Luxembourg, Luxembourg
Luxembourg, Luxembourg

The University of Luxembourg is the only university in Luxembourg, founded on 13 August 2003. Prior to that, there were several higher educational institutions such as the cour universitaire or the IST that offered one or two years of academic studies. Luxembourgish students had to go abroad in order to complete their studies at a university . The new university makes it possible for these students to complete their studies in their own country, as well as attract foreign academic interest to Luxembourg.The University is currently divided into three Campuses, namely:Campus Limpertsberg hosting the Faculty of Law, Economics and Finance and parts of the Faculty of Science, Technology and Communication as well as the central administration units of the UniversityCampus Kirchberg hosting further parts of the Faculty of Science, Technology and CommunicationsCampus Walferdange hosting the Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and EducationBy the finalisation of the restructured campus in Esch-Belval, south of the capital, two of the three faculties will relocate there: The Faculty of Arts, Humanities, Arts and Education science will first do so in summer 2014, followed by the Faculty of science, Technology and Communication in 2015 and 2016. The Faculty of Law, Economics and Finance will remain on Campus Limpertsberg.Like Luxembourg itself, the studies at the University of Luxembourg are characterised by their multilingualism. Courses are usually held in two languages: FrenchGerman, or English/German. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: ICT-37-2016 | Award Amount: 2.56M | Year: 2017

Europe and China are at the forefront of technological advances in areas related to the Future Internet (especially 5G and IoT). While both parties share common technological objectives, there is still room for improvement in what concerns bilateral co-operation. As a result, the main purpose of EXCITING is to support the creation of favourable conditions for co-operation between the European and Chinese research and innovation ecosystems, mainly related to the key strategic domains of IoT and 5G. EXCITING will study the research and innovation ecosystem for IoT and 5G in China and compare it with the European model. EXCITING will identify and document the key international standards bodies for IoT and 5G, as well as other associations and fora where discussions take place and implementation decisions are made. Going beyond standardisation, interoperability testing is a key step towards market deployment. EXCITING will identify and document the key international InterOp events at which European and Chinese manufacturers can test and certify their IoT and 5G products. It will also explain the rules for engaging in these events. EXCITING will produce Best Practice guidelines for establishing and operating practical joint collaborations, in order to stimulate further such co-operations in the future on IoT and 5G Large Scale Pilots. As a result of the above investigations EXCITING will produce a roadmap showing how research and innovation ecosystems, policy, standardisation, interoperability testing and practical Large Scale Pilots should be addressed during the H2020 timeframe, and make recommendations for optimising collaboration between Europe and China for IoT and 5G.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: EINFRA-2-2014 | Award Amount: 13.13M | Year: 2015

OpenAIRE2020 represents a pivotal phase in the long-term effort to implement and strengthen the impact of the Open Access (OA) policies of the European Commission (EC), building on the achievements of the OpenAIRE projects. OpenAIRE2020 will expand and leverage its focus from (1) the agents and resources of scholarly communication to workflows and processes, (2) from publications to data, software, and other research outputs, and the links between them, and (3) strengthen the relationship of European OA infrastructures with other regions of the world, in particular Latin America and the U.S. Through these efforts OpenAIRE2020 will truly support and accelerate Open Science and Scholarship, of which Open Access is of fundamental importance. OpenAIRE2020 continues and extends OpenAIREs scholarly communication infrastructure to manage and monitor the outcomes of EC-funded research. It combines its substantial networking capacities and technical capabilities to deliver a robust infrastructure offering support for the Open Access policies in Horizon 2020, via a range of pan-European outreach activities and a suite of services for key stakeholders. It provides researcher support and services for the Open Data Pilot and investigates its legal ramifications. The project offers to national funders the ability to implement OpenAIRE services to monitor research output, whilst new impact measures for research are investigated. OpenAIRE2020 engages with innovative publishing and data initiatives via studies and pilots. By liaising with global infrastructures, it ensures international interoperability of repositories and their valuable OA contents. To ensure sustainability and long-term health for the overall OpenAIRE infrastructure, the proposed OpenAIRE2020 project will establish itself as a legal entity, which will manage the production-level responsibilities securing 24/7 reliability and continuity to all relevant user groups, data providers and other stakeholders.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC1-PM-01-2016 | Award Amount: 16.02M | Year: 2017

