Bismarck, ND, United States
Bismarck, ND, United States

The University of Mary is a four year Catholic university near Bismarck, North Dakota.The university is the largest degree granting institution in Bismarck. It has campuses in Rome and Peru, and also operates academic programs at satellite locations in North Dakota , Minnesota, Montana, Wyoming, Kansas, Missouri, and Arizona. It is endorsed by The Newman Guide to Choosing a Catholic College. Wikipedia.


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News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Women who participate in obstetric and gynaecology clinical trials experience improved health outcomes compared to those who are not involved in trials, according to research by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). This is the case regardless of whether or not the treatment is found to be effective in the trial. The review of 21 studies* included 20,160 women, and found that participants had 25 per cent better odds of improved health outcomes**, compared with non-participants. The researchers hope the results may lead to more clinicians offering trials to their patients and more women volunteering for trials in a research area that currently faces many challenges. A clinical trial compares the effects of one treatment with another, and normally involves large numbers of volunteer patients in many centres. The results from trials help doctors understand how to treat a particular disease or condition, and are necessary to test the safety and efficacy of new treatments before they are brought into general use. Research on the effect of participation in trials has previously not consistently shown evidence of benefit. This may be because previous work has analysed data from all medical specialities grouped together which could include wide variations in the way care is given within and outside trials. The review, which focuses on pregnancy and reproductive health, is published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG) and is believed to be the first of its kind. It found that the beneficial effect of participating in a trial was largest when it was a high quality clinical trial, and when the trial tested an intervention that was unavailable outside of the trial. Lead researcher Professor Khalid Khan from QMUL said: "Clinical trials are often perceived as 'experiments', 'risky' or 'dangerous'. However, our findings challenge these misconceptions, and show not only that they are safe but that there is a significant benefit associated with participation, with overall 25 per cent chance of better health outcomes." "Interestingly, we also found that participants still experienced benefits irrespective of whether the treatment in the trial was found to be effective or not." Worldwide over 69 million babies are born annually (776,000 in the UK), but only a small proportion of pregnant women are entered into research studies. Pregnancy and reproductive health is an area with unique challenges, dealing with controversial topics (IVF, contraception, abortion), a lack of research funding (less than one per cent of UK government spend) and ethical/legal implications (studies involving pregnant women). As such, research results from general medicine often inform practise in pregnancy patients, which does not always lead to optimum medical care. Ngawai Moss was a participant of QMUL's EMPiRE trial - a study looking at how to control seizures in pregnant women with epilepsy. She said: "I'm very happy that I took part in a clinical trial and would do it all over again without hesitation. I would tell women who are considering whether to join a clinical trial, that the investment of their time is really quite minimal for the reward. "In my case, the trial was pretty straightforward and mainly involved monthly visits to fill in a questionnaire and have a blood test. It was reassuring to be able to see a medical professional on a regular basis, especially as I had a complicated pregnancy. It meant I had access to the team's medical insight, advice and support on general pregnancy-related issues." Professor Khalid Khan from QMUL added: "Women in general are often unrepresented in research, so we hope this may lead to a shift in attitudes and encourage more clinicians and women to be involved in trials. We also hope that patients recognise that research can be even safer than routine healthcare, due to the additional safeguards in place." The researchers say that it is important to remember that research can still be associated with risk, and it is the duty of researchers and clinicians to inform patients of the potential risk and benefit of engagement in research. QMUL's IBIS 3 Feasibility Study is currently looking to recruit post-menopausal breast cancer survivors. The clinical trial will test three types of medicines in 18 hospitals around the UK to find out the best way to prevent the late recurrence of breast cancer. More