Canterbury, United Kingdom

University of Kent

kent.ac.uk
Canterbury, United Kingdom

The University of Kent is a public research university based in Kent, United Kingdom. It was founded in 1965 and is regarded as one of the UK's "plate glass universities". The University of Kent's main site is a rural campus just north of Canterbury situated within 300 acres of park land, which houses over 4,300 students. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

The present invention related to an apparatus and method for master slave interferometry, referred to as Complex Master Slave (CMS). The method and apparatus can be used to provide complex-valued measurements of a signal reflected from an axial position inside an object or of signals reflected from points at several axial positions inside an object.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: FCT-04-2015 | Award Amount: 3.80M | Year: 2016

The Internet has become a key piece of any business activity. Criminal activity is not an exception. Some crimes previous to the Internet, such as thefts and scams, have found in the Internet the perfect tool for developing their activities. The Internet allows criminals hiding their real identity and the possibility to purchase specific tools for stealing sensitive data with a very low investment. The overall objective of RAMSES is to design and develop a holistic, intelligent, scalable and modular platform for Law Enforcement Agencies (LEAs) to facilitate digital Forensic Investigations. The system will extract, analyse, link and interpret information extracted from Internet related with financially-motivated malware. Customers, developers and malware victims will be included in order to obtain a better understanding of how and where malware is spread and to get to the source of the threat. To achieve these ambitious objectives, this project will rely on disruptive Big Data technologies to firstly extract and storage, and secondly look for patterns of fraudulent behaviour in enormous amounts of unstructured and structured data. We will focus on 2 case studies: ransomware and banking Trojans. In order to this, RAMSES brings together the latest technologies to develop an intelligent software platform, combining scraping of public and deep web, detecting manipulation and steganalysis for images and videos, tracking malware payments, extraction and analysis of malware samples and Big Data analysis and visualizations tools. Validation pilots will take place in three different EU countries (Portugal, Belgium and Spain) being the first a mono-LEA pilot in each site and the second a collaborative investigation pilot between several LEAs. Commercial potential will be validated during the project supported by a feasibility study to assess determinants for the adoption of the platform and appropriate business models.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: DS-04-2015 | Award Amount: 5.00M | Year: 2016

C3ISP mission is to define a collaborative and confidential information sharing, analysis and protection framework as a service for cyber security management. C3ISP innovation is the possibility to share information in a flexible and controllable manner inside a collaborative multi-domain environment to improve detection of cyber threats and response capabilities, still preserving the confidentiality of the shared information. C3ISP paradigm is collect, analyse, inform, and react. In order to achieve the aforementioned goals, the project aims to create an efficient and flexible framework for secure data analytics where data access and data analytics operations are regulated by multi-stakeholders data sharing agreements. In particular, C3ISP will: facilitate the definition, analysis, management, enforcement and dissolution of data sharing agreements; going from high level descriptions (close to natural language) to system enforceable data usage policies; consider the most appropriate data protection techniques used in the analytics infrastructure, from data centric policy enforcement mechanisms to homomorphic encryption techniques that enable to work directly on encrypted data (considering also intermediate solutions as anonymization techniques); address key challenges for compliant sharing of cyber security related information. By taking a compliance by design approach, the project places an early emphasis on understanding and incorporating regulatory requirements into the data sharing agreements. validate the framework through four Pilots covering several relevant areas as enterprise security, governmental CERTS, Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and, in particular, for SMEs interested in holistic cyber protection solutions (including managed security services). The project Consortium combines strong industry players with research institutions that will deliver high quality innovation; it also includes SMEs and digital innovation promoters.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.65M | Year: 2016

