Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

University of Malaya

www.um.edu.my
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

The University of Malaya is a public research university located in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It is the oldest and most esteemed university in Malaysia. The university's name was abbreviated as Malaya during the pre-independence period.The university was founded in 1949 as a public-funded tertiary institution. Today, it has more than 2,500 faculty members. In 2012, UM was granted autonomy status by the Ministry of Higher Education.In 2014, the QS World University Rankings has ranked UM at the 151st place of the world. Wikipedia.


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CrowdReviews.com Partnered with Madridge Publishers to Announce The International Probiotics and Antimicrobial Proteins Conference The Probiotics-2017 conference includes the probiotics consumed in diverse ways including dairy product, food supplements and functional foods with specific health claims. Recently, many reports suggest that certain probiotic strains or multi strain mixture have potent immunomodulatory activity in diverse disorders including allergic asthma, atopic dermatitis and rheumatoid arthritis. The Probiotics-2017 conference includes Plenary lectures, Keynote lectures and short courses by eminent personalities from around the world in addition to contributed papers both oral and poster presentations. You can submit your work on these broad themes. Probiotics regulation and product development Industrial production and microbial fermentation Diet-host interaction and intestinal microbiome signaling Gut microbiome and microbiota Food and Dairy technology Probiotics in gastrointestinal interactions & disorders Probiotics and food borne diseases Immune support by probiotics Recombinant Probiotics Role of probiotics & prebiotics in human health Prospects of probiotics vision, opportunity and challenges Probiotics in veterinary medicine Probiotics in womens health Pediatric nutrition To submit your abstracts please see: Please mail us at: Probiotics-2017 Organizing Committee: · Cristina A. Fente, Professor, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Spain · Alejandra Cardelle Cobas, University de Santiago de Compostela, Spain · Giuseppe Moniello, Professor, University of Sassari, Italy · Iryna Sorokulova, Professor, Auburn University, USA · Francoise Le Vacon, Biofortis Merieux NutriSciences, France · Harsharn Gill , Director, RMIT University, Australia · Abdel Moneim El Hadi Sulieman, Professor, University of Hail, Saudi Arabia · Koshy Philip, University of Malaya, Malaysia · Amiza Mat Amin, Dean, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, Malaysia · H. SebnemTellioglu Harsa, Professor, Izmir Institute of Technology, Turkey · Mihriban Korukluoglu , Professor, Uludag University, Turkey · Zerrin Erginkaya, Professor, Cukurova University, Turkey · Canan Hecer, Professor, Near East University, Turkey · El-Refaie Kenawy, Professor, Tanta University, Egypt · D Nageswara Rao, Professor, AIIMS, India · Lorenzo Pastrana, Professor, International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Portugal · Nezha Mouane, Professor, Mohammed V University, Morocco Probiotics-2017 is organizing an outstanding Scientific Exhibition/Program and anticipates the world’s leading specialists involved in Probiotics Research. They welcome Sponsorship and Exhibitions from the Companies and Organizations who wish to showcase their products at this exciting event. Email us at: Register for the conference and book your slots at: Contact person: Parvin A probiotics@madridge.com probiotics@madridge.net Naples, FL, May 13, 2017 --( PR.com )-- The International Probiotics and Antimicrobial Proteins Conference is going to be held during November 6-8, 2017 at Barcelona, Spain.The Probiotics-2017 conference includes the probiotics consumed in diverse ways including dairy product, food supplements and functional foods with specific health claims. Recently, many reports suggest that certain probiotic strains or multi strain mixture have potent immunomodulatory activity in diverse disorders including allergic asthma, atopic dermatitis and rheumatoid arthritis.The Probiotics-2017 conference includes Plenary lectures, Keynote lectures and short courses by eminent personalities from around the world in addition to contributed papers both oral and poster presentations.You can submit your work on these broad themes.Probiotics regulation and product developmentIndustrial production and microbial fermentationDiet-host interaction and intestinal microbiome signalingGut microbiome and microbiotaFood and Dairy technologyProbiotics in gastrointestinal interactions & disordersProbiotics and food borne diseasesImmune support by probioticsRecombinant ProbioticsRole of probiotics & prebiotics in human healthProspects of probiotics vision, opportunity and challengesProbiotics in veterinary medicineProbiotics in womens healthPediatric nutritionTo submit your abstracts please see: http://probiotics.madridge.com/abstract-submission.php Please mail us at: probiotics@madridge.com Probiotics-2017 Organizing Committee:· Cristina A. Fente, Professor, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Spain· Alejandra Cardelle Cobas, University de Santiago de Compostela, Spain· Giuseppe Moniello, Professor, University of Sassari, Italy· Iryna Sorokulova, Professor, Auburn University, USA· Francoise Le Vacon, Biofortis Merieux NutriSciences, France· Harsharn Gill , Director, RMIT University, Australia· Abdel Moneim El Hadi Sulieman, Professor, University of Hail, Saudi Arabia· Koshy Philip, University of Malaya, Malaysia· Amiza Mat Amin, Dean, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, Malaysia· H. SebnemTellioglu Harsa, Professor, Izmir Institute of Technology, Turkey· Mihriban Korukluoglu , Professor, Uludag University, Turkey· Zerrin Erginkaya, Professor, Cukurova University, Turkey· Canan Hecer, Professor, Near East University, Turkey· El-Refaie Kenawy, Professor, Tanta University, Egypt· D Nageswara Rao, Professor, AIIMS, India· Lorenzo Pastrana, Professor, International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Portugal· Nezha Mouane, Professor, Mohammed V University, MoroccoProbiotics-2017 is organizing an outstanding Scientific Exhibition/Program and anticipates the world’s leading specialists involved in Probiotics Research. They welcome Sponsorship and Exhibitions from the Companies and Organizations who wish to showcase their products at this exciting event. Email us at: probiotics@madridge.net Register for the conference and book your slots at: http://probiotics.madridge.com/register.php Contact person:Parvin A


