Worcester, MA, United States

University of Massachusetts Medical School

www.umassmed.edu/
Worcester, MA, United States

The University of Massachusetts Medical School is one of five campuses of the University of Massachusetts system. It is home to three schools: the School of Medicine, the Graduate School of Biomedical science, the Graduate School of Nursing; a biomedical research enterprise; and a range of public-service initiatives throughout the state. One of the fastest-growing academic health centers in the country, UMMS is located in Worcester, Massachusetts; other UMass sites are located in Amherst, Boston, Dartmouth and Lowell. UMMS is also known as UMass Worcester.UMMS is ranked 5th in primary-care education and 49th in research among the United States' 128 medical schools in the 2015 U.S. News & World Report annual guide, "America’s Best Graduate Schools”. UMMS is also a research center. During the past four decades UMMS researchers have made advances in a broad range of disease families, from HIV and infectious diseases to cancer, genetic disorders, diabetes and immune disease. UMMS faculty discovered the link between the immune system and type-1 diabetes, found the genetic cause underlying the third-most-common form of the muscular dystrophies, established the fundamental difference between HIV and other retroviruses and co-discovered RNA interference . UMMS scientists are making strides in collaborative efforts to develop vaccines for avian flu, HIV, West Nile virus and rabies. Wikipedia.


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Patent
University of Massachusetts Medical School | Date: 2016-12-16

A method of diagnosing a condition of a living subject that uses gadoxeate disodium as a contrast agent for making images such as CT scans of the biliary tree and related anatomical structures. The method uses x-ray radiation generated with excitation voltages in the range of 70 KV to 140 KV. The x-ray radiation is preferably filtered to suppress or practically remove x-rays having energy lower than 50.2 KeV.


Patent
University of Massachusetts Medical School | Date: 2017-03-15

The invention provides novel compositions and methods of surface mineralization for metallic or ceramic implants and devices and the resulting enhancement of properties and performance in skeletal tissue engineering, orthopedic applications and dental care. The novel approach utilizes zwitterionic brushes (e.g., of poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) or pSBMA) covalently grafted on the surface of titanium or its alloy substrates (e.g., Ti6A14V) to promote surface-mineralization of hydroxyapatite with enhanced surface mineral coverage and mineral- substrate interfacial adhesion. The zwitterionic surface brushes, capable of attracting both cationic and anionic precursor ions during hydroxyapatite-mineralization, significantly increase the surface mineral coverage and significantly reinforce the attachment of the surface apatite crystals on the titanium alloy substrate which withstood supersonication treatment.


Patent
University of Massachusetts Medical School | Date: 2017-01-25

Systems and methods according to the present concepts reduce irritability in infants, such as infants suffering from neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) or colic. According to one embodiment, a method for reducing irritability in an infant includes determining one or more physiological measurements from an infant. The one or more physiological measurements relate to a state of irritability in the infant. The method also includes determining the state of irritability based on the one or more physiological measurements and applying a stochastic stimulation to the infant based on the state of irritability. The stochastic stimulation may be applied via a mattress. The stochastic stimulation may be vibro-tactile or subsensory.


Patent
University of Massachusetts Medical School | Date: 2015-03-03

Systems and methods according to the present concepts reduce irritability in infants, such as infants suffering from neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) or colic. According to one embodiment, a method for reducing irritability in an infant includes determining one or more physiological measurements from an infant. The one or more physiological measurements relate to a state of irritability in the infant. The method also includes determining the state of irritability based on the one or more physiological measurements and applying a stochastic stimulation to the infant based on the state of irritability. The stochastic stimulation may be applied via a mattress. The stochastic stimulation may be vibro-tactile or subsensory.


Patent
University of Massachusetts Medical School | Date: 2017-01-04

The invention provides a novel approach to hydrogels with predictable degradation/gelling kinetics, which is useful for many biomedical applications where appropriate gelling kinetics and the timely disintegration of the hydrogel (e.g., drug delivery, guided tissue regeneration) is required. Precisely controlling hydrogel degradation over a broad range in a predictable manner is achieved via a simple but versatile hydrogel platform that allows formulation of hydrogels with predictable disintegration time from within 2 days to >250 days yet comparable macroscopic physical properties.


Rando O.J.,University of Massachusetts Medical School
Current Opinion in Genetics and Development | Year: 2012

Covalent modifications of histone proteins play key roles in transcription, DNA repair, recombination, and other such processes. Over a hundred histone modifications have been described, and a popular idea in the field is that the function of a single histone mark cannot be understood without understanding its combinatorial co-occurrence with other marks, an idea generally called the 'histone code hypothesis.' This idea is hotly debated, with increasing biochemical evidence for chromatin regulatory factors that bind to specific histone modification combinations, but functional and localization studies finding minimal combinatorial complexity in histone modification patterns. This review will focus on these contrasting results, and will briefly touch on possible ways to reconcile these conflicting views. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Boyer E.W.,University of Massachusetts Medical School
New England Journal of Medicine | Year: 2012

Opioid analgesic overdose is a life-threatening condition, and the antidote naloxone may have limited effectiveness in patients with poisoning from long-acting agents. The unpredictable clinical course of intoxication demands empirical management of this potentially lethal condition. Copyright © 2012 Massachusetts Medical Society.


Szabo G.,University of Massachusetts Medical School
Gastroenterology | Year: 2015

Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) has been among the leading causes of cirrhosis and liver-related death worldwide for decades. Early discoveries in alcoholic liver disease identified increased levels of bacterial endotoxin in the portal circulation, suggesting a role for gut-derived toxins in ALD. Indeed, alcohol consumption can disrupt the intestinal epithelial barrier and result in increased gut permeability that increasingly is recognized as a major factor in ALD. Bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide, is a prototypic microbe-derived inflammatory signal that contributes to inflammation in ALD through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4. Recent studies also have shown that alcohol consumption is associated with alterations in the gut microbiome, and the dysbalance of pathogenic and commensal organisms in the intestinal microbiome may contribute to the abnormal gut-liver axis in ALD. Indeed, bacterial decontamination improves ALD both in human and animal models. This short review summarizes recent findings and highlights emerging trends in the gut-liver axis relevant to ALD. © 2015 AGA Institute.


Lambert L.A.,University of Massachusetts Medical School
CA Cancer Journal for Clinicians | Year: 2015

Until recently, a diagnosis of peritoneal carcinomatosis was uniformly accompanied by a grim prognosis that was typically measured in weeks to months. Consequently, the management of carcinomatosis revolves largely around palliation of symptoms such as bowel obstruction, nausea, pain, fatigue, and cachexia. A prior lack of effective treatment options created the nihilistic view that currently exists and persists despite improvements in the efficacy of systemic therapy and the evolution of multimodality approaches including surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. This article reviews the evolution and current state of treatment options for patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. In addition, it highlights recent advances in understanding the molecular biology of carcinomatosis and the focus of current and future clinical trials. Finally, this article provides practical management options for the palliation of common complications of carcinomatosis. It is hoped that the reader will recognize that carcinomatosis is no longer an imminent death sentence and that through continued research and therapeutic innovation, clinicians can make an even greater impact on this form of metastatic cancer. CA Cancer J Clin 2015;65:283-298. © 2015 American Cancer Society.


Rando O.J.,University of Massachusetts Medical School
Cell | Year: 2012

The once popular and then heretical idea that ancestral environment can affect the phenotype of future generations is coming back into vogue due to advances in the field of epigenetic inheritance. How paternal environmental conditions influence the phenotype of progeny is now a tractable question, and researchers are exploring potential mechanisms underlying such effects. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

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