information on joining the trial is available on the website or by contacting ibis3help@qmul.ac.uk or 020 7882 3510. For more information, please contact: * Example trials analysed in the review included a trial on the use of heparin and aspirin for women with in vitro fertilization implantation failure, and a trial comparing the success of hormone releasing implants with copper-intrauterine devices as contraceptive methods. ** The review included maternal and neonatal health outcomes such as stillbirth, pre-eclampsia, pregnancy rates, Neural tube defect, spontaneous fetal death, treatment satisfaction, treatment acceptability, infant death, caesarean section rate, successful surgery, severe bleeding (abortion), and fetal outcomes. Research paper: 'Participation in clinical trials improves outcomes in women's health: A systematic review and meta-analysis'. Simrit K. Nijjar, Maria I. D'Amico, Noshali A. Wimalaweera, Natalie A.M. Cooper, Javier Zamora, Khalid S. Khan. BJOG 2017. DOI: 10.1111/1471-0528.14528. Once published, the article can be found here: http://onlinelibrary. Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) is one of the UK's leading universities, and one of the largest institutions in the University of London, with 21,187 students from more than 155 countries. A member of the Russell Group, we work across the humanities and social sciences, medicine and dentistry, and science and engineering, with inspirational teaching directly informed by our research. In the most recent national assessment of the quality of research, we were placed ninth in the UK (REF 2014). As well as our main site at Mile End - which is home to one of the largest self-contained residential campuses in London - we have campuses at Whitechapel, Charterhouse Square, and West Smithfield dedicated to the study of medicine, and a base for legal studies at Lincoln's Inn Fields. We have a rich history in London with roots in Europe's first public hospital, St Barts; England's first medical school, The London; one of the first colleges to provide higher education to women, Westfield College; and the Victorian philanthropic project, the People's Palace at Mile End. Today, as well as retaining these close connections to our local community, we are known for our international collaborations in both teaching and research. QMUL has an annual turnover of £350m, a research income worth £125m (2014/15), and generates employment and output worth £700m to the UK economy each year.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Vitamin D supplements protect against acute respiratory infections including colds and flu, according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) Vitamin D supplements protect against acute respiratory infections including colds and flu, according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). The study provides the most robust evidence yet that vitamin D has benefits beyond bone and muscle health, and could have major implications for public health policy, including the fortification of foods with vitamin D to tackle high levels of deficiency in the UK. The results, published in the BMJ, are based on a new analysis of raw data from around 11,000 participants in 25 clinical trials conducted in 14 countries including the UK, USA, Japan, India, Afghanistan, Belgium, Italy, Australia and Canada. Individually, these trials yielded conflicting results, with some reporting that vitamin D protected against respiratory infections, and others showing no effect. Lead researcher Professor Adrian Martineau from QMUL said: "This major collaborative research effort has yielded the first definitive evidence that vitamin D really does protect against respiratory infections. Our analysis of pooled raw data from each of the 10,933 trial participants allowed us to address the thorny question of why vitamin D 'worked' in some trials, but not in others. "The bottom line is that the protective effects of vitamin D supplementation are strongest in those who have the lowest vitamin D levels, and when supplementation is given daily or weekly rather than in more widely spaced doses. "Vitamin D fortification of foods provides a steady, low-level intake of vitamin D that has virtually eliminated profound vitamin D deficiency in several countries. By demonstrating this new benefit of vitamin D, our study strengthens the case for introducing food fortification to improve vitamin D levels in countries such as the UK where profound vitamin D deficiency is common." Vitamin D - the 'sunshine vitamin' - is thought to protect against respiratory infections by boosting levels of antimicrobial peptides - natural antibiotic-like substances - in the lungs. Results of the study fit with the observation that colds and 'flu are commonest in winter and spring, when levels of vitamin D are at their lowest. They may also explain why vitamin D protects against asthma attacks, which are commonly triggered by