News Article | April 13, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Washington, DC, April 13, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- WASHINGTON, April 13 – The Association of Academic Health Centers (AAHC), in conjunction with its international subsidiary AAHCI, is pleased to announce the next phase of its groundbreaking Aligned Institutional Mission (AIM) Program, a means for academic health centers around the world to optimize and measure the alignment of their education, research, and patient care missions. “AAHC/AAHCI successfully completed the Development Phase of this innovative program and is ready to move forward with the pivotal Pilot Phase that will test and refine program elements to prepare AIM for a full global launch,” said Steven A. Wartman, MD, PhD, AAHC president and CEO. “The feedback we have received from the Development Phase institutions has been outstanding. This pioneering program assists academic health centers on an individualized basis to optimally align their mission components to help create learning health systems for the 21st century.” The Pilot Phase of the program includes seven sites: East Tennessee State (USA), Florida International University (USA), Semmelweis University (Hungary), University of Kansas (USA), University of Malaya (Malaysia), University of Sao Paulo (Brazil), and University of Queensland-Brisbane Diamantina Health Partners (Australia). Following the completion of the Pilot Phase, the association plans a full-scale roll-out to all members in 2018. The AIM program works closely with a distinguished group of consultants, all of whom have had extensive experience in leadership positions with academic health centers: “The AIM Program offers participating institutions a program tool for internal assessment and goal setting; a peer consultant review period; and peer consultant recommendations and strategic improvement planning,” said Wartman. “Participating in the AIM program offered UAMS a valuable opportunity to assess its programs specifically within the framework of how they align our institution with our stated health improvement mission,” said Dan Rahn, MD, chancellor of the University of Arkansas Medical School (an institution that participated in the Development Phase of the program), adding “[u]sing the AIM assessment tool and then hosting a constructive site visit connected all of those changes into a coherent story that illustrates how we moved from our strategic vision to reengineering how we deliver care, manage data, ensure sustainability, align education, research and patient care, and ultimately impact population health.” AAHC is a non-profit association dedicated to advancing health and well-being through the vigorous leadership of academic health centers. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/8bb6f932-b76b-43d3-9f00-a8a09bcea085


