Rovaniemi, Finland
Rovaniemi, Finland

The University of Lapland is located in the city of Rovaniemi, Finland. It was founded in 1979. The University of Lapland is the most northern university in the European Union.The university is divided into four faculties: Faculty of Art and Design Faculty of Education Faculty of Law Faculty of Social scienceIn addition to faculties, there is the Arctic Centre that is devoted to the arctic studies and research. The European Union has planned a resolution on the Arctic Strategy for the EU. The resolution includes paragraphs that are after the establishment of the EU Arctic Information Centre as a networked undertaking with a permanent office in Rovaniemi at the University of Lapland, Finland. Finally, a subunit exists called the Institute of Business and Tourism; formerly it was a faculty but it is subsumed within the Faculty of Social science. Wikipedia.


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Unless otherwise stated, the comparison figures in brackets refer to the corresponding period in the previous year (reference period). Figures are unaudited. DNA's net sales are expected to remain at the same level and the comparable operating result is expected to improve somewhat in 2017 compared to 2016. The Group's financial position and liquidity is expected to remain at a healthy level. DNA's year 2017 is off to a strong start as expected. Our net sales increased 5.7% to EUR 213.4 million. Strong growth of service revenue (net sales less sales of devices and interconnection charges) continued, and good development of mobile device sales also had a positive effect on net sales. Service revenue was boosted in particular by the positive development of the mobile subscription base and growing use of mobile data as 4G subscriptions become more common. Our profitability improved and our operating result grew 14.9% and was EUR 28.9 million, or 13.5% of net sales (12.4%). Mobile communication network subscription volumes were up 100,000 from the reference period. There was a clear improvement in DNA's revenue per user (ARPU) for mobile communications from the comparison period. Price increases in certain older DNA subscription types increased DNA's subscription turnover rate (CHURN) in the first quarter. Our fixed-network subscription base (fixed voice, fixed broadband and cable television) increased by 8,000 subscriptions from the reference period, even though our customers kept moving away from using of fixed-voice subscriptions. At the same time, fixed-network broadband and cable television subscriptions increased in total by 20,000. In 2017, the focus of our network investments has shifted from network coverage expansion to capacity expansion. At the end of 2016, our 4G network reached 99.6 per cent of the population in mainland Finland as the shared network was completed in Eastern and Northern Finland. Due to the improved coverage, DNA has gained new consumer and corporate customers in the area. For example, the University of Lapland selected DNA as its mobile service provider. The agreement between DNA and the University of Lapland covers mobile voice and data connections for hundreds of users. When selecting the service provider, the University of Lapland placed emphasis on coverage. The DNA Valokuitu Plus (DNA Fibre Optic Plus) network enables broadband speeds of a Gigabit class per second without any changes to the housing company's internal network. In the first quarter, the Gigabit class speed became available to all 600,000 households in the DNA Valokuitu Plus network across Finland. DNA is among the first operators globally that is capable of providing Gigabit class broadband speeds in the entire network. In the first quarter, we tested the potential of the new 5G radio technology with Ericsson. A transmission speed of some 25 Gbps and a delay of less than 3 ms were achieved in the radio connection in the 5G test, which is a strong demonstration of the progress of 5G development. There are three important targets for 5G in the future: to enable a large-scale Internet of Things, to support highly reliable delay-critical connections, and to further increase the speed and efficiency of mobile broadband connections. In the first quarter, we became the first company in Finland to introduce grandparental leave, entitling grandparents to a one week's paid leave. Competition is expected to remain intense for the rest of the year and our outlook for 2017 remains unchanged. According to our strategy, we will continue measures to improve our customer experience further, and we will also continue to focus on employee well-being and professional development.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: Ocean.2010-1 | Award Amount: 14.85M | Year: 2011

The Arctic is engaged in a deep climatic evolution. This evolution is quite predictable at short (year) and longer scales (several decades), but it is the decadal intermediate scale that is the most difficult to predict. This is because the natural variability of the system is large and dominant at this scale, and the system is highly non linear due to positive and negative feedback between sea ice, the ocean and atmosphere. Already today, due to the increase of the GHG concentration in the atmosphere and the amplification of global warming in the Arctic, the impacts of climate change in the region are apparent, e.g. in the reduction in sea ice, in changes in weather patterns and cyclones or in the melting of glaciers and permafrost. It is therefore not surprising that models clearly predict that Artic sea ice will disappear in summer within 20 or 30 years, yielding new opportunities and risks for human activities in the Arctic. This climatic evolution is going to have strong impacts on both marine ecosystems and human activities in the Arctic. This in turn has large socio-economic implications for Europe. ACCESS will evaluate climatic impacts in the Arctic on marine transportation (including tourism), fisheries, marine mammals and the extraction of hydrocarbons for the next 20 years; with particular attention to environmental sensitivities and sustainability. These meso-economic issues will be extended to the macro-economic scale in order to highlight trans-sectoral implications and provide an integrated assessment of the socio-economic impact of climate change. An important aspect of ACCESS, given the geostrategic implication of Arctic state changes, will be the consideration of Arctic governance issues, including the framework UNCLOS (United Nations Convention for the Law of the Sea). ACCESS dedicates a full work package to integrate Arctic climate changes, socioeconomic impacts and Arctic governance issues.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: BG-10-2016 | Award Amount: 8.10M | Year: 2016

