Jönköping, Sweden
Jönköping, Sweden

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Elbanna A.,Royal Holloway, University of London | Linderoth H.C.J.,University of Jonkoping
Information Systems Frontiers | Year: 2014

The use of information systems in organisations presents one of the early signs of success. Hundreds of studies have generated a wealth of knowledge on systems use across a broad range of technologies and theoretical approaches. However, new types of technologies and organisations continue to pose challenges to systems use. The case of open systems that are offered to users on a voluntary basis presents one of those challenges for two reasons: 1) the systems are open in the sense that they could be configured in many ways depending on users finding use cases and possible applications; 2) the system use is voluntary and hence there is no organisational push. They bring users’ choice and active finding of use cases to the centre of their success. This study questions why and how users choose to engage (or not to engage) with open technology on a voluntary basis and how and why its use options and potential unfold? It examines a longitudinal case study (1994–2012) on the voluntary use of telemedicine. The findings reveal that users’ perception of open technology in a voluntary setting is formed through a continuous interplay between users’ technology mental models, professional identity, institutional traditions and arrangements and work practices. If perceived to be in contradiction with professional identity, institutional traditions and arrangements or work practices, users’ technology mental models are fixated on the misfit and the misfit is thereby reinforced. Hence, users do not try to find use cases or think of possible applications. However, institutional entrepreneurs could break this self-fulfilling prophecy by influencing both the technology mental models of users and the institutional arrangements. © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Karlsson C.E.,University of Skövde | Ernsth Bravell M.,University of Jonkoping | Ek K.,University of Skövde | Bergh I.,University of Skövde
International Journal of Older People Nursing | Year: 2015

Background: Pain assessment in people living with dementia is a challenge due to the complexity of pain and dementia and the difficulties in self-reporting. In home healthcare, nurses are frequently involved in pain assessment situations and there is a need to explore how home healthcare teams' manage pain assessment in this setting. Aim: The study aimed to explore home healthcare teams' experiences of pain assessment among care recipients with dementia. Design: An exploratory qualitative design was used. Methods: Open-ended individual interviews were conducted with thirteen registered nurses and ten nursing assistants, working in three different home healthcare teams in one municipality in western Sweden. Philosophical hermeneutics was utilised to interpret the home healthcare teams' experiences. Results: Four interpretations emerged: the need for trusting collaboration, the use of multiple assessment strategies, maintenance of staff continuity in care and assessment situations, and the need for extended time to assess pain. Conclusions: The home healthcare teams recognise pain assessment in people with dementia as involving a complex interaction of sensory, cognitive, emotional and behavioural components in which efforts to acquire understanding of behavioural changes mainly guides their assessments. The solid team coherence between registered nurses and nursing assistants aided the assessment procedure. To assess pain, the teams used multiple methods that complemented one another. However, no systematic routines or appropriate evidence-based pain tools were used. Implications for Practice: The team members'concern for care recipients when assessing pain is evident and needs to be acknowledged by the organisation which is responsible for the quality of care. Future studies should focus on further exploration of nurses' experiences with pain and dementia in home healthcare settings and address what nurses identify and how they deal with their findings. It is imperative to investigate how organisations and nurses can ensure best practices and how the implementation of evidence-based routines for assessing pain may aid in pain assessment situations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Hofwing M.,University of Jonkoping
Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference | Year: 2011

During casting residual stresses are developed due to the solidification and cooling. In this work the robustness of residual stresses in casted brake discs with respect to variations in four parameters is evaluated. The parameters are Young's modulus, yield strength and hardening, time of breaking the mould and the thickness of the brake disc. The robustness analysis is performed by Monte Carlo simulations of metamodels which are surrogates to a finite element model. Quadratic response surfaces and Kriging approximations are considered. Those are based on finite element analyses defined by a Latin hypercube sampled design of experiments. In the finite element analyses an un-coupled approach is utilized where a thermal analysis generates a temperature history of the solidification and cooling. Then follows a structural analysis which is driven by the temperature history. After casting the machining of the brake disc is analyzed by gradually removing elements in the finite element model. The results show that the variation in the studied parameters yield large variation in residual stresses. The thickness of the brake disc is the parameter that has largest influence to the variation in residual stresses. Furthermore, the level of the residual stresses are in general high and might influence the fatigue life of the brake disc. Copyright © 2011 by ASME.


