Liverpool, United Kingdom
Liverpool, United Kingdom

The University of Liverpool is a public university based in the city of Liverpool, England. Founded in 1881 as a university college, it is also one of the six original "red brick" civic universities. It comprises three faculties organised into 35 departments and schools.It is a founding member of the Russell Group of research-intensive universities, the N8 Group for research collaboration and the University Management school is AACSB accredited.The university has produced nine Nobel Prize winners and offers more than 230 first degree courses across 103 subjects. It was the world's first university to establish departments in Oceanography, civic design, architecture, and biochemistry at the Johnston Laboratories.In 2006 the university became the first in the UK to establish an independent university in China making it the world's first Sino-British university.It has an annual turnover of £410 million, including £150 million for research.Graduates of the University are styled with the post-nominal letters Lpool, to indicate the institution. Wikipedia.


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Patent
University of Liverpool | Date: 2015-03-12

A device for applying a compressive force to the uterus, the device comprising a contact portion for contacting the uterus and providing a compressive force thereto, and at least two elongate handles each extending from the contact portion along a respective longitudinal axis. The at least two elongate handles are configured to facilitate insertion of the device into the body and handling of the device from outside the body when inserted. At least a part of the contact portion is configured to be radially moveable relative to the longitudinal axes between a first radial position and a second radial position where the second radial position is radially outward of the first radial position.


Patent
University of Liverpool | Date: 2015-04-15

Provided are fusion proteins, polynucleotides and expression vectors with therapeutic utility in the prevention and/or treatment of cancer, as well as medical uses of these agents, and methods of treatment in which they are used. A fusion protein of the invention comprises an amino acid sequence that provides the apoptosis-inducing activity of TRAIL, and a membrane-anchoring amino acid sequence. The amino acid sequence that provides the apoptosis-inducing activity of TRAIL comprises the extracellular domain of TRAIL, or a fragment or variant thereof. A fusion protein comprising an amino acid sequence from TRAIL that is able to induce apoptosis, and a second sequence that anchors the first sequence to the cell membrane, is markedly more effective at reducing viability of TRAIL receptor positive cells than the naturally occurring (wild type) TRAIL protein itself.


Prior I.A.,University of Liverpool | Lewis P.D.,University of Swansea | Mattos C.,Northeastern University
Cancer Research | Year: 2012

All mammalian cells express 3 closely related Ras proteins, termed H-Ras, K-Ras, and N-Ras, that promote oncogenesis when they are mutationally activated at codon 12, 13, or 61. Although there is a high degree of similarity among the isoforms, K-Ras mutations are far more frequently observed in cancer, and each isoform displays preferential coupling to particular cancer types. We examined the mutational spectra of Ras isoforms curated from large-scale tumor profiling and found that each isoform exhibits surprisingly distinctive codon mutation and amino-acid substitution biases. These findings were unexpected given that these mutations occur in regions that share 100% amino-acid sequence identity among the 3 isoforms. Of importance, many of these mutational biases were not due to differences in exposure to mutagens, because the patterns were still evident when compared within specific cancer types. We discuss potential genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, as well as isoform-specific differences in protein structure and signaling, that may promote these distinct mutation patterns and differential coupling to specific cancers. ©2012 AACR.


Field J.K.,University of Liverpool | Oudkerk M.,University of Groningen | Pedersen J.H.,Copenhagen University | Duffy S.W.,Queen Mary, University of London
The Lancet | Year: 2013

Deaths from lung cancer exceed those from any other type of malignancy, with 1·5 million deaths in 2010. Prevention and smoking cessation are still the main methods to reduce the death toll. The US National Lung Screening Trial, which compared CT screening with chest radiograph, yielded a mortality advantage of 20% to participants in the CT group. International debate is ongoing about whether sufficient evidence exists to implement CT screening programmes. When questions about effectiveness and cost-effectiveness have been answered, which will await publication of the largest European trial, NELSON, and pooled analysis of European CT screening trials, we discuss the main topics that will need consideration. These unresolved issues are risk prediction models to identify patients for CT screening; radiological protocols that use volumetric analysis for indeterminate nodules; options for surgical resection of CT-identified nodules; screening interval; and duration of screening. We suggest that a demonstration project of biennial screening over a 4-year period should be undertaken. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP.2010.1.2-4 | Award Amount: 5.34M | Year: 2010

The aim of the present project is to explore the properties and possible applications of bismuth and bismuth based compounds when they are synthesized at the nanometric scale. This approach is motivated by the uncommon but advantageous properties of bismuth which, in part, have been exploited for many years. However, there are many unexplored possibilities and with the advent of nanotechnology new prospectives may be expected. We believe this approach will lead to new and high-tech applications of bismuth based materials, adding new value to one of the major mining products of Mexico (second most important world production) and boost the related economic benefits which at present are low. In the project, we have integrated complementary research groups from Mexico and Europe covering interdisciplinary fields. In the thematic work-packages, research groups working on the synthesis of the nanostructured materials will collaborate with others doing the physical-chemical materials characterization and the application development. The materials include Bi, Bi2O3 and Bi2S3 nanostructures, Bismuth metal oxide nanostructured ceramics and thin films, bismuth-based nanocomposites where Bi constitutes the nanoscale inclusion and the matrices varied from ceramics, polymers or glasses, and finally Bi superconductors. Extensive chemical and structural characterization will be required to correlate the synthesis parameters with the physical properties. Finally, the project includes the physical evaluation focused on the optical, electrical, magnetic, ferroelectric, etc. properties, according to the proposed applications. The time scale of the project is sufficient for the preparation of masters degree students and the initial years of doctorate students. These students will work in a very academic-rich environment and at the same time have contact with the industrial partners in the project, some of which are leaders in the development of Bi-based commercial products.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP.2011.2.2-6 | Award Amount: 2.17M | Year: 2011

This project will develop methodology for the design of light element (B, C, O) cluster/molecule-based superconducting systems with higher transition temperatures. This will be achieved by integrating chemical synthesis of new materials with physical control of electron density and delocalisation underpinned by theoretical understanding benchmarked against evidence from advanced spectroscopies and electronic property measurements to provide a unique multidisciplinary training environment. The consortium brings together ten world-leading EU/Japan groups in chemical design/materials synthesis (Liverpool/Okayama/Mainz/Aoyama Gakuin), physical control methods at extreme pressures/high electric fields (Osaka/Tokyo), evaluation of structural and electronic properties (Durham/Ljubljana) and theory and simulation (Trieste/Tokyo). The step change in the properties of molecular superconductors and the fundamental understanding of the novel competing electronic ground states from which superconductivity will emerge will be achieved by focussing on light element materials in which a fine balance exists between electron-phonon coupling and the electron correlations recently identified as significant in these systems. The rich diversity of molecular materials classes with high frequency phonons implicated in phonon-driven mechanisms of superconductivity and the ability to systematically control the importance of co-existing electron correlations in these narrow band systems by chemical and physical means justify our choice of targets. Light elements are cheap, abundant, non-toxic and environmentally benign and thus ideal candidates for sustainable energy-saving superconductor technologies without the need to use toxic and/or rare elements. The discovery of light element molecular superconductors with figures-of-merit needed for applications is a grand challenge requiring the fundamental research proposed here to identify proof-of-concept materials and scientific understanding.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH-2009-2.3.2-3 | Award Amount: 17.07M | Year: 2010

This proposal is for a large scale collaborative project in which we propose both to develop novel microbicides directed against new intracellular targets and to investigate novel combinations of highly active anti-retroviral drugs which may be particularly effective as microbicides. Combinations may enhance efficacy but equally importantly will increase the genetic barrier to the development of resistance. The proposal includes development of both slow release and gel formulations, pharmacokinetic and challenge experiments in macaques as well as human studies including a collaborative study with an EDCTP-funded project to use multiplex and proteomic technologies as well as culture-independent DNA-based analysis of mucosal microbiota to investigate biomarkers and establish a baseline signature from which perturbations can be recognised. This is a large consortium comprising 30 partners from 8 EU countries and from Switzerland, Ukraine, South Africa and the United States.Partners include microbicide developers, IPM and Particle Sciences, and producers, Gilead, Tibotec and Virco. Two SMEs will also participate in RTD aspects. The consortium is multidisciplinary with scientists engaged in basic discovery working with new targets and developing novel chemistry to produce compounds with improved safety and efficacy profiles as well as altered patterns of resistance.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.87M | Year: 2016

Cancer is a major social problem, and it is the main cause of death between the ages 45-65 years. In the treatment of cancer, radio therapy (RT) plays an essential role. RT with hadrons (protons and light ions), due to their unique physical and radiobiological properties, offers several advantages over photons for specific cancer types. In particular, they penetrate the patient with minimal diffusion, they deposit maximum energy at the end of their range, and they can be shaped as narrow focused and scanned pencil beams of variable penetration depth. Although significant progress has been made in the use of particle beams for cancer treatment, an extensive research and development program is still needed to maximize the healthcare benefits from these therapies. The Optimization of Medical Accelerators (OMA) is the aim of the here-proposed European Training Network, in line with the requirements of the ECs Medical Exposure Directive. OMA joins universities, research centers and clinical facilities with industry partners to address the challenges in treatment facility design and optimization, numerical simulations for the development of advanced treatment schemes, and in beam imaging and treatment monitoring. The proposed R&D program ranges from life sciences (oncology, cell and micro biology and medical imaging.), physics and accelerator sciences, mathematics and IT, to engineering. It is hence ideally suited for an innovative training of early stage researchers. By closely linking all above research areas, OMA will provide an interdisciplinary education to its Fellows. This will equip them with solid knowledge also in research areas adjacent to their core research field, as well as with business competences and hence give them a perfect basis for a career in research.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.89M | Year: 2016

Environmental microbial surveys have revealed a remarkable diversity of microeukaryotic life in most ecosystems, the majority of which had previously escaped detection. From an ecological point of view this work highlighted our ignorance of critical microbial players in natural environmental processes, including primary production, biogeochemical cycling and trophic interactions such as parasitism and grazing. Consequently, our understanding of community function is partial, limiting our ability to study environmental change. While, from an evolutionary perspective, we are missing major components of the Tree of Life giving rise to a fragmented understanding of how major cellular functions have evolved. Single cell genomics (SCG), including single cell transcriptomics, is an emerging technology that has the potential to retrieve genomic information from individual uncultured microbes recovered directly from natural environments and promises to provide new tools to investigate microeukaryotes in unparalleled detail. The aim of this ITN is therefore to train a new generation of scientists with the highest expertise, in SCG, from the initial stages of cell sorting to genome sequencing and gene annotation, to the full exploitation of the data obtained. Such progress will allow the European research community for the first time to address critical ecological and evolutionary questions. SINGEK will drive training through research by both local and network-wide activities, secondments, and workshops, and by establishing an environment that extends far beyond each partner team. This training environment will also provide the transferable skills essential for successful career development. This network of well connected and highly qualified scientists with expertise in eukaryotic SCG will be ready to implement this technology beyond ecology and evolution to other fields such as biomedicine or biotechnology driving innovation across the EU.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC5-06-2014 | Award Amount: 6.91M | Year: 2015

AQUACROSS aims to support EU efforts to enhance the resilience and stop the loss of biodiversity of aquatic ecosystems as well as to ensure the ongoing and future provision of aquatic ecosystem services. It focuses on advancing the knowledge base and application of the ecosystem-based management concept for aquatic ecosystems by developing cost effective measures and integrated management practices. AQUACROSS considers the EU policy framework (i.e. goals, concepts, time frames) for aquatic ecosystems and builds on knowledge stemming from different sources (i.e. WISE, BISE, Member State reporting, modelling) to develop innovative management tools, concepts, and business models (i.e. indicators, maps, ecosystem assessments, participatory approaches, mechanisms for promoting the delivery of ecosystem services) for aquatic ecosystems at various scales. It thereby provides an unprecedented effort to unify policy concepts, knowledge, and management concepts of freshwater, coastal, and marine ecosystems to support the cost-effective achievement of the targets set out by the EU 2020 Biodiversity Strategy.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.7.3 | Award Amount: 2.12M | Year: 2010

The IMPACT project will conduct original research to develop and integrate formal, computational models of policy and arguments about policy, to facilitate deliberations about policy at a conceptual, language-independent level. These models will be used to develop and evaluate innovative prototype tools for supporting open, inclusive and transparent deliberations about public policy. To support the analysis of policy proposals in an inclusive way which respects the interests of all stakeholders, research on how to use methods from the field of computational linguistics to mine arguments from data resources distributed throughout the Internet will be conducted. Prior research on using argumentation schemes to generate focused surveys, minimizing noise and the need for manual moderation, will be extended in this project to support argumentation schemes needed for policy deliberations and generate surveys in multiple languages. Research will also be conducted on how to visualize arguments about policy, building on previous research by the participants, but extended to visualize relationships between arguments and policies, in multiple languages. An abstract Application Programmers Interface (API) for the services required by the toolbox from content management systems will be defined, using existing standards whenever feasible, and implemented on top of a number of Open Source content management systems which have been successfully developed or used in European eParticipation and other Web 2.0 or Social Web projects. The tools in the argumentation toolbox will be designed and implemented as advanced Rich Internet Applications (RIAs) to increase usability and help overcome the digital divide and facilitate consultations across languages and cultures.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2007.4.3 | Award Amount: 12.06M | Year: 2009

Audiovisual content collections are undergoing a transformation from archives of analogue materials to very large stores of digital data. As time-based digital media and their related metadata are edited, re-used and re-formatted in a continuously evolving environment, the concept of the unique original loses its meaning and we require dynamic processes that can preserve indefinitely not only the audiovisual signal but also its evolving associations, context and rights.\nPrestoPRIME will research and develop practical solutions for the long-term preservation of digital media objects, programmes and collections, and find ways to increase access by integrating the media archives with European on-line digital libraries in a digital preservation framework. This will result in a range of tools and services, delivered through a networked Competence Centre.\nThe project will deliver a preservation framework, complete with risk management and content quality and corruption control measures, capable of supporting audiovisual signal migration and multivalent preservation methods using federated services for distributing and storing content. It will create a metadata conversion and deployment toolkit, with a novel and efficient process for metadata vocabulary alignment, annotation and services for user-generated content metadata. A rights management system and audiovisual fingerprint registry will make it possible to track and manage content at all stages of its lifecycle, in all contexts of use.\nThe project will demonstrate and evaluate an integrated prototype of the preservation Framework and software in the networked Competence Centre. The Competence Centre and the European Association for Audiovisual Archives will be established to provide business models, registry and best practice services and training.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 1.40M | Year: 2013

Led by an international team of established researchers, this ambitious large-scale project develops new and transferable methodologies for understanding and exploiting complex bodies of genealogical, biometric, and criminal justice data, thereby demonstrating the benefits of digital innovation to sometimes skeptical scholars and public audiences. Through data mapping and life-course analysis this project will investigate a central issue of penology and social policy: the relative impacts of different types of punishment on criminal desistance, health outcomes, employment opportunities, and family life over the long term. Using sophisticated data-linking methodologies it joins together existing and widely used large data-sets (Old Bailey Online [containing accounts of all trials held at Londons Central Criminal Court]; London Lives [a searchable archive of crime, poverty and social policy]; and Founders and Survivors [records of the 73,000 men women and children who were transported to Tasmania]) with newly digitised data to make it possible to chart the fortunes of all Londoners convicted at the Old Bailey between the departure of the First Fleet to Australia (1787) through to the death of the last transported Londoner in Australia in the early 1920s. Prisoners kept in Londons burgeoning prison estate will be identified and followed in newly available digitized prison records, as well as civil datasets (such as the censuses carried out between 1841 and 1911). Convicts sentenced to transportation will be traced through the richly detailed convict records in Australia, as well as in London prison registers and birth, marriage and death records. We will trace the criminal London poor through a plethora of digital records, recreating a pan-global prism capable of mapping and analyzing their lives at both the collective and individual level. The main output will be a database and curated-website, in addition to publications in leading journals. At the outset we will publish a blog, and a project website (which will explain our methodology and progress, introduce debates on ethics, methodology, and epistemology, and provide preliminary findings, so that we can engage with the widest possible audience). The London Eye website will also provide an integrated search engine for searching the conjoined datasets containing life course data for 66,000 Londoners who experienced differing penal regimes, which we expect to be regularly consulted by many of the 12 million family historians in the UK and Australia. In addition, in partnership with media and industry partners, we will create online digital learning resources that will disseminate project findings to family historians, schools, and the creative industries. This project reconstructs the story of family formation, desistence and reoffending on a vast and unprecedented scale. In constructing this digital Panopticon of London criminal justice, this interdisciplinary trans-national project will resolve a number of important questions which have long intrigued historians, sociologists, social geographers, linguistic researchers, economists and criminologists, who have hitherto lacked the tools to carry out this research.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 5.94M | Year: 2011

There are more than fifteen thousand particle accelerators in the world, ranging from the linear accelerators used for cancer therapy in modern hospitals to the giant atom-smashers at international particle physics laboratories used to unlock the secrets of creation. For many decades these scientific instruments have formed one of the main pillars of modern research across scientific disciplines and countries. The optimization of the performance of any particle accelerator critically depends on an in-depth understanding of the beam dynamics in the machine, the availability of simulation tools to study and continuously improve all accelerator components from beam handling elements to rf cavities, a complete set of beam diagnostics methods to monitor all important machine and beam parameters with high precision, and a control and data acquisition system that links all the above. The oPAC consortium proposes to carry out collaborative research into all the above aspects, with the aim to optimize the performance of present and future accelerators that lie at the heart of many research infrastructures. The network brings together leading research centers, universities, and industry partners to jointly train the next generation of researchers in this interdisciplinary field. oPAC aims at developing long term collaboration and links between the involved teams across sectors and disciplinary boundaries and to thus help defining improved research and training standards in this important field.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRADEV-3-2015 | Award Amount: 31.03M | Year: 2015

The nations of Europe are distributed around some of the most complex and dynamic geological systems on the planet and understanding these is essential to the security of livelihoods and economic power of Europeans. Many of the solutions to the grand challenges in the geosciences have been led by European scientists the understanding of stratigraphy (the timing and distribution of layers of sediment on Earth) and the discovery of the concept of plate tectonics being among the most significant. Our ability to monitor the Earth is rapidly evolving through development of new sensor technology, both on- and below-ground and from outer space; we are able to deliver this information with increasing rapidity, integrate it, provide solutions to geological understanding and furnish essential information for decision makers. Earth science monitoring systems are distributed across Europe and the globe and measure the physico-chemical characteristics of the planet under different geological regimes. EPOS will bring together 24 European nations and combine national Earth science facilities, the associated data and models together with the scientific expertise into one integrated delivery system for the solid Earth. This infrastructure will allow the Earth sciences to achieve a step change in our understanding of the planet; it will enable us to prepare for geo-hazards and to responsibly manage the subsurface for infrastructure development, waste storage and the use of Earths resources. With a European Research Infrastructure Consortium (ERIC) to be located in Rome (Italy), EPOS will provide an opportunity for Europe to maintain world-leading European Earth sciences and will represent a model for pan-European federated infrastructure.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 4.01M | Year: 2016

Large Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are deeply interwoven in the fabric of the Universe and lock up ~15% of the elemental carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM) of galaxies. They dominate the mid-infrared emission characteristics of galaxies that can be used to trace star formation locally as well as in the early universe, they influence the phase structure of the ISM and the star formation rate of galaxies, and they are the epitome of molecular complexity in space, heralding the importance of top-down chemistry. In spite of the influential role of PAHs in the ISM, their lifecycle, catalytic activity, interaction with interstellar radiation, gas and grains and their role in the organic inventory of solar system bodies is still poorly understood. The EUROPAH ETN aims to change this by creating a highly multidisciplinary network that combines astronomy, molecular physics, molecular spectroscopy, environmental science, quantum chemistry, surface sciences, and plasma physics in a comprehensive research and training program. EUROPAH will train 16 ESRs through cutting edge individual research and innovation projects investigating key physical and chemical processes of PAHs in space and related terrestrial settings and linking directly to R&D needs of our industrial beneficiaries. EUROPAH will engage all ESRs in industry driven innovation activities aimed at R&D of the industrial participants products and services, including outreach activities led by our industrial science communication beneficiary. Research and innovation training is complemented by an extensive program of network-wide training events to expose ESRs to all disciplines in the network and to instill in them a comprehensive set of transferable skills. This will provide the ESRs with a unique learning environment in a multidisciplinary setting aimed at developing a research oriented creative and innovative mind set and will place them well for a future career in academia or in industry.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.85M | Year: 2017

Antiprotons, stored and cooled at low energies in a storage ring or at rest in traps, are highly desirable for the investigation of basic questions on fundamental interactions, the static structure of antiprotonic atoms, CPT tests by high-resolution spectroscopy on antihydrogen, as well as gravity experiments. Antimatter experiments are at the cutting edge of science. They are, however, very difficult to realize and have been limited by the performance of the only existing facility in the world, the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN. The Extra Low Energy Antiproton ring (ELENA) will be a critical upgrade to this unique facility and commissioned from summer 2016. This will significantly enhance the beam quality and enable new experiments. To fully exploit the discovery potential of this facility and to pave the way for a vibrant long-term physics program with low energy antiprotons, advances are urgently required in numerical tools that can adequately model beam transport, life time and interaction, beam diagnostics tools and detectors that can fully characterize the beams properties, as well as in into advanced experimental techniques for improved precision and novel experiments that exploit the enhanced beam quality that ELENA will provide. AVA is a new European training network between universities, research centers and industry that will carry out an interdisciplinary and cross-sector antimatter research and training program for a cohort of 15 Fellows. It targets new scientific and technical developments and aims at boosting the career prospects of all trainees.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FOF-13-2016 | Award Amount: 4.04M | Year: 2016