The ETN has two aims: to a) train ESRs; b) investigate the The History of Human Freedom and Dignity in Western Civilization. a) The ETN will establish an innovative training programme which allows the ESRs to obtain specialist knowledge of a specific research topic and to obtain transferable skills enabling the students to apply their knowledge in non-academic institutions, e.g. dealing with social welfare, human resources, or legal /political institutes. The training program includes acquiring transferable skills via courses and via secondments in non-academic partner organisations. b) The thesis of the research is that the concept of the ideal modern Western European human being has its roots far back in the history of philosophy and theology. This ideal human being has the right to think, believe, and express itself freely about all matters without fearing retribution, and to be treated as an autonomous and dignified individual. But such a conception is not shared by all and never was. Its long history has been formed through a continuous battle between two theological and philosophical traditions going back to Origen from Alexandria and Augustine of Hippo respectively. Origen saw humans as free, valuable and dignified beings, while Augustine saw them as predestined, sinful and bound to servitude. The network will investigate the reception and use of Origens ideas in order to provide a comprehensive and historically based understanding of these fundamental values, their origins, development and the fights they have gone through. Only then can we argue for their continued place in modern society. Such a project is highly relevant today, since the modern conception of humans is a fundamental pillar of Western democracies which is under pressure from both political and fundamentalist religious groups that question the societal structures building on ideas of humans freedom and dignity, and by global crises and structures that limit the individuals autonomy.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 2.51M | Year: 2017

Over recent years the ubiquity of mobile platforms such as smartphones and tablets devices has rapidly increased. These devices provide a range of untethered interaction unimaginable a decade previously. With this ability to interact with services and individuals comes the need to accurately authenticate the identity of the person requesting the transaction many of which carry financial/legally-binding instruction. Biometric solutions have also seen increased prominence over the past decade with large-scale implementations in areas such as passport and national ID systems. The adoption of specific biometric sensors by mobile vendors indicates a long-term strategy as a means of authentication. This adoption is is at critical point users need to be confident of biometrics in terms of usability, privacy and performance; compromise in any one of these categories will lead to mistrust and a reluctance to adopt over and above conventional forms of authentication. The design, implementation and assessment of biometrics on mobile devices therefore requires a range of solutions to aid initial and continued adoption. The EU needs to have experts trained specifically in the field to ensure that it participates, competes and succeeds in the global market. AMBER comprises 11 partners with recognised expertise from across the EU. The specific objectives are to: Address a range of current issues facing biometric solutions on mobile devices requiring timely research and development. Collate Europe-wide complementary expertise to investigate these issues and provide a structure and environment to effectively facilitate training. Train and equip the next generation of researchers to define, investigate and implement solutions, and provide transferable skills to enable effective planning, management and communication of research ideas and outcomes. Develop solutions and theory to ensure secure, ubiquitous and efficient authentication whilst protecting privacy of citizen.


Zhu H.,University of Kent
IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications | Year: 2011

The microcellular system and distributed antenna system (DAS) are two promising systems for future high data rate wireless communications, since both systems can reduce the radio transmission distance between the transmitter and the receiver. This paper aims to compare the average spectrum efficiency and the cell edge spectrum efficiency between the two cellular systems in the downlink transmission. In order to achieve high spectrum efficiency, frequency reuse and/or spatial diversity are exploited in these two systems. The performances between the two cellular systems are theoretically compared in a network topology with seven macrocells, each of which has seven hexagonal sectors (or microcells). Moreover, the approach of antenna unit selection in the DAS for spatial diversity is presented. Numerical results show that the average spectrum efficiency per sector and the cell edge spectrum efficiency in the microcellular system are better than those in the DAS without frequency reuse. However, when the frequency reuse is considered in the DAS, the DAS outperforms the microcellular system in both of the average and cell edge spectrum efficiencies. © 2011 IEEE.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: BBSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 325.75K | Year: 2017