The SYSCID consortium aims to develop a systems medicine approach for disease prediction in CID. We will focus on three major CID indications with distinct characteristics, yet a large overlap of their molecular risk map: inflammatory bowel disease, systemic lupus erythematodes and rheumatoid arthritis. We have joined 15 partners from major cohorts and initiatives in Europe (e.g.IHEC, ICGC, TwinsUK and Meta-HIT) to investigate human data sets on three major levels of resolution: whole blood signatures, signatures from purified immune cell types (with a focus on CD14 and CD4/CD8) and selected single cell level analyses. Principle data layers will comprise SNP variome, methylome, transcriptome and gut microbiome. SYSCID employs a dedicated data management infrastructure, strong algorithmic development groups (including an SME for exploitation of innovative software tools for data deconvolution) and will validate results in independent retrospective and prospective clinical cohorts. Using this setup we will focus on three fundamental aims : (i) the identification of shared and unique core disease signatures which are associated with the disease state and independent of temporal variation, (ii) the generation of predictive models of disease outcome- builds on previous work that pathways/biomarkers for disease outcome are distinct from initial disease risk and may be shared across diseases to guide therapy decisions on an individual patient basis, (iii) reprogramming disease - will identify and target temporally stable epigenetic alterations in macrophages and lymphocytes in epigenome editing approaches as biological validation and potential novel therapeutic tool. Thus, SYSCID will foster the development of solid biomarkers and models as stratification in future long-term systems medicine clinical trials but also investigate new causative therapies by editing the epigenome code in specific immune cells, e.g. to alleviate macrophage polarization defects.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-28-2015 | Award Amount: 4.36M | Year: 2016

Stroke a leading cause of death and disability, with an estimated total cost of 65 billion per year in Europe. Even though preventive measures are in place to reduce the incidence of stroke, the number of persons having a stroke in Europe is likely to increase from 1.1 million/year in 2000 to more than 1.5 million/year in 2025 because of the increasing ageing population. Secondary stroke carries with it a greater risk than first-ever stroke for death and disability. Also, as mortality from first strokes has decreased recently, the number of people at risk for a secondary stroke has increased, with an associated increase in healthcare costs. In order to reduce these stroke statistics and the associated cost, the self-management of stroke risk factors is particularly suitable and necessary for the following reasons: 1) risk factors for stroke are well-known, and 2) 90% of strokes or secondary stroke events are preventable if the risk factors are managed appropriately. The Decision SupporT and self-mAnagement system for stRoke survivoRs (STARR) project and the system developed in it are targeting the self-management of stroke risk factors. Based on existing computational predictive models of stroke risk, we will develop a modular, affordable, and easy-to-use system, which will inform stroke survivors about the relation between their daily activities (e.g., medication intake, physical and cognitive exercises, diet, social contacts) and the risk of having a secondary stroke. This will lead to better prevention and a reduction of the number of secondary stroke events, as well as to a more efficient participation of patients in medical decision-making. A multidisciplinary consortium has been built for achieving the objectives of this ambitious project, involving stroke survivors associations, healthcare actors, sensing and human-machine interfaces experts. The consortium also comprises 3 European companies which will exploit the results of the project after its end.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: DS-03-2015 | Award Amount: 8.11M | Year: 2016