respiratory viruses. Daily or weekly supplementation halved the risk of acute respiratory infection in people with the lowest baseline vitamin D levels, below 25 nanomoles per litre (nmol/L). However, people with higher baseline vitamin D levels also benefited, although the effect was more modest (10 per cent risk reduction). Overall, the reduction in risk of acute respiratory infection induced by vitamin D was on a par with the protective effect of injectable 'flu vaccine against 'flu-like illnesses. Acute respiratory infections are a major cause of global morbidity and mortality. Upper respiratory infections such as colds and 'flu are the commonest reason for GP consultations and days off work. Acute lower respiratory infections such as pneumonia are less common, but caused an estimated 2.65 million deaths worldwide in 2013. Vitamin D supplementation is safe and inexpensive, so reductions in acute respiratory infections brought about by vitamin D supplementation could be highly cost-effective. The study was conducted by a consortium of 25 investigators from 21 institutions worldwide* and funded by the National Institute for Health Research. Joel Winston, Public Relations Manager (School of Medicine and Dentistry) Queen Mary University of London j.winston@qmul.ac.uk Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7943 / +44 (0)7970 096 188 * Institutions involved in the research: Edmond and Lily Safra Children's Hospital (Tel Hashomer, Israel), Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth (NH, USA), Harvard School of Public Health (Boston, MA, USA), Jikei University School of Medicine (Tokyo, Japan), Karolinska Institutet (Stockholm, Sweden), Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA, USA), McMaster University (Hamilton, Ontario, Canada), Medical University of Lodz (Poland), QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute (Queensland, Australia), Queen Mary University of London (UK), The Pennsylvania State University (Hershey, PA, USA), Università degli Studi di Milano (Milan, Italy), Universitair ziekenhuis Leuven (Belgium), University of Auckland (New Zealand), University of Birmingham (UK), University of Colorado School of Medicine (Aurora, CO, USA), University of Delhi (India), University of Otago (Christchurch, New Zealand), University of Tampere (Finland), University of Tasmania (Australia), Winthrop University Hospital (Mineola, NY, USA). Research paper: 'Vitamin D supplementation to prevent acute respiratory infections: systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data'. Martineau et al. BMJ 2017 Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) is one of the UK's leading universities, and one of the largest institutions in the University of London, with 23,120 students from more than 155 countries. A member of the Russell Group, we work across the humanities and social sciences, medicine and dentistry, and science and engineering, with inspirational teaching directly informed by our research. In the most recent national assessment of the quality of research, we were placed ninth in the UK (REF 2014). As well as our main site at Mile End - which is home to one of the largest self-contained residential campuses in London - we have campuses at Whitechapel, Charterhouse Square, and West Smithfield dedicated to the study of medicine, and a base for legal studies at Lincoln's Inn Fields. We have a rich history in London with roots in Europe's first public hospital, St Barts; England's first medical school, The London; one of the first colleges to provide higher education to women, Westfield College; and the Victorian philanthropic project, the People's Palace at Mile End. Today, as well as retaining these close connections to our local community, we are known for our international collaborations in both teaching and research. QMUL has an annual turnover of £350m, a research income worth £125m (2014/15), and generates employment and output worth £700m to the UK economy each year. The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is funded by the Department of Health to improve the health and wealth of the nation through research. The NIHR is the research arm of the NHS. Since its establishment in April 2006, the NIHR has transformed research in the NHS. It has increased the volume of applied health research for the benefit of patients and the public, driven faster translation of basic science discoveries into tangible benefits for patients and the economy, and developed and supported the people who conduct and contribute to applied health research. The NIHR plays a key role in the Government's strategy for economic growth, attracting investment by the life-sciences industries through its world-class infrastructure for health research. Together, the NIHR people, programmes, centres of excellence and systems represent the most integrated health research system in the world. For further information, visit the NIHR website (http://www. ).