The ENCOMPASS project principally aims to create a fully digital integrated design decision support (IDDS) system to cover the whole manufacturing chain for a laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) process encompassing all individual processes within in. The ENCOMPASS concept takes a comprehensive view of the L-PBF process chain through synergising and optimising the key stages. The integration at digital level enables numerous synergies between the steps in the process chain and in addition, the steps themselves are being optimised to improve the capability and efficiency of the overall manufacturing chain. ENCOMPASS addresses the three key steps in the process chain: component design, build process, and post-build process steps (post-processing and inspection). The links between these stages are being addressed by the following five interrelations: 1. Between the design process and both the build and post-build processes in terms of manufacturing constraints / considerations to optimise overall component design 2. Between the design process and build process component-specific L-PBF scanning strategies and parameters to optimise processing and reduce downstream processing 3. Between the design process and the build and post-build processes in terms of adding targeted feature quality tracking to the continuous quality monitoring throughout the process chain 4. Between the build and post-build processes by using build specific processing strategies and adaptation based on actual quality monitoring data (for inspection and post-processing) 5. Between all stages and the data management system with the integrated design decision support (IDDS) system By considering the entire AM process chain, rather than the AM machine in isolation, ENCOMPASS will integrate process decision making tools and produce substantial increases in AM productivity, with clear reductions in change over times and re-design, along with increased right-first time, leading to overall reductions in production costs, materials wastage, and over-processing. This will lead to higher economic and environmental sustainability of manufacturing, and re-inforce the EUs position in industrial leadership in laser based AM.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-SICA | Phase: NMP.2012.2.2-3 | Award Amount: 5.68M | Year: 2013

OXIGEN will combine leading-edge European expertise in the manufacture of specialist powder alloys (Mechanical Alloying), knowledge of niche high-temperature materials and capabilities in additive manufacturing. This will produce an integrated, world-leading capability to directly manufacture from powder to part custom-designed, best-in-class high temperature alloys for power generation component applications. OXIGEN will develop different (Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS)) alloys individually designed to address specific high temperature materials performance challenges currently limiting power generation component capabilities. This will lead to the prospect of higher efficiency power generation turbine systems. Working within OXIGEN, and with end users (Alstom, Siemens and Ivchenko Progress) with a combined significant global reach and capabilities, it is expected that holistic exploitation of project results can contribute significantly towards achieving sustained high temperature turbine operation (>620 Degrees C) leading towards power plant efficiency gains greater than 30%. To achieve these key objectives, the consortium consists of 11 organisations who are recognised leaders in various industrial sectors, in the Development of ODS materials and powder production technologies and in the development of LMD and SLM processes.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2015 | Award Amount: 1.33M | Year: 2016

Increasingly challenging global and environmental requirements have resulted in agricultural systems coming under increasing pressure to enhance their resilience capabilities in order to respond to the abrupt changes in resource quality, quantity and availability, especially during unexpected environmental circumstances, such as uncertain weather, pests and diseases, volatile market conditions and commodity prices. Therefore, integrated solutions are necessary to support the whole food agricultural life-cycle value chain. Solutions necessarily must consider the products cycle, as well as each of the value chain stages. Thus, managing risks and the uncertain availability of information will lead farmers to take advantage of these managerial, technical and social based-solutions. This implies the need for innovative technology-based knowledge management system to capture the agricultural information, at a variety of regional locations, in terms of collecting, storing, processing, and disseminating information about uncertain environmental conditions that affect agricultural decision-making production systems. Hence, from the genetic design of the seed, till their planting and harvest processes, RUCAPS provides knowledge of the full agricultural life-cycle based-decision making process to realise the key impacts of every stage of the agriculture-related processes. Therefore, RUCAPS implies the development of a high impact research project in order to integrate real-life based agriculture requirements, alternative land management scenarios, unexpected weather and environmental conditions as well as supporting innovation in the development of agriculture production systems, operations, logistics and supply chain management and the impact of these systems and processes over the end-users and customers. This is to be conceived through the integration of standard and customised solutions for facilitating the collaborative engagement within the agriculture value chain.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.2.2-2 | Award Amount: 3.46M | Year: 2012

The objective of CHROMED project is to evaluate the impact of adopting a health and lifestyle status management system to support elderly patients with a combination of chronic diseases involving respiratory and cardiovascular systems. A large scale clinical trial will be implemented to develop and evaluate clinical protocols and organizational models based on the new technologies in order to improve both quality of life and healthcare costs associated with these patients. The CHROMED idea arises from a previously successful research experience in patient monitoring at home. The CHROMED project focuses its investigation on the applicability of an integrated solution for a pathological condition which: a) is very prevalent in ageing patients and b) severely impairs quality of life: COPD with other typical comorbidities such as congestive heart failure and sleep disordered breathing. An international multi-centric randomized control trial will be implemented in five European regions: United Kingdom, Sweden, Estonia, Spain and Slovenia, representing different social and organizational contexts in Europe. In each country, the participating care organizations have existing practices and procedures for age-related disease management. In CHROMED a specific ICT platform in combination with a set of both well established and innovative devices will be used to collect and process useful clinical data at the patients home. In particular, for each patient a set of devices will be defined considering the existing co-morbidities.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRAIA-1-2014-2015 | Award Amount: 10.00M | Year: 2016

ENSAR2 is the integrating activity for European nuclear scientists who are performing research in three of the major subfields defined by NuPECC: Nuclear Structure and Dynamics, Nuclear Astrophysics and Nuclear Physics Tools and Applications. It proposes an optimised ensemble of Networking (NAs), Joint Research (JRAs) and Transnational Access Activities (TAs), which will ensure qualitative and quantitative improvement of the access provided by the current ten infrastructures, which are at the core of this proposal. The novel and innovative developments that will be achieved by the RTD activities will also assure state-of-the-art technology needed for the new large-scale projects. Our community of nuclear scientists profits from the diverse range of world-class research infrastructures all over Europe that can supply different ion beams and energies and, with ELI-NP, high-intensity gamma-ray beams up to 20 MeV. We have made great effort to make the most efficient use of these facilities by developing the most advanced and novel equipment needed to pursue their excellent scientific programmes and applying state-of-the-art developments to other fields and to benefit humanity (e.g. archaeology, medical imaging). Together with multidisciplinary and application-oriented research at the facilities, these activities ensure a high-level socio-economic impact. To enhance the access to these facilities, the community has defined a number of JRAs, using as main criterion scientific and technical promise. These activities deal with novel and innovative technologies to improve the operation of the facilities. The NAs of ENSAR2 have been set-up with specific actions to strengthen the communities coherence around certain resarch topics and to ensure a broad dissemination of results and stimulate multidisciplinary, application-oriented research and innovation at the Research Infrastructures.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2010-1.1.27 | Award Amount: 12.01M | Year: 2010

The overall aim of NERA is to achieve a measurable improvement and a long-term impact in the assessment and reduction of the vulnerability of constructions and citizens to earthquakes. NERA will integrate the key research infrastructures in Europe to monitor earthquakes and assess their hazard and risk, and will combine expertise in observational and strong-motion seismology, modeling, geotechnical and earthquake engineering to develop activities to improve the use of infrastructures and facilitate the access to data. NERA will ensure the provision of high-quality services, including access to earthquake data and parameters and to hazard and risk products and tools. NERA will coordinate with other EC projects (SHARE, SYNER-G) a comprehensive dissemination effort. NERA will contribute to the OECD GEM program and to the EPOS ESFRI infrastructure.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: HEALTH.2011.3.4-2 | Award Amount: 2.23M | Year: 2012

The main purpose of RESCAP-MED is to enhance the non-communicable diseases (NCDs) research landscape in southern and eastern Mediterranean countries by (a) strengthening capacity in a set of disciplines most relevant to improving public health and reducing health inequalities, and (b) enhancing networking, cooperation, and collaboration between researchers in the Mediterranean region. The main concept for achieving this purpose and making it sustainable is: 1 the creation of a Mediterranean regional network for NCD researchers; 2 the establishment of a competitive, funded fellowship programme linked to this research network. This proposal aims to enhance and, where needed, build research capacity in the region for health, its social and environmental determinants and their complex interactions, in order to inform policy development and implementation. We concentrate on the immense challenge posed to the health systems and economies of the region by the increasing burden of NCDs. We focus on strengthening the disciplinary capacity necessary to explain the social and environmental factors causing the rise in NCDs, and necessary to identify achievable policy outcomes and interventions. We prioritise five disciplines in this action: epidemiology, health economics, environmental health, medical anthropology, and health policy evaluation. These actions would create new institutional possibilities for the future, and are made more achievable because this proposal develops out of an existing FP7-funded research collaboration (MedCHAMPS, Grant number 223075) in several countries of the region, each of which is a partner in RESCAP-MED. It thus builds directly on established and ongoing personal and institutional relationships, and the emerging evidence from MedCHAMPS. This consortium brings together 11 partners: ten academic partners and one international organisation (WHO-EMRO).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-24-2015 | Award Amount: 18.47M | Year: 2016

The management of febrile patients is one of the most common and important problems facing healthcare providers. Distinction between bacterial infections and trivial viral infection on clinical grounds is unreliable, and as a result innumerable patients worldwide undergo hospitalization, invasive investigation and are treated with antibiotics for presumed bacterial infection when, in fact, they are suffering from self-resolving viral infection. We aim to improve diagnosis and management of febrile patients, by application of sophisticated phenotypic, transcriptomic (genomic, proteomic) and bioinformatic approaches to well characterised large-scale, multi-national patient cohorts already recruited with EU funding. We will identify, and validate promising new discriminators of bacterial and viral infection including transcriptomic and clinical phenotypic markers. The most accurate markers distinguishing bacterial and viral infection will be evaluated in prospective cohorts of patients reflecting the different health care settings across European countries. By linking sophisticated new genomic and proteomic approaches to careful clinical phenotyping, and building on pilot data from our previous studies we will develop a comprehensive management plan for febrile patients which can be rolled out in healthcare systems across Europe.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 4.58M | Year: 2011

The advancement of science and engineering in the past decades is inherently linked to the development of lasers. Ever higher laser beam powers, brightness and shorter pulse lengths have helped establish them as an invaluable tool for both a wide range of industry and medical applications, such as for example material treatment, precision measurements, laser cutting, display technologies, and laser surgery, and for fundamental research, where many of the most advanced experiments in astrophysics, atomic, molecular and optical physics, as well as in plasma research would be impossible without the latest laser technology. Moreover, lasers have become increasingly important for the successful operation and continuous optimization of particle accelerators: Laser-based particle sources are well suited for delivering the highest quality ion and electron beams, laser acceleration has demonstrated unprecedented accelerating gradients and might be an alternative for conventional particle accelerators in the future, and without laser-based beam diagnostics it would not be possible to unravel the characteristics of many complex particle beams. The LA3-NET consortium proposes to develop laser applications for particle accelerators within an initial training network. The network brings together research centers, universities, and industry partners to jointly train the next generation of researchers. The partners aim at developing long term collaboration and links between the involved teams across sectors and disciplinary boundaries and to thus help defining improved research and training standards in this multi-faceted field


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 6.65M | Year: 2015

Society faces major challenges that require disruptive new materials solutions. For example, there is a worldwide demand for materials for sustainable energy applications, such as safer new battery technologies or the efficient capture and utilization of solar energy. This project will develop an integrated approach to designing, synthesizing and evaluating new functional materials, which will be developed across organic and inorganic solids, and also hybrids that contain both organic and inorganic modules in a single solid. The UK is well placed to boost its knowledge economy by discovering breakthrough functional materials, but there is intense global completion. Success, and long-term competitiveness, is critically dependent on developing improved capability to create such materials. All technologically advanced nations have programmes that address this challenge, exemplified by the $100 million of initial funding for the US Materials Genome Initiative. The traditional approach to building functional materials, where the properties arise from the placement of the atoms, can be contrasted with large-scale engineering. In engineering, the underpinning Newtonian physics is understood to the point that complex structures, such as bridges, can be constructed with millimetre precision. By contrast, the engineering of functional materials relies on a much less perfect understanding of the relationship between structure and function at the atomic level, and a still limited capability to achieve atomic level precision in synthesis. Hence, the failure rate in new materials synthesis is enormous compared with large-scale engineering, and this requires large numbers of researchers to drive success, placing the UK at a competitive disadvantage compared to larger countries. The current difficulty of materials design at the atomic level also leads to cultural barriers: in building a bridge, the design team would work closely with the engineering construction team throughout the process. By contrast, the direct, day-to-day integration of theory and synthesis to identify new materials is not common practice, despite impressive advances in the ability of computation to tackle more complex systems. This is a fundamental challenge in materials research. This Programme Grant will tackle the challenge by delivering the daily working-level integration of computation and experiment to discover new materials, driven by a closely interacting team of specialists in structure and property prediction, measurement and materials synthesis. Key to this will be unique methods developed by our team that led to recent landmark publications in Science and Nature. We are therefore internationally well placed to deliver this timely vision. Our approach will enable discovery of functional materials on a much faster timescale. It will have broad scope, because we will develop it across materials types with a range of targeted properties. It will have disruptive impact because it uses chemical understanding and experiment in tandem with calculations that directly exploit chemical knowledge. In the longer term, the approach will enable a wide range of academic and industrial communities in chemistry and also in physics and engineering, where there is often a keener understanding of the properties required for applications, to design better materials. This approach will lead to new materials, such as battery electrolytes, materials for information storage, and photocatalysts for solar energy conversion, that are important societal and commercial targets in their own right. We will exploit discoveries and share the approach with our commercial partners via the Knowledge Centre for Materials Chemistry and the new Materials Innovation Factory, a £68 million UK capital investment in state-of-the-art materials research facilities for both academic and industrial users. Industry and the Universities commit 55% of the project cost.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-10b-2015 | Award Amount: 5.41M | Year: 2016

The overarching goal of VIVALDI is to increase the sustainability and competitiveness of the European shellfish industry by improving the understanding of bivalve diseases and by developing innovative solutions and tools for the prevention, control and mitigation of the major pathogens affecting the main European farmed shellfish species: Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), mussels (Mytilus edulis and M. galloprovincialis), European flat oyster (Ostrea edulis), clams (Venerupis philipinarum) and scallops (Pecten maximus ). The project addresses the most harmful pathogens affecting either one or more of these shellfish species: the virus OsHV-1, Vibrio species including V. aestuarianus, V. splendidus, V. harveyi and V. tapetis, as well as the parasite Bonamia ostreae. The project is committed to provide practical solutions based on the most advanced knowledge. VIVALDI will dissect the disease mechanisms associated with pathogen virulence and pathogenesis and host immune responses, develop in vivo and in vitro models, and apply omic approaches that will help the development of diagnostic tools and drugs against pathogen targets, and breeding programmes in a collaborative effort with industrial partners. The proposal will include a global shellfish health approach, recognising that cultured bivalves are often exposed to several pathogens simultaneously, and that disease outbreaks can be due to the combined effect of two or more pathogens. The proposal will also investigate advantages and risks of the used of disease-resistant selected animals in order to improve consumer confidence and safety. VIVALDI will be both multi- and trans-disciplinary. In order to cover both basic and applied levels from molecules to farm, the proposal will integrate partners with a broad range of complementary expertises in pathology and animal health, epidemiology, immunology, molecular biology, genetics, genomics and food safety.


The BiFFiO project addresses the challenge which both the aquaculture and agriculture industries faces in respects to regulatory requirements and societal requirements for the waste produced, an issue which is in need of sustainable solutions. The concept of the BiFFiO project is to mix the waste readily available from fish farms and manure waste from the agriculture industry in a reactor for production of biogas, which in turn can be used to fill the need for renewable energy in the aquaculture industry and supply fertilizer products to the agriculture industry. The BiFFiO project partners see great opportunities for business development in production of renewable energy from mixed agriculture and aquaculture waste. The main BiFFiO project objectives are 1) Development of a new best practice and novel technology for handling mixed waste from aquaculture and agriculture for production of energy, and further use of the digested waste, 2) Development from current large scale state-of-the art technologies for treating animal waste, to an economical, efficient and scalable three-stage system of pre-treatment, biogas reactor and fertilizer recuperation, which can be located at or in the vicinity of most near shore and on-shore fish farm operations, 3) Application of new technology in the agriculture industry alone or together with fish farming industry, on both remote and central locations to save costs for waste transport and deposition, 4) Impact on socio-economic conditions through the benefits of improved hygienic and environmental standards of closed fish farming and by reduced greenhouse gas emissions and other pollution burdens from the agriculture sector. Five SME AGs and seven Other SME and end user partners from the agriculture, aquaculture and bio-energy sector will take part in the project together with three RTD partners, Teknologisk Institutt (NO), University of Liverpool (UK) and aqua consult Ingenieur (DE), who will be performing the BiFFiO RTD work.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.2.2.1-4 | Award Amount: 16.45M | Year: 2013

DESIRE will focus on epileptogenic developmental disorders EDD, i.e. early onset epilepsies whose origin is closely related to developmental brain processes. A major cause of EDD are malformations of cortical development (MCD), either macroscopic or subtle. EDD are often manifested as epileptic encephalopathies (EE), i.e. conditions in which epileptic activity itself may contribute to severe cognitive and behavioral impairments. EDD are the most frequent drug-resistant pediatric epilepsies carrying a lifelong perspective of disability and reduced quality of life. Although EDD collectively represent a major medical and socio-economic burden, their molecular diagnosis, pathogenic mechanisms (PM) and rationale treatment are poorly understood. Specific objectives of DESIRE are to advance the state of the art with respect to: (1) the genetic and epigenetic causes and PM of EDD, particularly epileptogenic MCD, to elucidate molecular networks and disrupted protein complexes and search for common bases for these apparently heterogeneous disorders. (2) the diagnostic tools (biomarkers) and protocols through the study of a unique and well-characterized cohort of children to provide standardized diagnosis for patient stratification and research across Europe. (3) treatment of EDD using randomized, multidisciplinary clinical protocols and testing preclinical strategies in experimental models to also address novel preventative strategies. The workplan spans from clinical observation, to whole exome studies, cellular and animal models and basic research, identification of biomarkers and improvement of diagnostic methods, and back to the clinical trials and assessment of innovative, targeted treatment strategies. The consortium partners have an outstanding track record in genetics, basic neurophysiology, neuropathology and clinical research. Specialized expertise will be made available by the SMEs involved to develop novel diagnostic tools for tailored treatment approaches.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2009.2.2.1.1 | Award Amount: 8.27M | Year: 2010

The overall aim of the ODEMM project is to develop a set of fully-costed ecosystem management options that would deliver the objectives of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive, the Habitats Directive, the European Commission Blue Book and the Guidelines for the Integrated Approach to Maritime Policy. This will be achieved by: (i) providing a comprehensive knowledge base to support policy for the development of sustainable and integrated management of European marine ecosystems; (ii) developing Operational Objectives to achieve the High-Level Policy Objectives set by the MSFD and the HD, and with reference to the proposed Maritime Policy; (iii) identifying Management Options (individual management tools and combinations of tools) to meet the Operational Objectives; (iv) providing a risk assessment framework for the evaluation of Management Options and to assess the risk associated with the different options; (v) conducting a cost-benefit analysis of a range of Management Options using appropriate techniques; (vi) identifying stakeholder opinions on the creation of governance structures directed towards implementation of the ecosystem approach, and to elaborate different scenarios for changing governance structures and legislation to facilitate a gradual transition from the current fragmented management approach towards fully integrated ecosystem management; (vii) documenting the steps necessary for the transition from the current fragmented management scheme to a mature and integrated approach, and providing a toolkit that could be used to evaluate options for delivering ecosystem-based management; and (viii) communicating and consulting on the outcomes of the project effectively with policy makers and other relevant user groups.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2011.1.3-04 | Award Amount: 3.91M | Year: 2012

Infections with parasitic worms (nematodes and trematodes) represent a significant economic and welfare burden to the European ruminant livestock industry. The increasing prevalence of anthelmintic resistance means that current control programmes are costly and unsustainable in the long term. Recent changes in the epidemiology, seasonality and geographic distribution of helminth infections have been attributed to climate change. However, other changes in environment (e.g. land use) and in livestock farming, such as intensification and altered management practices, will also have an impact on helminth infections. Sustainable control of helminth infections in a changing world requires detailed knowledge of these interactions. GLOWORM will devise new, sustainable strategies for the effective control of ruminant helminthoses in the face of global change. We will: (1) optimise diagnosis, by developing novel, high-throughput diagnostic tests for mixed helminth infections, sub-clinical infections and anthelmintic resistance, (2) map, monitor and predict the impact of global change on parasite epidemiology, leading to spatial risk maps and improved forecasting of disease, (3) produce predictive models to identify optimal future intervention strategies, (4) identify and mitigate the economic impacts of infections and (5) involve end-users in the production and dissemination of detailed advice for effective worm control. We will work together to develop a panel of innovative technologies and models to monitor and predict changing patterns of infection and disease, optimise the use of anthelmintics to limit the development and spread of drug resistance, and reduce the overall economic impact of helminth infections. GLOWORM will contribute to the continued productivity and profitability of European livestock farming by delivering new tools, strategies and recommendations for the monitoring, surveillance, and sustainable control of helminth infections in grazing livestock.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-SICA | Phase: KBBE-2007-1-3-09 | Award Amount: 7.62M | Year: 2009