Over recent years, Industrial and Automation Control Systems (IACS) adopted in Critical Infrastructures (CIs) have become more complex due to the increasing number of interconnected devices, and to the large amount of information exchanged among system components. With the emergence of such an Internet of Things generation of IACS, the boundaries to be protected have grown well beyond that of the single or aggregated-plant, typical of the mono-operator or silos vision. That poses new challenges, as more operators become involved in a scenario that naturally demands the introduction of multi-tenancy mechanisms. New ICT paradigms, where virtualization is playing an important role, provide innovative features for flexible and efficient management, monitoring and control of devices and data traffic. With the OT/IT convergence, OT (Operation Technologies) will benefit from IT innovation, but at the same time, they will also inherit new IT threats that can potentially impact CIs. ATENA project, with reference to the above-mentioned interdependent scenario, aims at achieving the desired level of Security and Resilience of the considered CIs, while preserving their efficient and flexible management. ATENA, leveraging the outcomes of previous European Research activities, particularly the CockpitCI and MICIE EU projects, will remarkably upgrade them by exploiting advanced features of ICT algorithms and components, and will bring them at operational industrial maturity level; in this last respect, ATENA outcomes will be tailored and validated in selected Use Cases. In particular, ATENA will develop a Software Defined Security paradigm combining new anomaly detection algorithms and risk assessment methodologies within a distributed environment, and will provide a suite of integrated market-ready ICT networked components and advanced tools embedding innovative algorithms both for correct static CI configuration and for fast dynamic CI reaction in presence of adverse events.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-30-2015 | Award Amount: 9.43M | Year: 2016

The Internet of Things (IoT) brings opportunities for creating new services and products, reducing costs for societies, increasing the service level for the citizens in a number of areas, and changing how services are sold and consumed. Despite these opportunities, current information system architectures create obstacles that must be addressed for leveraging the full potential of IoT. One of the most critical obstacles are the vertical silos that shape todays IoT because they constitute a serious impediment to the creation of cross-domain, cross-platform and cross-organisational applications and services. Those silos also hamper developers from producing new added value across multiple platforms due to the lack of interoperability and openness. bIoTope provides the necessary Standardized Open APIs for enabling horizontal interoperability between silos. Such horizontal interoperability makes it possible to develop Systems of Systems where cross-domain information from platforms, devices and other information sources can be accessed when and as needed. bIoTope-enabled Systems can seamlessly exploit all available information, which makes them smart in the sense that they can take or propose the most appropriate actions depending on the current Users or Objects Context/Situation, and even learn from experience. bIoTope capabilities lay the foundation for open innovation ecosystems where companies can innovate both by the creation of new software components for IoT ecosystems, as well as create new Platforms for Connected Smart Objects with minimal investment. Large-scale pilots implemented in smart cities will provide both social, technical and business proofs-of-concept for such IoT ecosystems. This is feasible because the bIoTope consortium combines unique IoT experience, commercial solution providers and end-users, thus ensuring the high quality and efficiency of the results and implementations.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: REFLECTIVE-6-2015 | Award Amount: 3.69M | Year: 2016

CROSSCULT aims to make reflective history a reality in the European cultural context, by enabling the re-interpretation of European (hi)stories through cross-border interconnections among cultural digital resources, citizen viewpoints and physical venues. The project has two main goals. The first goal is to lower cultural EU barriers and create unique cross-border perspectives, by connecting existing digital historical resources and by creating new ones through the participation of the public. The second goal is to provide long-lasting experiences of social learning and entertainment that will help towards the better understanding and re-interpretation of European history. To achieve these goals, CROSSCULT will use cutting-edge technology to connect existing digital cultural assets and to combine them with interactive experiences that all together are intended to increase retention, stimulate reflection and help European citizens appreciate their past and present in a holistic manner. CROSSCULT will be implemented on 4 real-world flagship pilots involving a total of 8 sites across Europe. It will be realized through the participation of 11 partners and 14 associate partners including computer scientists, social sciences and humanity researchers, historians and private companies, from 7 European countries. The project will ensure continuous stakeholder involvement through a Living Lab and it will be supported by a concrete business plan. CROSSCULT is directly related to the work program since, on the one hand it re-purposes the use of digital cultural assets to stimulate a new shared culture of European history, one that moves from silos to unification, and on the other hand it boosts the development of new businesses that exploit the rich European digital cultural heritage.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: REV-INEQUAL-07-2016 | Award Amount: 4.89M | Year: 2016