Blue-Action will provide fundamental and empirically-grounded, executable science that quantifies and explains the role of a changing Arctic in increasing predictive capability of weather and climate of the Northern Hemisphere.To achieve this Blue-Action will take a transdisciplinary approach, bridging scientific understanding within Arctic climate, weather and risk management research, with key stakeholder knowledge of the impacts of climatic weather extremes and hazardous events; leading to the co-design of better services.This bridge will build on innovative statistical and dynamical approaches to predict weather and climate extremes. In dialogue with users, Blue-Arctic will take stock in existing knowledge about cross-sectoral impacts and vulnerabilities with respect to the occurrence of these events when associated to weather and climate predictions. Modeling and prediction capabilities will be enhanced by targeting firstly, lower latitude oceanic and atmospheric drivers of regional Arctic changes and secondly, Arctic impacts on Northern Hemisphere climate and weather extremes. Coordinated multi-model experiments will be key to test new higher resolution model configurations, innovative methods to reduce forecast error, and advanced methods to improve uptake of new Earth observations assets are planned. Blue-Action thereby demonstrates how such an uptake may assist in creating better optimized observation system for various modelling applications. The improved robust and reliable forecasting can help meteorological and climate services to better deliver tailored predictions and advice, including sub-seasonal to seasonal time scales, will take Arctic climate prediction beyond seasons and to teleconnections over the Northern Hemisphere. Blue-Action will through its concerted efforts therefore contribute to the improvement of climate models to represent Arctic warming realistically and address its impact on regional and global atmospheric and oceanic circulation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: SiS-2008-3.0.3.1 | Award Amount: 1.35M | Year: 2009

Fifteen relevant organisations among science centres, science museums and aquariums will be engaged by this proposal ACCENT in a coordination action aimed at rationalising their two-way communication practices and at strengthening their collaborations with the scientific community on climate change issues. Climate change issues are clearly a growing concern for the public today. In recent years, people have received a great deal of information from media on the causes and consequences of climate changes, but depending on countries and regions the understanding of citizens and their engagement in these topics is still varied. ACCENT proposes to contribute to a global effort to move the campaign on climate change from informative to the active phase, through the exchange and dissemination of practices, with specific actions that encourage the involvement of citizens in actions and dialogue. The rising demand for public participation is evident when addressing global challenges; in this sense, involvement of the public would be central to the ACCENT strategy to improve the capacity of European democracies to represent and include citizens perspectives. Through ACCENT, the science centre community is committing itself to strengthening the efforts its institutions made at the local level in a one year European Communication Action on Climate change issues for the dissemination of European research results, and to establishing the dialogue among scientists, stakeholders and the public through participative practices. They will capitalise on their competences in a European sustainable Web platform that will act as collector as well as disseminator for any organisations dealing with public engagement in science. ACCENT will assess the outcomes from the engagement and participation of the public in order to deliver reliable data on the opinion and perception of European citizens about climate change issues.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH.2013.5.1-1 | Award Amount: 3.09M | Year: 2014

Since 2008, Europe has been shaken by an ongoing crisis. If relevant parts of populations are exposed to socioeconomic risks, it is a distinctive characteristic of European political ethics that they must not be left alone, but should be subject to support and solidarity by budget support policy, economic development policies and social policy at different levels. But, in analogy with medical and psychological findings, some parts of the vulnerable population, although experiencing the same living conditions as others, are developing resilience, which in our context means that they perform social, economic and cultural practices and habits which protect them from suffer and harm and support sustainable patterns of coping and adaption. This resilience to socioeconomic crises at household levels is the focus of the proposed project. It can consist of identity patterns, knowledge, family or community relations, cultural and social as well as economic practices, be they formal or informal. Welfare states, labour markets and economic policies at both macro or meso level form the context or environment of those resilience patterns. For reasons of coping with the crisis without leaving the common ground of the implicit European social model (or the unwritten confession to the welfare state) under extremely bad monetary conditions in many countries, and for reasons of maintaining quality of life and improving social policy, it is a highly interesting perspective to learn from emergent processes of resilience development and their preconditions. Thus, the main questions are directed at understanding patterns and dimensions of resilience at micro-/household level in different types of European member and neighbour states accounting for regional varieties, relevant internal and external conditions and resources as well as influences on these patterns by social, economic or labour market policy as well as legal regulations.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: MSCA-NIGHT-2016 | Award Amount: 428.88K | Year: 2016