This project aims at Improving Human Health and Animal Production in developing countries through Integrated Control of Neglected Zoonoses in animals, based on Scientific Innovation and Public Engagement. Neglected zoonoses, such as anthrax, rabies, brucellosis, bovine TB, zoonotic trypanosomiasis, echinococcosis, cysticercosis and leishmaniasis, are major causes of ill-health in developing countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Production animals and companion animals of significant societal value act as reservoirs for transmission to man, and the burden of these diseases on affected communities is compounded by the adverse effects many diseases have on the productivity of livestock and hence the livelihoods of the poor. Control of these diseases in animals represents an opportunity to address the constraints they pose to both human health and animal productivity, thereby contributing to poverty reduction and the MDGs. Effective control in animals will require scientific innovation to identify and (where necessary) develop tools for diagnosis, for quantification of disease burdens, and for control. Public engagement at all stakeholder levels will be needed to ensure that strategies are appropriate for use in affected communities and are adopted within the policy framework of affected countries. The project will: (i) map and review research activities at a global level, (ii) survey and assess the burden of zoonoses in communities, (iii) improve or develop disease control tools as appropriate for conditions in affected countries, with private sector inputs where appropriate, (iv) develop cost-effective control and prevention strategies taking into account economic, sociological and cultural factors as well as traditional knowledge, (v) build capacity in ICPCs through technology transfer and training and (vi) empower communities and policy makers to utilise control and prevention strategies appropriately and effectively.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: ENV.2010.1.2.1-1 | Award Amount: 4.16M | Year: 2011

The HEALTHY FUTURES project is motivated by concern for the health impacts of environmental changes. HEATHLY FUTURES aims to respond to this concern through construction of a disease risk mapping system for three water-related high-impact VBDs (malaria, Rift valley fever and schistosomiasis) in Africa, accounting for environmental/climatic trends and changes in socio-economic conditions to predict future risk. Concentrating on eastern Africa as a study area, HEALTHY FUTURES comprises a comprehensive, inter-disciplinary consortium of health, environment, socio-economic, disease modelling and climate experts in addition to governmental health departments. To achieve its aims, HEALTHY FUTURES will deploy a bottom-up, end-user/stakeholder-focused approach combining field-, laboratory- and library-based research.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: NoE | Phase: HEALTH.2010.4.2-2 | Award Amount: 12.67M | Year: 2011

Paediatric drugs (PD) lack appropriate testing. Most drugs have inadequate information about dosing regimen, dose adjustment and how to administer them. These are longstanding problems that unquestionably require concerted efforts at the international level. Both the US and the EU have introduced paediatric legislation that facilitates participation of children in research and pharmaceutical innovation but initiatives are not always coordinated and often different approaches are used to deal with the same problems. The main aim of GRiP will be to implement an infrastructure matrix to stimulate and facilitate the development and safe use of medicine in children. This implementation entails active coordination of knowledge management efforts and integrated use of existing research capacity, whilst reducing the fragmentation and duplication of activities. The consortium will primarily focus on: 1) development of a Paediatric Clinical Pharmacology Training Program; 2) Validation and harmonisation of research tools specific for paediatrics; 3) Sharing of strategies and plans; 4) Use of ongoing/planned research studies to evaluate the feasibility of proposed research tools and strategies. GRiP brings together an exceptional range of high quality leaders and stakeholders that are very active in the context of EU and US paediatric medicines research. GRiP will mobilize 21 institutions as partners and at least another 16 major networks that represent several hundreds of clinical sites and a total of more than 1000 researchers across Europe, the US and Asia. The integration of the WHO, EMA and the NIH-NICHD associated networks, including the FDA, will be a major asset not just for an effective implementation of the network activities without duplication, but also for the rapid translation of GRiP deliverables into practice. This partnership will work closely with families to provide children with safe and effective medicines.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.66M | Year: 2016

The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) is a class C Gprotein-coupled receptor that plays a pivotal role in systemic calcium metabolism by regulating parathyroid hormone secretion and urinary Ca excretion. Abnormal CaSR function is implicated in calciotropic disorders, and in non-calciotropic disorders such as Alzheimers disease (AD), cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes (DM), sarcopenia and cancer, which account for >25% of the global disease burden. The CaSR is a unique GPCR whose principal physiological ligand is the Ca2\ ion; it is expressed almost ubiquitously; interacts with multiple G subtypes regulating highly divergent downstream signalling pathways, depending on the cellular context. The CaSR Biomedicine is a fully translational project that utilises the concept of a single molecule, the CaSR, influencing a range of physiological and disease processes, to develop a unique, strong multidisciplinary and intersectoral scientific training programme preparing 14 young scientists to become specialists in GPCR biology and signalling. The objectives of CaSR Biomedicine are: 1. Educate and train Early Stage Researchers to become highly innovative scientists to enhance their career perspective. 2. Elucidate ligand- and tissue-dependent differences in CaSR physiology by examining its functions at cellular level and thus to contribute to the understanding of GPCR signalling in general. 3. Assess how CaSR function is altered in AD, CVD, DM, sarcopenia, and cancer, and to find innovative CaSR-based therapeutic approaches for these major, age-related disorders. 4. Establish long-lasting interdisciplinary and intersectoral cooperation among researchers and between researchers and industry, to strengthen the European Research Area. Therefore the CaSR Biomedicine will investigate the complexity of CaSR signalling and function to identify CaSR-based therapeutic approaches to diseases linked to changes in CaSR expression or function (AD, CVD, DM, sarcopenia, and cancer).


1 in 20 first time pregnancies are complicated by pre-eclampsia, the leading cause of maternal death in Europe. No clinically useful screening test exists; consequently, clinicians are unable to offer targeted surveillance or known/emerging preventative strategies. Consortium members have pioneered a personalised medicine approach to identifying blood-borne biomarkers through recent technological advancements, especially in the field of mass spectrometry and the comprehensive mapping of the blood metabolome and proteome. The overall objective of the IMPROvED project is to develop a sensitive, specific, high-throughput and economically viable early pregnancy screening test for pre-eclampsia. This will involve a multicentre, phase IIa clinical study to assess and refine novel and innovative prototype tests based on emerging metabolomic and proteomic technologies developed by SMEs within the consortium. The study will i) recruit 5000 first time pregnant women; ii) establish a high calibre biobank, augmented by accurate clinical metadata; iii) determine whether prototype predictive assays and algorithms translate to the clinical environment; iv) assess potential synergy of a combined metabolomic and proteomic approach and v) progress regulatory approval and development of the selected test into the clinical arena. The application of new technologies to identify at risk patients in early pregnancy will allow stratified care with personalized fetal and maternal surveillance, early diagnosis and timely intervention. If an effective test halved antenatal visits and administration of therapies (such as aspirin) to those at risk reduced the incidence of disease by only 20%, potential savings would approximate to 4 billion of the estimated 9 billion/yr spent in Europe providing antenatal care for nulliparous women and treatment for pre-eclampsia. Moreover, an accurate predictive test would be a crucial step in reducing the life-threatening complications of the disease.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRAIA-1-2014-2015 | Award Amount: 13.00M | Year: 2015

Particle physics is at the forefront of the ERA, attracting a global community of more than 10,000 scientists. With the upgrade of the LHC and the preparation of new experiments, the community will have to overcome unprecedented challenges in order to answer fundamental questions concerning the Higgs boson, neutrinos, and physics beyond the Standard Model. Major developments in detector technology are required to ensure the success of these endeavours. The AIDA-2020 project brings together the leading European infrastructures in detector development and a number of academic institutes, thus assembling the necessary expertise for the ambitious programme of work. In total, 19 countries and CERN are involved in this programme, which follows closely the priorities of the European Strategy for Particle Physics. AIDA-2020 aims to advance detector technologies beyond current limits by offering well-equipped test beam and irradiation facilities for testing detector systems under its Transnational Access programme. Common software tools, micro-electronics and data acquisition systems are also provided. This shared high-quality infrastructure will ensure optimal use and coherent development, thus increasing knowledge exchange between European groups and maximising scientific progress. The project also exploits the innovation potential of detector research by engaging with European industry for large-scale production of detector systems and by developing applications outside of particle physics, e.g. for medical imaging. AIDA-2020 will lead to enhanced coordination within the European detector community, leveraging EU and national resources. The project will explore novel detector technologies and will provide the ERA with world-class infrastructure for detector development, benefiting thousands of researchers participating in future particle physics projects, and contributing to maintaining Europes leadership of the field.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FETOPEN-01-2016-2017 | Award Amount: 3.99M | Year: 2017

ArrestAD proposes a novel and visionary thinking resulting from the demonstration of the central role of a particular heparan sulfate species at the intracellular level in neurons and in circulating cells in the molecular pathology of Alzheimers disease (AD). AD is a societal challenge for which there is neither prevention nor possible cure. Research in the field has long been refining classic concepts based on the aggregation of A and tau through initial seeding and then spreading. Our vision is different and based on the demonstration that tau abnormal phosphorylation and aggregation is triggered by the interaction of tau with heparan sulfates internalized in neurons and circulating cells only in AD [UPEC R.1; P.1,2]. Based in this new concept, ArrestAD will establish links between AD genetics, disease hallmarks, and altered traffic and intracellular accumulation of heparan sulfates to generate new knowledge underpinning the development of new strategies for detection and treatment of AD. This will open to radically new technologies addressing two major objectives: 1) proving that specific and early diagnosis of AD is possible in circulating cells, and 2) demonstrating that a new class of drug candidates are able to preventing and/or arresting AD-neurodegeneration. To reach these objectives, ArrestAD brings together internationally recognized experts in AD clinics and diagnosis, in heparan sulfate biology, transcriptomics, interactomics, carbohydrate chemistry, enzymology, cell biology, animal experimentation with AD models, and a SME specialized in the development of diagnosis kits using circulating cells. The high-risk character of this joint science and technology research is offset by the multidisciplinary nature of the Consortium and the high socio-economic gain resulting from success. Based in this technology, we will build a diverse portfolio of future projects that will result in a long-term benefit for citizens, economy and society.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: BG-01-2015 | Award Amount: 9.21M | Year: 2016

ATLAS creates a dynamic new partnership between multinational industries, SMEs, governments and academia to assess the Atlantics deep-sea ecosystems and Marine Genetic Resources to create the integrated and adaptive planning products needed for sustainable Blue Growth. ATLAS will gather diverse new information on sensitive Atlantic ecosystems (incl. VMEs and EBSAs) to produce a step-change in our understanding of their connectivity, functioning and responses to future changes in human use and ocean climate. This is possible because ATLAS takes innovative approaches to its work and interweaves its objectives by placing business, policy and socioeconomic development at the forefront with science. ATLAS not only uses trans-Atlantic oceanographic arrays to understand and predict future change in living marine resources, but enhances their capacity with new sensors to make measurements directly relevant to ecosystem function. The ATLAS team has the track record needed to meet the projects ambitions and has already developed a programme of 25 deep-sea cruises, with more pending final decision. These cruises will study a network of 12 Case Studies spanning the Atlantic including sponge, cold-water coral, seamount and mid-ocean ridge ecosystems. The team has an unprecedented track record in policy development at national, European and international levels. An annual ATLAS Science-Policy Panel in Brussels will take the latest results and Blue Growth opportunities identified from the project directly to policy makers. Finally, ATLAS has a strong trans-Atlantic partnership in Canada and the USA where both government and academic partners will interact closely with ATLAS through shared cruises, staff secondments, scientific collaboration and work to inform Atlantic policy development. ATLAS has been created and designed with our N American partners to foster trans-Atlantic collaboration and the wider objectives of the Galway Statement on Atlantic Ocean Cooperation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IRSES | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-IRSES | Award Amount: 707.70K | Year: 2013

This is a project for a partnership between leading Brazilian and European research groups in dynamical systems, a prominent subject in mathematics. An extensive consortium of European and Brazilian institutions will collaborate to provide world leading critical mass and support for research on the very forefront of the field. Work Packages reflect parallel priorities in the research. Transfer of knowledge is facilitated by two large conferences and five smaller workshops. The project has excellent strategic value in view of the development of closer ties in higher education and research between the European Research Area and Brazil.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME | Phase: SME-2013-1 | Award Amount: 1.50M | Year: 2013

The AquaMMS project will improve todays SoA by developing a robust and portable miniature mass spectrometer, which will monitor online a wide range of vital water quality parameters simultaneously. AquaMMS will be suitable for use primarily in land-based aquaculture industry, but other markets are also relevant including environmental monitoring sector and the water supply industry. This technology will provide the fish farmer with advance warning of a broad range of potential pollutants, like toxic metals, phosphates, nitrites, nitrates, hydrogen sulphide and geosmins. These pollutants can otherwise inflict chronic stress on the farmed fish resulting in disease outbreaks and/or poor product quality, which means lost profit to the fish farms. Most of these parameters are at present technically challenging to measure accurately on a regular basis and may only be analysed when problems arise on the farm and samples are sent for more comprehensive analysis at external laboratories. Q-technologies (UK) has successfully developed miniature mass spectrometry (MMS) technology for the oil and gas industry, and has seen the need and potential in developing and marketing a similar system for the aquaculture industry. Therefore, they have taken the initiative to propose the AquaMMS project by combining forces with the SMES, Faaltech (Ireland) and BAMO (Germany). Together, these SMEs will form the production and distribution chain of the product post project. Anglesey Aquaculture Ltd (UK) and Telemarks Roye as (Norway) will take part in the project representing the end user community and will act as a test sites for the developed technology. Anglsey Aquaculture and Telemarks Roye will benefit from improved production by using AquaMMS ahead of its competitors. The RTDs, University of Liverpool (UK), Teknologisk Institutt (Norway) and Cork Institute of Technology (Ireland) have been invited to perform the RTD work needed to reach the objectives.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-24-2015 | Award Amount: 14.94M | Year: 2016

Pharmacogenomics is the study of genetic variability affecting an individuals response to a drug. Its use allows personalized medicine and reduction in trial and error prescribing leading to more efficacious, safer and cost-effective drug therapy. The U-PGx consortium will investigate a pre-emptive genotyping approach (that is: multiple pharmacogenomic variants are collected prospectively and embedded into the patients electronic record) of a panel of important pharmacogenomic variants as a new model of personalised medicine. To meet this goal we combine existing pharmacogenomics guidelines and novel health IT solutions. Implementation will be conducted at a large scale in seven existing European health care environments and accounts for the diversity in health system organisations and settings. Feasibility, health outcome and cost-effectiveness will be investigated. We will formulate European strategies for improving clinical implementation of pharmacogenomics based on the findings of this project.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC1-PM-22-2016 | Award Amount: 12.56M | Year: 2016

The ZikaPLAN initiative combines the strengths of 25 partners in Latin America, North America, Africa, Asia, and various centres in Europe to address the urgent research gaps (WP 1-8) in Zika, identifying short-and long term solutions (WP 9-10) and building a sustainable Latin-American EID Preparedness and Response capacity (WP 11-12). We will conduct clinical studies to further refine the full spectrum and risk factors of congenital Zika syndrome (including neurodevelopmental milestones in the first 3 years of life), and delineate neurological complications associated with Zika due to direct neuroinvasion and immune-mediated responses. Laboratory based research to unravel neurotropism, investigate the role of sexual transmission, determinants of severe disease, and viral fitness will envelop the clinical studies. Burden of disease and modelling studies will assemble a wealth of data including a longitudinal cohort study of 17,000 subjects aged 2-59 in 14 different geographic locations in Brazil over 3 years. Data driven vector control and vaccine modelling as well as risk assessments on geographic spread of Zika will form the foundation for evidence-informed policies. The Platform for Diagnostics Innovation and Evaluation will develop novel ZIKV diagnostic tests in accordance with WHO Target Product Profiles. Our global network of laboratory and clinical sites with well-characterized specimens is set out to accelerate the evaluation of the performance of such tests. Based on qualitative research, we will develop supportive, actionable messages to affected communities, and develop novel personal protective measures. Our final objective is for the Zika outbreak response effort to grow into a sustainable Latin-American network for emerging infectious diseases research preparedness. To this end we will engage in capacity building in laboratory and clinical research, collaborate with existing networks to share knowledge and tackle regulatory and other bottlenecks.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2008.2.2.1.2. | Award Amount: 10.98M | Year: 2009

The HERMIONE project is designed to make a major advance in our knowledge of the functioning of deep-sea ecosystems and their contribution to the production of goods and services. This will be achieved through a highly interdisciplinary approach (including biologists, ecologists, microbiologists, biogeochemists, sedimentologists, physical oceanographers, modelers and socio-economists) that will integrate biodiversity, specific adaptions and biological capacity in the context of a wide range of highly vulnerable deep-sea habitats. Gaining this understanding is crucial, because these ecosystems are now being affected by climate change and impacted by man through fishing, resource extraction, seabed installations and pollution. To design and implement effective governance strategies and management plans we must understand the extent, natural dynamics and interconnection of ocean ecosystems and integrate socio-economic research with natural science. The study sites include the Arctic, North Atlantic and Mediterranean and cover a range of ecosystems including cold-water corals, canyons, cold and hot seeps, seamounts and open slopes and deep-basins. The project will make strong connections between deep-sea science and user needs. HERMIONE will enhance the education and public perception of the deep-ocean issues also through some of the major EU aquaria. These actions, together with GEOSS databases that will be made available, will create a platform for discussion between a range of stakeholders, and contribute to EU environmental policies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 3.83M | Year: 2011

Renal disease is a global public health problem, with the incidence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) rising annually. Current treatment options for ESRD are dialysis or renal transplantation, which have significant drawbacks in terms of increased morbidity and mortality, besides placing an increasing economic burden on society. The development of interventions aimed at preventing ESRD, including drug- and cellular-based therapies, is made difficult by the lack of availability of primary human renal cells for in vitro drug testing and by our inability to accurately assess the effectiveness of cellular-based therapies in appropriate animal models. However, due to recent advances in the fields of stem cell science, biomaterials and bioelectronics, we have unprecedented opportunities to generate the following tools that will facilitate important breakthroughs in renal medicine: (i) human kidney-derived stem/progenitor cells (KSPCs) for drug discovery and cellular therapy; (ii) biomaterials for regulating the differentiation of the KSPCs in vitro for use in drug development programmes; (iii) electronic devices capable of measuring renal function, enabling the effectiveness of stem cell-based therapies to be properly evaluated. The overarching goal of the NephroTools ITN is to provide state-of-the-art multidisciplinary training for a cohort of 15 young researchers in order to equip them with the skills required to make a significant impact in renal medicine and the wider field of stem cell biotechnology. To achieve this goal, the training of each researcher will be based around a specific research project, coupled with placement periods, within a multidisciplinary and cross-sectoral Network that aims to evaluate the potential of human kidney stem/progenitor cells for use in drug discovery and regenerative therapy programmes.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2011.2.4.3-1 | Award Amount: 7.76M | Year: 2012

Diabetic retinopathy (DR), the leading cause of blindness among working-age individuals in developed countries has been classically considered to be a microcirculatory disease of the retina. However, there is growing evidence to suggest that retinal neurodegeneration is an early event in the pathogenesis of DR. For this reason, it is reasonable to hypothesize that therapeutic strategies based on neuroprotection will be effective not only in preventing or arresting retinal neurodegeneration but also in preventing the development and progression of the early stages of DR (ie. microaneurysms and/or retinal thickness). EUROCONDOR (European Consortium for the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy) is a solid and well balanced consortium (ophthalmologists, endocrinologists, basic researchers) which has been created in order to implement the first clinical trial using eye drops for treatment of the early stages of DR. The participants are top leaders in their field and central readings will be performed by the Coordinating Centre of the European Vision Institute Clinical Research Network (EVICR.Net). The main objectives of the project are the following: Primary objective: To assess whether the selected neuroprotective drugs (brimonidine and somatostatin) administered topically are able to prevent or arrest neurodegeneration, as well as the development and progression of the early stages of DR. Secondary objectives: 1) To determine the prevalence of functional abnormalities related to neurodegeneration in those patients without or with minimal microvascular damage under ophthalmoscopic examination. 2) To compare the effectiveness of the selected drugs. 3) To evaluate the local and systemic adverse effects of the selected drugs. 4) To identify those patients most prone to progressive worsening (characterization of phenotypes and circulating biomarkers). 5) To determine the molecular mechanisms by which the selected drugs exert their beneficial effects.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.4.1-6 | Award Amount: 4.23M | Year: 2011

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal human cancers with a five-year survival rate of less than 5%. Late presentation and a high level of resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs are among the major reasons for this dismal prognosis. The presence of the highest degree of desmoplasia among all solid tumours and the fact that chronic inflammatory pancreatic disease is associated with an increased risk for pancreatic cancer indicate, that the tumour microenvironment is of particular importance for carcinogenesis in the pancreas. The long-term objective of this proposal is to increase survival of pancreatic cancer patients by exploring the contribution of the tumour microenvironment to the failure of presently available oncological treatments. For this purpose the clinical observation will be reverse-translated into innovative in-vitro and mouse models closely mimicking the human disease. This will allow a profound study of the mechanistic basis of treatment failure by deciphering the complex network between components of the microenvironment and cancer cells leading to increased resistance to chemotherapy and infiltrative growth along adjacent lymphatic and neural structures as well as metastatic spread. Identification of cancer (stem) cell-autonomous as well as stromal-derived mediators of invasion and chemoresistance will lead to novel drug targets to overcome the current therapeutic dilemma. The consortium has been specifically designed to include all required levels of expertise: 1) surgical and medical oncology groups conducting the largest clinical trials for pancreatic cancer in Europe, 2) expert pancreatic pathologists, 3) basic scientists focused on the study of carcinogenesis and tumour microenvironment interactions in the pancreas, 4) molecular oncology groups that have developed genetically engineered mouse models faithfully recapitulating human pancreatic cancer, as well as 5) pharmaceutical industry specialised on drug development.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP-SICA | Phase: KBBE.2010.1.3-01 | Award Amount: 12.38M | Year: 2011