Rossi S.,University of Trento | Parziani N.,University of Trento | Zanella C.,University of Trento | Zanella C.,University of Jonkoping | Zanella C.,SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden
Wear | Year: 2015

Vitreous enamel is an inorganic coating applied on metallic substrates as powder and fired at relatively high temperature in order to cover the surface forming the coating. This kind of layer shows, at the same time, very good functional and aesthetical properties. In several applications, good mechanical resistance together with corrosion protection is required and enamel is a good alternative to other coatings. Enamel presents optimum corrosion protection and high hardness values but the low fracture toughness reduces its resistance to abrasive wear related to brittle fracture. The microstructure of enamel, the chemical composition of the frit, and the deposition parameters are crucial for the final properties. Moreover, it is possible to introduce mill additives in the frit or hard particles inside the layers to improve final resistance. In this paper, abrasion resistance of enamel is tested by Taber Abraser test. Mill additives (spodumene or quartz), hard (WC or SiC) or solid lubricant (graphite) particles have been added to the frit to study their influence on the abrasion resistance. The abrasion resistance of modified enamels was evaluated through mass loss after abrasion and wear track were observed by SEM in order to evaluate the abrasion damage. An improvement of the abrasion resistance was obtained modifying the frit with mill additives. The introduction of SiC and WC particles produced an important modification in wear mechanism of the glassy coating, reducing the crack nucleation due to the low pores quantity and good interface between vitreous matrix and particles. In these cases the wear mechanism is limited to scratches on the surface. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Linderoth H.C.J.,University of Jonkoping
Proceedings of the 31st Annual Association of Researchers in Construction Management Conference, ARCOM 2015 | Year: 2015

In recent years Building information modelling (BIM) has been considered as a means for transforming the building and construction industry by introducing significant changes in the industry for all stages of the construction process. However, when new technologies are promoted they are almost considered as a magic bullet that should transform an industry, or an organization to the better. By drawing on the concepts of institutional logics and sense making, and a case study over 12 years of telemedicine use in a Swedish county, the objective of the paper is to analyse what actors in the building and construction industry can learn from other societal sectors implementing and using new ICT. It is concluded that the use of technology is heavily shaped by significant actor groups' sense making of the technology, that is grounded both an institutional logic and what benefits or disadvantages the group perceive from technology use. What can be learnt from the telemedicine case is the importance of analysing underlying reasons to why an application is accepted or not.


Johnson E.,University of Pretoria | Nilsson S.,University of Jonkoping | Nilsson S.,Gothenburg University | Adolfsson M.,University of Jonkoping
AAC: Augmentative and Alternative Communication | Year: 2015

Most children with severe cerebral palsy experience daily pain that affects their school performance. School professionals need to assess pain in these children, who may also have communication difficulties, in order to pay attention to the pain and support the children's continued participation in school. In this study, South African school professionals' perceptions of how they observed pain in children with cerebral palsy, how they questioned them about it and how the children communicated their pain back to them were investigated. Thirty-eight school professionals participated in five focus groups. Their statements were categorized using qualitative content analysis. From the results it became clear that professionals observed children's pain communication through their bodily expressions, behavioral changes, and verbal and non-verbal messages. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) methods were rarely used. The necessity of considering pain-related vocabulary in a multilingual South African context, and of advocating for the use of AAC strategies to enable children with cerebral palsy to communicate their pain was highlighted in this study. © 2015 The Author(s). Published by Taylor & Francis.