Simply stepping outside on a sunny day exposes the skin to enough ultraviolet radiation (UV) to cause blistering and the formation of cancerous tumours. Why this doesnt occur is due to enzymes present in every cell that scan DNA for damage and then initiate repair. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is one of a number of diseases caused by deficiencies in this repair pathway and for individuals with XP this leads to skin blistering, cancer and neurological dysfunction. A complete lack of these nucleotide excision repair (NER) enzymes is lethal. Because most organisms are exposed to UV, this mechanism of DNA repair is conserved across all forms of life. In humans over 30 enzymes are involved in NER, whereas in bacteria only 6 enzymes are required. Therefore understanding NER at the simpler bacterial level will provide insight into the human equivalent. Despite decades of research into NER there is surprisingly little known about the precise details. The components are well-established but how they work together is still uncertain. The main aim of our work is to understand how the bacterial system works as a whole, but still at the molecular level. This is important because the classical approach of studying individual components may miss the formation of enzyme complexes or overstate the importance of individual components. This is very complex and therefore we study single molecules to simplify the system. We aim to directly watch complexes forming, their mechanisms of damage location and the recruitment of other components. These are all physical concepts; a protein has to search through a sea of undamaged DNA to find the lesion, somehow it must communicate with other proteins to signal that it has achieved this goal and then organise these other proteins onto the site of damage. Only through single molecule imaging of a complex mixture of components can we get a true picture of how DNA is repaired. To take this further we are also proposing to image these processes in live bacteria. We will use cutting edge techniques to isolate single molecules within cells and study how they behave alone and with each other. This is immensely exciting; the prospect of visualising single molecule processes in their native environments is a very new field of study. These combined approaches will offer a complete view of how DNA repair occurs in vitro and in vivo. Not only will this project improve our understanding of bacteria repair it will serve as a proxy for understanding how proteins interact with DNA more generally. There is a gap in our toolset from cell biology to single molecule imaging that we will fill during this project. Therefore the tools and techniques that we develop will find application across a wide range of problems. Ultimately, the knowledge gained from this study will inform studies of human equivalent systems, such as XP. This will have considerable impact on the lives of individuals with this highly debilitating condition.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 406.51K | Year: 2017

Since its launch in 2014 Gateways to the First World War has encouraged community groups and members of the public to broaden their research by asking new questions, connecting with diverse communities and creating imaginative outputs (see interim report for details). The aim outlined in the original funding application, of encouraging people to engage with their own preconceptions and...test and question their origins, has remained central to the ethos of the centre. The centre is, and will remain, firmly rooted in its internationally-recognised research into the history of the conflict and its legacy. Gateways will continue to offer this resource to all centres and, specifically, will offer leadership in particular themes: The memory of the First World War Life on the Home and Fighting Fronts The medical history of the First World War Propaganda and persuasion Maritime and naval history Operational and military history. The centre has developed a programme of high-quality events, organised in a variety of locations, which have involved sharing the latest academic research on the First World War to enrich and inspire existing and developing projects, workshops and training, showcasing of HLF projects and networking opportunities. As planned in the original application for funding, collaborations with non-HEI bodies has been a key element of the Gateways project and the centre has established and extended strong partnerships with a range of organisations including the Imperial War Museums, First World War Centenary Partnership, Commonwealth War Graves Commission and the Department for Culture, Media and Sport. Significant activities are underway to support these organisations, particularly for the Somme 100 commemorations, and will continue over the next two years. The centre has established UK-wide reach through its travelling exhibitions, events (including a successful community Roadshow) and academic and community collaborations in a number of regions, including Scotland. Gateways will build its role around a rich programme of events for 2017-2019, which has been very much shaped by careful analysis of feedback on activities carried out 2014-2016 and conversations with partner organisations and its sister centres.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 799.60K | Year: 2017