Livestock production efficiency is impaired by helminth infection which is ubiquitous in cattle, sheep and goats world-wide. It causes severely debilitating gastro-intestinal, respiratory and hepatic disorders, dependent on the infecting species. The treatment and prevention of helminth parasitism in livestock continues to rely almost exclusively on the use of anthelmintic drugs, an approach threatened by the global emergence of anthelmintic resistance. An alternative approach is vaccination. Members of the present consortium (from the EU and Switzerland, North and South America, North and South Africa, Australia, 2 SMEs and 1 major animal health company) have developed prototype vaccines with the predicted required efficacy to control major gastro-intestinal nematode infections of livestock, notably Ostertagia ostertagi in cattle and Haemonchus contortus in sheep, the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica in sheep and cattle with leading positions in subunit vaccine development against Cooperia onchophora, Dictyocaulus viviparus in cattle and the tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus in dogs. This proposal aims to deliver at least one prototype vaccine to the point of uptake by the commercial sector or through government/philanthropic agencies and this will be addressed by 1) Developing effective native or synthetic vaccines, the latter using novel, molecular expression systems. 2) Defining the protective immune responses induced by these vaccines to order to optimise the structure of the antigens and the method of their delivery. 3) Defining vaccine efficacy with trials in both housed and grazing livestock 4) Providing a platform for training and knowledge exchange which includes participation in training programmes, short exchanges of staff, workshops,and web site provision. 5) Interacting closely with computer modellers, the animal health industry, farmer organisations and other stakeholders to define required vaccine characteristics. 6) Knowledge exchange/dissemination to policy makers, scientists, government departments and the general public.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.4.1-6 | Award Amount: 4.16M | Year: 2011

Lung and pancreatic cancers still have a mortality rate over 85% at 5 years of diagnosis, a clear demonstration of the actual treatment failure and the need for improved clinical management. This involves better tools for diagnosis, prognosis, and selection of sensitive and resistant patients to current conventional therapies or improved innovative treatments as well as the development of novel therapeutic strategies. The major objective of this proposal is to improve management of patients with either lung or pancreatic tumors by studying the clinical applications of still not investigated metabolic and signalling pathways with the following aims: -development of new tools for early diagnosis -identification of novel tumour markers for early diagnosis and prognosis -prediction of response to conventional treatments -identification of the molecular mechanisms of generation of resistance -development of improved treatments based on the identification of novel molecular targets -design of novel anticancer strategies. -achieve a better understanding of how combinatorial treatments using current standard clinical procedures with novel treatments under development may improve patient outcome. The proposed consortium is composed of four experimental research groups with a profound knowledge on molecular and cellular biology of cancer, and ample experience in the design of targeted and personalized cancer therapies along with translational research, complemented with three clinical groups with an extensive experience in the clinical management of lung and pancreatic cancer patients, guaranteeing a clinical proof-of principle and applicability, integrating basic-clinical European scientific excellence. Furthermore, the consortium has incorporated one company with direct involvement in critical areas that will make feasible to translate to the clinic the results generated in the project.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP.2011.1.1-1 | Award Amount: 10.04M | Year: 2012

The overall concept of NanoBarrier is to develop a new nanotechnology platform based on inorganic-organic hybrid polymers, microfibrillated cellulose, nanocapsules with controlled permeability and additive technology and combine this with resource-efficient processing technologies to realize safe and extended shelf-life and multifunctional biopolymer food packaging solutions. These solutions based on CO2 neutral and renewable resources, should work as an enabling technology for innovative companies to stimulate to further consumption growth of fish and seafood and environmental conscious packaging solutions for meat and dairy products; food sectors of major social, economical and health impact in the European region. The project will also bring forward robust biopolymer formulations, compounding expertise and coating approaches to combine nanoparticle technology with biopolymer formulations. Dedicated demonstrators are planned based on resource-efficient processing technologies, such as blow moulding and film blowing. The demonstrators will be multifunctional barrier films for meat packaging, multifunctional barrier bottles for liquid yoghurt and milk and multifunctional barrier jars for crab packaging. NanoBarrier will include sustainable parameters from the demonstrator design step applying ecodesign methodology to minimize the environmental, social and economic impact from the early development step. An LCA will quantify the impact of the foreseen demonstrators and measures are taken to evaluate safety. The objectives of the project will be achieved by implementing the work organized in four technical work packages (in addition to a coordination work package) where each WP are designed to fulfill one- or several of the specific scientific objectives in the project. The project consortium cover the whole value chain from manufacture and competence of nanoparticle technology to end-use supply and include leading organizations and competences throughout Europ


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: AAT.2010.1.1-1.;AAT.2010.1.1-3. | Award Amount: 5.10M | Year: 2012

Vision-2020, whose objectives include the reduction of emissions and a more effective transport systems, puts severe demands on aircraft velocity and weight. These require an increased load on wings and aero-engine components. The greening of air transport systems means a reduction of drag and losses, which can be obtained by keeping laminar boundary layers on external and internal airplane parts. Increased loads make supersonic flow velocities more prevalent and are inherently connected to the appearance of shock waves, which in turn may interact with a laminar boundary layer. Such an interaction can quickly cause flow separation, which is highly detrimental to aircraft performance, and poses a threat to safety. In order to diminish the shock induced separation, the boundary layer at the point of interaction should be turbulent. The main objective of the TFAST project is to study the effect of transition location on the structure of interaction. The main question is how close the induced transition may be to the shock wave while still maintaining a typical turbulent character of interaction. The main study cases - shock waves on wings/profiles, turbine and compressor blades and supersonic intake flows - will help to answer open questions posed by the aeronautics industry and to tackle more complex applications. In addition to basic flow configurations, transition control methods (stream-wise vortex generators and electro-hydrodynamic actuators) will be investigated for controlling transition location, interaction induced separation and inherent flow unsteadiness. TFAST for the first time will provide a characterization and selection of appropriate flow control methods for transition induction as well as physical models of these devices. Emphasis will be placed on closely coupled experiments and numerical investigations to overcome weaknesses in both approaches.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.3.1-1 | Award Amount: 3.73M | Year: 2011

This project is concerned with optimising the delivery of primary healthcare to European citizens who are migrants who experience language and cultural barriers in host countries. We focus on the implementation of evidence-based health information (e.g. guidelines to enhance communication in cross-cultural consultations) and interventions (e.g. training initiatives on interculturalism and the use of paid interpreters) designed to address language and cultural barriers in primary care settings. We explore how these are translated (or not) into routine practice in primary care settings. We will investigate and support implementation processes for these using a unique combination of contemporary social theory, the Normalisation Process Theory and a participatory research methodology. Our five study objectives are to determine: What guidelines and/or training initiatives are currently available in our partner countries that have been generated by primary care research in a way that was inclusive of all key stakeholders? How are the guidelines and/or training initiatives translated into practice by primary care staff? What are the processes of implementation, on the ground in routine practice? What is the capacity of primary care settings in different countries (and, therefore, different organisational contexts) to incorporate implementation processes within their current organisational arrangement? Is the implementation work for guidelines and/or training initiatives sustainable - leading to normalised use of these technologies in routine practice? What are the benefits (if any) of using NPT and PLA to investigate and support implementation processes? There will be co-operation between an inter-disciplinary team of experienced researchers, across 6 European health care settings with different organizational contexts and capacities to respond to this implementation work.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME | Phase: SME-2012-1 | Award Amount: 1.47M | Year: 2012

The proposers of RAZone have identified a new market opportunity in enhancing the productivity of the aquaculture sector and minimizing risks associated with application of ozone for water quality management in hatchery and ongrow farms that use RAS technology. This will be achieved by developing improved ozoneflotation technology that is cost effective, user friendly and safe both for stock and farm staff. The innovations of RAZone include novel ozone feeding system that ensures enhanced gas dispersion in water and maximizes contact between gas and water for separation of fine particles and dissolved organics in recirculated water. In addition, the development of RAZone includes innovative flotation chamber where fine particles that make up 70% of suspended substances and dissolved organics are efficiently removed. For optimum dosage of ozone and minimizing risk of stock mortality due to toxicity directly from inefficiently dispersed ozone or from generated by products, an intelligent process control unit will be created. Despite the recognized potential of ozone in RAS, there remains a significant lack of equipment and knowledge in the industry related to cost effective and safe use of the technology. Application of ozone via protein skimmers has become a costly component of RAS operation due to poorly designed equipment for ozone feeding, inefficient configuration of skimmers and lack of controlled ozone dosage combined with poor understanding of process. This may result in either avoidance of ozone technology altogether or inefficient application to achieve desired aims in addition to associated risks. By redressing existing limitations in the application of ozone, the SME participants of RAZOne expect significant economic benefit from a superior technology that will improve management of water quality resulting in reduced stock mortality, improved produce quality and increased production as well as increased employment in the industry.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2009-1-3-05 | Award Amount: 4.17M | Year: 2010

CamCon aims to improve the control of Campylobacter in primary poultry production in various parts of Europe and thereby enable the production of low-risk broilers. The project places great emphasis on ensuring rapid and effective dissemination of scientific achievements to end-users, in particular the EU poultry industry. The consortium consists of 10 participants from seven countries representing various parts of Europe. The participating institutions include national diagnostic laboratories, institutions providing research and advisory services and universities. The scientists involved have a strong background in Campylobacter research and have published many original publications in the field. CamCon will be a 4-year project with a total budget of 4.17 million where the scientific work is organized in five Work Packages: WP1 will study the epidemiology of Campylobacter in broilers in selected regions and climates of the EU and compare the sub-types found in chickens; WP2 will investigate the effectiveness and efficacy of pre-harvest interventions; WP3 will implement on-site, telecommunication-based, hands-free detection methods and develop quantitative screening methods; WP4 will develop second-generation farm-to-fork contamination models for more precise quantitative risk assessments; and WP5 will prepare guidelines, educational videos, Internet-based tools, and propose EU standards for producers, regulators and consumers, which are based on the results of the research carried out in the other Work Packages.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2013.7.3.3 | Award Amount: 4.42M | Year: 2013

SIRBATT (Stable Interfaces for Rechargeable Batteries) is a multisite collaborative project consisting of 12 full partners from the European Area (6 Universities, 1 Research Institute and 5 industrial partners). Collaboration with leading battery research groups in the USA and Japan is also considered. The diversity of the research organisations in the partnership has been chosen to provide a wide range of complementary expertise in areas relating to the study of battery electrode interfaces, covering both experimental and theoretical aspects of this important contemporary area. SIRBATT will develop microsensors to monitor internal temperature and pressure of lithium cells in order to maintain optimum operating conditions to allow long-life times that can be scaled for use in grid scale batteries. The cells will comprise of candidate electrode materials in which the complex interfacial region and surface layers have been well characterised and understood via utilisation of a suit of advanced in situ measurement techniques complemented by application of transformative modelling methods. The knowledge from these studies will be used to develop candidate electrode materials with an optimised cycle life and stability, for example by the use of novel stable lithium salts and the inclusion of stable film forming additives into the electrolyte. The scientific aim of SIRBATT is the radical improvement in the fundamental understanding of the structure and reactions occurring at lithium battery electrode/electrolyte interfaces which it will seek to achieve through an innovative programme of collaborative research and development.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: INFRA-2011-2.1.1. | Award Amount: 10.17M | Year: 2011

Key questions in physics can be answered only by constructing a giant underground observatory to search for rare events and study terrestrial and astrophysical neutrinos. The Astroparticle Roadmap of ApPEC/ASPERA strongly supports this, recommending that: a new large European infrastructure of 100000-500000 ton for proton decay and low-energy neutrinos be evaluated as a common design study together with the underground infrastructure and eventual detection of accelerator neutrino beams. The latest CERN roadmap also states: a range of very important non-accelerator experiments takes place at the overlap of particle and astroparticle physics exploring otherwise inaccessible phenomena; Council will seek with ApPEC a coordinated strategy in these areas of mutual interest. Reacting to this, uniting scientists across Europe with industrial support to produce a very strong collaboration, the LAGUNA FP7 design study has had a very positive effect. It enabled, via study of seven pre-selected locations (Finland, France, Italy, Poland, Romania, Spain and UK), a detailed geo-technical assessment of the giant underground cavern needed, concluding finally that no geo-technical show-stoppers to cavern construction exist. Building on this, the present design study will address two challenges vital to making a final detector and site choice: (i) to determine the full cost of construction underground, commissioning and long-term operation of the infrastructure, and (ii) to determine the full impact of including long baseline neutrino physics with beams from CERN.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.3.1 | Award Amount: 17.80M | Year: 2013

To extend beyond existing limits in nanodevice fabrication, new and unconventional lithographic technologies are necessary to reach Single Nanometer Manufacturing (SNM) for novel Beyond CMOS devices. Two approaches are considered: scanning probe lithography (SPL) and focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP). Our project tackles this challenge by employing SPL and FEBIP with novel small molecule resist materials. The goal is to work from slow direct-write methods to high speed step-and-repeat manufacturing by Nano Imprint Lithography (NIL), developing methods for precise generation, placement, metrology and integration of functional features at 3 - 5 nm by direct write and sub-10nm into a NIL-template. The project will first produce a SPL-tool prototype and will then develop and demonstrate an integrated process flow to establish proof-of-concept Beyond CMOS devices employing developments in industrial manufacturing processes (NIL, plasma etching) and new materials (Graphene, MoS2). By the end of the project: (a) SNM technology will be used to demonstrate novel room temperature single electron and quantum effect devices; (b) a SNM technology platform will be demonstrated, showing an integrated process flow, based on SPL prototype tools, electron beam induced processing, and finally pattern transfer at industrial partner sites. An interdisciplinary team (7 Industry and 8 Research/University partners) from experienced scientists will be established to cover specific fields of expertise: chemical synthesis, scanning probe lithography, FEBIP-Litho, sub-3nm design and device fabrication, single nanometer etching, and Step-and-Repeat NIL- and novel alignment system design. The project coordinator is a University with great experience in nanostructuring and European project management where the executive board includes European industry leaders such as IBM, IMEC, EVG, and Oxford Instruments.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2011.2.1.1-3 | Award Amount: 17.32M | Year: 2011

Bacterial infection is the major cause of disability and death in children worldwide. We will use meningococcal disease (MD) as a model to understand genetic factors underlying susceptibility and severity of childhood bacterial infection which will then be applied to other childhood infections. We have established cohorts of patients with MD in Central and Southern Europe (CE,SE), UK and Africa as well as cohorts with other bacterial infections. We have established an inter-disciplinary team with expertise in Infectious Diseases, Immunogenetics, Bio-informatics, Microbiology, Public Health and Vaccinology including SME and industrial partners. We have already undertaken a genome wide study (GWAS) to identify genes causing susceptibility to meningococcal disease in a UK cohort. We identified complement factor H (fH) and fH-related (fHr) genes controlling MD susceptibility. This finding is fundamental to prevention as vaccines containing the MD fH receptor are undergoing trials. We will undertake GWAS on the CE, and SE MD cohorts, allowing meta analysis, and cross validation, and undertake GWAS on 2,500 Meningococcal Vaccine recipients. We will use next generation sequencing to identify the causal variants within the fH/fHr region and other regions implicated by pathway and severity analyses of the three MD GWAS and vaccine GWAS. We will match bacterial and host genetic variation and identify mechanisms of action of fH variants and other genes controlling susceptibility and severity using RNA expression, functional analyses and animal models. We will identify Mendelian defects and rare mutations as well as copy number variation and epi-genetic effects using next generation sequencing and RNA sequencing in extreme phenotype cohorts with MD , pneumococcal ,staphylococcal and salmonella disease. The study will identify mechanisms underlying susceptibility, provide new targets for treatment and prevention, and identify those at risk of disease or poor outcome.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA | Phase: ICT-2013.8.1 | Award Amount: 1.09M | Year: 2013

This project aims to bridge communities of creators with communities of technology providers and innovators, in a collective, strategic intelligence/roadmapping effort to streamline, coordinate and amplify collaborative work towards developing, enhancing, and mainstreaming new ICT technologies and tools by addressing the needs of different sectors of the creative industries (e.g. art, culture, publishing, design etc.)\n\nDespite the profound impact of ICT in most of societys daily activities, ICT engagement with art seems to have been left a bit behind. To fill this gap, ICT use could help make art more widely accessible, more inclusive, and generate significant awareness around it. The project will involve creators who currently use ICT tools in their everyday creative practices, and engage them in a collective dialogue with ICT researchers and developers, with a focus of empowering creators by giving them access to new forms of facilitation, enhancement, and contextualization of the creative process and its product--the artistic inspiration, pursuit, and possibilities, as well as the artwork itself. The focus will be the future ICT R&D agenda, which will develop new tools for supporting the creative processes as well as enhancing and improving existing tools and platforms to be more adapted to, or to better care for, the needs of specific creators groups. Thus, the project will also contribute to overcoming the existing fragmentation in efforts by bringing together the relevant stakeholder communities, and to the creation of a critical mass of ICT and creative communities working together. The main target users will be individual creators/workers and professionals, as well as SMEs, creative groups, communities, and organizations. Main results will include recommendations for policy, planning, and decision making for the creative industries community and convergent plans (roadmaps) for specific future actions and initiatives developments for each creative sector.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: SSH 2011.8.8-3 | Award Amount: 1.18M | Year: 2012

This proposal is focused on increasing our understanding of the career paths and employment patterns and contribution of doctoral graduates in the social sciences and humanities. The study focuses on three Objectives: Objective 1: Identification of the dimensions of the population and its core characteristics and assess trends in their employment Objective 2: Identify the diversity of post-doctoral career paths in the SSH field. Objective 3: Assessment of the contribution that this diverse group of research-trained graduates make to Europes knowledge based economy and society (their impact). In order to respond effectively to these objectives a team of national experts has been put together. All the team have extensive experience of work in this area from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and specific research skills. The team represents 13 European countries. The national reach of the team is however much broader with all participants having engaged in cross-country research spanning the EU and beyond. The work is distributed across 8 work packages combining a range of research review, policy analysis, statistical analysis with fresh survey research and qualitative interviews. The study incorporates an integrated impact strategy commencing at project start-up through close engagement with the stake holder and user communities and SSH researchers themselves. An active dissemination programme comprising text and web-based dissemination with 5 Regional Workshops and international quality level academic publication commitments. The results of this work will provide an important and entirely new evidence base enabling us to respond to the three objectives outlined above and shape the future of social sciences and humanities at European and National level.


The AIDA project aims to answer the question of clinical effectiveness and optimal dosing of 5 off-patent antibiotics for infections caused by multiple drug resistant (MDR) bacteria in three randomized controlled clinical trials. In an era of increasing emergence of drug resistance (EDR) and lack of new antibiotics, old off- patent antibiotics are increasingly being prescribed to patients. However, many of these were developed in an age before the advent of a structured process for drug assessment and approval, and the establishment of clinical efficacy and effectiveness in randomized controlled trials in particular. In a multidisciplinary approach the exposure response relationships for each antibiotic will be elucidated by including pharmacokinetic (PK), pharmacodynamic (PD) and microbiological studies, including emergence of drug resistance (EDR). The project addresses the optimization of treatment of infections caused by MDR pathogens that impose a major burden of disease in Europe and the rest of the world by selecting 5 off-patent-antibiotics that are increasingly being used without clear evidence with respect to their effectiveness, duration of therapy and issues of EDR. In the first trial the efficacy of colistin alone is compared to colistin plus imipenem for severe infections caused by carbapenem-resistant bacteria. The second trial compares fosfomycin vs. nitrofurantoin for the treatment of lower urinary tract infection in women at high risk of antibiotic-resistant pathogens. In the third trial antimicrobial oral treatment with minocycline plus rifampicin is compared with oral treatment with linezolid for complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTI) due to MRSA. Exposure response relationships, PK/PD and EDR issues will be addressed in a separate project component and is an essential element of the research project that will interrelate synergistically with the clinical studies. The results thereof will be used to refine exposure response relationships but also to study effects of exposure that are not readily observed in the trials. This will aid to delineate optimal exposures and drug dosing. This project addresses an urgent medical need that is critical both for individual patients and for society. An effective dissemination strategy is essential to effectively communicate project results to the target groups therefore supporting the project goal of preserving and strengthening the public health benefits of the studied off-patent antibiotics. The dissemination of project results to professional groups and the public in general, communication to policymakers, and implementation of results in national formularies is an important aspect.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2008-1.1.1 | Award Amount: 18.74M | Year: 2009

The Project promotes the access to five European Research Infrastructures, and it is structured intop eight Networking Activities, plus the Management of the Consortium, and fourteen Joint Research Activities. The Project represents the continuation of the successful HadronPhysics project in FP6 and originates from the initiative of more than 2.500 European scientists working in the field of hadron physics. Hadron physics deals with the study of strongly interacting particles, the hadrons. Hadrons are composed of quarks and gluons. Their interaction is described by Quantum Chromo Dynamics, the theory of the strong force. Hadrons form more complex systems, in particular atomic. Under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature, hadrons may loose their identity and dissolve into a new state of matter similar to the primordial matter of the early Universe. The Networking Activities are related to the organization of experimental and theoretical collaborative work concerning both ongoing activities at present Research Infrastructures and planned experiments at future facilities. In hadron physics the close interaction between experimentalists and theoreticians is of paramount importance. The Joint Research Activities concentrate on technological innovations for present and future experiments. Applications in material science, medicine, information, technology, etc., represent natural fall-outs. The main objective of this Integrating Activity is to optimize the use and development of the Research Infrastructures existing in Europe working in the field of hadron physics. The Project aims as well at structuring, on European scale, the way Research Infrastructures operate, and at fostering their joint development in terms of capacity and performance. The approach used is the bottom up approach, to respond to the needs of the scientific community in all fields of science and technology.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.4.5-2 | Award Amount: 7.93M | Year: 2012