11 Subjects Rank in Top 50 and 52 in Top 100 as Malaysia Continues to Redesign its Higher Education System to Deliver Holistic Graduates KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, May 3, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Malaysia, ranked the 12th most preferred education destination in the world (UNESCO 2014), continues to improve its global rankings, strengthening its position as an international education hub of quality. "QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017 reveals 11 subjects across 4 universities in Malaysia are ranked within the world's top 50 while 52 subjects are in the world's top 100," said Mohd Yazid Abd Hamid, CEO of Education Malaysia Global Services (EMGS), a company of the Ministry of Higher Education responsible for the global promotion of Malaysia's higher education and international student services. University of Malaya (UM) leads the way with 5 subjects in top 50, achieving a remarkable 23rd in Electronic and Electrical Engineering, 26th in Developmental Studies, 33rd in Mechanical Engineering and 38th in Chemical Engineering. Taylor's University and Universiti Sains Malaysia rank 29th and 32nd respectively for Hospitality and Leisure Management. International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM) is 46th for Theology, Divinity, and Religious Studies. "Islamic Banking and Finance is also Malaysia's specialisation. INCEIF and IIUM contribute about 11% of the world's research and publications on Islamic Banking," Mohd Yazid added. Malaysia's network of 480 institutions offers over 6,000 programmes at pre-university, undergraduate and postgraduate levels. There are nine international branch campuses of leading British, Australian and Chinese universities in Malaysia with three ranking in world's top 100 -- Monash, Southampton and Nottingham. Studying at these universities in Malaysia translates into a minimum 30% savings on tuition fee when compared to its parent campus. "Costs remains a critical challenge in the global higher education landscape. Malaysia is a practical solution -- we provide quality education with lower tuition fees, lower cost of living which adds to a greater student experience. Kuala Lumpur, for the third consecutive year has been voted the Most Affordable City in the World for Students (QS Best Student Cities Survey 2016)," Mohd Yazid said. Many colleges in Malaysia offer twinning programmes and some offer joint degree programmes with reputable foreign partner universities, allowing students to study in two campuses across two countries and graduate with dual certification from both institutions or a certification from the foreign partner university. "The Higher Education Blueprint (2015-2025) outlines clear strategies in redesigning higher education in Malaysia, focussing on creating holistic graduates -- graduates with knowledge, practical, entrepreneurial, information management, problem-solving, communication and social skills, social responsibility, and strong ethics and values. "With its cultural, religious and geographical proximity, Malaysia is the ideal education destination for Pakistanis who seek quality higher education and a great student experience, especially ideal for postgraduate students -- you can have your dependents and family with you during your study here," Mohd Yazid said. Visit www.educationmalaysia.gov.my or email to enquiry@emgs.com.my for more information.


Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has emerged as a capable therapeutic modality for the treatment of cancer. PDT is a targeted cancer therapy that reportedly leads to tumor cell apoptosis and/or necrosis by facilitating the secretion of certain pro-inflammatory cytokines and expression of multiple apoptotic mediators in the tumor microenvironment. In addition, PDT also triggers oxidative stress that directs tumor cell killing and activation of inflammatory responses. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the role of PDT in facilitating tumor cell apoptosis remain ambiguous. Here, we investigated the ability of PDT in association with hypericin (HY) to induce tumor cell apoptosis by facilitating the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and secretion of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines in human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) cells. To discover if any apoptotic mediators were implicated in the enhancement of cell death of HY-PDT-treated tumor cells, selected gene profiling in response to HY-PDT treatment was implemented. Experimental results showed that interleukin (IL)-6 was significantly increased in all HY-PDT-treated cells, especially in 1 μg/ml HY-PDT, resulting in cell death. In addition, quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that the expression of apoptotic genes, such as BH3-interacting-domain death agonist (BID), cytochrome complex (CYT-C) and caspases (CASP3, 6, 7, 8 and 9) was remarkably higher in HY-PDT-treated HepG2 cells than the untreated HepG2 cells, entailing that tumor destruction of immune-mediated cell death occurs only in PDT-treated tumor cells. Hence, we showed that HY-PDT treatment induces apoptosis in HepG2 cells by facilitating cytotoxic ROS, and potentially recruits IL-6 and apoptosis mediators, providing additional hints for the existence of alternative mechanisms of anti-tumor immunity in hepatocellular carcinoma, which contribute to long-term suppression of tumor growth following PDT.