News Article | December 20, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The NHS Health Check program in England may have prevented an estimated 4,600 to 8,400 heart attacks, strokes, or death from these causes in its first five years, according to an independent review of the programme led by Queen Mary University of London The NHS Health Check programme in England may have prevented an estimated 4,600 to 8,400 heart attacks, strokes, or death from these causes in its first five years, according to an independent review of the programme led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). The programme, which has in the past been considered 'controversial', led to an increase in diagnoses of 30 per cent for diabetes, 50 per cent for hypertension and 80 per cent for chronic kidney disease, and 40 per cent more statins were prescribed, but researchers say there is still room for improvement for treating those at higher risk. NHS Health Check started in 2009 and is the first programme in the world to tackle prevention of heart attacks and strokes by offering a free check to every adult aged 40-74 years. The scheme offers professional advice on lifestyle changes and treatments, including statins, to reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke. This study, published in the British Journal of General Practice, looked at the first five years of the NHS Health Check programme in three London areas (City & Hackney, Tower Hamlets and Newham) and found that: The introduction of this scheme was controversial, say study authors. Statins received adverse publicity and the programme's effectiveness was contested. This was largely based on a review of 16 trials of health checks, of which 12 were conducted before 1994 when neither statins nor modern antihypertensive drugs were in use. Study lead Dr John Robson from QMUL said: "Those who attended NHS Health Checks were substantially more likely to be found with a diagnosis of a new disease, including hypertension, diabetes and chronic kidney disease. We saw a 30 to 80 per cent increase in the number of disease cases found, compared to those who did not attend, and 40 per cent more people were prescribed statins, so these are very substantial gains in public health terms. "If you compare attendance levels with other programmes, such as the bowel screening programme, the coverage here is much better, so one would hope that would translate into earlier opportunities for greater protection for those people. However, there is still room for improvement for NHS Health Checks, especially in terms of ensuring even better treatments for those at higher risk." The study was funded by the Department of Health, but independently conducted. Joel Winston Public Relations Manager (School of Medicine and Dentistry) Queen Mary University of London j.winston@qmul.ac.uk Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7943 / +44 (0)7970 096 188 Research paper: 'NHS Health Check comorbidity and management: an observational matched study in primary care'. John Robson, Isabel Dostal, Vichithranie Madurasinghe, Aziz Sheikh, Sally Hull, Kambiz Boomla, Chris Griffiths and Sandra Eldridge. British Journal of General Practice. Paper will appear online here after embargo lifts: http://bjgp. Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) is one of the UK's leading universities, and one of the largest institutions in the University of London, with 21,187 students from more than 155 countries. A member of the Russell Group, we work across the humanities and social sciences, medicine and dentistry, and science and engineering, with inspirational teaching directly informed by our research. In the most recent national assessment of the quality of research, we were placed ninth in the UK (REF 2014). As well as our main site at Mile End - which is home to one of the largest self-contained residential campuses in London - we have campuses at Whitechapel, Charterhouse Square, and West Smithfield dedicated to the study of medicine, and a base for legal studies at Lincoln's Inn Fields. We have a rich history in London with roots in Europe's first public hospital, St Barts; England's first medical school, The London; one of the first colleges to provide higher education to women, Westfield College; and the Victorian philanthropic project, the People's Palace at Mile End. Today, as well as retaining these close connections to our local community, we are known for our international collaborations in both teaching and research. QMUL has an annual turnover of £350m, a research income worth £125m (2014/15), and generates employment and output worth £700m to the UK economy each year.