Chronic inflammatory diseases of joints are major causes of disability in the ageing population. Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common types of arthritis and a major cause of pain and disability in older individuals. OA is expected to place a heavy burden on European healthcare systems, as European citizens grow older. Cartilage damage in OA is detected radiographically by decreases in joint space width (JSW). However, radiographic evidence is seen only after significant cartilage degradation has already taken place. The early stages of the disease may remain latent and asymptomatic for many years. Therefore, there is an acute need for reliable biomarkers and diagnostic tests that can facilitate earlier diagnosis of OA, and inform the prognosis, monitoring and therapeutic strategies for chronic and disabling forms of this disease. However, there is currently a lack of reliable, quantifiable and easily measured biomarkers that provide an earlier diagnosis of OA, inform on the prognostic of the disease and monitor and predict responses to therapeutic modalities. Biomarkers of tissue turnover in joints can reflect disease relevant biological activity and provide valuable information that may be useful diagnostically and therapeutically, potentially enabling a more rational and personalized approach to healthcare management. The proliferation of omic technologies has facilitated rapid progress in biomarker research. Combinations of omic technologies are dominating the biomarker research arena and are playing increasingly important roles in the identification, validation and qualification of new biomarkers. The aim of the D-BOARD consortium is to bring together leading academic institutions and European Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) to focus on the identification, validation and qualification of new combination biomarkers and the development of diagnostic tests capable of subclinical disease diagnosis for degenerative and inflammatory diseases of joints.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2013.6.2-2 | Award Amount: 16.30M | Year: 2013

SOLUTIONS will deliver a conceptual framework for the evidence-based development of environmental and water policies. This will integrate innovative chemical and effect-based monitoring tools with a full set of exposure, effect and risk models and assessment options. Uniquely, SOLUTIONS taps (i) expertise of leading European scientists of major FP6/FP7 projects on chemicals in the water cycle, (ii) access to the infrastructure necessary to investigate the large basins of Danube and Rhine as well as relevant Mediterranean basins as case studies, and (iii) innovative approaches for stakeholder dialogue and support. In particular, International River Commissions, EC working groups and water works associations will be directly supported with consistent guidance for the early detection, identification, prioritization, and abatement of chemicals in the water cycle. A user-friendly tool providing access to a set of predictive models will support stakeholders to improve management decisions, benefiting from the wealth of data generated from monitoring and chemical registration. SOLUTIONS will give a specific focus on concepts and tools for the impact and risk assessment of complex mixtures of emerging pollutants, their metabolites and transformation products. Analytical and effect-based screening tools will be applied together with ecological assessment tools for the identification of toxicants and their impacts. Beyond state-of-the-art monitoring and management tools will be elaborated allowing risk identification for aquatic ecosystems and human health. The SOLUTIONS approach will provide transparent and evidence-based lists of River Basin Specific Pollutants for the case study basins and support the review of the list of WFD priority pollutants.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SSH.2012.3.2-1 | Award Amount: 8.36M | Year: 2013

The main objectives of this project are to investigate the diversity of family forms, relationships, and life courses in Europe; to assess the compatibility of existing policies with these changes; and to contribute to evidence-based policy-making. The project will extend our knowledge on how policies promote well-being, inclusion and sustainable societal development among families. Our approach relies on three key premises. First, family life courses are becoming more diverse and complex. Second, individual lives are interdependent, linked within and across generations. Third, social contexts and policies shape individual and family life courses. Building upon these premises we a) explore the growing complexity of family configurations and transitions, b) examine their implications for men, women and children with respect to inequalities in life chances, intergenerational relations and care arrangements, c) investigate how policies address family diversity, d) develop short- and longer-term projections, and e) identify future policy needs. Transversal dimensions that are integrated into the project are gender, culture, socioeconomic resources and life stages. Our approach is multidisciplinary combining a wide range of expertise in social sciences, law and the humanities represented in the consortium of 25 research partners from 15 European countries, old and new member states, and three transnational civil society actors. We will conduct comparative analyses applying advanced quantitative methods to high quality register and survey data, and qualitative studies. The project will also develop a database of the legal content of family forms available in European countries, suitable for comparative analyses. Together with various stakeholders, government agencies, national and local policy-makers, non-governmental organizations and additional members of the scientific community across Europe, we will identify and disseminate innovation and best policy practices.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: ENV.2009.1.2.1.2 | Award Amount: 4.72M | Year: 2010

One of the most dramatic and immediate impacts of climate variation is that on disease, especially the vector-borne diseases that disproportionally affect the poorest people in Africa. Although we can clearly see that, for example, an El Nino event triggers Rift Valley Fever epidemics, we remain poor at understanding why particular areas are vulnerable and how this will change in coming decades, since climate change is likely to cause entirely new global disease distributions. This applies to most vector borne disease. At the same time, we do not know currently the limit of predictability of the specific climate drivers for vector-borne disease using state-of-the-art seasonal forecast models, and how best to use these to produce skilful infection-rate predictions on seasonal timescales. The QWeCI project thus aims to understand at a more fundamental level the climate drivers of the vector-borne diseases of malaria, Rift Valley Fever, and certain tick-borne diseases, which all have major human and livestock health and economic implications in Africa, in order to assist with their short-term management and make projections of their future likely impacts. QWeCI will develop and test the methods and technology required for an integrated decision support framework for health impacts of climate and weather. Uniquely, QWeCl will bring together the best in world integrated weather/climate forecasting systems with heath impacts modelling and climate change research groups in order to build an end-to-end seamless integration of climate and weather information for the quantification and prediction of climate and weather on health impacts in Africa.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.1.1-2 | Award Amount: 2.20M | Year: 2011

Over the last few years the field of proteomics has evolved into a prolific data producer. As a result, various databases that collect and redistribute the acquired data have been established. While data format standards for quantitative proteomics have now been defined and implemented with significant contribution from the recently completed EU ProDaC grant, standards for quantitative proteomics are still lacking. This simultaneous creation of multiple repositories and databases, and lack of standards for quantitative proteomics result in a fragmentation of data, and cause confusion for data submitters and users alike. Based on consortium expertise in the operation of large scale proteomics repositories (PRIDE, PeptideAtlas, Tranche, Peptidome) we aim to implement the next step, regular data exchange between major international proteomics resources. In parallel, we will further develop standards (mzQuantML) for the dynamic field of quantitative mass spectrometry. The main objectives of ProteomExchange are user-oriented: (i) to provide a single point of data submission to the user; (ii) to ensure data availability in all of the different member databases; (iii) to use community standard formats to represent the data, so it becomes accessible to all regardless of data origin; (iv) to provide added value through different views on the same data, from repositories to derived search tools. With an international consortium and support from large scale data producers (ISAS (Germany), U. Cambridge (UK), Karolinska Institute (Sweden)), industry (Pfizer, Philips, Waters), and journals (Nature Biotechnology, MCP, JPR), we here propose a Coordination Action project to solidify an emerging informal collaboration between major repositories into a production-quality data deposition and dissemination consortium on par with the systems so successfully employed by three-dimensional structure databases and nucleotide sequence databases, amongst others.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: INFRADEV-03-2016-2017 | Award Amount: 3.30M | Year: 2017

Childrens health is a major societal challenge for Europe and the world, requiring development of paediatric medicines and treatments strategies based on evidence derived from clinical trials demonstrating efficacy and safety in infants and children, rather than on uncritical extrapolation from adult data (over 50 % of the medicines used for children had not been tested in this specific age group). Conducting clinical trials in children requires specific competences and infrastructure. ECRIN-ERIC (www.ecrin.org) is a generic infrastructure for multinational trial management, in any disease area. However it does not specifically address the paediatric needs in terms of trial management capacity. In its 2016 Roadmap, ESFRI suggested an upgrade of ECRIN to develop a common infrastructure for paediatric trial management through cooperation with the European Paediatric Clinical Trial Research Infrastructure (EPCTRI). The resulting PedCRIN project is also a unique opportunity to improve ECRIN business model and financial sustainability, attracting more industry-sponsored trials and more Member and Observer countries. PedCRIN builds on five work packages : project coordination (WP1); establishment of a strategy and upgrade of the governance and business plan, through a Sustainability Board jointly involving the scientific partners and the government representatives (WP2); development of tools specific for paediatric and neonatal trials (WP3) (methodology, outcome measures, adverse event reporting, bio-sample management, ethical and regulatory database, monitoring, quality and certification); operational support provided as transnational access to a few pilot trials to test the updated organisation and tools (WP4); communication targeting users communities (including industry), policymakers, patient and parents empowerment (WP5). Two other ESFRI-landmarks, BBMRI-ERIC and EATRIS ERIC, will contribute to PedCRIN.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRADEV-4-2014-2015 | Award Amount: 14.84M | Year: 2015

The social and economic challenges of ageing populations and chronic disease can only be met by translation of biomedical discoveries to new, innovative and cost effective treatments. The ESFRI Biological and Medical Research Infrastructures (BMS RI) underpin every step in this process; effectively joining scientific capabilities and shared services will transform the understanding of biological mechanisms and accelerate its translation into medical care. Biological and medical research that addresses the grand challenges of health and ageing span a broad range of scientific disciplines and user communities. The BMS RIs play a central, facilitating role in this groundbreaking research: inter-disciplinary biomedical and translational research requires resources from multiple research infrastructures such as biobank samples, and resources from multiple research infrastructures such as biobank samples, imaging facilities, molecular screening centres or animal models. Through a user-led approach CORBEL will develop the tools, services and data management required by cutting-edge European research projects: collectively the BMS RIs will establish a sustained foundation of collaborative scientific services for biomedical research in Europe and embed the combined infrastructure capabilities into the scientific workflow of advanced users. Furthermore CORBEL will enable the BMS RIs to support users throughout the execution of a scientific project: from planning and grant applications through to the long-term sustainable management and exploitation of research data. By harmonising user access, unifying data management, creating common ethical and legal services, and offering joint innovation support CORBEL will establish and support a new model for biological and medical research in Europe. The BMS RI joint platform will visibly reduce redundancy and simplify project management and transform the ability of users to deliver advanced, cross-disciplinary research.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: SiS-2010-1.0.1 | Award Amount: 4.56M | Year: 2011

This ambitious SiS CATALYST project seeks to identify how children can be change agents in the Science and Society relationship, and from this starting point, to indicate how they can be catalysts in the longer term solutions to the grand challenges faced by society - their future. It will contextual this in Global, European, national, regional and local arenas. The Action Plan involves refining Case Studies of replicable and scalable SiS activities for children with an associated pan European benchmarking and mutual agreement process, which will provide vehicles for strategic and political alignment, as well as shared assessment tools. These core WPs will be enriched by WPs which systematically engage three critical groups: young people, students and Key Players. The focus will be on children with ability, who are currently least likely to progress to study science in post secondary education. It will also combine the science and society agenda with the social inclusion agenda through entrepreneurship as well as considering the ethics of activities. The capturing the mutual learning will be priortised and robustly disseminating and communicating this in regional, national, European arenas and beyond, specifically targeting newcomers. The totality of the activities of the consortium will be externally evaluated and all actors will be assisted to reflect on the Partnership Learning that has occurred. This will be captured as an example of mobilising mutual learning for future European initiatives. Key to the project will be the active participation of young people, exploring their perceptions and understanding of science. Learning from them as the scientists of the future. The Action Plan will be systematically promoted in Europe and beyond, with the goal of having at least 20 Ministers for Education presenting the same certificates to children in 20 countries in the final year and a Childrens Gateway to the website of every University in the World


Ford E.S.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Capewell S.,University of Liverpool
Annual Review of Public Health | Year: 2011

Mortality rates from coronary heart disease (CHD), which had risen during the twentieth century in many countries, started declining in some countries during the 1960s. Once initial skepticism about the validity of the observed trends dissipated, researchers attempted to generate explanations about the events that had transpired using a variety of techniques, including ecological examinations of the trends in risk factors for CHD and changes in management of CHD, multivariate risk equations, and increasingly sophisticated modeling techniques. Improvements in risk factors as well as changes in cardiac treatments have both contributed to the reductions in CHD mortality, although estimates of their contributions have varied among countries. Models suggest that additional large reductions in CHD mortality are feasible by either improving the distribution of risk factors in the population or raising the percentage of patients receiving evidence-based treatments. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. rights reserved.


Colver A.,Royal Infirmary | Fairhurst C.,Evelina Childrens Hospital | Pharoah P.O.D.,University of Liverpool
The Lancet | Year: 2014

The syndrome of cerebral palsy encompasses a large group of childhood movement and posture disorders. Severity, patterns of motor involvement, and associated impairments such as those of communication, intellectual ability, and epilepsy vary widely. Overall prevalence has remained stable in the past 40 years at 2-3.5 cases per 1000 livebirths, despite changes in antenatal and perinatal care. The few studies available from developing countries suggest prevalence of comparable magnitude. Cerebral palsy is a lifelong disorder; approaches to intervention, whether at an individual or environmental level, should recognise that quality of life and social participation throughout life are what individuals with cerebral palsy seek, not improved physical function for its own sake. In the past few years, the cerebral palsy community has learned that the evidence of benefi t for the numerous drugs, surgery, and therapies used over previous decades is weak. Improved understanding of the role of multiple gestation in pathogenesis, of gene environment interaction, and how to infl uence brain plasticity could yield signifi cant advances in treatment of the disorder. Reduction in the prevalence of post-neonatal cerebral palsy, especially in developing countries, should be possible through improved nutrition, infection control, and accident prevention.


Dell G.S.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | Chang F.,University of Liverpool
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences | Year: 2014

This article introduces the P-chain, an emerging framework for theory in psycholinguistics that unifies research on comprehension, production and acquisition. The framework proposes that language processing involves incremental prediction, which is carried out by the production system. Prediction necessarily leads to prediction error, which drives learning, including both adaptive adjustment to the mature language processing system as well as language acquisition. To illustrate the P-chain, we review the Dual-path model of sentence production, a connectionist model that explains structural priming in production and a number of facts about language acquisition. The potential of this and related models for explaining acquired and developmental disorders of sentence production is discussed. © 2013 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Collaborative Research & Development | Award Amount: 2.56M | Year: 2014

Hybrid Air Vehicles Ltd has formed a collaborative industrial research team with Blue Bear Systems Research, Forward Composites, Liverpool University, Sheffield University and Cranfield University. This project team will advance the fundamental and interrelated enabling technologies required to maintain the UKs lead in the field of hybrid air vehicles – a novel aircraft form with substantial worldwide sales potential (against competitors such as Lockheed Martin and EADS). The project will focus on lowering the developmental risks in key technology areas such as novel aircraft aerodynamics, carbon composite structures, avionics monitoring systems and improving rate production to enable launch of production design and manufacture. The project results will be exploited by HAV and the UK aerospace supply chain generating UK jobs and maintaining HAV’s lead in the field of hybrid air vehicles and LTA technology.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2011.1.4-2 | Award Amount: 7.80M | Year: 2012

The concept of THE GRAIL project is the creation of an in vivo, in situ structured bioactive, selectively porous, bioresorbable scaffold that locally regenerates intima growth after endovascular treatment of the obstructed arteries in patients with atherosclerosis. Arterial obstruction due to arteriosclerosis is the cause of a wide spectrum of diseases, disabilities and death, because of induced ischemia in feed arteries of the diseased organs. These organs include the brain (ischemic stroke), the heart , the kidneys, the gastrointestinal tract, the lower limbs (leading to amputations, especially in diabetic patients). The purpose of the in vivo tissue engineered (TE) blood vessel is to offer an alternative treatment for patients affected with this disease: to substitute the actual mechanical, acute oriented rechanneling or by passing of obstructed arteries with a regenerative, physiological, disease solving and long term oriented, approach in the therapy of ischemic cardiovascular disease, compatible with today minimal invasive surgical techniques. This is an unexplored area of approaches of therapy for arterial obstruction by TE technology: the substitution of the diseased arterial intima (atherosclerotic plaque removed) with an absorbable bioactive scaffold, called the synthesized intimal layer (SIL), to be repopulated by resident and circulating patient resident and stem cells. SIL does not intend to stent the artery; conversely it aims to replace the diseased and stiffened area with a soft and compliant intelligent scaffold that becomes reabsorbed once its task is completed , leaving a physiologically responsive regenerated tissue. The project aims to merge the single laboratories ongoing work, coordinate it and finalizing it to bring it through the whole pre clinical process, including the whole regulatory work, the GLP animal pre clinical implants and the design and production of TE device deployment technology.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-09-2015 | Award Amount: 28.14M | Year: 2016

Many HIV vaccine concepts and several efficacy trials have been conducted in the prophylactic and therapeutic fields with limited success. There is an urgent need to develop better vaccines and tools predictive of immunogenicity and of correlates of protection at early stage of vaccine development to mitigate the risks of failure. To address these complex and challenging scientific issues, the European HIV Vaccine Alliance (EHVA) program will develop a Multidisciplinary Vaccine Platform (MVP) in the fields of prophylactic and therapeutic HIV vaccines. The Specific Objectives of the MVP are to build up: 1.Discovery Platform with the goal of generating novel vaccine candidates inducing potent neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibody responses and T-cell responses, 2. Immune Profiling Platform with the goal of ranking novel and existing (benchmark) vaccine candidates on the basis of the immune profile, 3. Data Management/Integration/Down-Selection Platform, with the goal of providing statistical tools for the analysis and interpretation of complex data and algorithms for the efficient selection of vaccines, and 4. Clinical Trials Platform with the goal of accelerating the clinical development of novel vaccines and the early prediction of vaccine failure. EHVA project has developed a global and innovative strategy which includes: a) the multidisciplinary expertise involving immunologists, virologists, structural biology experts, statisticians and computational scientists and clinicians; b) the most innovative technologies to profile immune response and virus reservoir; c) the access to large cohort studies bringing together top European clinical scientists/centres in the fields of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines, d) the access to a panel of experimental HIV vaccines under clinical development that will be used as benchmark, and e) the liaison to a number of African leading scientists/programs which will foster the testing of future EHVA vaccines through EDCTP


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRADEV-1-2014 | Award Amount: 3.99M | Year: 2015

The award of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Physics acknowledged the leading role of Europe in particle physics, which has a global community of over 10,000 scientists. To reinforce its pole position throughout the 21st century, Europe must be ready to propose an ambitious post-LHC accelerator project by 2018/19. This is one of the main recommendations of the updated European Strategy for Particle Physics, adopted by the CERN Council in May 2013. The EuroCirCol conceptual design study is a direct response to this recommendation, initiating a study for a 100 TeV energy-frontier circular collider through a collaboration of institutes and universities worldwide. A new research infrastructure of such scale depends on the feasibility of key technologies pushed beyond current state of the art. Innovative designs for accelerator magnets to achieve high-quality fields up to 16 T and for a cryogenic beam vacuum system to cope with unprecedented synchrotron light power are required. The effects of colliding two 50 TeV beams must be mastered to meet the physics research requirements. Advanced energy efficiency, reliability and cost effectiveness are key factors to build and operate such an accelerator within realistic time scale and cost. This proposal is part of the Future Circular Collider study under European leadership, federating resources worldwide to assess the merits of different post-LHC accelerator scenarios. It forms the core of a globally coordinated strategy of converging activities, involving participants from the ERA and beyond. Organisations joining this study from Japan and the USA are expected to take part in a global implementation project and a suitable governance model will be drawn-up accordingly. The main outcome of EuroCirCol will be laying the foundation of subsequent infrastructure development actions that will strengthen the ERA as a focal point of global research cooperation and as a leader in frontier knowledge and technologies over the next decades.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: NMP.2012.4.0-2 | Award Amount: 587.89K | Year: 2013

Engineering simulation is an essential feature of the design and manufacture of all engineered products at all scales. However such simulations are not routinely validated, at least in part because technology for rapid, cost-effect validations has not been available. Two previous projects, SPOTS and ADVISE have led to the development of appropriate technology. The goal of the VANESSA project is to establish the validation methodology and the associated calibration procedures within a standards framework and to promote the adoption of the methodology within the European industrial and scientific communities. It will deliver a CEN Workshop Agreement on the validation of computational solid mechanics models using strain fields from calibrated optical measurement systems. It is expected that this innovative approach to design validation will be taken up by EU industrial base leading to a strengthening of the position of European industry. The technical approach embedded in the validation process has the potential to stimulate improved quality control for the process chain from design, during production and certification, through to service and maintenance.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.1.2-2 | Award Amount: 15.73M | Year: 2012

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a major health problem with severe co-morbidities, requiring life-long treatment. Oscillating processes, like biological clocks are well studied and modeled in a number of systems. Circadian rhythms are extremely important for optimal treatments of patients. Recently, the NfkB pathway has been shown to be oscillating. In this project, we will model NfkB oscillation in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases in animal models and patient cohorts with immunosuppressive treatments and controls. The aim is to build an experimentally validated model the NfkB oscillation in 4D within the gut tissue. Dynamic, experimental validation will be done for various types of cells in the gut by a combination of methods, including single-cell based transcriptomics, multi-photon microscopy and time-dependent, multi-component profiling. The validated model framework will enable searching for critical components of the NfB oscillation and to assess their relevance for the disease in patients. Interfering with the oscillation of biological pathways may provide new possibilities to influence biological processes like inflammation. Hence, we will search (assisted by the models and databases developed) for small molecules interfering with the NfkB oscillation in chemical databases and validate selected candidates in experimental systems. To this end, we will use cell lines with the correct indicator constructs using high content microscopy. To better translate the findings in animal models to patients, we will use a mouse model with transplanted human tissue so that we can verify the mathematical model in human tissue and verify functionality of small molecules in vivo. Owing to its systems, highly focused approach, the project will generate substantial insights into key mechanisms underlying IBD and will provide ways to modulate the oscillatory behavior of the NfB in IBD and IBD-dependent co-morbidities.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.3.2-1 | Award Amount: 7.82M | Year: 2012

