University of Maryland Extension

Frederick, Maryland, United States

University of Maryland Extension

Frederick, Maryland, United States
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Drass J.A.,Frederick Memorial Healthcare System | Rhoades D.,University of Maryland Extension | Baldwin S.A.,Frederick Memorial Healthcare System
Diabetes Educator | Year: 2011

Purpose The Frederick Restaurant Challenge is an innovative project based on a collaborative effort among community organizations and partners designed to offer delicious healthful meal options at local restaurants during the month of November for American Diabetes Month. Local restaurants were challenged to participate and submitted recipes for healthful meals to the Frederick County Diabetes Coalition for review by registered dietitians. Diners voted on meals to determine the challenge winner(s), and were eligible to win prizes as well. Publicity prior to and during the month was effective in creating positive news about healthful meals when eating out, raised awareness about diabetes, and provided restaurants with desirable advertising opportunities. Feedback from restaurants and diners was overwhelmingly positive. The purpose of this article is to describe this successful low-budget project to encourage its replication in local communities. Conclusions The Frederick Restaurant Challenge proved to be a very successful, innovative, low-budget project that met its intended goals: to develop healthful meal options for people with diabetes (or for anyone wishing to eat healthier); to demonstrate that healthful food can taste delicious; and to encourage restaurants to continue offering healthful options on their menus beyond the challenge month. Community interventions such as the Frederick Restaurant Challenge offer unique and important strategies for affecting change and raising awareness not only for people with diabetes but also for the entire community.


Baldwin R.L.,Bovine Functional Genomics Laboratory | Zhang A.,Biocontrol | Fultz S.W.,University of Maryland Extension | Abubeker S.,Biocontrol | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Dairy Science | Year: 2014

Brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB; Halyomorpha halys) is an emerging invasive species of grave concern to agriculture as a polyphagous plant pest with potential negative effects on the dairy industry. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of including BMSB-contaminated silage in lactating dairy cow rations. First, 6 dairies, either highly infested (n=3; 30 to 100 bugs per stalk) or not infested (n=3), were sampled to assess the prevalence of bug secretion compounds tridecane (major component) and E-2-decenal (stink odor component) in silage and milk. Second, using wild BMSB, a mini-silo dose-response experiment (adding 100, 50, 25, 10, and 1 freshly crushed bugs/0.5kg of chopped corn) was conducted to assess the effect of ensiling on BMSB stink odor compounds. Finally, synthetic BMSB stink odor compounds (10g of tridecane and 5g of E-2-decenal) were ruminally infused twice daily over 3 d, and samples of milk, urine, and rumen fluid were collected to evaluate disposition. Bug stink odor compounds were sampled by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Milk production and feed composition were unaffected when BMSB-contaminated silage was fed. Moreover, no E-2-decenal was detected in silage or milk (detection threshold = 0.00125μg/mL). The dose-response of tridecane in mini-silo samples exhibited a linear relationship (R2=0.78) with the amount of BMSB added; however, E-2-decenal was completely decomposed and undetectable in spiked mini-silos after ensiling. Both synthetic secretion compounds infused into rumen were undetectable in all milk and urine samples. E-2-Decenal was not detectable in rumen fluid, whereas tridecane was detected only at 15 min postinfusion but not present thereafter. Feed intake was unaffected by infusion treatment and BMSB secretion compounds (E-2-decenal and tridecane) were not observed in milk. E-2-Decenal and tridecane from the metathoracic gland of BMSB are not able to contaminate milk either due to the ensiling process or because of metabolism within the rumen. Concern over BMSB stink odor compounds contaminating the fluid milk supply, even on highly infested farms, is not warranted. © 2014 American Dairy Science Association.


PubMed | Bovine Functional Genomics Laboratory, Biocontrol, U.S. Department of Agriculture and University of Maryland Extension
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of dairy science | Year: 2014

Brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB; Halyomorpha halys) is an emerging invasive species of grave concern to agriculture as a polyphagous plant pest with potential negative effects on the dairy industry. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of including BMSB-contaminated silage in lactating dairy cow rations. First, 6 dairies, either highly infested (n=3; 30 to 100 bugs per stalk) or not infested (n=3), were sampled to assess the prevalence of bug secretion compounds tridecane (major component) and E-2-decenal (stink odor component) in silage and milk. Second, using wild BMSB, a mini-silo dose-response experiment (adding 100, 50, 25, 10, and 1 freshly crushed bugs/0.5kg of chopped corn) was conducted to assess the effect of ensiling on BMSB stink odor compounds. Finally, synthetic BMSB stink odor compounds (10g of tridecane and 5g of E-2-decenal) were ruminally infused twice daily over 3 d, and samples of milk, urine, and rumen fluid were collected to evaluate disposition. Bug stink odor compounds were sampled by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Milk production and feed composition were unaffected when BMSB-contaminated silage was fed. Moreover, no E-2-decenal was detected in silage or milk (detection threshold = 0.00125g/mL). The dose-response of tridecane in mini-silo samples exhibited a linear relationship (R(2)=0.78) with the amount of BMSB added; however, E-2-decenal was completely decomposed and undetectable in spiked mini-silos after ensiling. Both synthetic secretion compounds infused into rumen were undetectable in all milk and urine samples. E-2-Decenal was not detectable in rumen fluid, whereas tridecane was detected only at 15 min postinfusion but not present thereafter. Feed intake was unaffected by infusion treatment and BMSB secretion compounds (E-2-decenal and tridecane) were not observed in milk. E-2-Decenal and tridecane from the metathoracic gland of BMSB are not able to contaminate milk either due to the ensiling process or because of metabolism within the rumen. Concern over BMSB stink odor compounds contaminating the fluid milk supply, even on highly infested farms, is not warranted.


Brown V.,University of Westminster | Russell M.,University of Maryland Extension | Ginter A.,Towson University | Braun B.,University of Maryland University College | And 3 more authors.
Health Promotion Practice | Year: 2016

Smart Choice Health Insurance© is a consumer education program based on the definition and emerging measurement of health insurance literacy and a review of literature and appropriate theoretical frameworks. An interdisciplinary team of financial and health educators was formed to develop and pilot the program, with the goal of reducing confusion and increasing confidence in the consumer’s ability to make a smart health insurance decision. Educators in seven states, certified to teach the program, conducted workshops for 994 consumers. Results show statistically significant evidence of increased health insurance literacy, confidence, and capacity to make a smart choice health insurance choice. Discussion centers on the impact the program had on specific groups, next steps to reach a larger audience, and implications for educators, consumers, and policymakers nationwide. © 2015, © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.


Ristvey A.G.,University of Maryland Extension | Solano L.,University of Maryland University College | Wharton K.,University of Maryland University College | Cohan S.M.,University of Maryland University College | Lea-Cox J.D.,University of Maryland University College
Low Impact Development 2010: Redefining Water in the City - Proceedings of the 2010 International Low Impact Development Conference | Year: 2010

Extensive green roof systems are becoming increasingly popular with urban Low Impact Design (LID), having a number of tangible benefits, not the least of which is storm water mitigation, ameliorating urban storm water discharge from impervious surfaces while reducing high-flow periods which cause stream-bed erosion and carry pollutants to local waterways. The most important factor of storm water amelioration is the substrate or media, which are mineral-based manufactured aggregates, blended with specific granulometric distributions based on design intent or regional rainfall patterns, better optimizing water holding capacity while still providing enough air-filled porosity for healthy plant roots. Crumb rubber, a recycled tire product, is a potential green roof substrate amendment, and is currently available in large quantities throughout North America. Crumb rubber offers many potential benefits, including improvements in substrate air-filled porosity while reducing the weight of the green roof substrate for increasing the potential retrofit of older buildings. Three typical green roof substrates were amended with 8-12 sieve-mesh crumb rubber in increments of 0, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30% by volume, and were analyzed for air-filled porosity and water holding capacity with the North Carolina State University Porometer system. Higher proportions of crumb rubber significantly reduced total porosity and water holding capacity, yet increased air-filled porosity compared to unamended control in one substrate and decreased bulk density in all substrates. This study was developed to determine the effect of crumb rubber amendments on the porosity and bulk density of green roof substrates to balance water holding performance yet, retain a root friendly environment, and increase the potential for green roof retrofit onto buildings with limited structural capacity. © 2010 ASCE.


Solano L.,University of Delaware | Ristvey A.G.,University of Maryland Extension | Lea-Cox J.D.,University of Maryland University College | Cohan S.M.,University of Maryland University College
Ecological Engineering | Year: 2012

