation of human fetal neural stem cell transplants in penetrating ballistic-like brain injury accompanied by amelioration of cognitive deficits.” Date:  Monday, November 14        Time: 8AM-12PM PT Presenter: Shyam Gajavelli, PhD, University of Miami Location:  San Diego Convention Center (San Diego, CA) Title:  “Induction of immune tolerance by short-course immunosuppression after spinal grafting of allogeneic neural precursors in pigs with previous chronic spinal cord traumatic injury” Date:  Monday, November 14        Time: 8AM-12PM PT Presenter: Martin Marsala, MD, University of San Diego School of Medicine  Location:  San Diego Convention Center (San Diego, CA) Title: “Remyelinating human oligodendrocyte progenitors for regenerative treatment of demyelinating diseases and spinal cord injury” Date:  Wed,  November 16        Time: 8AM-12PM PT Presenter: Tom Hazel, PhD, VP of Research, Neuralstem, Inc.  Location:  San Diego Convention Center (San Diego, CA) Neuralstem's patented technology enables the commercial-scale production of multiple types of central nervous system stem cells, which are being developed as potential therapies for multiple central nervous system diseases and conditions. Neuralstem’s technology enables the generation of small molecule compounds by screening hippocampal stem cell lines with its proprietary systematic chemical screening process.  The screening process has led to the discovery and patenting of molecules that Neuralstem believes may stimulate the brain's capacity to generate new neurons, potentially reversing pathophysiologies associated with certain central nervous system (CNS) conditions. The company has completed Phase 1a and 1b trials evaluating NSI-189, a novel neurogenic small molecule product candidate, for the treatment of major depressive disorder or MDD, and is currently conducting a Phase 2 efficacy study for MDD. Neuralstem's stem cell therapy product candidate, NSI-566, is a spinal cord-derived neural stem cell line. Neuralstem is currently evaluating NSI-566 in three indications: stroke, chronic spinal cord injury (cSCI), and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Neuralstem is conducting a Phase 1 safety study for the treatment of paralysis from chronic motor stroke at the BaYi Brain Hospital in Beijing, China.  In addition, NSI-566 was evaluated in a Phase 1 safety study to treat paralysis due to chronic spinal cord injury, as well as, a Phase 1 and Phase 2a risk escalation, safety trials for ALS.  Patients from all three indications are currently in long-term observational follow-up periods to continue to monitor safety and possible therapeutic benefits. This news release contains "forward-looking statements" made pursuant to the "safe harbor" provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such forward-looking statements relate to future, not past, events and may often be identified by words such as "expect," "anticipate," "intend," "plan," "believe," "seek" or "will." Forward-looking statements by their nature address matters that are, to different degrees, uncertain. Specific risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those expressed in our forward-looking statements include risks inherent in the development and commercialization of potential products, uncertainty of clinical trial results or regulatory approvals or clearances, need for future capital, dependence upon collaborators and maintenance of our intellectual property rights. Actual results may differ materially from the results anticipated in these forward-looking statements. Additional information on potential factors that could affect our results and other risks and uncertainties are detailed from time to time in Neuralstem's periodic reports, including the Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2015, and filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on March 14, 2016, Form 10-Q for the period ended June 30, 2016, and in other reports filed with the SEC.


