Fredericksburg, VA, United States
Fredericksburg, VA, United States

The University of Mary Washington is a public university in Virginia that focuses on undergraduate education in the liberal arts. The core of its main campus of roughly 4,000 mostly residential students in Fredericksburg, Virginia is the College of Arts and science, which offers degrees in various liberal arts disciplines. A College of Education and a College of Business offer advanced degrees. Around 450 students are enrolled in the University's graduate programs. Wikipedia.


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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has determined its list of Virginia’s best colleges and universities for 2017. Of the four-year schools that were analyzed, 40 made the list, with University of Richmond, University of Virginia, Virginia Military Institute, Washington and Lee University and Hampton University ranked as the top five. Of the 23 two-year schools that were also included, Tidewater Community College, Lord Fairfax Community College, Southwest Virginia Community College, Danville Community College and Central Virginia Community College were the top five. A full list of schools is included below. “Virginia’s unemployment rate recently reached its lowest point since before the Great Recession, which is great news for career-minded students,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.org. “The schools on our list have shown that they offer the educational experience and resources that leave their students career-ready.” To be included on the “Best Colleges in Virginia” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also scored on additional data that includes employment and academic resources, annual alumni earnings 10 years after entering college, opportunities for financial aid and such additional statistics as student/teacher ratios and graduation rates. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Virginia” list, visit: Best Four-Year Colleges in Virginia for 2017 include: Averett University Bluefield College Bridgewater College Christopher Newport University College of William and Mary Eastern Mennonite University Emory & Henry College Ferrum College George Mason University Hampden-Sydney College Hampton University Hollins University James Madison University Jefferson College of Health Sciences Liberty University Longwood University Lynchburg College Mary Baldwin College Marymount University Norfolk State University Old Dominion University Radford University Randolph College Randolph-Macon College Regent University Roanoke College Shenandoah University Southern Virginia University Sweet Briar College The University of Virginia's College at Wise University of Mary Washington University of Richmond University of Virginia-Main Campus Virginia Commonwealth University Virginia Military Institute Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Virginia State University Virginia Union University Virginia Wesleyan College Washington and Lee University Best Two-Year Colleges in Virginia for 2017 include: Blue Ridge Community College Central Virginia Community College Dabney S Lancaster Community College Danville Community College Eastern Shore Community College Germanna Community College John Tyler Community College Lord Fairfax Community College Mountain Empire Community College New River Community College Northern Virginia Community College Patrick Henry Community College Paul D Camp Community College Piedmont Virginia Community College Rappahannock Community College Reynolds Community College Southside Virginia Community College Southwest Virginia Community College Thomas Nelson Community College Tidewater Community College Virginia Highlands Community College Virginia Western Community College Wytheville Community College About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


CPR Provides Fast, Affordable Repairs for Phones, Tablets, Laptops and Game Consoles INDEPENDENCE, OH / ACCESSWIRE / May 5, 2017 / CPR Cell Phone Repair, the largest and fastest growing retail mobile device repair franchise network in North America, is pleased to announce the opening of a new store in Fredericksburg, VA. CPR Cell Phone Repair welcomes Gary Thibodeaux to the network and congratulates him on the opening of his new store. To learn more about CPR Cell Phone Repair Fredericksburg, please visit: https://www.cellphonerepair.com/fredericksburg-va/. Josh Sevick, CPR's President stated, "We are delighted to welcome Gary Thibodeaux, a 27 year United States military veteran, to the CPR family. We know that Gary will do an excellent job of delivering top quality repairs and service to customers in the Fredericksburg community." Located just 47 miles south of Washington, D.C., Fredericksburg is one of the most popular cities in Northern Virginia. Fredericksburg is rich in Civil War history and continues to draw at least 1.5 million visitors to the area's battlefield parks, museums, and historic sites. Fredericksburg is also a desirable commuter town with easy bus and rail transportation for both Richmond and Washington, D.C. The largest local employers are GEICO and the University of Mary Washington. Fredericksburg is also closely located to 4 large military bases and has a large military family population. "After 27 years of military service, I am really happy about starting my next career with CPR Cell Phone Repair. I think our store's location is a good choice for our customers with easy access and parking, plus proximity to popular restaurants, stores, and services. I look forward to serving the community where my family and I have lived for many years," added franchisee, Gary Thibodeaux. Please call 540-412-9245 or contact [email protected] to learn more about the store's full range of electronic device repair services. Founded in Orlando, Fla. in 1996, CPR Cell Phone Repair is the fastest growing wireless technology franchise in North America and operates over 300 locations internationally. As a pioneer and leader in the electronics repair industry, CPR offers same-day repair and refurbishing services for cell phones, laptops, gaming systems, digital music players, tablets, and other personal electronic devices. In both 2016 and 2017, CPR was named in Entrepreneur Magazine's Franchise 500 List. In 2017, CPR was ranked in the top 100 tier of the List and was ranked #1 in the electronic repairs category. For more information about CPR Cell Phone Repair and franchise opportunities, visit http://www.cellphonerepair.com/ or call 877-856-5101.