Saidur R.,University of Malaya
Energy Education Science and Technology Part A: Energy Science and Research | Year: 2010

Chillers consume a major share of total air conditioning energy use in commercial and industrial buildings for space conditioning to get thermal comfort for a country. In this paper, energy consumption by chillers has been estimated using data collected by walkthrough energy audit for Malaysian office buildings. It has been found that chillers use about 42,285MWh and 84,569MWh of electric energy for 50% and 100% loadings in an institutional buildings. As chillers are major energy users, energy savings measure such as use of energy efficient chillers and VSDs in chillers cooling load reductions have been applied to reduce their energy consumptions. It has been found that 90MWh-896MWh of energy can be saved for using energy efficient chillers for different percentage of loadings. Along with energy savings, US$57,314 as a bill savings can be achieved for high efficient chillers for 50% chillers loading. Study found that 35,975 MWh energy and US$2,302,431 bill can be saved for 60% of speed reductions using VSD. It was also found that payback periods for this energy saving option for chillers are economically viable. Along with energy savings, emission reductions and cost of avoided carbon associated with energy savings have been estimated and presented in this paper. © Sila Science.


A bibliographic review of the crystallographic literature has been conducted on gold(I) compounds bearing functional groups capable of forming conventional hydrogen bonding interactions, namely, primary amide, secondary amide and carboxylic acid. The clear majority of structures featured hydrogen bonding interactions leading to well defined zero- or one-dimensional supramolecular architectures; rarely were two-dimensional architectures formed. Conversely, aurophilic, Au⋯Au, were the exception rather than the rule. This observation is correlated with steric hindrance: small atoms associated via directional hydrogen bonding compared with encumbered gold-atom environments (due to bulky ligands). Amide-{⋯HNCO}2 and carboxylic acid-{⋯HOCO}2 synthons featured in significantly more of the gold(I) structures compared with all-organic systems, particularly for non-ionic structures where charged-assisted hydrogen bonding precluded the formation of these cyclic synthons. This suggests a crystal engineering strategy of functionalising metal complexes with hydrogen bonding potential to improve opportunities of rational design of crystal structures. © 2014.


Tiekink E.R.T.,University of Malaya
Chemical Communications | Year: 2014

In this Viewpoint, the impact of the paper published by Gautam R. Desiraju and Angelo Gavezzotti (J. Chem. Soc., Chem. Commun., 1989, 621) upon the development of Crystal Engineering, now recognised a key discipline in contemporary chemical/pharmaceutical/materials science, is discussed. © 2014 the Partner Organisations.


Tiekink E.R.T.,University of Malaya
Dalton Transactions | Year: 2012

Despite being disparaged for their malodorous and toxic demeanour, compounds of selenium, a bio-essential element, and tellurium, offer possibilities as therapeutic agents. Herein, their potential use as drugs, for example, as anti-viral, anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory agents, etc., will be surveyed along with a summary of the established biological functions of selenium. The natural biological functions of tellurium remain to be discovered. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Saidur R.,University of Malaya
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews | Year: 2010

The industrial sector is the largest users of energy around the world. Industrial motor uses a major fraction of total industrial energy uses. This paper describes a comprehensive literature review about electric motor energy analysis. This paper compiles latest literatures in terms of thesis (MS and PhD), journal articles, conference proceedings, web materials, reports, books, handbooks on electrical motor energy use, losses, efficiency, energy savings strategies. Different types of losses that occur in a motor have been identified and ways to overcome these losses explained. An energy audit that helps to identify motor energy wastages have been discussed extensively. As motors are the major energy users, different energy savings strategies such as use of high-efficient motor, variable speed drive (VSD), and capacitor bank to improve the power factor to reduce their energy uses have reviewed. Different policy measures (i.e. regulatory, voluntary and incentives based) to save motor energy use have been reviewed and presented in this paper. In this review, computer tools that can be used to analyze electric motors energy used has been discussed. Cost parameters to carry out economic analysis have been shown as well. Moreover, payback period for different energy savings strategies have been identified. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


The present invention disclosed a method to produce a slow release lipid nanoparticles comprising steps of determining a log P value of an active ingredient; mixing fatty acid, non-ionic surfactant and the active ingredient to form a mixture; melting the mixture; homogenizing the mixture to form a nanoemulsion; sonicating the homogenized nanoemulsion; and pouring the nanoemulsion into cold water to form the liquid nanoparticles. The lipid nanoparticles with active ingredient and the selected log P value has a prolong release property. In specific embodiment, the active ingredients are the chemical compound with the log P value selected from the range 0 to 4.0.

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