News Article | December 6, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

Management to host a call on Thursday, December 8th, at 8:30 a.m. ET DURHAM, N.C., Dec. 06, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Heat Biologics, Inc. (Nasdaq:HTBX), a leader in the development of gp96-based immunotherapies designed to activate a patient’s immune system to fight cancer, reported topline response and survival results in the ongoing Phase 1b study evaluating HS-110, in combination with Bristol-Myers Squibb’s anti-PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor, nivolumab (Opdivo®), for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer Annual Meeting in Vienna, Austria. In an oral presentation, principal investigator, Daniel Morgensztern, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine and Director of Thoracic Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, reported that one-year results from the first eight trial patients showed that the HS-110/nivolumab combination was well-tolerated, with a safety profile consistent with single agent nivolumab. There were no additional toxicities seen in HS-110/nivolumab combination compared to existing data on single agent nivolumab alone. HS-110 generated a robust antigen-specific immune response in several patients, consistent with the mechanism of action seen in other HS-110 trials.  Additionally, the patients who responded best to the combination therapy (immune responders) had longer overall survival and better objective response rate (ORR) than the non-immune responders, even though they had the same baseline immune function. Immune responders in the study saw a 50% ORR, while non-immune responders saw a 0% ORR. This is important, as checkpoint inhibitors have been shown, independently, to be much more effective in tumors with pre-existing, high tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). As such, there now exists an acute need to address the large proportion of non-responders with low-TIL tumors. Moreover, the immune responders had a better median overall survival (OS) than non-immune responders. The one-year OS is currently 50% for the responders, and 25% for the non-responders. Finally, immune responders also saw a better median OS at 12.7 months, than non-immune responders, who saw a median OS of 7.1 months.  Researchers concluded that immune response may correlate with clinical efficacy and that HS-110 may have synergistic activity with immune checkpoint inhibitors. “We are encouraged by the data generated in the trial,” said Dr. Morgensztern. “We were impressed by the ability of HS-110 to activate a CD8+ T cell immune response. The HS-110/nivolumab combination is worth continued exploration in the treatment of lung cancer, as the HS-110 mechanism of action is potentially synergistic with anti-PD-1 checkpoint inhibitors.” “We’ve continued to see ELISPOT analysis correlate with clinical efficacy with HS-110 in NSCLC, an encouraging trend also observed in other trials with HS-110,” said Taylor Schreiber, MD, PhD, Heat’s Chief Scientific Officer. “We are seeing trends between TIL status and TIL increases after treatment among these patients, which may speak to the ability of HS-110 to convert “cold” tumors to “hot” tumors to increase the effectiveness of PD-1 checkpoint therapy in lung cancer.” “These new data are further confirmation of the ability of our ImPACT platform, which has been administered to over 200 patients in 4 clinical studies, to generate a robust antigen-specific immune response, an important component of immunotherapy,” said Jeff Wolf, Heat’s CEO.  “The future of immuno-oncology lies in combining synergistic modalities to create more effective treatments. At Heat, we are actively pursuing opportunities to combine our ImPACT and ComPACT platforms with checkpoint inhibitors, and other promising immunotherapies to improve patient outcomes.” Heat plans to hold an investor call on December 8th at 8:30 a.m. ET to discuss its overall clinical strategy moving forward. The call will be available on the company’s website at www.heatbio.com, or by calling 866-320-0174 for U.S. callers, or +1 785-424-1631 for international callers.  A webcast will also be archived on the company’s website and a telephone replay of the call will be available approximately one hour following the call, through midnight December 15, 2016, and can be accessed by calling: 877-481-4010 (U.S. callers) or +1 919-882-2331 (international callers) and entering conference ID: 10169. The oral presentation will be uploaded to Heat’s website at http://www.heatbio.com/our-science/publications in line with the conference’s embargo policy. Heat Biologics, Inc. (Nasdaq:HTBX) is an immuno-oncology company developing novel therapies that are designed to activate a patient’s immune system against cancer utilizing an engineered form of gp96, a protein that activates the immune system when cells die. Heat’s highly specific T cell-stimulating therapeutic vaccine platform technologies, ImPACT and ComPACT, form the basis of its product candidates. These platforms, in combination with other therapies, such as checkpoint inhibitors, are designed to address three distinct but synergistic mechanisms of action: robust activation of CD8+ “killer” T cells (one of the human immune system’s most potent weapons against cancer); reversal of tumor-induced immune suppression; and T cell co-stimulation to further enhance patients’ immune response.  Currently, Heat is conducting a Phase 1b trial with HS-110 (viagenpumatucel-L) in combination with an anti-PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor to treat patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Heat’s wholly-owned subsidiary, Zolovax, Inc., is developing therapeutic and preventative vaccines to treat infectious diseases based on Heat’s gp96 vaccine technology, with a current focus on the development of a Zika vaccine in conjunction with the University of Miami. The Zolovax patent portfolio also includes gp96 vaccines targeting West Nile virus, Dengue and yellow fever among others. For more information, please visit www.heatbio.com. Forward Looking Statements This press release includes forward-looking statements on our current expectations and projections about future events. In some cases, forward-looking statements can be identified by terminology such as "may," "should," "potential," "continue," "expects," "anticipates," "intends," "plans," "believes," "estimates," and similar expressions. These statements are based upon current beliefs, expectations and assumptions and include statements regarding the conclusion  that immune response may correlate with clinical efficacy and that HS-110 may have synergistic activity with immune checkpoint inhibitors,  the belief that the HS-110/nivolumab combination is worth continued exploration with a mechanism of action synergistic with anti-PD-1 checkpoint inhibitors to improve treatment in lung cancer, the ability of HS-110 to convert “cold” tumors to “hot” tumors to increase the effectiveness of PD-1 checkpoint therapy in lung cancer and the other potential of Heat’s ImPACT and ComPACT therapies. These statements are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, many of which are difficult to predict, including the ability of Heat's ImPACT and ComPACT therapies to perform as designed, the ability to enroll patients and complete the clinical trials on time, the ability to achieve similar results in a larger patient population and other factors described in our annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2015 and our other filings with the SEC. The information in this release is provided only as of the date of this release, and we undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statements contained in this release based on new information, future events, or otherwise, except as required by law.