There is an increasing need for developing European Union Cohesion Policy in terms of greater sensitivity towards territorial specificities, more supportive of community-based development and the facilitation of greater civic participation. This also relates to the concern over decreasing identification with the European project among the population. Place-based development, endogenous regional development and territorial capital are some of the policy approaches that have been invoked to facilitate a reorientation of Cohesion Policy and territorial development policy. These need to be connected more specifically to notions of the local and localism. RELOCAL will target this objective by exploring in depth the two dimensions underlying the challenge described in the Call text. The project will be based on case studies of local contexts (e.g. cities and their regions) that exemplify development challenges in terms of spatial justice. Among the research questions that have been identified are the following: - How can spatial justice be conceptualised, operationalised, adapted? - How processes of territorial inequalities in different localities be understood and analysed? - How does the local relate to cohesion in an EU context? - What factors and filters are operating that enhance or limit the relation between the local and cohesion? What might bridge abstract notions of spatial justice and local practises on the one hand and CP on the other? - Is there a territorial trap in thinking locally, endogenously? Can enhanced autonomy contribute to spatial justice? How can processes of place-making be related to spatial justice? - What is the scope for alternative development, stabilisation, sustainability, solidarity models/scenarios?


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: ERC-COG | Phase: ERC-CoG-2015 | Award Amount: 1.67M | Year: 2016

Thermodynamics provided mankind with the intellectual tools to master energy transfers and energy conversion in macroscopic systems operating close to equilibrium. It is now one of the most fundamental theories in physics. My goal is to establish a thermodynamic theory describing energy conversion and information processing in small synthetic or biological systems operating far from equilibrium. Significant progress has been achieved in this direction over the last decade. The new theory is called stochastic thermodynamics (ST). It allows us to describe and understand energy conversion in systems as diverse as quantum junctions and molecular motors, and also to predict the energetic cost of information processing operations such as erasing bits of information or feedback controlling a small device. It was validated in single molecule pulling experiments, electronic circuits, NMR and colloidal particles in optical tweezers. Nevertheless, ST still suffers from serious limitations which prevent its application in more complex systems. Therefore, I propose to expand the theoretical foundations of ST far beyond its current realm of validity and to broaden the scope of its applications in various new directions. I want to answer questions such as: Can one design devices made of many small energy converters (e.g. thermoelectric junctions) arranged in such a way as to generate collective behaviors (e.g. synchronization) prompting higher powers and efficiencies? Can one do the same by engineer quantum effects? How can one reduce the dissipation occurring when computing very quickly with small devices? Why are metabolic networks so efficient in converting energy, transmitting information, and preventing errors (e.g. toxic byproducts)? I will do so in close contact with leading experimental groups in the field. My conviction is that ST will become as important for nanotechnologies and molecular biology as thermodynamics has been for the industrial revolution.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: ERC-ADG | Phase: ERC-ADG-2015 | Award Amount: 2.31M | Year: 2016

Software-intensive systems pervade modern society and industry. These systems often play critical roles from an economic, safety or security standpoint, thus making their dependability indispensible. Software Verification and Validation (V&V) is core to ensuring software dependability. The most prevalent V&V technique is testing, that is the automated, systematic, and controlled execution of a system to detect faults or to show compliance with requirements. Increasingly, we are faced with systems that are untestable, meaning that traditional testing methods are highly expensive, time-consuming or infeasible to apply due to factors such as the systems continuous interactions with the environment and the deep intertwining of software with hardware. TUNE will enable testing of untestable systems by revolutionising how we think about test automation. Our key idea is to frame testing on models rather than operational systems. We refer to such testing as model testing. The models that underlie model testing are executable representations of the relevant aspects of a system and its environment, alongside the risks of system failures. Such models inevitably have uncertainties due to complex, dynamic environment behaviours and the unknowns about the system. This necessitates that model testing be uncertainty-aware. We propose to develop scalable, practical and uncertainty-aware techniques for test automation, leveraging our expertise on model-driven engineering and automated testing. Our solutions will synergistically combine metaheuristic search with system and risk models to drive the search for critical faults that entail the most risk. TUNE is the first initiative with the specific goal of raising the level of abstraction of testing from operational systems to models. The project will bring early and cost-effective automation to the testing of many critical systems that defy existing automation techniques, thus significantly improving the dependability of such systems.

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