Josh Sevick, CPR's President stated, "We are delighted to welcome Gary Thibodeaux, a 27 year United States military veteran, to the CPR family. We know that Gary will do an excellent job of delivering top quality repairs and service to customers in the Fredericksburg community." Located just 47 miles south of Washington, D.C., Fredericksburg is one of the most popular cities in Northern Virginia. Fredericksburg is rich in Civil War history and continues to draw at least 1.5 million visitors to the area's battlefield parks, museums, and historic sites. Fredericksburg is also a desirable commuter town with easy bus and rail transportation for both Richmond and Washington, D.C. The largest local employers are GEICO and the University of Mary Washington. Fredericksburg is also closely located to 4 large military bases and has a large military family population. "After 27 years of military service, I am really happy about starting my next career with CPR Cell Phone Repair. I think our store's location is a good choice for our customers with easy access and parking, plus proximity to popular restaurants, stores, and services. I look forward to serving the community where my family and I have lived for many years," added franchisee, Gary Thibodeaux. Please call 540-412-9245 or contact tech@cpr-fredericksburg.com to learn more about the store's full range of electronic device repair services. Founded in Orlando, Fla. in 1996, CPR Cell Phone Repair is the fastest growing wireless technology franchise in North America and operates over 300 locations internationally. As a pioneer and leader in the electronics repair industry, CPR offers same-day repair and refurbishing services for cell phones, laptops, gaming systems, digital music players, tablets, and other personal electronic devices. In both 2016 and 2017, CPR was named in Entrepreneur Magazine's Franchise 500 List. In 2017, CPR was ranked in the top 100 tier of the List and was ranked #1 in the electronic repairs category. For more information about CPR Cell Phone Repair and franchise opportunities, visit http://www.cellphonerepair.com/ or call 877-856-5101.


John Kent Kidwell, Owner & Managing Partner, Law Offices of Kidwell & Kent, has joined The Expert Network©, an invitation-only service for distinguished professionals. Mr. Kidwell has been chosen as a Distinguished Lawyer™ based on peer reviews and ratings, dozens of recognitions, and accomplishments achieved throughout his career. Mr. Kidwell outshines others in his field due to his extensive educational background, numerous awards and recognitions, and career longevity. After studying political science as an undergrad at the University of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg, Virginia, Mr. Kidwell headed straight to Arlington for law school. He graduated from George Mason University School of Law in 2005 and joined his father’s firm as an associate attorney shortly after. In 2016, Mr. Kidwell was pier-nominated and certified by the Heritage Foundation as one of the Top Attorneys in North America. Throughout his career, Mr. Kidwell has shown an inspirational dedication to charity and community, earning him many Awards and Professional Appointments. Throughout his career, Mr. Kidwell has shown an inspirational dedication to charity and community, earning him many Awards and Professional Appointments. With nearly 15 years of experience representing clients throughout Northern Virginia, Maryland, and the Washington, D.C. metro area, Mr. Kidwell brings a wealth of knowledge to his industry and, in particular, to his areas of specialization, small business representation, estate planning, and real estate transactions. With offices in both Fairfax, Virginia, and Rockville, Maryland, Mr. Kidwell and his team offer a wide range of legal services relating to Real Estate, Wills, Trusts and Estate Planning, Business & Corporate Law, Personal Injury and Tort Law, Civil Litigation, Traffic Defense, and Family and Domestic Relations Law. Today, Mr. Kidwell operates the firm in his father’s memory and oversees a team of assertive attorneys and paralegals who utilize their in-depth legal knowledge and industry experience to tackle problems in an industry recognized, efficient manner. Built on the foundation of empathy, trust, and diligence, Kidwell & Kent provides clients with competent, experienced counsel to help them succeed. In 2013, Mr. Kidwell was recognized by the Heritage Registry as a pillar of the community, due both to his work as an attorney as well as his continued dedication to local charitable organizations. Mr. Kidwell is the former President and Founder of a 501(c)(3) charity; Alternative Fuels for America, and he regularly holds free seminars throughout the region. Mr. Kidwell is also a published author, with multiple books available on Amazon, and periodical columns published in Local Newspapers throughout Northern Virginia. With a bright future ahead of him, Mr. Kidwell looks forward to continuing his family’s at Kidwell & Kent, a legacy founded on the professional counseling and general helping of others. For more information, visit Mr. Kidwell's profile on The Expert Network© here: https://expertnetwork.co/members/john-kent-kidwell/22e7e3e013fcdbab The Expert Network© has written this news release with approval and/or contributions from John Kent Kidwell. The Expert Network© is an invitation-only reputation management service that is dedicated to helping professionals stand out, network, and gain a competitive edge. The Expert Network© selects a limited number of professionals based on their individual recognitions and history of personal excellence.


