Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Robak T.,Medical University of Lodz
Cancer Treatment Reviews | Year: 2011

Hairy-cell leukemia variant (HCl-V) is a district clinico-pathological entity with intermediate features between classical HCl (HCl-C) and B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia. HCl-V is now included in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification as a provisional entity. It is an uncommon disorder accounting for approximately 0.4% of chronic lymphoid malignancies and 10% of all HCl cases. In contrast to HCl-C, HCl-V is a more aggressive disease and according to the new WHO classification it is no longer considered to be biologically related to HCl-C. Patients with HCl-V have an elevated white blood count, easy-to-aspirate bone marrow and weak reactivity to tartrate - resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). Immunophenotypically, HCl-V cells are positive for CD103 and CD11c and negative for CD25. The HCl-V cells express also the B-cell antigens, CD19, CD20 and CD22. The HCl-V patients have frequently an unmutated Ig gene configuration. Currently, the principles of therapy for this rare disease derive from uncontrolled single institutional studies, or even single case reports. In contrast to HCl-C, the HCl-V response to purine nucleoside analogs (PNA) is limited to partial responses in approximately 50% of patients. However, complete responses were observed in patients treated with rituximab and anti-CD22 immunotoxins. In Japan, a distinct subtype of HCl known as HCl-Japanese variant (HCl-JV) has been identified. As with HCl-V, patients with HCl-JV have leukocytosis, weak TRAP activity in leukemic cells, and lack of CD25 antigen. In this review, the biology, diagnostic criteria, and current therapeutic options in HCl-V and HCl-JV are presented. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Robak T.,Medical University of Lodz
Blood | Year: 2013

In this issue of Blood, Abrisqueta and colleagues report on the outcomes of a phase 2 clinical trial evaluating rituximab maintenance therapy in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients after treatment with rituximab, fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and mitoxantrone (R-FCM). © 2013 by The American Society of Hematology. Source


Robak T.,Medical University of Lodz
Expert Opinion on Investigational Drugs | Year: 2011

Introduction: In the last few years, several new purine and pyrimidine nucleoside analogs have been synthesized and made available for both preclinical studies and clinical trials. Areas covered: This article summarizes recent achievements in the mechanism of action, pharmacological properties and clinical activity and toxicity as well as the emerging role of newer purine and pyrimidine nucleoside analogs potentially active in lymphoid and myeloid malignancies. A literature review was conducted from the MEDLINE database PubMed for articles in English. Publications from 2000 to October 2010 were scrutinized. The search terms used were clofarabine, nelarabine, forodesine, 8-chloroadenosine, LMP-420, azacitidine, decitabine, sapacitabine, troxacitabine, thiarabine and zebularine in conjunction with hematologic malignancies, leukemia and lymphoma. Conference proceedings from the previous 5 years of the American Society of Hematology, European Hematology Association, and American Society of Clinical Oncology were searched manually. Additional relevant publications were obtained by reviewing the references from the chosen articles. Expert opinion: Several new nucleoside analogs are currently under investigation in preclinical and clinical studies concerning hematological malignancies. Clofarabine, nelarabine, azacitidine and decitabine have been recently approved for the treatment of leukemias and/or myelodysplastic syndromes. Other agents including forodesine, 8-chloroadenosine, LMP-420, sapacitabine, troxacitabine, thiarabine and zebularine seem to be promising for the treatment of lymphoid and myeloid malignancies. However, definitive data from ongoing and future clinical trials will aid in better defining their status in the treatment of hematological disorders. © 2011 Informa UK, Ltd. Source


Zawilska J.B.,Medical University of Lodz
Toxicology Letters | Year: 2014

Methoxetamine is one of the constantly growing group of novel psychoactive substances that has emerged in recent years. The compound belongs to the arylcyclohexylamine class, which is used for its recreational and psychedelic effects. Methoxetamine is a structural analogue of ketamine, with a much longer duration of action and intensity of effects, and has been extensively advertised as its 'legal' and 'bladder friendly' alternative. This review surveys the current state of knowledge regarding the metabolism, pharmacology, prevalence and pattern of methoxetamine use, and analytical methods of its detection. Consumption of methoxetamine bears a significant health risk and may even lead to fatal intoxication. A significant amount of research is still needed in order to fully quantify the short- and long-term effects of methoxetamine and its interaction with other drugs of abuse. © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Source


Robak T.,Medical University of Lodz
Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy | Year: 2012

Introduction: Rituximab is a high-affinity chimeric mouse anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, currently used for the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and autoimmune disorders. Areas covered: This article summarizes recent achievements in the clinical activity and toxicity of rituximab in the treatment of patients with CLL. A literature search was conducted of the PubMed MEDLINE database for articles in English. Publications from 2000 through January 2012 were scrutinized. The search terms used were rituximab in conjunction with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or CLL. Conference proceedings from the previous 5 years of The American Society of Hematology, The European Hematology Association, and American Society of Clinical Oncology were searched manually. Additional relevant publications were obtained by reviewing the references from the chosen articles. Expert opinion: Rituximab is an active drug in CLL when used as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy, particulary with fludarabine or fludarabine and cyclophosphamide (R-FC regimen). In addition, rituximab may be an optimal therapeutic choice of treatment for CLL-associated autoimmune cytopenias. © 2012 Informa UK, Ltd. Source

Discover hidden collaborations