The International Nurses Association is pleased to welcome Wendy Bryant, RN, to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare. Wendy Bryant is a Registered Nurse with 11 years of experience in her field and an extensive expertise in all facets of nursing, especially medical/surgical nursing. Wendy is currently serving patients as a Charge Nurse within Navarro Regional Hospital in Corsicana, Texas. Wendy Bryant attended the University of Mary Hardin Baylor in Belton, Texas, graduating with her Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing in 2005. An advocate for continuing education, Wendy is currently pursuing her Master of Science Degree in Nursing with a Family Nurse Practitioner concentration at Kaplan University. She holds additional certifications in Advanced Cardiac Life Support, Basic Life Support, Pediatric Advanced Life Support, and is also EKG and Telemetry Certified. To keep up to date with the latest advances and developments in nursing, Wendy maintains a professional membership with the American Nurses Association. Throughout her career, Wendy has worked in many areas of the nursing field, including pediatrics, geriatrics, home health care, and in hospital settings. She attributes her success to her mother, who has always been a strong influence in her life. When she is not assisting her patients, Wendy enjoys running marathons. Learn more about Wendy Bryant here: http://inanurse.org/network/index.php?do=/4135237/info/ and be sure to read her upcoming publication in Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare.


News Article | December 12, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Treating a type of white blood cell using hormones could improve the development of the placenta in women with pregnancy complications, according to early research led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) involving mice and human blood samples Treating a type of white blood cell using hormones could improve the development of the placenta in women with pregnancy complications, according to early research led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) involving mice and human blood samples. Pre-eclampsia is a condition in some pregnant women that results in poor maternal blood vessel development in the placenta, leading to poor foetal growth. According to the World Health Organization, it is one of the leading causes of maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality in both the developed and developing world, occurring in 2-8 per cent of all pregnancies. The study, funded by the Wellcome Trust and British Heart Foundation and published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, looked specifically at neutrophils - short-lived white blood cells that act as the first line of defence in infections - and discovered a new role for them in maintaining a healthy pregnancy. The researchers studied and compared the blood from healthy and pre-eclamptic pregnant women. In the healthy women's blood, they saw that neutrophils interacted with T-cells - another type of white blood cell essential for the immune system. In contrast with the healthy pregnancies, the neutrophils failed to interact with the T-cells in the blood from pre-eclamptic women. The authors suggest that there are signs that, in healthy pregnancies, neutrophils play a role in helping the T-cells to promote blood vessel growth and give rise to normal placental development, suggesting that this could be a potential therapeutic target for pregnancy complications. In tests outside of the human body, the team treated the neutrophils from pre-eclamptic women with pregnancy hormones progesterone and estriol, and found that they were able to begin normal interactions with their T-cells. Further tests in pregnant mice with pre-eclampsia found that if neutrophils underwent the same hormone treatment, and were re-infused into the mouse, placental development began to return to normal. Study author Dr Suchita Nadkarni from QMUL said: "Although we're a long way off and need to confirm these results in a much larger cohort of patients, this could eventually form part of therapy for pregnancy complications. If we could replicate in humans what we've done in mice, and re-introduce the treated neutrophils back into their blood, we may see normal placental development in pregnant women diagnosed with pre-eclampsia. "In the meantime, however, these results give us a much better insight into how the maternal immune system works during pregnancy, and why in some cases it might not work and lead to complications." The study was co-authored by researchers at University of São Paulo, University of Cambridge and University College London Hospitals. Research paper: 'Neutrophils induce pro-angiogenic T cells with a regulatory phenotype in pregnancy'. Suchita Nadkarni; Joanne Smith; Amanda Sferruzzi-Perri, Agata Ledwozyw, Madhav Kishore, Robert Haas, Claudio Mauro, David Williams, Sandra Farsky, Federica Marelli-Berg and Mauro Perretti. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 2016. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1611944114 Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) is one of the UK's leading universities, and one of the largest institutions in the University of London, with 21,187 students from more than 155 countries. A member of the Russell Group, we work across the humanities and social sciences, medicine and dentistry, and science and engineering, with inspirational teaching directly informed by our research. In the most recent national assessment of the quality of research, we were placed ninth in the UK (REF 2014). As well as our main site at Mile End - which is home to one of the largest self-contained residential campuses in London - we have campuses at Whitechapel, Charterhouse Square, and West Smithfield dedicated to the study of medicine, and a base for legal studies at Lincoln's Inn Fields. We have a rich history in London with roots in Europe's first public hospital, St Barts; England's first medical school, The London; one of the first colleges to provide higher education to women, Westfield College; and the Victorian philanthropic project, the People's Palace at Mile End. Today, as well as retaining these close connections to our local community, we are known for our international collaborations in both teaching and research. QMUL has an annual turnover of £350m, a research income worth £125m (2014/15), and generates employment and output worth £700m to the UK economy each year.