Acquired immune deficiency (AIDS), tuberculosis (TB) and malaria are the primary infectious diseases causing death world wide. In addition to these pathogens, 170 million people are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), which leads to chronic liver disease. Because of shared routes of transmission, HCV co-infection is recognized as a major cause of morbidity and mortality among HIV-1 infected persons. The epidemiology and clinical features of co-infected subjects are well documented, however, there is a paucity of basic scientific studies addressing the interactions between these pathogens. There is undoubtedly a complex interplay between pathogens and the host immune response. This was highlighted when the Merck HIV-1 vaccine trial was halted due to increased HIV-1 transmission amongst vaccine recipients with previous adenovirus infection, suggesting that immune responses specific for adenovirus vector antigens were detrimental. We propose that pathogen evasion and dysregulation of host immune responses plays a key role in co-infection associated morbidity. We will test this hypothesis by establishing in vitro and ex vivo co-infection model systems to study pathogen interactions and assess the effect(s) of co-infection on innate signalling and adaptive immune responses. We will develop new approaches to dissect pathogen interactions, ranging from the genesis of fluorescent labelled viruses to state-of-the-art tissue explant models and novel humanised mouse models. Translational studies of co-infected patients will ascertain pathogen-specific effects on innate and adaptive immune responses and the consequences for disease progression. It is imperative that such interactions are elucidated before proceeding with new prophylactic or therapeutic strategies aimed at curtailing pathogen transmission or disease progression in co-infected individuals. We specifically address the call of understanding the basic biology of co-pathogen interactions and immunity.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.1.2-1 | Award Amount: 5.41M | Year: 2011

The LCAOS project will develop and test a new diagnostic tool, able to detect: (i) the presence of lung cancer (LC), and (ii) an increased risk of a patient developing LC in the future. Diagnostic tests currently available are unsuitable for widespread screening because they are costly, occasionally miss tumours, are not time-efficient, nor free of complications. LCAOS will overcome these problems by using an approach based on volatile biomarkers emitted from cell membranes. A multidisciplinary effort, incorporating nanotechnology, biomedical engineering, medical oncology, and computation strategies, will develop a highly-sensitive, inexpensive, and fast-response, non-invasive, artificial nose (known as, NaNose), building on the coordinators earlier success in this area. The NaNose will be able to detect pre-neoplastic volatile biomarkers that indicate an increased genetic risk of LC, and the presence of LC. It has already been established that these biomarkers can be detected either directly from the headspace of the cancer cells or via exhaled breath. LCAOS will: (i) develop arrays of chemically-sensitive field effect transistors (FETs) of non-oxidized, molecule-terminated silicon nanowires (Si NWs); (ii) test the ability of these devices to sense volatile LC biomarkers from in-vitro tissue, and exhaled human breath; (iii) study the signal transduction mechanism of the volatile biomarkers, using pattern recognition; (iv) improve systems to enable the NaNose to distinguish the targeted biomarkers from environmental clutter, using methylation, expression profiling, and genome-wide sequencing; and (v) perform clinical-related studies to assess LC conditions in actual patients & tissues, and in the presence of real-world confounding signals. Validation will be carried out by clinician partners and professional mathematicians and computer scientists. Resources will also be allocated to ensure the commercial potential of the sensor device layout.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-EJD | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-EJD | Award Amount: 3.86M | Year: 2016

Our aim is to create, in Europe, an innovative and ambitious multidisciplinary intersectoral joint doctoral training programme, dedicated to Methods in Research on Research (MIROR) in the field of clinical research. Research on Research, is an emerging new scientific discipline that aims to reduce waste in research and increase research value. Waste in research represents tens of billions of Euros spent each year on studies that are redundant, flawed in their design, never published or poorly reported. The public is the main victim of this waste and reducing waste and increasing value of research represents a major societal challenge. Our proposal involving 15 early-stage researchers, aims to 1) prepare students for envisioning the future challenges in clinical research and find innovative solutions to face them, 2) train students to go well beyond the state-of-the-art in their research, 3) help students think differently, taking advantage of the multidisciplinary expertise and intercultural diversity of the network, 4) teach students how to move from research to action and convert knowledge and idea into a product, and 5) help students develop skills to match the public and private sector needs and create new professional opportunities. MIROR will bring together 7 world-class research teams in various disciplines (computer sciences, applied mathematics, biostatistics, bioinformatics, clinical epidemiology, psychology, social sciences and translational medicine) from 6 different European countries; 6 non-academic partners involved in diverse sectors, and 4 major academic partners. We will tackle several steps of a clinical research project (planning, conduct, reporting and the peer-review); various study designs (observational studies, randomised trials, systematic reviews); various study questions (therapeutic, diagnostic, and prognostic evaluation) using various methods (meta-epidemiologic studies, qualitative studies, experimental studies, simulations etc).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2011.4.2-1 | Award Amount: 7.78M | Year: 2011

Dobutamine and adrenaline are widely used as second line therapy for systemic hypotension in infants. Dopamine is currently the most widely used first line drug. In neonates, sustained hypotension may, and impaired organ perfusion will, cause brain injury and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. All three catecholamines are currently used off-label and have different modes of action which may result in potentially harmful haemodynamic effects. No reliable safety or efficacy data exists for the use of these drugs in neonates or newborns. Furthermore, no uniform criteria exist to define hypotension and there is little evidence to support current intervention strategies, which vary widely. Recently, superior vena cava (SVC) flow has been proposed as a more reliable indicator of circulatory failure than low blood pressure and preliminary results suggest Dobutamine is the optimum therapeutic in such cases. NEO-CIRC proposes 1) a randomised placebo controlled trial to provide safety and efficacy data for Dobutamine as a first line inotrope for all gestational ages 2) to perform pre-clinical; pharmacokinetic; pharmacodynamic; metabolomic and pharmacogenomic studies 3) to develop improved biomarkers of hypotension 4) to develop and adapt a formulation of Dobutamine suitable for newborns with the aim to apply for a Paediatric Use Marketing Authorisation. The NEO-CIRC consortium includes international experts in neonatal medicine, pharmacology, pharmacogenomics, drug formulation and pre-clinical neonatal models and an experienced group of experienced multicentre clinical trials NICUs. Outcomes anticipated include improved biomarkers of organ perfusion; a new consensus definition of neonatal circulatory failure and answers to key clinical practice uncertainties, including variability of response to Dobutamine in common pathophysiologies seen in newborn infants impact on longer term developmental outcomes so important to the patients, families and wider society.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.5.3 | Award Amount: 4.57M | Year: 2011

Synergy will develop a simulation environment and a decision-support system aiming at enabling deployment of systems medicine. The three core elements are a knowledge base (KB), an inference engine (IE), and a graphical visualisation environment (GVE). The project focuses on patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).The KB will include five well established physiological models addressing: 1) Central and peripheral O2 transport and utilization, 2) Pulmonary gas exchange, 3) Regional-lung heterogeneities in ventilation and perfusion, 4) Skeletal muscle bioenergetics, and 5) Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. These models will be written in systems biology markup language (SBML) and vertically integrated. Ontologies will be used as the default knowledge-representation system. The KB will include multi-level data from experimental studies (BioBridge), data from a multicentre longitudinal study on COPD phenotyping (PAC-COPD) and public datasets.The IE will enable to explore associations over the KB, perform transversal multi-scale model integration and related simulations including interactions among O2-availability/O2-utilization, ROS generation, systemic inflammation and abnormal tissue remodelling.The Web-based GVE will facilitate relevant simulations in a more intuitive way with respect to the state of the art, addressing two main user profiles: bio-researchers and clinicians.The focus will be on underlying mechanisms of COPD phenotypes associated with poor prognosis. Disease model validation and refinement will be done using a well-established, large dataset (ECLIPSE) together with experimental studies designed to test in silico generated hypotheses. Besides the use of the simulation environment by bio-researchers for optimal experimental design, the Synergy platform will be a relevant decision-support tool for integrated healthcare strategies aiming at modulating the evolution of COPDs.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: HEALTH-2009-4.3.1-1 | Award Amount: 6.63M | Year: 2010

Filarial infections remain a major public health problem in West and Central Africa. Three filarial species are involved: Onchocerca volvulus (onchocerciasis or river blindness); Wuchereria bancrofti (lymphatic filariasis); and Loa loa (the eye worm). Treatment of onchocerciasis with ivermectin has been successful in many situations but emergence of drug resistance and risk of severe adverse reactions associated with L loa co-infections is restricting the implementation of mass treatment and consequently alternate approaches to control are required. Studies with animal models have identified the general mechanisms of protective immunity while human studies have drawn attention to immune regulatory processes that influence clinical presentations Together, these observation provide a basis for vaccine development. The next challenge is to identify target antigens and ensure appropriate formulation and delivery to promote protective responses and avoid any pathology. This project aims to: 1, use transciptomics and bioinformatics to identify the parasite molecules that are targets of protective immunity and that may influence the regulation of such responses; and 2, microarray technologies and bioinformatics to determine the pathways that lead to expression of protective immunity. Cohorts of onchocerciasis patients who have received treatment with ivermectin or tetracycline, or are co infected with either W bancrofti or L loa provide both input to the pathway studies and a means of validation of the computer assimilations. Confirmation of the mechanisms and targets of protective immunity and validation of computer assimilations will also be investigated using the O ochengi-cattle model that also enables experimentation under natural challenge. Litomosoides sigmodontis in mice provides a robust and rapid validation of results obtained from computation relating to expression and regulation of protective responses and a primary system for screening vaccine candidates


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IRSES | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-IRSES | Award Amount: 980.70K | Year: 2012

The sarcomere is the structural unit of striated muscle tissues where thick and thin filaments cooperate to achieve muscle contraction. Recently it is becoming increasingly clear that sarcomeres have in addition to muscle contraction also important signaling functions: Stretch and strain sensing signalosomes are assembled by the giant muscle proteins titin and nebulin, that in turn are embedded into the sarcomere. Thereby, titin and nebuliun with dual structural scaffold and biosensing functions intricately connect the sarcomere to muscle remodelling. Molecular progress on titin- and nebulin based sarcomeric signalosomes has been accelerated during recent years, and the next step require is a functional understanding regarding how titin and nebulin and associated signaling complexes generate biochemical signals, and how these signals in turn, control muscle trophicity and remodelling. This network addresses this issue by bringing together teams leading in titin and nebulin muscle biology from America, Japan, and the US. Each team will contribute specific resources to study titin- and nebulin-based muscle remodelling, including transgenic animal models, compounds from high-throughput screens, and intricate myofibril mechanics. Importantly, SARCOSI will provide the European researchers resources that are otherwise not available. While the participants have collaborated and published together occassionally in the past, the SARCOSI network will establish long-term strategic EU transcontinental partnerships by staff exhanges and joint mentoring of thesis and postdoctoral projects. The exchange of staff will enhance the transfer of technologies and models between participating laboratories. By working close together and sharing resources, progress will be achieved much faster than working separately in the clinically important field of pathological muscle remodelling that contributes to both chronic heart failure and to skeletal muscle sarcopenia


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-ITN-2008 | Award Amount: 4.90M | Year: 2010

The overarching aim of the SMALL ITN project is to train Early Stage Researchers in the field of molecular recognition at surfaces from fundamental science to novel applications. For this task, SMALL combines European experts from surface science, nanotechnology, theory, chemical synthesis, physics, biology and industry, and thus takes a highly integrated approach to the training. The researchers will work within a well-structured scientific programme aimed at molecular recognition, underpinning the next generation of molecular sensors, catalysis, biomimetics, and molecular electronics. The programme of training will foster scientists who, in addition to being specialists in particular branches of molecular nanotechnology, have broad interdisciplinary experience in the experimental and theoretical techniques of molecular nanotechnology. Their hands-on training will be substantiated by a well-developed network training programme which will address both scientific and complementary skills. In their projects, the Early Stage Researcher will explore the nature of the interactions responsible for molecular and atomic recognition and the role that these play in the massively parallel self-assembly of supramolecular nanostructures, using a collaboration of cutting edge experimental and theoretical techniques. They will investigate how to achieve chemical selectivity at surfaces, including enantioselective recognition, by molecular and atomic surface modification as a route to novel catalysis and nanoscale sensors, drawing on expertise across different scientific disciplines and pioneering industrial partnerships.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2010-1.1.33 | Award Amount: 26.09M | Year: 2011

AIDA (http://cern.ch/aida) addresses the upgrade, improvement and integration of key research infrastructures in Europe, developing advanced detector technologies for future particle accelerators, as well as transnational access to facilities that provide these research infrastructures. In line with the European Strategy for Particle Physics, AIDA targets the infrastructures needed for R&D, prototyping and qualification of detector systems for the major particle physics experiments currently being planned at future accelerators. By focusing on common development and use of such infrastructure, the project integrates the entire detector development community, encouraging cross-fertilization of ideas and results, and providing a coherent framework for the main technical developments of detector R&D. This project includes a large consortium of 37 beneficiaries, covering much of the detector R&D for particle physics in Europe. This collaboration allows Europe to remain at the forefront of particle physics research and take advantage of the world-class infrastructures existing in Europe for the advancement of research into detectors for future accelerator facilities. The infrastructures covered by the AIDA project are key facilities required for an efficient development of future particle physics experiments, such as: test beam infrastructures (at CERN, DESY and LNF), specialised equipment, irradiation facilities (in several European countries), common software tools, common microelectronics and system integration tools and establishment of technology development roadmaps with a wide range of industrial partners.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IRSES | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-IRSES | Award Amount: 592.20K | Year: 2013

The overall aim of this proposed exchange programme ENRICH is to bring together an international team of researchers to establish a research network, with a wide variety of skills in operations research, safety and security studies, green logistics, economic modelling, ICT, and intermodal management to develop a container supply chain (CSC) integration methodology, aimed at addressing long-lasting changes in operational, environmental, economic, technical and managerial practices in different segments of the rail, road, air and sea transport industries from an overall supply chain perspective. The network is a physical and virtual grouping of academics and researchers designed to create an interdisciplinary think-tank and knowledge exchange platform for enhancing CSC resilience and sustainability in todays and tomorrows operational environments, in which a high level of uncertainty exists due to economic crisis, security risks, climate change, and every changing technologies. The proposal is for a project of eight partners (5 EU members, 1 AC member and 2 Third Country members) with extensive exchange of both experienced researchers (ERs) and early stage researchers (ESRs) during four years to fully explore the complementary strengths and synergies within the consortium. This project will support and reinforce the collaborations amongst the participants and help establish a long-term research co-operation. The research will increase the European research capacity in this vital and rapidly developing container transportation field, and also maintain and enhance the EUs leading position in the areas of supply chain resilience and sustainability. Moreover, the interdisciplinary nature of the proposed exchange programme offers a link for research and training of the involved ERs and ESRs in a collaborative academic environment.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.4.3 | Award Amount: 12.28M | Year: 2013

A new approach is needed to ensure that the digital objects created today are available and useful for future generations of users. As scientific, engineering, and media assets and their related metadata are generated across different lifecycle phases, in a continually evolving environment, the concept of a fixed and stable final version becomes less relevant. The highly dynamic and complex digital objects that result from such an environment mean that human appraisal is increasingly infeasible. Automated or computer-assisted mechanisms are needed to address the long-term sustainability of this content, dealing not only with technological obsolescence (such as hardware, software, file formats), but also with semantic drift of digital assets (e.g. due to changes in terminology), and with disciplinary and societal changes (socialisation of the data).\n\nPERICLES will address these challenges by developing extensions to current preservation and lifecycle models that address the evolution of dynamic, heterogeneous resources and their dependencies in changing environments, including policies, processes, semantics, and users, as well as the content itself. Maintaining the complex dependencies between the components of the preservation ecosystem is key to achieving preservation by design, through models that capture intents and interpretative contexts, and thus enabling content to remain relevant to changing communities of users. These models will be complemented with a suite of tools that implement functionality in support of these models. PERICLES also has a strong focus on facilitating the future commercial exploitation of these outputs, which is reflected in the make-up of the consortium.\n\nThe project outputs will be validated against a corpus of user scenarios relating to the preservation of highly complex and dynamic and/or large-scale digital assets, derived from real-life contexts in (i) digital media and contemporary art, and (ii) space science. Media assets will include software-based art installations as well as digital images and video, together with contextual information generated during the creation process or through social media. Scientific datasets will include experimental (e.g. biophysics, material science) and observational (e.g. space weather) data, as well as related data (e.g. auxiliary data, calibration curves) and engineering and operations documentation.\n\nThe project will involve partners of a range of complementary types, including six academic partners, one multinational corporation, two SMEs and two non-academic public sector organisations.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 3.48M | Year: 2013

One dimensional nanostructures (1DNS) produced from various elemental (Si and Ge) and compound (III-V and II-VI) semiconductors are receiving increasing worldwide attention due to their unique properties and potential for a wide range of applications. They are the building blocks for single photon emitters, third generation solar cells and the monolithic integration of optoelectronic devices. 1DNS can be used to fabricate the smallest light emitting devices and lasers. Despite recent progress, many fundamental and applied challenges still prevent transfer of 1DNS from laboratories to large scale industrial use. The proposed NanoEmbrace assembles eight leading industry partners and ten internationally renowned institutions in materials science, engineering, chemistry, condensed matter physics and nanoscale device fabrication. The original vision of NanoEmbrace is to gain superior control and understanding of 1DNS and to transfer 1DNS from laboratory to industry. It is probably the first organised attempt to put together all the competences and capabilities, experimental and theoretical, necessary for the comprehension of the mechanisms that govern the growth of 1DNS that cannot all be described by existing models. We also aim to provide the highest quality multidisciplinary and cross-sectoral training to early career researchers (ESRs) in nanoscience to create the next generation of research and industry leaders. The ESRs joining NanoEmbrace will have a unique opportunity to enjoy close personal contact with internationally renowned experts and to put together an unprecedented, complex but unified overall understanding of the growth of 1DNS and to develop the process required to produce practical commercial devices. To deliver the highest quality of training to young talented researchers, NanoEmbrace has identified the key research themes: controlled synthesis, theoretical modelling, characterisation of 1DNS and the integration of 1DNS into device fabrication.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.4.1-6 | Award Amount: 3.85M | Year: 2011

Lung cancer (LC) is still the most lethal type of cancer worldwide. The extremely poor prognosis for LC patients is partly due to the lack of effective therapies. At present, most patients with pulmonary carcinomas are treated with chemotherapy. This essentially consists of classic cytotoxic drugs which only improve survival in small cohorts in few cases. In spite of the rapidly growing understanding of the epigenetic and genetic profile of LC, such knowledge has contributed little to improving therapeutics. This scenario, however, is likely to change soon because several specific cancer therapies, targeting molecules that are altered in cancer, are being developed or are already undergoing clinical trials. Thinking ahead, our proposal focuses, on the one hand, on validating novel and specific therapeutic strategies, with particular emphasis on discovering (epi)genetic alterations that could act as novel targets for therapies, and, on the other, on defining the (epi)genetic markers that could determine the efficacy response or resistance to targeted therapies as well as the acquired resistance of the tumours to therapy. To reach our goals, we have designed an integrative and interdisciplinary approach involving leading European clinical scientists of international renown with prominent preclinical and basic research groups using high throughput and state-of-the art platforms for genomics and gene expression analysis. To date, no such comprehensive information exists. The results will be of great value for the stratification of lung tumours according to their genetic background for tailored treatments. The development of an (epi)genetic-based therapeutic prediction model will hopefully set the basis for future tailored treatment of LC as well as of other epithelial cancers.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Fellowship | Award Amount: 807.01K | Year: 2015

Complex fluid flows are ubiquitous in both the natural and man-made worlds. From the pulsatile flow of blood through our bodies, to the pumping of personal products such as shampoos or conditioners through complex piping networks as they are processed. For such complex fluids the underlying microstructure can give rise to flow instabilities which are often totally absent in simple Newtonian fluids such as water or air. For example, many wormlike micellar surfactant (soap/detergent) systems are known to exhibit shear-banding where the homogenous solution splits into two (or more) bands of fluid: such flows are often unstable to even infinitesimally small perturbations. At higher pump speeds the flows can develop chaotic motion caused by the elastic normal-stresses developed in flow. Such elastic turbulence can also develop for other flowing complex fluids, such as polymer solutions and melts, and give rise to new phenomena. Often such instabilities are unwelcome, for example in rheometric devices when the aim is to measure material properties or in simple pumping operations when they can give rise to unacceptably large pressure drops and prevent pumping. In other cases they can give rise to enhanced mixing of heat and mass which would otherwise be difficult to achieve (e.g. microfluidics applications).