The CHANGE project aims to foster collaboration between the public and researchers in Finland in order to improve our everyday life in a rapidly changing world. This project brings together 9 universities, 1 research institute and two expert organisations for science communication. It spans many facets of research in Finland and covers numerous individual researchers with diverse backgrounds and research topics. We will deliver a message of cutting edge research conducted in Finland and introduce the general public with the large number of researchers and the significant work they perform. We want to break stereotypes the general public may have on researchers. The programme for activities during the night will include content for everyone, from children to seniors. However, the specific aim is to promote research careers especially to high school and university students, and young people in general who are about to make their first real career choice. Our message is that high education is fun and could provide them with a secured future. For the first time, so many Finnish universities and organisations will unite for a widespread European Researchers Night and perform simultaneously activities targeted for the general public around the country.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: SEC-2010.4.2-3 | Award Amount: 15.53M | Year: 2012

The AIRBEAM project proposes a situation awareness toolbox for the management of crisis over wide area taking benefit of an optimised set of aerial (unmanned) platforms, including satellites. The number of unmanned air- and space-borne platform available and their associated sensors present a new set of challenges to end users involved in the effective management of emergencies and actions of law enforcement. Within the scope of crisis management, the project intends to provide official public users from each Member States with the means to specify their own needs and to assess the technical solutions provided by unmanned aerial platforms. Through intense collaboration between industrial partners, stakeholders and end users, AIRBEAM will define an ambitious yet realistic concept of use. By running scenarios that will be properly selected and defined by the end-users within the project in a simulated environment, the increased capabilities for situation awareness will be assessed methodically. Various platform and sensor mixes will be compared using key performance indicators among which is cost effectiveness. Live demonstrations with multiple civil unmanned aerial platforms will complete these ground simulation exercises in demonstrating to end users the potential and maturity of the coordinated use of multiple platforms.


In a very short time, discussions on Arctic governance have moved from being a topic of scholarly attention and NGO advocacy onto the agendas of states and of the European Union (EU). Increasingly, the various alternatives propounded by a diverse set of actors over what Arctic governance should look like appear as pre-negotiation tactics, a type of testing period before a regime change. The article examines whether the still predominant inter governmental forum, the Arctic Council, is facing a threat of being supplanted by other forms of governance. It will study how resistant the Arctic Council, and its predecessor the 1991 Arctic environmental protection strategy, are to change in order to understand whether the council could renew itself to meet future challenges. It will also examine the various proposals for Arctic governance set out by states, the EU and the region's indigenous peoples. All this will permit conclusions to be drawn on where the Arctic Council stands amid all these proposals and whether, and in what way, it should change to support more sustainable governance in the Arctic. © Cambridge University Press 2009.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2014 | Award Amount: 1.02M | Year: 2015

Challenges faced by the marginalized youth in developing countries, such as unemployment, are not simple or easily solved. This is influenced by a number of factors including levels of education, gender, self-esteem, geographic location, physical ability and transport. The objective of the project is to contribute to solving the issues related to the youth unemployment in developing countries by creating participatory tools for human development that enable transformational change for the youth. Based on a service design approach, the project will provide tools for the marginalized youth suitable for daily use, enhancing regional democracy, increasing equal opportunities and contributing to human and service development with a particular target group: the San people in South Africa and Namibia. The San are faced with various social, cultural and political difficulties, and their communities are among the poorest in their countries, which are among the most unequal societies in the world. The tools aim to support the youths motivation and abilities to participate in the development of their own community towards a wider integration into their national socio-economic systems. The project focuses on the means and methods that assist in reaching the target group. Another objective is to cooperate with NGOs and other service providers in order to produce agile and human-centred processes and methods for developing service structures and systems towards improving the status of the marginalized youth. The third objective is to convey information on service design methods to those engaged in the development of youth services. The project aims to support the uptake of service design methods and tools in practical development work as well as the target and interest groups on a permanent basis. Thus the project establishes a strategy for continuation of the work with the target group and the local partners.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IRSES | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-IRSES | Award Amount: 327.90K | Year: 2013

This project intends to undertake a comparative study of three different regions: Siberia (Russia), Lapland (Sweden) and Patagonia (Argentina). These regions have a series of common features as regards their natural and cultural heritage, and are destined to experience similar changes due to the global warming and globalisation processes. The protection and the promotion of cultures, territories and heritages strengthen a socio-economical development process for local communities. Such sustainable valorization should generate high level know-how and good practices that can be transferred to specific territories with national and international protection (National Park, National Reserves, UNESCO labels, etc.). Huge natural spaces in Arctic and Sub-Antartic regions get specific attention from international community (UN and EU) due to current global warming and the impacts of climate change on cultures and territories. These regions have fragile ecosystems that can be rapidly damaged by mass tourism or by a not well-controlled development strategy implemented by public institutions or private companies. This project aims at studying these extreme regions, training professionals working in public administrations in order to improve their educational background, and students with postgraduate curricula linked to tourism, geography, natural heritage, politics and social economics. Cross-cultural training transfers and valorization processes applied to the fields of tourism studies and the tourism industries, as well as cultural heritage and regional development of territories will be offered. Long term sustainable actions will be implemented at international level, such as an International Network of Regional Tourism Observatories and e-Learning platform to diffuse collected data, surveys and pedagogical materials.

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