Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Keyaerts N.,University Of Leuven Kuleuven Energy Institute | Hallack M.,University Paris - Sud | Glachant J.-M.,University Paris - Sud | Glachant J.-M.,University of Florence | D'haeseleer W.,University Of Leuven Kuleuven Energy Institute
Energy Policy | Year: 2011

This paper analyzes the value and cost of line-pack flexibility in liberalized gas markets through examination of the techno-economic characteristics of gas transport pipelines and the trade-offs between different ways to use the infrastructure: transport and flexibility. Line-pack flexibility is becoming increasingly important as a tool to balance gas supply and demand over different periods. In the European liberalized market context, a monopolist unbundled network operator offers regulated transport services and flexibility (balancing) services according to the network code and balancing rules. Therefore, gas policy makers should understand the role and consequences of line-pack regulation. The analysis shows that the line-pack flexibility service has an important economic value for the shippers and the TSO. Furthermore, the analysis identifies distorting effects in the gas market due to inadequate regulation of line-pack flexibility: by disregarding the sunk costs of flexibility in the balancing rules, the overall efficiency of the gas system is decreased. Finally, the analysis demonstrates that the actual costs of line-pack flexibility are related to the peak cumulative imbalance throughout the balancing period. Any price for pipeline flexibility should, therefore, be based on the related trade-off between the right to use the line-pack flexibility and the provision of transport services. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Declercq B.,University Of Leuven Kuleuven Energy Institute | Delarue E.,University Of Leuven Kuleuven Energy Institute | D'haeseleer W.,University Of Leuven Kuleuven Energy Institute
Energy Policy | Year: 2011

This paper investigates the impact of the economic recession on CO2 emissions in the European power sector, during the years 2008 and 2009. Three main determinants of the power sector's emissions are identified: the demand for electricity, the CO2 price, and fuel prices. A counterfactual scenario has been set up for each of these, i.e., what these parameters would have been if not affected by the recession. A simulation model of the European power sector is then employed, comparing a historical reference simulation (taking the parameters as actually occurred) with the counterfactual scenarios. The lower electricity demand (due to the recession) is shown to have by far the largest impact, accounting for an emission reduction of about 175Mton. The lower CO2 price (due to the recession) resulted in an increase in emissions by about 30Mton. The impact of fuel prices is more difficult to retrieve; an indicative reduction of about 17Mton is obtained, mainly as a consequence of the low gas prices in 2009. The simulated combined impact of the parameters results in an emission reduction of about 150Mton in the European power sector over the years 2008 and 2009 as a consequence of the recession. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Rombauts Y.,University Of Leuven Kuleuven Energy Institute | Delarue E.,University Of Leuven Kuleuven Energy Institute | D'haeseleer W.,University Of Leuven Kuleuven Energy Institute
Renewable Energy | Year: 2011

Allocating wind farms across different locations in different countries may reduce the variability of hourly wind power changes. Taking into account cross-border transmission-capacity constraints between countries can however decrease the effect of this diversification. A portfolio-theory-based model is developed that takes into account these cross-border transmission-capacity constraints when allocating wind power as efficient as possible across different locations. Three models are developed, looking to the cases where cross-border transmission-capacity constraints are equal to infinity, zero and a certain limited value, respectively. It is notably this last model that brings new perspectives in the allocation of wind power, based on portfolio theory modelling. Keeping cross-border transmission-capacity available for wind-power flows is an effective measure to limit hourly wind-power variations. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Delarue E.,University Of Leuven Kuleuven Energy Institute | Martens P.,University Of Leuven Kuleuven Energy Institute | D'haeseleer W.,University Of Leuven Kuleuven Energy Institute
International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control | Year: 2012

This paper analyzes market opportunities for power plants equipped with post-combustion carbon capture. The focus is on an Ultra Super Critical Pulverized Coal plant and a Natural Gas Combined Cycle plant, which both have flexible CO 2 capture (i.e., the capture plant can be turned on and off). In a methodological framework, it is first demonstrated that flexible operation yields higher profits compared to operating strictly with or without carbon capture. The most beneficial operating mode is determined by the ratio between the CO 2 and electricity price. Furthermore, a definition is proposed for the marginal cost which can be attributed to the additional capacity which is made available by turning off the capture plant (which could serve as reserve power). A detailed optimization model is employed, to account for the power plants' technical constraints, and to determine the benefits of flexible capture quantitatively. It is shown that at moderate CO 2 prices, capture plants can serve as back-up capacity, i.e., making additional power available by turning off the capture plant can be cheaper than having to start-up and operate additional single cycle gas turbines. Furthermore, the option of turning off the capture plant might avoid investment in additional back-up capacity and could therefore also prove useful at higher CO 2 prices. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Martens P.,University Of Leuven Kuleuven Energy Institute | Delarue E.,University Of Leuven Kuleuven Energy Institute | D'Haeseleer W.,University Of Leuven Kuleuven Energy Institute
IEEE Transactions on Power Systems | Year: 2012

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) seems to be an indispensable technology to safeguard the future of fossil-fired generation in the context of global warming. The deployment of CCS has an impact on the functioning and balancing of the overall electricity generation system. In this paper a mixed integer linear programming (MILP) model is developed for an ultra super-critical pulverized coal plant with post-combustion capture. Emphasis is on an appropriate representation of the dynamic behavior of this power plant. Four operating modes are considered for the capture plant, i.e., normal, start-up, off, and stand-by. The model is illustrated by means of a methodological example. © 2012 IEEE. Source

Discover hidden collaborations