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: STFC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 230.48K | Year: 2016

The nature and scale of the task to decommission the UKs legacy nuclear facilities inherited by the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) has been historically poorly characterised and highly uncertain. A key objective for the NDA is to form a comprehensive understanding of the work to be done and the associated costs. Although uncertainties still remain, the total discounted costs of completing the NDAs mission were estimated in 2013/14 to be £69.4 billion. An understanding of the nature of legacy waste is an essential part of the decommissioning process. This proposal targets the process of locating and identifying the nature of the gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes present in legacy nuclear waste. The ability to locate, characterise and correctly partition the waste is key to this strategy and will contribute to a significant reduction in the costs associated with the decommissioning effort. This knowledge exchange project brings together the University of Liverpool Nuclear Physics Group, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Canberra UK Ltd and National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) to develop a field capable gamma-ray sensor, couple it with an existing 3-D vision system and provide control software and reconstruction algorithms for real time image fusion. This system will enable reliable quantification of waste into free-release/low/intermediate level brackets, with the potential to significantly reduce the cost and time of decommissioning.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: NERC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 520.73K | Year: 2015

Phytoplankton are aquatic, single-celled plants that lie at the heart of the global cycling of carbon between the atmosphere and the oceans. Like other plants, phytoplankton require sunlight and nutrients to grow and flourish. However, in the ocean sunlight is confined to the upper few tens of metres, while nutrient concentrations are low at the sea surface and greatest at depths of a kilometre or more. The growth of phytoplankton is thus fundamentally dependent on processes that transfer nutrients from depth up to the sunlit surface. Over the mid latitudes the problem of acquiring nutrients appears to be particularly stark. The winds at mid latitudes provide a widespread downward transport of water, which inhibits the transfer of nutrient-rich deeper waters up into the sunlit, surface waters. Thus, one might expect much of the mid latitude ocean to be a desert due to a lack of nutrients. However, phytoplankton growth in the mid latitude ocean is more than might initially be expected, and is globally very important as it drives about half of the oceans biological removal of carbon out of the atmosphere. Oceanographers have calculated the amount of nutrient required to support this growth, based upon the concentrations of inert tracers in the upper ocean. However, adding together the known nutrient supplies falls significantly short of this total nutrient requirement. Hence, there is a conundrum as to how the biological growth over the mid latitude ocean is sustained. If we want to understand how carbon is cycled between the atmosphere and oceans, and how it affects our climate, we need to answer this problem. In this proposal, we address the problem of how deep nutrients are transported into the surface waters in mid-latitudes. We propose to test a new view: tides passing over the mid-Atlantic ridge generate enhanced turbulence and mixing, which in turn provides a nutrient supply to the upper thermocline waters. These nutrients are then transported horizontally along density surfaces over the western side of the basin, probably being swept along the Gulf Stream and eventually passing into the winter mixed surface layer. When this surface layer shallows and warms in spring, the nutrients are then available to the phytoplankton. The work plan involves two main components. We will carry out a field programme collecting measurements of the turbulence and nutrient concentrations over and adjacent to the mid-Atlantic ridge. This fieldwork will involve collecting data from a novel long-term moored array of instruments on the ridge along with a focused 5 week research cruise. Our work involves sampling sufficiently quickly to be able to resolve tidal changes in currents and mixing over the ridge: this has never been done before, and we have brought together scientists with expertise in tidal measurements in shallower shelf seas with others who are expert in deep ocean mixing and transports in order to do this. The 2nd component of our work will use computer models of circulation in the Atlantic to explore the wider implications of the fieldwork observations, allowing us to decide whether or not mixing over the mid-Atlantic ridge really does provide enough nutrients to explain the phytoplankton production in the mid-latitude N Atlantic.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 4.00M | Year: 2017

Nanowires (NWs) exhibit unique properties that make them potential building blocks for a variety of next generation NanoElectronics devices. Recent advances have shown that NWs with predefined properties can be grown, offering a new paradigm enabling functional device prototypes including: biosensors, solar cells, transistors, quantum light sources and lasers. The critical mass of scientific knowledge gained now needs to be translated into NW technologies for industry. FP7-MC NanoEmbrace (ITN) and FUNPROB (IRSES), made substantial contributions to NW research, producing excellent scientific and technological results (>100 journal papers published) and delivered outstanding training in nanoscience and transferable skills to ESRs. Despite demonstrable scientific and technological advantages of NWs, NW-based technology concepts have not yet been translated into market-ready products, because industry and academia have not worked hand-in-hand to commercialize the research findings. Thus, it is essential that NW research is now directed towards customer-oriented scientific R&D; whilst applying innovative industrial design techniques to ensure rapid translation of the basic technologies into commercial devices. This ambitious challenge requires close collaboration between academia and the nascent NW industry, combining the efforts of scientists and engineers to address market needs. Building upon our previous achievements, a team of leading scientific experts from top institutions in Europe, strengthened by experts in innovative design and industrial partners with an excellent track record of converting cutting edge scientific ideas into market products has formed the INDEED network to address this challenge. To enhance employability, INDEED will train young ESRs to become experts with a unique skill set that includes interdisciplinary scientific techniques, industrial experience through R&D secondments and innovative design skills.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 640.79K | Year: 2014

Autonomy is surely a core theme of technology in the 21st century. Within 20 years, we expect to see fully autonomous vehicles, aircraft, robots, devices, swarms, and software, all of which will (and must) be able to make their own decisions without direct human intervention. The economic implications are enormous: for example, the global civil unmanned air- vehicle (UAV) market has been estimated to be £6B over the next 10 years, while the world-wide market for robotic systems is expected to exceed $50B by 2025. This potential is both exciting and frightening. Exciting, in that this technology can allow us to develop systems and tackle tasks well beyond current possibilities. Frightening in that the control of these systems is now taken away from us. How do we know that they will work? How do we know that they are safe? And how can we trust them? All of these are impossible questions for current technology. We cannot say that such systems are safe, will not deliberately try to injure humans, and will always try their best to keep humans safe. Without such guarantees, these new technologies will neither be allowed by regulators nor accepted by the public. Imagine that we have a generic architecture for autonomous systems such that the choices the system makes can be guaranteed? And these guarantees are backed by strong mathematical proof? If we have such an architecture, upon which our autonomous systems (be they robots, vehicles, or software) can be based, then we can indeed guarantee that our systems never intentionally act dangerously, will endeavour to be safe, and will - as far as possible - act in an ethical and trustworthy way. It is important to note that this is separate from the problem of how accurately the system understands its environment. Due to inaccuracy in modelling the real world, we cannot say that a system will be absolutely safe or will definitely achieve something; instead we can say that it tries to be safe and decides to carry out a taskto its best ability. This distinction is crucial: we can only prove that the system never decides to do the wrong thing, we cannot guarantee that accidents will never happen. Consequently, we also need to make an autonomous system judge the quality of its understanding and require it to act taking this into account. We should also verify, by our methods, that the systems choices do not exacerbate any potential safety problems. Our hypothesis is that by identifying and separating out the high-level decision-making component within autonomous systems, and providing comprehensive formal verification techniques for this, we can indeed directly tackle questions of safety, ethics, legality and reliability. In this project, we build on internationally leading work on agent verification (Fisher), control and learning (Veres), safety and ethics (Winfield), and practical autonomous systems (Veres, Winfield) to advance the underlying verification techniques and so develop a framework allowing us to tackle questions such as the above. In developing autonomous systems for complex and unknown environments, being able to answer such questions is crucial.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: SSH.2013.4.1-2 | Award Amount: 3.12M | Year: 2014

Young people in the South and East Mediterranean area are enduring a multiple transitions. In addition to the political and socioeconomic transformations, there is the transition to adulthood from the famous tripartite division of the life cycle in preparation for professional life, working life and retirement. Other experiences of socio-economic transformation, as in East Europe, may give us learnt lessons to manage economic, political and social change. Today, there are no longer substantial differences separating the young people of west and east. Nevertheless, there are important differences in economic resources, education and social between two shores of the Mediterranean. In addition, the SEM young Europeans differ in cultural values and practices different from their counterparts in the north. Still, some processes linked to economic globalization and the precarious living conditions, labor and difficulties in individual empowerment, among others, suggest the emergence of a youth crime and its consolidation as a category of scientific analysis. This argument lets you put so research that supports integrating the European experiences in youth employment, political participation and gender equality, the youth situation in the context of transition and European double in similar scenarios on the south bank. To articulate such research dimensions the project will articulate the concept of triple transition, taking into account political transitions, socio-economic transitions, and invisible transition such as cultural trends and emotions related to youth and the insecurity about the future (resident generation)


Siminas S.,Royal Manchester Childrens Hospital | Losty P.D.,University of Liverpool
Annals of Surgery | Year: 2015

Objective: Surgery for pediatric idiopathic constipation (IC) is undertaken after failure of bowel management programs. Decisions are influenced by rectal biopsy, transit studies, megacolon/megarectum, degree of soiling/incontinence, and anorectal manometry profile(s). A systematic review of ALL published studies critically evaluates outcomes of surgery for IC. Methods: MEDLINE (PubMed), Google Scholar, and EMBase were searched for English-language articles only. Studies included (1) peer-review publications with 3 or more patients, and (2) clinical outcomes defined by authors. Results: Forty-five reports (1157 patients) met full inclusion criteria. Only 2 papers were randomized controlled trials. Many had small patient numbers (median n16; range: 3-114). Twenty-three described heterogenous populations with variant pathology. Follow-up was short (median 1.5 years: range: 3 months-14 years). The antegrade continence enema operation (ACE)-[open/laparoscopic assisted, cecostomy, or "left sided" ACE]-was judged as successful in 82% of cases, although high morbidity and reoperations were reported. Colon resection and pull through operations had "good" outcome(s) in 79% of children with 17% reporting significant morbidity and a 10% incidence of revisional surgery. Anal dilatation did not improve outcome(s). Botulinum toxin injection scored equally effective compared to internal sphincter myectomy in short-term follow-up. Permanent colostomy was considered successful in 86% of refractory IC cases. Conclusions: Surgical management and outcome(s) for pediatric IC are based on low-quality evidence. No single operation was considered "best practice." This study crucially highlights that surgeons must develop better care strategies. © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


Bjork J.,Linköping University | Hanke F.,University of Liverpool | Stafstrom S.,Linköping University
Journal of the American Chemical Society | Year: 2013

We computationally study the reaction mechanisms of halogen-based covalent self-assembly, a major route for synthesizing molecular nanostructures and nanographenes on surfaces. Focusing on biphenyl as a small model system, we describe the dehalogenation, recombination, and diffusion processes. The kinetics of the different processes are also investigated, in particular how diffusion and coupling barriers affect recombination rates. Trends across the periodic table are derived from three commonly used close-packed (111) surfaces (Cu, Ag, and Au) and two halogens (Br and I). We show that the halogen atoms can poison the surface, thus hindering long-range ordering of the self-assembled structures. Finally, we present core-level shifts of the relevant carbon and halogen atoms, to provide reference data for reliably detecting self-assembly without the need for atomic-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy. © 2013 American Chemical Society.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: AAT.2010.6.3-3. | Award Amount: 4.50M | Year: 2011

Considering the prevailing congestion problems with ground-based transportation and the anticipated growth of traffic in the coming decades, a major challenge is to find solutions that combine the best of ground-based and air-based transportation. The optimal solution would consist in creating a personal air transport system (PATS) that can overcome the problems associated with all of our current methods of transportation. We propose an integrated approach to enable the first viable PATS based on Personal Aerial Vehicles (PAVs) envisioned for travelling between homes and working places, and for flying at low altitude in urban environments. Such PAVs should be fully or partially autonomous without requiring ground-based air traffic control. Furthermore, they should operate outside controlled airspace while current air traffic remains unchanged, and should later easily be integrated into the next generation of controlled airspace. The myCopter project aims to pave the way for PAVs to be used by the general public within the context of such a transport system. Our consortium consists of experts on socio-technological evaluation to assess the impact of the envisioned PATS on society, and of partners that can make the technology advancements necessary for a viable PATS. To this end, test models of handling dynamics for potential PAVs will be designed and implemented on unmanned aerial vehicles, motion simulators, and a manned helicopter. In addition, an investigation into the human capability of flying a PAV will be conducted, resulting in a user-centred design of a suitable human-machine interface (HMI). Furthermore, the project will introduce new automation technologies for obstacle avoidance, path planning and formation flying, which also have excellent potential for other aerospace applications. This project is a unique integration of social investigations and technological advancements that are necessary to move public transportation into the third dimension.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.4.4-1 | Award Amount: 11.00M | Year: 2012

DevelopAKUre is a proposal to fund the clinical development of an orphan designated drug, nitisinone, for the treatment of a rare Mendelian disease, Alkaptonuria (AKU). AKU is a genetic deficiency of homogentisic acid dioxygenase, causing high levels of homogentisic acid (HGA). Oxidation of HGA to pigment polymer, termed ochronosis, alters connective tissues. This leads to multisystemic damage dominated by premature severe arthritis. Currently, multiple arthroplasty is inevitable since AKU is incurable and there is no effective palliative therapy. No data exists regarding the presence or absence of ochronosis before age 30 years. Hence, it is unknown whether treatment is necessary before then. A potential HGA-lowering therapy with nitisinone is available, but lacks outcome data. Thanks to our existing successful fundamental and clinical research (cell models, animal models, natural history studies), we are now ready for the final stage of clinical development of nitisinone for AKU in order to overcome these challenges. This will involve a dose finding study, a phase 3 clinical trial to prove efficacy, and a cross-sectional study in children and young adults to determine when to start treatment. The results of DevelopAKUre will allow us to make the case to the European Medicines Agency for marketing authorisation of nitisinone for AKU, thereby contributing to the goal of the International Rare Diseases Research Consortium of 200 new therapies by 2020. Our consortium has worked together for five years already. It includes Liverpool Universitys AKU Research Team as the lead applicant, the AKU Society UK patient group for dissemination and patient recruitment, three SMEs (Denmark, Netherlands) for biomarker analysis and clinical trial coordination, an industry partner (Sweden) supplying the drug and regulatory support, three universities (UK, Italy, Slovakia) for the analysis of data, and three clinical trial centres (UK, France, Slovakia) to reach required numbers.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.2.4.2-1 | Award Amount: 7.84M | Year: 2013

The scope of the project is to generate a candidate drug targeting the inflammatory mediator High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) to be used in treatment of stroke. The candidate drug will be validated in animal models, characterized and optimized for subsequent clinical development. Stroke remains a leading cause of death and disability throughout the world. Within EU, more than 500 000 persons die of stroke each year. Of those surviving stroke, 50% are left with physical or cognitive impairment and the total annual cost of stroke is estimated at Euro 27 billion. Stroke occurs as a consequence of hemorrhagic insult or artery occlusion due to underlying cardiovascular disease. Pivotal in beneficial treatment of stroke is instant intervention. Blood clot dissolution using recombinant tissue plasminogen activator is the only pharmacological treatment demonstrated to limit neurological damage in stroke, but is only effective for patients who present within 3 hours after stroke onset. Thus there is an unmet need for an efficacious therapy that can be administered within and beyond 3 hours to achieve neuroprotection. HMGB1, released during the cerebral ischemic event and the subsequent neuroinflammation, is a well-characterized mediator of inflammation. Beneficial effects of blocking HMGB1 is proven in preclinical stroke studies. The drug to be developed is an Affibody molecule binding to and neutralizing HMGB1. Affibody molecules are engineered proteins significantly smaller than antibodies and therefore having favorable biodistribution properties, and a history of being efficient and non-toxic in clinical trials. In this application, we describe a multidisciplinary research consortium with Europes leading scientists in HMGB1 research and in registry-based clinical trial and dissemination methodology. The consortium has unique potentials to bring a new treatment principle against cerebral stroke to clinical reality.


A diverse variety of medical or lifestyle conditions lead to a progressive loss of muscle force by functionally impairing myofibril contractility and causing ultimately myofibril loss. Major underlying risk factors of chronic muscle force loss are ageing, inactive lifestyles, and unbalanced nutrition. Together, these factors are predicted to lead to an endemic incidence of muscle weakness both in the developed countries. Clinical research on the mechanisms involved requires a multidisciplinary approach covering aspects of ageing, metabolism, and on the humoral cross-talk of muscle with other key organs including heart, liver, kidney, and lung. To achieve this, six European groups with complementary expertise in inter-organ-cross-talk during stress-induced secondary myopathies will team-up with a leading team in the U.S. with expertise in the translation of muscle research into therapeutic interventions, and with one team from South Africa with cutting-edge expertise in the regulation of regenerative capacities in muscle. Importantly, four SMEs will participate in this RISE network that provide expertise in early muscle disease detection, monitoring, and the developing preventive strategies: Their knowledge on muscle disease detection at early stages and their monitoring during interventions will promote translational innovation. To implement innovation and our joint research program, both early stage and advanced researchers will be seconded from the academic eight teams to these four SMEs and vice versa. Thereby, this RISE scheme will establish a long-term collaborative University-SME driven translational innovative research program innovation in our interdisciplinary field of growing socioeconomic medical importance.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IAPP | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-IAPP | Award Amount: 1.78M | Year: 2012

The aim of the project is to enhance the potential and output of vibrating machines and decrease their ecological footprint by implementation of parametric resonance (PR). Compared with the regular resonance, the PR is characterized by a much higher intensity within a wide range of frequencies. The advantage of a PR-based machine was demonstrated with a prototype PR screener (PRS) developed and produced by the project partners. The PRS demonstrated large amplitudes of high-frequency lateral oscillations and self-vibro-insulation and could process a naturally wet fine granular material. However, the PR is instable, and its use as an effective operating mode assumes, among others, creation of a stabilized instability regime. This is an inspiring and challenging high-tech task for combined efforts of applied mathematicians and engineers. The extraordinary PR features together with open nontrivial theoretical and engineering problems provide a motivation to undertake this interdisciplinary research. The main objectives are: to develop a technically sound control of PR amplitude; to develop mathematical models for the process of material separation with a PRS; to design PRS-related screens with given stiffness and minimal bending stresses, and to design other types of PR-based separators and crushers. The enhancement of vibro-cutting/drilling tools via the development of the underpinning theory and application of the PR principle will also be an objective. An exchange of fundamentals and technical concepts between the large-scale research and the micro/nano PR studies is assumed. The project activities will be based on close cooperation and targeted secondments between academia and industry. As a result, a large number of ESRs will have a unique opportunity to be trained through research, working on all interdisciplinary aspects, starting from the conceptual design and modelling and finishing with prototypes/demonstrators of new PR-based machines and tools.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 2.57M | Year: 2013

The CERMAT2 project is aimed to train young researchers in understanding the modelling of Solid Mechanics problems applied to the process and design of advanced ceramics in a synergic collaboration between academia and industry, in view of social developments related to enhancement of industrial production and pollution reduction. In the EU, the ceramic industry is employing about 200,000 people and involves a production (including bricks, sanitaryware, tiles, technical ceramics, and refractory products) on the order of 28 billion per year. Industries related to the production of traditional ceramics are well developed in Italy (with a 9 billion turnover), while advanced ceramics are targeted in Germany and UK (a sector with a 20% growth per year). Advanced ceramics find special (biomedical, thermomechanical or nanotech) applications, where they exhibit unchallenged characteristics (for instance, thermal stability, wear resistance and chemical inertia) and, compared to other finishing materials, can minimize environmental impact. Despite the technical and industrial interest, the production of ceramic components is based on poorly understood empirical processes, often difficult to control. As a consequence, the production of rejected items can still be strongly reduced, a target having an impact on both cost reduction and environment preservation. In fact, the employed technologies involve a massive waste of energy and material, so that even a small increase in the mechanical performance of the ceramic structure would yield a reduction in weight of articles with a deep impact on pollution reduction. The optimization of the production process is directly linked to the modelling of the behaviour of powders and binders used during compaction, in the simulation of sintering, and in the design of mechanical characteristics of the final pieces.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2013.2.3.1 | Award Amount: 9.20M | Year: 2013

The motivation for the AVATAR project lies in the fact that upscaling wind turbine designs towards 10-20 MW requires radical innovations to make this feasible. Many of these innovationshave a strong aerodynamic component and can be considered as unconventional from an aerodynamic point of view. As such the analysis of the resulting rotor designs falls outside the validated range of applicability of the current state of the art computational aerodynamic tools. The overall objective of the AVATAR project is then to evaluate, validate and improve aerodynamic and aero-elastic tools to ensure applicability for large wind turbines. The capability of these models to produce valid load calculations at all modeling complexity levels needs to be demonstrated. This leads to a number of secondary objectives related to the assessment and evaluation of such designs eventually culminating in new design guidelines. In the AVATAR workplan aerodynamic models are developed and calibrated for all aspects which play a role in the design of large wind turbines. Thereto the entire chain of aerodynamic modelling is mobilized ranging from computational efficient engineering tools to very advanced high fidelity but computationally expensive tools. The development of new comprehensive models is based on a philosophy in which the high fidelity tools feed results towards the lower complexity tools where furthermore (wind tunnel and field) measurements are used to validate and improve the models. The capabilities of the resulting tools are demonstrated on a large scale rotor with and without flow control devices. The project is carried out by an absolute world class consortium since it consists of a selected group of participants from the subprogram aerodynamics of EERA Joint Program Wind (European Energy Research Alliance) in which all leading institutes on the field of aerodynamics participate, complimented with two leading industrial partners.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.91M | Year: 2017

To ensure a healthy environment for people living and working in buildings, research and engineering in the area of building acoustics is essential. Developments in modern building concepts, such as sustainable low-energy consuming buildings, buildings with lightweight materials and open plan working environments, as well as the need to build in extremely noisy areas, require involvement of acoustic experts in order to successfully (re)design buildings without negatively impacting upon peoples health and well-being. Taking up current and future acoustic challenges requires innovative solutions based on a thorough understanding and mastering of modern methods and tools, as well as a holistic acoustic approach involving acoustic design, products and subjective evaluation. However, in the complex field of building acoustics, research activities typically are not holistic and have become slightly marginalised. As a consequence, there is a lack of building acoustics experts. To meet the future acoustic needs of the built environment, Acoutect is constructed around two objectives: 1) Establish a long-lasting European-wide training programme on building acoustics, 2) Launch an innovative research programme. With these objectives, Acoutect will equip ESRs with skills to ensure acoustic quality of modern and future building concepts, and with excellent perspectives for a career in industry or academia within the area of building acoustics. The training and supervision to reach these objectives is offered by the Acoutect consortium composed of 5 academic and 7 non-academic participants. This consortium comprises various disciplines and sectors within building acoustics and beyond, promoting intersectoral, interdisciplinary and innovative training and mobility of the researchers within the project.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: STFC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 134.34K | Year: 2015