NEW YORK, NY--(Marketwired - Dec 6, 2016) -  Texas A&M University quarterback, Trevor Knight was named the 2016 Wuerffel Trophy recipient at the National Football Foundation's Annual Awards ceremonies press conference at the Waldorf Astoria in New York City today by the award's namesake, Heisman Trophy winner and College Football Hall of Famer Danny Wuerffel. The Wuerffel Trophy, presented by the All Sports Association, is college football's premier award for community service. It is presented to the college football player (Football Bowl Subdivision) who best combines exemplary community service with athletic and academic achievement. "Trevor Knight has consistently demonstrated selfless acts of community service throughout his college career," said Wuerffel, whose own college and professional football career embodies the level of humanitarian and community service work the Wuerffel Trophy aspires to honor. "Being an inspiration to others on and off the field is what this trophy represents. We are honored to add Trevor to our distinguished list of Wuerffel Trophy recipients." Knight helped lead the Aggies to a 8-4 record in 2016, after transferring from the University of Oklahoma and earning his undergraduate degree in business administration. He is currently enrolled in the Mays Business School at A&M. At Oklahoma he was a 5-time Big 12 Commissioner's Honor Roll member, 7-time Sooner Scholar and an Academics All-Big 12. After leading three mission trips to Haiti while at OU, Knight was the driving force to set up a similar mission trip at A&M this year. Additionally he has participated in countless local community service efforts with Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center, local churches, schools and other organizations in Norman, Oklahoma and College Station, Texas. Knight is a two-time Wuerffel Trophy nominee. The Wuerffel Trophy is named after Wuerffel, who is one of the most decorated players in football history at the University of Florida. In 1996, he not only led the Gators to win their first national championship as quarterback, but also went on to win nearly a dozen awards that year including the coveted Heisman Trophy. Wuerffel has received many honors since 1996, including induction into the University of Florida Athletic Hall of Fame as a "Gator Great," the Gator Football Ring of Honor and election into the College Football Hall of Fame; however he says one of his greatest professional achievements has been the work he has accomplished for inner-city church leaders as executive director for the nonprofit Desire Street Ministries. "To leverage the use of your talents, your time and the influence you have on others for the betterment of humanity is always an incredible challenge," said Wuerffel. "I think in so many ways, how we care for those who are hurting and on the margins and fringes of society ultimately defines who we are." As 2016 Wuerffel Trophy recipient, Knight will be interviewed on ESPNU and ESPN3 during "The Home Depot College Football Awards Red Carpet Show," at 6 p.m. EST Dec. 8, prior to The Home Depot College Football Awards Show at the College Football Hall of Fame in downtown Atlanta. Knight will be formally presented with the Wuerffel Trophy at the All Sports Association's 48th Annual Awards banquet on Feb. 10 in Fort Walton Beach, Florida. University of Miami head coach Mark Richt will be the keynote speaker at the event. For available corporate sponsorships contact: Tom Brassell, Executive Director, (850) 585-5512. To learn more about The Wuerffel Trophy, visit www.wuerffeltrophy.org. ABOUT THE WUERFFEL TROPHY: The Wuerffel Trophy is college football's premier award for community service. The All Sports Association, based in Fort Walton Beach, Florida, presents the Wuerffel Trophy to the Football Bowl Subdivision player who best exhibits exemplary community service, along with qualifying academic and athletic achievement. As the trophy namesake, Danny Wuerffel, former Heisman Trophy winner from the University of Florida who had a six year career as quarterback in the National Football League, embodies the three categories of the award: community service, academics and athletics. Past winners of the Wuerffel Trophy include: Ty Darlington, University of Oklahoma (2015); Deterrian Shackelford, University of Mississippi (2014); Gabe Ikard, University of Oklahoma (2013); Matt Barkley, University of Southern California (2012); Barrett Jones, University of Alabama (2011); Sam Acho, University of Texas (2010); Tim Hiller, Western Michigan University (2009); Tim Tebow, University of Florida (2008); Paul Smith, University of Tulsa (2007); Joel Penton, Ohio State University (2006); and Rudy Niswanger, Louisiana State University (2005). The Wuerffel Trophy is a member of the National College Football Awards Association, which encompasses the most prestigious awards in college football. The 23 awards boast more than 700 years of tradition-selection excellence. For more information, go to www.NCFAA.org and www.wuerffeltrophy.org.