Davies S.,University of Mary Washington
Communications of the ACM | Year: 2011

What would it take for a true personal knowledge base to generate the benefits envisioned by Vannevar Bush? © 2011 ACM.


The natural lifetimes of triplet dissolved organic matter ( 3DOM*) were determined by an O 2 saturation kinetics study of singlet oxygen quantum yields (Φ 1O2) in buffered D 2O. At least two distinct 3DOM* pools are present, and the observed lifetime range (∼20 to 80 μs) leads to a dependence of Φ 1O2 on O 2 concentrations between 29 and 290 μM. Thus, steady-state 1O 2 concentrations will depend on [O 2] in natural waters. The lifetimes are essentially identical for DOM samples of different origins and do not vary with excitation wavelength. However, Φ 1O2 varies greatly between samples and decreases with excitation wavelength. These data strongly suggest that 3DOM* quantum yields decrease with excitation wavelength, which gives rise to the Φ 1O2 variation. Borohydride reduction of several samples in both D 2O and H 2O lowers the absorbance and 1O 2 production rates, but it does not alter Φ 1O2. This is consistent with a model in which 1O 2 sensitizing chromophores are borohydride reducible groups in DOM, such as aromatic ketones. Interpreted in the framework of a charge transfer (CT) model for DOM optical properties, the collective data suggest a model in which electron acceptor moieties are important 1O 2 sensitizers and where CT interactions of these moieties disrupt their ability to produce 1O 2. © 2012 American Chemical Society.


Rouhani F.,University of Mary Washington
Antipode | Year: 2012

In recent years, human geographers have criticized the increasing corporatization, commodification, and objectification of knowledge production, and have looked to critical pedagogical frameworks that seek to counteract these forces. Anarchism, as a body of theories and practices, has a long history of engagement with radical pedagogical experimentation. Anarchism and geography have much to contribute to one another: anarchism, through its support for creative, non-coercive, practical learning spaces, and geography, for its critical examination of the spaces of education. In this paper, I evaluate the prospects for anarchist-geographic pedagogies theoretically, as well as through my own experiences teaching and learning about anarchism over the past decade in a liberal arts, higher education US environment. I argue for a combined critical anarchist-geographic pedagogical approach that appreciates the challenges of building alternative learning models within existing neoliberalizing institutions, provides the necessary tools for finding uniquely situated opportunities for educational change, and emplaces a grounded, liberating, student-led critical pedagogy. © 2012 The Author. Antipode © 2012 Antipode Foundation Ltd..


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 444.06K | Year: 2011

In this project, the University of Mary Washington (UMW) is completing a series of initiatives to recruit and retain STEM majors, particularly students who are members of groups that are traditionally under-represented in the STEM disciplines. The suite of activities in this Type 1A project provides pathways to success in the STEM disciplines by (1) enhancing an existing summer bridge program with a revised pre-calculus course and a new interdisciplinary science research course to better prepare students for STEM disciplines, (2) adding new undergraduate research experiences, particularly for first and second year students, including peer mentoring by upper-level STEM majors and early-engagement training for faculty through workshops, (3) creating a new STEM outreach program for high school students that provides opportunities to engage in research and other activities with faculty and undergraduate student research teams, (4) creating a STEM learning community by implementing a supplemental instruction program, (5) establishing a STEM diversity scholarship program to attract qualified, culturally diverse students to UMW, and (6) creating a new STEM colloquium for faculty and students to share their research with a larger STEM community.