Extensive green roof systems can mitigate urban stormwater by capturing rainfall and reducing runoff volume. Green roof media, often made from heat-expanded shales, slates and clays are fundamental for roof hydraulic dynamics, and for providing optimal plant growth conditions. However, many of these media have a high carbon footprint from processing and occasionally impose load limitations for retrofitting on roofs of older infrastructure. This research studied recycled-tire crumb rubber (CR), as a light-weight material for amending green roof media. Despite its advantages as a recycled product, CR releases zinc (Zn). This heavy metal could be harmful for green roof plants and the overall ecosystem. Zinc released from CR was quantified, and the interactions with the commercial green roof media, rooflite ®, were characterized. In initial leaching assays, it was confirmed that CR leaches Zn in potentially toxic quantities for Sedum, which is perhaps the most important genus utilized in commercial applications in the United States. However, when CR was combined in volumetric proportions of 6%, 18% and 30% with the green roof medium rooflite ® and bathed in water for 16 days, up to 99% of Zn became unavailable compared to a 100% CR control. Crumb rubber was volumetrically combined in 30% proportions with either rooflite ® or glass beads for three months. Analysis of leachates from weekly applications of water showed that the green roof medium could render the Zn unavailable and below USEPA toxicity thresholds. These results suggest that media with high cation exchange capacities can effectively mitigate the Zn released from CR. This application may allow for the reutilization of a waste material as an amendment for extensive green roof media. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | University of Maryland Extension, University of Delaware, University of Maryland University College, University of Westminster and Towson University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Health promotion practice | Year: 2016

Smart Choice Health Insurance is a consumer education program based on the definition and emerging measurement of health insurance literacy and a review of literature and appropriate theoretical frameworks. An interdisciplinary team of financial and health educators was formed to develop and pilot the program, with the goal of reducing confusion and increasing confidence in the consumers ability to make a smart health insurance decision. Educators in seven states, certified to teach the program, conducted workshops for 994 consumers. Results show statistically significant evidence of increased health insurance literacy, confidence, and capacity to make a smart choice health insurance choice. Discussion centers on the impact the program had on specific groups, next steps to reach a larger audience, and implications for educators, consumers, and policymakers nationwide.


Pena-Purcell N.,Texas A&M University | Bowen E.,West Virginia University | Zoumenou V.,University of Maryland Extension | Schuster E.R.,University of Missouri | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Extension | Year: 2012

We report results of a Web-based nationwide survey of nutrition and health Extension specialists representing 42 states. Survey items (n = 36) assessed five areas: curriculum review, nutrition and physical activity, professional training, communication, and evaluation. An internal curriculum review was common, but few states shared their criteria or process on-line. The majority of respondents reported discussing physical activity, and over half lead physical activities. Most favored on-line professional development training and a one-stop website for sharing information and resources. Evaluation data were most commonly collected for food safety, healthy eating and physical activity, and food resource management. © by Extension Journal, Inc.


Oberholtzer L.,Pennsylvania State University | Hanson J.C.,University of Maryland College Park | Brust G.,University of Maryland Extension | Dimitri C.,New York University | Richman N.,Brightseed Strategies
Journal of Extension | Year: 2012

This article describes results from a study examining the supply chain for local foods in Maryland school meals, the barriers and opportunities for increasing local foods in schools, and the development of Extension efforts to meet the needs identified. Interviews and surveys were administered with stakeholders, including farmers and food service directors. The results suggest that outreach regarding public schools should focus on the farm level, while efforts for private schools should focus on both the schools and the farm level and facilitating networking between the two. © by Extension Journal, Inc.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Travis Hutchison of Cordova, Md., has been elected chairman of the Maryland Soybean Board. Hutchison succeeds William Layton, who has retired from the statewide board after reaching the term limits. Brian Johnson of Westover was elected vice chairman and Danny Saathoff of Denton was elected treasurer at the board’s August meeting. The directors officially assumed their duties Oct. 1. Ten farmer-directors volunteer their time on the Maryland Soybean Board, which administers soybean checkoff funds for soybean research, marketing and education programs in the state. Hutchison, Johnson and Saathoff are joined by Alan Hudson of Berlin, Randy Stabler of Brookeville, Linda Burrier of Union Bridge, Joshua Appenzeller of Millington, Bill Langenfelder of Worton, Jeffrey Griffith of Lothian and Jason Spicer of Church Creek. April Cheesman of Perdue Farms, Inc.; Jim Lewis of the University of Maryland Extension Service and Mark Powell of the Maryland Department of Agriculture serve as ex-officio members. In Maryland, farmers grow about a half a million acres of soybeans, producing more than 20 million bushels of beans each year. With a value of $173 million to the state’s economy, soybeans are one of Maryland’s top crops. For more information on the Maryland Soybean Board, visit http://www.mdsoy.com. About Maryland Soybean Board: The Maryland Soybean Board administers soybean checkoff funds for soybean research, marketing and education programs in the state. One-half of the checkoff funds stay in Maryland for programs; the other half is sent to the United Soybean Board. To learn more about the Maryland Soybean Board, visit http://www.mdsoy.com.

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