Blankenstein T.,Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine | Blankenstein T.,Charité - Medical University of Berlin | Coulie P.G.,Catholic University of Louvain | Gilboa E.,University of Miami | Jaffee E.M.,Johns Hopkins University
Nature Reviews Cancer | Year: 2012

Many standard and targeted therapies, as well as radiotherapy, have been shown to induce an anti-tumour immune response, and immunotherapies rely on modulating the host immune system to induce an anti-tumour immune response. However, the immune response to such therapies is often reliant on the immunogenicity of a tumour. Tumour immunogenicity varies greatly between cancers of the same type in different individuals and between different types of cancer. So, what do we know about tumour immunogenicity and how might we therapeutically improve tumour immunogenicity? We asked four leading cancer immunologists around the world for their opinions on this important issue. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Zarbin M.A.,Rutgers University | Rosenfeld P.J.,University of Miami
Retina | Year: 2010

Purpose: To review treatments under development for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in the context of current knowledge of AMD pathogenesis. Methods: Review of the scientific literature published in English. Results: Steps in AMD pathogenesis that appear to be good targets for drug development include 1) oxidative damage; 2) lipofuscin accumulation; 3) chronic inflammation; 4) mutations in the complement pathway; and 5) noncomplement mutations that influence chronic inflammation and/or oxidative damage (e.g., mitochondria and extracellular matrix structure). Steps in neovascularization that can be targeted for drug development and combination therapy include 1) angiogenic factor production; 2) factor release; 3) binding of factors to extracellular receptors (and activation of intracellular signaling after receptor binding); 4) endothelial cell activation (and basement membrane degradation); 5) endothelial cell proliferation; 6) directed endothelial cell migration; 7) extracellular matrix remodeling; 8) tube formation; and 9) vascular stabilization. Conclusion: The era of pathway-based therapy for the early and late stages of AMD has begun. At each step in the pathway, a new treatment could be developed, but complete inhibition of disease progression will likely require a combination of the various treatments. Combination therapy will likely supplant monotherapy as the treatment of choice because the clinical benefits (visual acuity and frequency of treatment) will likely be superior to monotherapy in preventing the late-stage complications of AMD. Copyright © by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: NERC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 250.09K | Year: 2015