Cole E.,University of Mary | Davenport R.,University of Mary | Willett K.,University of Oxford | Brohi K.,University of Mary
Annals of Surgery | Year: 2015

Objective: To characterize the relationship between tranexamic acid (TXA) use and patient outcomes in a severely injured civilian cohort, and to determine any differential effect between patients who presented with and without shock. Background: TXA has demonstrated survival benefits in trauma patients in an international randomized control trial and the military setting. The uptake of TXA into civilian major hemorrhage protocols (MHPs) has been variable. The evidence gap in mature civilian trauma systems is limiting the widespread use of TXA and its potential benefits on survival. Methods: Prospective cohort study of severely injured adult patients (Injury severity score∗gt; 15) admitted to a civilian trauma system during the adoption phase of TXA into the hospital's MHP. Outcomes measured were mortality, multiple organ failure (MOF), venous thromboembolism, infection, stroke, ventilator-free days (VFD), and length of stay. Results: Patients receiving TXA (n = 160, 42%) were more severely injured, shocked, and coagulopathic on arrival. TXA was not independently associated with any change in outcome for either the overall or nonshocked cohorts. In multivariate analysis, TXA was independently associated with a reduction in MOF [odds ratio (OR) = 0.27, confidence interval (CI): 0.10-0.73, P = 0.01] and was protective for adjusted all-cause mortality (OR = 0.16 CI: 0.03-0.86, P = 0.03) in shocked patients. Conclusions: TXA as part of a major hemorrhage protocol within a mature civilian trauma system provides outcome benefits specifically for severely injured shocked patients. Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


OBJECTIVES:: To describe the head growth of children according to maternal and child HIV infection status. DESIGN:: Longitudinal analysis of head circumference data from 13647 children followed from birth in the ZVITAMBO trial, undertaken in Harare, Zimbabwe between 1997–2001, prior to availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) or cotrimoxazole prophylaxis. METHODS:: Head circumference was measured at birth, then at regular intervals through 24 months of age. Mean head circumference-for-age Z-scores (HCZ) and prevalence of microcephaly (HCZ <-2) were compared between HIV-unexposed children, HIV-exposed uninfected children (HEU), and children infected with HIV in utero (IU), intrapartum (IP), and postnatally (PN). RESULTS:: Children infected with HIV in utero had head growth restriction at birth. Head circumference Z-scores remained low throughout follow-up in IP children, whilst they progressively declined in IU children. During the second year of life, HCZ in the PN group declined, reaching a similar mean as IP-infected children by 21 months of age. Microcephaly was more common among IU and IP children than HIV-uninfected children through 24-months. HEU children had significantly lower head circumferences than HIV-unexposed children through 12-months. CONCLUSIONS:: HIV-infected children had lower head circumferences and more microcephaly than HIV-uninfected children. Timing of HIV acquisition influenced HCZ, with those infected before birth having particularly poor head growth. HEU children had poorer head growth until 12 months of age. Correlations between head growth and neurodevelopment in the context of maternal/infant HIV infection, and further studies from the current ART era, will help determine the predictive value of routine head circumference measurement. Copyright © 2016 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.


Reglero-Real N.,University of Mary
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology | Year: 2016

Endothelial cells line the lumen of all blood vessels and play a critical role in maintaining the barrier function of the vasculature. Sealing of the vessel wall between adjacent endothelial cells is facilitated by interactions involving junctionally expressed transmembrane proteins, including tight junctional molecules, such as members of the junctional adhesion molecule family, components of adherence junctions, such as VE-Cadherin, and other molecules, such as platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule. Of importance, a growing body of evidence indicates that the expression of these molecules is regulated in a spatiotemporal manner during inflammation: responses that have significant implications for the barrier function of blood vessels against blood-borne macromolecules and transmigrating leukocytes. This review summarizes key aspects of our current understanding of the dynamics and mechanisms that regulate the expression of endothelial cells junctional molecules during inflammation and discusses the associated functional implications of such events in acute and chronic scenarios. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.