Proton Beam Therapy is a type of radiotherapy, which uses a precision high-energy beam of particles to destroy cancer cells. The treatment is particularly suitable for complex childhood cancers, increasing success rates and reducing side- effects, such as deafness, loss of IQ and secondary cancers. It can also used to treat brain cancers and head and neck cancers. It is crucial that there is clear knowledge of the quantity of radiation required and also delivered to a patient during treatment. This proposal Imaging of prompt gamma emissions during proton cancer therapy for geometric and dosimetric verification, aims to develop an optimised detector and methodology to allow real time verification of radiation delivery. This task is an essential part of the radiotherapy process, however this is significantly more challenging for protons than for high energy photons (which are utilised in existing facilities). The proposal brings together experts in radiation sensors from the University of Liverpool, imaging experts from University College London (UCL) and University College London Hospital (UCLH) and Radiation therapy professionals from the Clatterbridge Cancer Centre. UCLH will be the home of one of the two new proton therapy centres to be built in England, Clatterbridge houses the only existing proton therapy facility in the UK.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: OCEAN 2013.3 | Award Amount: 9.97M | Year: 2013

The BYEFOULING project will address high volume production of low toxic and environmentally friendly antifouling coatings for mobile and stationary maritime applications. The technology will fulfil the coating requirements as a result of the incorporation of novel antifouling agents and a new set of binders into coating formulations for maritime transportation and fishing vessels, floating devices and aquaculture. The main vision of BYEFOULING is to provide the means for industrial, cost-effective and robust manufacturing of antifouling coatings in Europe, where SMEs are both coating components developers and production technology providers. A set of procedures, guidelines and fabrication tools will be developed, enabling short time to market for new coating concepts. The main goal of BYEFOULING is to design, develop and upscale antifouling coatings with enhanced performance compared to current available products. The approach in BYEFOULING is to tackle the different stages of the biofouling process using innovative antifouling agents, covering surface-structured materials, protein adsorption inhibitors, quorum sensing inhibitors, natural biocides and microorganisms with antifouling properties. Encapsulation of the innovative compounds in smart nanostructured materials will be implemented to optimize coating performance and cost all along their life cycle. A proof-of-concept for the most promising candidates will be developed and demonstrators will be produced and tested on fields. BYEFOULING will combine a multidisciplinary leading research team from 11 European countries, which are already acting worldwide in the scientific community, with highly relevant and skilled technological partners, to build a consortium able to develop a full production line for antifouling coatings in Europe. Readily available low toxic and cost-effective antifouling coatings will increase the efficiency of maritime industry and be the enabling technology to realize new products.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: MG-1.1-2014 | Award Amount: 4.29M | Year: 2015

Encounters with atmospheric turbulence are a vitally important in the design and certification of many manmade structures such as aircraft and wind turbines. Gusts cause rapid changes in the flow about the structures which leads to rigid and flexible unsteady responses. Knowledge of aircraft/gust interactions is therefore vital for loads estimation during aircraft design as it impacts on control systems and often defines the maximum loads that these structures will experience in service. At present industry typically uses the linear doublet lattice method with static loads corrections from expensive wind tunnel data. The wind tunnel data is created using the final aerodynamic surface in the predicted cruise shape. This means that gust loads come relatively late when the design options have been narrowed. Increased competition and environmental concerns are likely to lead to the adoption of more flexible materials and the consideration of novel configurations, in which case the linear assumptions of the current gust loads process will become unacceptable. To introduce non-linearity into the gust loads process without significantly increasing the cost and time, this project has three main objectives: to carry out investigations using CFD so that the non-linearities in gust interactions are understood; to create a gust loads process that does not require wind tunnel data and hence reduces the need for wind tunnel testing; to develop updated reduced order models for gust prediction that account for non-linearity at an acceptable cost. These investigations will reduce the need for expensive wind tunnel testing and hence lead to time and cost savings at the design stage therefore ensuring that the European aerospace and defence industry remain competitive in the future. The wind turbine industry has similar concerns, with gusts and wind shear restricting the locations available for wind farms. The project will also address these issues using common methodology.


Our proposal encompasses parallel clinical trials addressing the feasibility and the effectiveness of donor-derived regulatory T cells (Treg) as a therapeutic agent in the treatment and prevention of tissue and organ damage resulting from graft versus host disease (GVHD) after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We propose a collaborative clinical study in which Treg therapy for GHVD is the common dominator. However, by bringing together several clinical centers with expertise in this area, we are also having the opportunity to simultaneously address other issues that would not otherwise be addressable by each clinical center on its own. Firstly, by using different Treg preparation strategies, we will be able to determine whether ex vivo isolated Treg are sufficient or whether in vitro expansion and subsequently higher dosages are required. Secondly, we will investigate if sole Treg infusion is effective or if rather co-administration of therapeutic agents that are likely to induce Treg survival and expansion in vivo (rapamycin; IL-2) is required for a successful response to Treg therapy. The studies on GVHD treatment outcome will be pursued together with a detailed analysis of immune monitoring, comprising T cell receptor clonotype tracking and tissue regeneration markers, in order to further understand the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic and regenerative potential of Treg cells. Our consortium has developed a concerted approach to the topic of Treg therapy in GVHD. This is a unique opportunity to determine the validity of this cellular immunotherapy approach in GVHD prevention and treatment, with potential for a significant impact on patient quality of life, survival rate and ultimately on the quality of health care provided.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: AAT.2010.3.3-3.;AAT.2010.3.4-1. | Award Amount: 3.84M | Year: 2010

The ARISTOTEL project challenge is ensuring aircraft safety and aims to reduce the aircraft and rotorcraft accidents caused by a particularly unfavourable category of phenomena: aircraft-pilot-couplings and rotorcraft-pilot-couplings (A/RPCs). Generally, A/RPCs are defined as inadvertent, sustained aircraft oscillations which are a consequence of an abnormal joint enterprise between the aircraft and the pilot. Recent experiences show that modern designs are being confronted in an increasing degree with dangerous A/RPCs. The reason for this is that modern aircraft feature a significant level of automation in their flight-control-systems (FCS). FCS is generally intended to relieve pilot workload and allow operations in degraded weather and visibility conditions. Especially in the modern rotorcraft, there seem to be embedded tendencies predisposing the FCS system towards dangerous RPCs. As the level of automation is likely to increase in future designs, extending to smaller aircraft and to different kinds of operation, the consequences of the pilot fighting the FCS system and inducing A/RPCs needs to be eradicated. It is the goal of this project to develop the design tools and techniques needed to detect and alleviate the A/RPC problems. End products of the project will be: 1) Advanced vehicle-pilot-FCS simulation models for rigid body and aeroservoelastic A/RPC analysis; 2) A/RPC design guidelines and criteria; 3) protocols and guidelines for A/RPC flight simulator training. All results will be directly useable by the aerospace industry in the design process for improving flight safety. The project will contribute in this sense to: 1) the minimization of the factors that lead to pilot loss of control resulting in increased enhancement of the European aircraft safety and 2) will strengthen the European Aeronautics Industry competitiveness in their time- and cost-effective design tools.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-EJD | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.15M | Year: 2016

Helicopters and the other vertical flight vehicles, like tilt-rotors, compound helicopters, hybrids and rapidly expanding class of easy to fly vertical take-off personal vehicles, are expected to see widespread use in the future especially as means of transport, exploiting the formidable capability to provide point-to-point connections. However, if the expansion of the usage of rotorcraft vehicles were to follow the pace of grow followed by the fixed-wing public transport in the last years, there are several issues that need to be addressed urgently to increase the use and the public acceptance of rotorcraft. In particular, aspects related to complexity of the operations and safety are of primary importance, due to the fact that in the last 20 years helicopter accident rates, worldwide, remained unacceptably high, especially when compared with fixed-wing aircraft. The complexity of the phenomena that rule the functioning of rotorcraft calls for the development of engineers with a genuine multidisciplinary background. The key objectives of the NITROS training network are: to train the next generation of European aeronautical scientists and engineers on this type of flying machines developing the entrepreneurial attitude in them that is essential to introduce disruptive technological innovations; to train engineers to avoid overlooking the impact that their design choices may have on flight safety; to introduce innovations in rotorcraft design that will enhance the safety of helicopters, to obtain a significant reduction of the accident rate; to create a network of excellence of European institution dedicated to rotorcraft. All these goals can be reached by exposing the young researches to a dynamic network composed not only by some of the most renewed European engineering schools and research centres working in the rotorcraft field, but also to a good mix of industrial partners composed by rotorcraft manufacturers, operators and certification enitites.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: AAT.2008.4.1.1. | Award Amount: 3.66M | Year: 2010

The upstream FFAST project addresses the topic Design Systems and Tools (AAT.2008.4.1.1) by developing, implementing and assessing a range of numerical simulation technologies to accelerate future aircraft design. Critical load identification methods and reduced order modelling techniques developed will potentially provide a step change in the efficiency and accuracy of the dynamic aeroelastic loads process . Identifying the flight conditions that lead to the maximum loads on aircraft structures and introducing higher fidelity methods at these conditions will reduce the cost and turn around time of the loads process of conventional aircraft. This will lead to significant improvements to product development and manufacture, supporting the ACARE 2020 targets. In addition, innovative designs required for green aircraft can be evaluated more rapidly and at lower risk. Reduced order modelling techniques offer the potential for further step changes in the efficiency of the aeroelastic loads process. These offer the accuracy of high fidelity methods at a cost close to that of the current low fidelity methods. The target for the FFAST project is to demonstrate a speed up of 2 to 3 orders of magnitude over high fidelity methods. To meet this target research will be carried out in work packages to: improve identification of critical loads; develop reduced order modelling strategies for unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic simulation. A work package dedicated to validation and evaluation on a set of industrially relevant test cases will judge the success of the technologies developed and give industry confidence to make the necessary pull-through investment. Strong industrial support of FFAST allows direct exploitation of the results via focused future investment, the solution data base and early release software. The dissemination of FFAST to a wider audience is vital and will be achieved via a website, targeted lectures and workshops, conferences and journal publications.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 3.82M | Year: 2012

One of the strategic objectives of the industrial initiative of the SET Plan on wind energy is to reduce cost of energy by improving reliability of wind turbines and their components and optimizing operation and maintenance (O&M) strategies. Increasing reliability and optimizing O&M have a direct impact on the availability of wind turbines and thus reduce cost and increase energy output. This strategy considerably contributes to making wind energy fully competitive. This is particularly evident in the offshore sector, where O&M represents a high percentage of total costs. MARE-WINT will contribute to the achievement of this goal by proving training in the context of doctoral programmes for 14 researchers in multi-disciplinary area of future generation of Offshore Wind Turbines (OWT) engineering focusing on issues having a major impact on the mechanical loading of OWT and which are still not sufficiently understood. OWT is a complex energy conversion fluid flow machine which entails coupled hydro-aero-mechanical issues. To design, built and operate a reliable OWT knowledge from disciplines like mechanical engineering, material science, metrology, fluid mechanics, condition monitoring, and computer simulation need to be combined. It is the ambition of MARE-WINT network to bring together specific partners capabilities and know-how to realize tailored training trajectories, focusing on increased reliability OWT design. Balanced industry-academia network consortium includes 6 Universities, 7 Research Institutes, 4 SMEs and 7 Large Industry Partners. The participation of 13 private sector Partners active in off-shore developments is essential to achieving the full impact of the project. Industrial partners are involved in hosting, training and defining the training needs of the researchers. Strong involvement of the industry will give PhD students the widest possible employment prospects. There are 4 Industrial PhD programmes identified within MARE-WINT


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IRSES | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-IRSES | Award Amount: 281.40K | Year: 2014

The PLENOSE project aims at establishing a multi-disciplinary network between European, North American and Indian institutes. From the perspective of an exchange of competencies, the objective of PLENOSE is to share the expertise of the partners in the fields of Marine Engineering, Structural Dynamics, Reliability Assessment, Random Processes and the necessary skills for performing experiments in artificial and in natural basins. The scientific goal of the PLENOSE project is to define and validate a technique for the design of artificial islands consisting of floating or fixed structures, with the well-defined purpose of exploiting renewable energies in open seas. The multipurpose energy island may produce energy from sun, wind and waves, with several advantages. For example, the global downtime is reduced if different sources of renewable energy are considered: if wind does not blow, electrical power may be produced from waves (with swells) and/or sun, and so on. At this purpose, pertinent dynamical models and adequate experimental models are exploited in order to disseminate the problems occurring at the design stage. Novel methodologies in the field of stochastic dynamics (e.g. Wiener Path Integrals, Wavelets based statistical linearization) are analysed for performing random vibration analysis. Moreover, innovative wave energy converters, based on the principle of the Oscillating Water Column, are investigated for maximizing the harvesting capability of the plant.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: AAT.2011.6.2-1.;AAT.2011.6.1-1. | Award Amount: 2.63M | Year: 2011

The aim of the NOVEMOR (NOvel Air VEhicle Configurations: From Fluttering Wings to MORphing Flight) research project is to investigate novel air vehicle configurations with new lifting concepts and morphing wing solutions to enable cost-effective air transportation. A multidisciplinary analysis and design optimization environment developed in an earlier EU Project (SIMSAC) will be used and improved to include analysis of novel configurations such as the joined-wing concept for improved lift and morphing wing solutions as an integral part of the aircraft conceptual design, rather than just as an add-on later in the design cycle. Such concepts will enable improved aircraft efficiencies, aerodynamic performance, reduced structural loads and lighter weight. The NOVEMOR project will focus on the following primary objectives: 1. Design and evaluation of a new aircraft concept, the joined-wing configuration, including structural, aerodynamic and aeroelastic simulations and analysis, flight testing of an aeroelastically scaled remotely piloted vehicle and multidisciplinary design optimization techniques. This configuration will be evaluated against a conventional reference aircraft. 2. Morphing wing solutions (span and camber strategies and wing-tip devices) will be proposed to enhance lift capabilities and manoeuvering. These will be considered early in the design process, right from the beginning of aircraft design cycle, included in the conceptual design. 3. Design, testing and evaluation of several adaptive/morphing concepts and mechanisms as part of a conceptual design environment, capable of augmenting performance characteristics in terms of drag reduction, loads reduction, weight and noise impact reduction; 4. To evaluate the overall benefits of these new concepts in terms of improved lift capabilities.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-14-2015 | Award Amount: 7.97M | Year: 2016

Uveal melanoma (UM) is a rare intraocular tumour with an incidence of 5 cases per million individuals per year. Up to 50% of UM patients develop metastases, most often in the liver, and these are invariably fatal. Despite new discoveries in the genetic and molecular background of the primary tumour, little is known about the metastatic disease; furthermore, there is no therapy to either prevent or treat UM metastases. In UM Cure 2020, we aim to identify and validate at the preclinical level novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of UM metastases. For this purpose, the consortium brings together the major experts of UM in both patient care and basic/translational/clinical research, as well as patient representatives. An ambitious multidisciplinary approach is proposed to move from patient tissue characterisation to preclinical evaluation of single or combinations of drugs. This approach includes the characterisation of the genetic landscape of metastatic UM and its microenvironment, proteomic studies to address signal pathway deregulation and establishment of novel relevant in vitro and in vivo UM models. We also aim to validate accurate surrogate endpoint biomarkers to evaluate therapies and detect metastases as early as possible. Underpinning this will be the UM Cure 2020 virtual biobank registry, linking existing biobanks into a harmonised network, which will prospectively collect primary and metastatic UM samples. Together, our approach will lead to the identification of new therapies, allowing the initiation of UM-dedicated clinical trials sponsored by academia or pharma. Dissemination of results will include the building of a patient network across the countries as part of the consortium as well as a dedicated UM patient and caregivers data portal as part of the UM Cure 2020 website, in order to increase patient information and disease awareness.


Field J.K.,University of Liverpool | Hansell D.M.,Royal Brompton Hospital | Duffy S.W.,Queen Mary, University of London | Baldwin D.R.,University of Nottingham
The Lancet Oncology | Year: 2013

Implementation of lung cancer CT screening is currently the subject of a major policy decision within the USA. Findings of the US National Lung Screening Trial showed a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality and a 6·7% decrease in all-cause mortality; subsequently, five US professional and clinical organisations and the US Preventive Services Task Force recommended that screening should be implemented. Should national health services in Europe follow suit? The European community awaits mortality and cost-effectiveness data from the NELSON trial in 2015-16 and pooled findings of European trials. In the intervening years, a recommendation is proposed that a demonstration trial is done in the UK. In this Review, we summarise the existing evidence and identify questions that remain to be answered before the implementation of international lung cancer screening programmes. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Galperin M.Y.,U.S. National Center for Biotechnology Information | Rigden D.J.,University of Liverpool | Fernandez-Suarez X.M.,Thermo Fisher Scientific
Nucleic Acids Research | Year: 2015

The 2015 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue contains 172 papers that include descriptions of 56 new molecular biology databases, and updates on 115 databases whose descriptions have been previously published in NAR or other journals. Following the classification that has been introduced last year in order to simplify navigation of the entire issue, these articles are divided into eight subject categories. This year's highlights include RNA-central, an international community portal to various databases on noncoding RNA; ValidatorDB, a validation database for protein structures and their ligands; SASBDB, a primary repository for smallangle scattering data of various macromolecular complexes; MoonProt, a database of 'moonlighting' proteins, and two new databases of protein-protein and other macromolecular complexes, ComPPI and the Complex Portal. This issue also includes an unusually high number of cancer-related databases and other databases dedicated to genomic basics of disease and potential drugs and drug targets. The size o f NAR online Molecular Biology Database Collection, http://www.oxfordjournals.org/nar/database/a/, remained approximately the same, following the addition of 74 new resources and removal of 77 obsolete web sites. The entire Database Issue is freely available online on the Nucleic Acids Researchweb site (http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/).


Nomura D.,Tohoku University | Teubner T.,University of Liverpool
Nuclear Physics B | Year: 2013

Motivated by recent progress of theory and experiment on the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron, a e, we update the hadronic contributions to a e. Using our up-to-date compilation of e +e -→hadrons data, we find the leading order hadronic contribution aehad,LO,VP=(1.866±0.010exp±0.005rad){dot operator}10-12 and the next-to-leading order hadronic contribution aehad,NLO,VP=(-0.2234±0.0012exp±0.0007rad){dot operator}10-12, where the first and second errors are from the error of the experimental data and the uncertainty in the treatment of radiative corrections, respectively. These values are compatible with earlier evaluations by other groups, but have significantly improved uncertainties due to the more precise input data used. We also update the leading order hadronic contribution to the ground state hyperfine splitting of muonium, obtaining δνMuhad,VP=(232.68±1.25exp±0.72rad) Hz. This value is consistent with the most precise evaluation in the literature and reduces its error by a factor of two. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Fernandez-Suarez X.M.,Life Technologies | Rigden D.J.,University of Liverpool | Galperin M.Y.,U.S. National Center for Biotechnology Information
Nucleic Acids Research | Year: 2014

The 2014 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue includes descriptions of 58 new molecular biology databases and recent updates to 123 databases previously featured in NAR or other journals. For convenience, the issue is now divided into eight sections that reflect major subject categories. Among the highlights of this issue are six databases of the transcription factor binding sites in various organisms and updates on such popular databases as CAZy, Database of Genomic Variants (DGV), dbGaP, DrugBank, KEGG, miRBase, Pfam, Reactome, SEED, TCDB and UniProt. There is a strong block of structural databases, which includes, among others, the new RNA Bricks database, updates on PDBe, PDBsum, ArchDB, Gene3D, ModBase, Nucleic Acid Database and the recently revived iPfam database. An update on the NCBI's MMDB describes VAST+, an improved tool for protein structure comparison. Two articles highlight the development of the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database: one describes SCOPe, which automates assignment of new structures to the existing SCOP hierarchy; the other one describes the first version of SCOP2, with its more flexible approach to classifying protein structures. This issue also includes a collection of articles on bacterial taxonomy and metagenomics, which includes updates on the List of Prokaryotic Names with Standing in Nomenclature (LPSN), Ribosomal Database Project (RDP), the Silva/LTP project and several new metagenomics resources. The NAR online Molecular Biology Database Collection, http://www.oxfordjournals.org/nar/database/c/, has been expanded to 1552 databases. The entire Database Issue is freely available online on the Nucleic Acids Research website (http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/). © 2013 The Author(s). Published by Oxford University Press.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.4.2-1 | Award Amount: 7.88M | Year: 2014

Vancomycin is the critically important antibiotic to treat neonatal Late Onset Sepsis (LOS) due to Gram positive bacteria in neonates, including Coagulase Negative Staphylococci (CoNS) and Staphylococcus aureus. These organisms also create biofilms which are extremely resistant to antibiotics. The increased incidence of LOS due to bacteria such as CoNS and MRSA in NICUs has led to a marked increased use of vancomycin, which is now the third commonest antibiotic used in European NICUs. However, a standardised dosing regimen for premature infants has not yet been defined and there is no data about the serum concentrations needed to ensure bacterial kill for CoNS in humans. In view of the lack of any firm dosage for neonates and infants, vancomycin has been included in the EMA list of off-patent drugs addressing unmet therapeutic needs in children. Accordingly NeoVanc consortium has already submitted a Paediatric Investigation Plan (PIP) which has provisionally received a favourable 120 day opinion and this application is built on what is included in the approved PIP. This project aims to:-develop a new age-appropriate formulation of vancomycin; define the circulating concentration of vancomycin that is needed to kill CoNS in in vitro biofilm and animal model, and use that data to derive the concentration and best PD target that will be maximally effective in neonates; define the neonatal dosage that is needed to attain the concentration that can kill CoNS and enterococci by conducting a systematic meta-analysis of all available PK data and develop an optimal dosing and therapeutic drug monitoring regimen. NeoVanc will then conduct a Phase 2 b randomised clinical trial to compare the proportion of neonates reaching the PD target derived from the pre-clinical studies when treated with the current standard vs new optimised treatment regimens and to obtain data on dosing, efficacy and short and long-term safety to be included in the SPCs leading to a PUMA.

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