A goal of the STEREPS project is that the University of Mary Washington will graduate an additional 20 STEM majors per year by years 3-5 of the project, with approximately 5 of these STEM majors from under-represented groups each year. The project provides an environment for improved collaboration and dissemination across the STEM disciplines at UMW, an increase in the number and diversity of STEM graduates entering the regions STEM workforce, and the dissemination of scientific and pedagogical results at regional and national conferences.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY | Award Amount: 106.76K | Year: 2013

More than 400,000 tons of petroleum hydrocarbons are released annually into the ocean, where they are subject to physical, chemical and biological processes, known as weathering, that are known to remove select hydrocarbons from the ocean. However, little attention has been given to the residues left by the weathering of oil, and studies indicate that oxygenation of these hydrocarbons can play a part in the formation of recalcitrant tar and toxic compounds. To address this gap, researchers from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, University of Mary Washington, and University of California Santa Barbara will conduct research to lay a scientific foundation for understanding 1) which processes control the formation of oxygenated hydrocarbons, 2) the rates of these processes, 3) the identity of the major products, 4) the rates at which they are formed and destroyed, and 5) for distinguishing photochemical oxygenation from biological oxygenation. The results from these experiments will contribute to a better understanding of the petroleum oxygenation processes and the environmental fate of understudied oxygenation products.

Broader Impacts: This study will provide for several undergraduates and two postdoctoral scholars to be trained in innovative analytical and experimental techniques. The results of this effort will help regulatory agencies to define new analytical methods and target compounds for oil spill research, and will add to our understanding regarding the fate and impacts of hydrocarbons released into the ocean.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING | Award Amount: 31.20K | Year: 2011

PIs: Allison MacKay / Yu-Ping Chin / Charles Sharpless
Proposal Numbers: 1133600 / 1133094 / 1132207

Evaluating the impacts of human pharmaceutical compounds in the environment is a daunting task, given the wide variety of chemicals administered for medical conditions and the various wastewater management schemes that facilitate their release to aquatic systems. Prior studies suggest photodegradation reactions to be important attenuation processes for pharmaceutical compounds in the environment. The susceptibility of pharmaceuticals to photochemical reactions will be impacted by the co-release of these compounds with effluent organic matter (EfOM). EfOM is expected to have differing photoreactivity, relative to well-studied natural organic matter (NOM) sources, presumably because of its anticipated lower aromatic content and lower color, compared to NOM.
The PIs hypothesize that pharmaceutical compound photodegradation will be altered with increasing proportion of wastewater effluent in natural channel flow because of the increased presence of EfOM, relative to NOM. The ultimate goal of the proposed research is to identify key environmental system characteristics that are associated with enhanced environmental photodegradation rates of pharmaceutical compounds. They propose three major research activities to evaluate their hypothesis. (1): Field measurements of environmental degradation rates and pathways will be obtained for representative wastewater discharge scenarios ? forested New England watershed (Pomperaug River, CT), agricultural Midwestern watershed (East Fork of the Little Miami River, OH), and an urban stream with combined sewer outfalls (Park River, CT). Flow-adjusted samples will be obtained downstream of the effluent discharge to measure pseudo-first order environmental degradation rates with differing seasonal EfOM-to-NOM ratios. Photolysis losses will be differentiated from other losses by comparing daytime and nighttime observations. Supporting lab degradation studies will resolve contributions of organic matter (OM) type to photochemical pathways. (2): OM will be isolated from the field sites, including from effluent streams directly. Isolation methods of XAD-8 resin and tangential flow ultrafiltration will be used for consistency with geochemistry methods. Isolates will be characterized for their biochemical constituents (thermochemolysis), and for optical and structural properties (UV-Vis, fluorescence, solid-state 13C NMR). (3): Quantum yields of singlet oxygen, hydrogen peroxide and excited triplet-state OM will be obtained for OM isolates and correlated to OM characteristics (Task 2). Together, the results of Tasks 2 and 3 will yield critical insights for interpreting differences in photodegradation rate constants (Task 1) among the sites and within seasons, as effluent contributions change at each site.
This study will be the first to examine the fate of pharmaceutical compounds in New England and Midwestern rivers, expanding on prior fate studies from arid systems. They will establish an important body of knowledge about environmental system drivers of pharmaceutical compound fates that will contribute to robust science-based decisions about regulation, remediation, and/or ?green? design for pharmaceutical compounds. They will work closely with the Pomperaug River Watershed Coalition and the East Fork Watershed Cooperative to engage citizens in cutting-edge science through semi-annual project progress presentations, to involve water managers and community members in water quality sampling, and to organize a cross-disciplinary Roundtable to bring together environmental scientists and engineers, regulators, with ecologists and pharmacologists to discuss environmental management of pharmaceutical compounds in the environment.
The PIs will mentor graduate and undergraduate researchers through the process of scientific discovery ? experimental design, manuscript preparation and national professional society presentations. The PIs will continue their record of engaging student researchers from groups underrepresented in the sciences and engineering. Students will have a unique opportunity to work with a guiding PI team with expertise in engineering (PI MacKay), geochemistry (PI Chin), photochemistry (PI Sharpless) and systems ecology (Collaborator Nietch), providing broad context for their own projects.

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