The hydroxyl radical (OH) is the dominant oxidizing agent in the troposphere, as such its concentration controls the abundances and lifetimes of most atmospheric pollutants, including the important greenhouse gas methane (CH4). Ozone (O3) is also an important oxidant and is itself a greenhouse gas. The concentrations of OH and O3 are interdependent, both being determined by a complex series of reactions involving CH4, carbon monoxide (CO), non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOX = NO + NO2). As emissions of these compounds have changed substantially since pre-industrial times, the tropospheric budgets of OH and O3 will also have changed. However, there are large uncertainties associated with current understanding of these past changes and consequently very large uncertainties in projected future changes and associated climate impacts. Most of this uncertainty in past trends comes from lack of observations to constrain studies. Whilst there are a few direct observational data sets which indicate how O3 concentrations changed through the 20th century, there are none for OH. Direct observational data sets of CH4, NMVOCs, CO and NOX, extend, at best, from the 1980s. These time series can be extended backward in time through the analysis of air trapped in firn (unconsolidated snow). Whilst such historic time series have been available for CH4 for some time, only recently have they become available for CO and for some NMVOCs, in particular alkanes. Furthermore, we have also recently determined, from firn analysis, historic time series of alkyl nitrates. Alkyl nitrates are products of the chemistry involving NOX and as such can be used as a diagnostic of the changes in NOX. These new (and in the case of the alkyl nitrates, unique), historic time series provide an exciting opportunity to investigate the changing OH and O3 budgets of the northern hemisphere troposphere since 1950 with observational constraints never available before. Very interestingly, the simple analyses carried out on these time series to date suggest that substantial changes in the atmospheric chemistry have occurred. To exploit the full value of these time series a detailed study is required with a comprehensive chemistry-climate model. Here we propose the first such study. The outcomes of this study will be: 1) a better understanding of the impact of changing anthropogenic emissions on the OH and O3 budgets of the northern hemisphere troposphere; 2) an improved modelling capability with which to project future changes and better inform climate policy. This proposal brings together experts in firn air data interpretation with experts in chemistry-climate modelling. Both groups also have considerable expertise in organic (including alkyl) nitrate chemistry. This proposal specifically builds on past NERC funded work on the trends of alkanes and alkyl nitrates in firm air using simply relationships and models.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2015

Therapeutic ultrasound is a common modality for pain management and rehabilitation therapy which has been clinically utilized for 60 years. Specifically designed ultrasonic devices for accelerated healing and wound site debridement are generally hand-operated bulky systems. As such, they are used on a case-by-case basis with irregular therapeutic treatment regimens dependent on patient access and associated treatment costs. This limits ultrasounds effectiveness and its broad-use in the military/civilian wound healing. Recent innovation and FDA regulatory clearances by ZetrOZ in the development of portable, wearable, long duration, low intensity therapeutic ultrasound systems, allows ultrasound to be delivered and sustained for 4 hours of daily therapeutic treatment. Initial studies have demonstrated that the long duration ultrasound device speeds healing in a small-animal wound model and a pilot study of a chronic wound. Here, we propose to modify the device for optimal use in a wound healing scenario, and conduct initial large-animal studies measuring the ability of the device to facilitate accelerated wound closure and healing. The wounds will be assessed both visually and with histological sections. Following completion of this Phase I study, a Phase II study will expand on these results, and obtain GLP animal data for regulatory filings with FDA.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Kyle Parkway Dentistry is a modern dental practice that provides comprehensive dental care to patients of all ages. Dr. Mahesh Dholariya is proud to welcome his newest team member, Dr. Jake Duong, an experienced general dentist who specializes in oral surgery and wisdom teeth removal. Dr. Duong shares the mission of Kyle Parkway Dentistry, which is to provide state-of-the-art dentistry in an environment that is comfortable and relaxing. Dr. Jake Duong earned both his bachelor’s degree and his dental degree from The University of Alabama at Birmingham. While there, he completed a one-year residency, receiving specialized training in soft tissue management and implant placement. While Dr. Duong is proficient in all areas of general dentistry, his passion lies in oral surgery. He will be able to provide in-house surgical services, including wisdom teeth removal and IV sedation dentistry, to patients at Kyle Parkway Dentistry. Along with his certification in oral surgery and IV sedation dentistry, he has also received implant certification from the University of Miami School of Medicine’s Implant Dentistry Continuum. Dr. Duong is committed to pursuing ongoing professional development through continuing education. He also maintains current memberships in many prestigious dental organizations, including Texas Academy of General Dentistry, American Dental Society Of Anesthesiology, American Dental Association and more. “I’m thrilled to bring my oral surgery expertise to such a highly respected dental practice. With an additional dentist and expanded services, Kyle Parkway Dentistry can truly maximize patient care and convenience,” says Dr. Duong. Kyle Parkway Dentistry offers an expansive menu of dental services, including general and restorative dentistry as well as periodontal care and cosmetic dental procedures. The practice mission is to provide state-of the-art dentistry while adhering to each patient’s need for comfort and convenience. They offer a number of relaxing office amenities and provide flexible scheduling such as family block appointments and Saturday hours. Oral and IV Sedation dentistry are also now offered at Kyle Parkway Dentistry. For more information about Dr. Jake Duong from Kyle Parkway Dentistry, visit the practice website at kyleparkwaydentistry.com or call (512) 256-0105.

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