2017 marks the 400-year anniversary of the death in 1617 of Pocahontas, a woman with strong localized connections in both Kent and Norfolk, and whose short stay in Britain and death in Gravesend symbolize both a hope for Native-British relations and its tragic curtailment. Conflict over resources and general mistrust in the Virginia colony would escalate in the years following her death. Three short years later, the Massachusetts Bay colony would be established, again dependent on the possibility of good relationships with the Native population of the northeast coast. These two significant anniversaries-their meaning for British and Native communities now as well as their historical detail-frame the timeline of this project, and give urgent impetus to reflect on the legacy and impact of Britains colonial history, its relationship with Native North America, and the political, cultural, and economic significance of Native transatlantic mobility-to both British and Native communities. In so doing, we provide a lens for the further consideration of migration and displacement, the historic and ongoing development of globalization, and questions of nationhood and belonging. Our research, principally managed by two senior specialists in Native American Studies-Stirrup and Fear-Segal-will follow three key phases: 1. beginning with the examination of known scholarship and the combing of established archives in the UK and in key locations in the US and Canada; 2. pursuing new archival possibilities uncovered during phase one in order to recover detail that is, perhaps, more intimately local to travellers stays in particular places; 3. making use of a variety of means, including crowdsourcing, calls for submission of materials, and oral history, to locate and document highly localised tales, memories, family legends, and, where possible, photographs and other artefacts, pertaining to Native presence in and travel through Britain. In undertaking this work we will identify gaps in the narrative as well as more fully map out the routes and networks that move beyond London, rendering partial narratives complete. Four core projects undertaken by each member of the research team will identify and explore particular groups and purposes of travel that will enable us to build a comprehensive narrative through manageable and discrete programmes of research. In addition to the more conventional academic outputs for such work-conference papers, journal articles, a co-authored book, blog posts, and our own conference on Native presence in and travel to Europe-we plan methods of interpretation and dissemination that emphasise community involvement and that ensure public accessibility. The project will incorporate: - a series of artist residencies for Native visual, verbal, and musical artists to work for short but sustained periods in the UK with school and community groups (in Canterburys Beaney Gallery or Studio 3, the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Art in Norwich, Bristols Rainmaker Gallery, and Salford (TBC)). Through workshops, these residencies will develop artworks that will then be exhibited in various locations and, where feasible, online. The musical residency, through collaboration with the Voice Project, will result in a choral piece for performance by community choirs in Norfolk and Kent in the first instance. - Similarly, we will collaborate with the theatrical charity Border Crossings on the 2019 Origins: Festival of First Nations, both to focus that event on the concerns of this project and to facilitate outreach. - We will also engage the British Librarys Regional Libraries Network in order to further disseminate findings in British locales relevant to those materials. - All of this work will be visually documented and disseminated via our website, online mapping and visualisation technology, giving online life to the hidden archive and ensuring the broadest possible access both in the UK and North America.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 444.86K | Year: 2017

The project considers the economical, psychological and social effects of ransomware. Ransomware is a particular type of malware, and a new crime of extortion committed online. Malicious software gets installed through a phishing email or a drive-by download on a website. When it runs, it performs an action such as the encryption of the users files, and asks a ransom for this action to be undone. The victim is coerced into paying through psychological manipulations which sometimes masquerade as advice. Due to the subtle ways that the technological aspects of the crime blend with - and are exploited through - various human dimensions, it has profound economic, psychological and societal impacts upon its victims, which makes its eradication all the more complicated. Law Enforcement Agencies have estimated that losses to criminals using ransomware are many millions of pounds, but the true costs may never be known because victims have shown to be particularly reluctant to report. This project sets out to answer the following questions: Why is ransomware so effective as a crime and why are so many people falling victim to it? Who is carrying out ransomware attacks? How can police agencies be assisted? What interventions are required to mitigate the impacts of ransomware? In order to do so, the project gathers data from Law Enforcement Agencies (which have agreed to closely collaborate with the project), through surveys of the general public and SMEs, and through interviews with stakeholders. The data will be analysed using script analysis, behavioural analysis, and other profiling techniques, leading to narratives regarding the criminals, the victims, and the typical ransomware scenario. Economical and behavioural models of ransomware will then be constructed and used to improve ransomware mitigation and advice, as well as support for law enforcement.

Loading University of Kent collaborators
Loading University of Kent collaborators