A comprehensive guided-inquiry approach was used in a combined organic and biochemistry course for prenursing and predietetics students rather than lecture. To assess its effectiveness, exam grades and final course grades of students in three instructional techniques were compared. The three groups were the following: (i) lecture only, (ii) lecture for the biochemistry portion and guided inquiry for the organic material, and (iii) all guided inquiry, all with the same instructor covering the same material and using the same style of assessments. When the final exam grades and the course grades of students were compared, guided-inquiry and partial guided-inquiry students had a statistically significant improvement in these grades over students taught by lecture only. This study demonstrates that guided inquiry is effective in nonscience majors' classes, for which content is often tailored to the audience. © 2014 The American Chemical Society and Division of Chemical Education, Inc.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: S-STEM:SCHLR SCI TECH ENG&MATH | Award Amount: 501.25K | Year: 2015

Over the past decade, the Bakken oil boom has had a significant impact on the western North Dakota economy and landscape, resulting in an increased need for wildlife conservationists and environmental scientists to study the energy industrys interactions with the environment. To address this need, The University of Marys Expanding Career Opportunities in Wildlife and Environmental Biology (ECOWEB) project will recruit and enroll 12 academically talented students with financial need in the UM biology programs wildlife conservation or environmental science track. The ECOWEB project will award scholarships ranging from $8,000 to $10,000 per year and enhance student support structures and connections to work-based, research, and graduate school opportunities, so as to ensure students obtain a bachelors degree and successfully transition to STEM employment or graduate school. The ECOWEB Project will have broad and significant impacts in the following ways: 1) enhancing collaborations between UM and other institutions by providing graduate school visits and collaborative research opportunities for S-STEM scholars; 2) enhancing the Biology Departments partnerships with regional biology-related industries and agencies by establishing internship opportunities and seminar events; 3) increasing the number and quality of research opportunities for biology students as well as opportunities to participate and present at professional conferences; 4) increasing the number of biology graduates from populations traditionally underrepresented in STEM; and 5) strategically disseminating evaluation findings within the UM community and to other postsecondary institutions and STEM professionals to advance knowledge and practice about student recruitment and support structures that increase retention to graduation and career preparation.

The ECOWEB project will accomplish three objectives that address local needs. Objective 1: Identify and recruit a diverse population of 12 academically talented students with financial need for the UM biology programs wildlife conservation or environmental science track. The recruitment plan includes digital and print marketing, local and regional high school recruitment, and Open House events that encourage students from groups traditionally underrepresented in STEM. Objective 2: Enhance student support structures to ensure wildlife conservation and environmental science students obtain a bachelors degree within four years. The project will employ strategies and support structures that increase student retention to graduation, enable students to complete their degree in four years, and prepare graduates for successful transition into the wildlife conservation and environmental science workforce or graduate programs. UM Biology Department faculty and student support administrators will collaboratively develop, implement, and assess an array of new and enhanced support services, including: a) an S-STEM cohort model that emphasizes an S-STEM identity and community learning, b) an S-STEM-specific First Year Experience course, c) faculty and peer mentorships, d) a monthly seminar series with industry experts and researchers working in wildlife conservation and environmental science fields, e) biology-related service-learning projects, f) summer research and internship opportunities, and g) student participation in national and regional professional conferences. Objective 3: Enable S-STEM scholars to secure employment in target fields or enter a biology graduate program within one year of graduation. The ECOWEB project will prepare scholars for the STEM workforce or graduate school by providing key support services and activities, including career counseling, GRE preparation, a seminar series, internship opportunities, and field trips to graduate programs. Assessment of the efficacy of these different activities will help contribute to expanding the knowledge base regarding the circumstances under which scholarship projects of this type are successful.

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