Zanella C.,University of Trento | Zanella C.,University of Jonkoping | Leisner P.,University of Jonkoping
Transactions of the Institute of Metal Finishing | Year: 2014

Over the past decade the European Pulse Plating Seminar has been established as the most important event for discussing research and applications of pulse plating. Now it is organised every second year in the area of Vienna by the company Happy Plating. For the past two years it has been co-organised with the European Academy of Surface Technology, EAST. The pulse plating seminars have made it possible to follow how the application of pulse plating has increased and widened during the last decade since the first seminar in 2006. © 2014 Institute of Materials Finishing Published by Maney on behalf of the Institute.


Johansson P.,University of Jonkoping | Linderoth H.C.J.,University of Jonkoping | Granth K.,University of Jonkoping
Proceedings 30th Annual Association of Researchers in Construction Management Conference, ARCOM 2014 | Year: 2014

Design errors are claimed to account for 26% of the cost of defects, these in turn are stated to encompass 2-9% of production cost for building and constructions. Lack of knowledge and information has been identified as a major reasons for design errors. Recently Building Information Modelling (BIM) has been considered as a mean for reducing design errors. However, limited research has been conducted on the role of BIM as a means for transfer and sharing knowledge in order to reduce design errors. The aim of the paper is to analyse BIM's role of facilitating knowledge and expertise sharing in order to prevent design errors. The aim is achieved by analysing a case study of design errors in a construction project. By drawing on the concept of boundary object it is confirmed that BIM can serve a mean for preventing design errors by facilitating knowledge and expertise sharing, across discipline, time and space, and professional boundaries. Depending the kind of boundary knowledge and expertise should be shared across, different challenges emerge in organizing the knowledge and expertise sharing.


PubMed | University of Pretoria and University of Jonkoping
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Augmentative and alternative communication (Baltimore, Md. : 1985) | Year: 2015

Most children with severe cerebral palsy experience daily pain that affects their school performance. School professionals need to assess pain in these children, who may also have communication difficulties, in order to pay attention to the pain and support the childrens continued participation in school. In this study, South African school professionals perceptions of how they observed pain in children with cerebral palsy, how they questioned them about it and how the children communicated their pain back to them were investigated. Thirty-eight school professionals participated in five focus groups. Their statements were categorized using qualitative content analysis. From the results it became clear that professionals observed childrens pain communication through their bodily expressions, behavioral changes, and verbal and non-verbal messages. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) methods were rarely used. The necessity of considering pain-related vocabulary in a multilingual South African context, and of advocating for the use of AAC strategies to enable children with cerebral palsy to communicate their pain was highlighted in this study.


PubMed | University of Skövde and University of Jonkoping
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of older people nursing | Year: 2015

Pain assessment in people living with dementia is a challenge due to the complexity of pain and dementia and the difficulties in self-reporting. In home healthcare, nurses are frequently involved in pain assessment situations and there is a need to explore how home healthcare teams manage pain assessment in this setting.The study aimed to explore home healthcare teams experiences of pain assessment among care recipients with dementia.An exploratory qualitative design was used.Open-ended individual interviews were conducted with thirteen registered nurses and ten nursing assistants, working in three different home healthcare teams in one municipality in western Sweden. Philosophical hermeneutics was utilised to interpret the home healthcare teams experiences.Four interpretations emerged: the need for trusting collaboration, the use of multiple assessment strategies, maintenance of staff continuity in care and assessment situations, and the need for extended time to assess pain.The home healthcare teams recognise pain assessment in people with dementia as involving a complex interaction of sensory, cognitive, emotional and behavioural components in which efforts to acquire understanding of behavioural changes mainly guides their assessments. The solid team coherence between registered nurses and nursing assistants aided the assessment procedure. To assess pain, the teams used multiple methods that complemented one another. However, no systematic routines or appropriate evidence-based pain tools were used.The team membersconcern for care recipients when assessing pain is evident and needs to be acknowledged by the organisation which is responsible for the quality of care. Future studies should focus on further exploration of nurses experiences with pain and dementia in home healthcare settings and address what nurses identify and how they deal with their findings. It is imperative to investigate how organisations and nurses can ensure best practices and how the implementation of evidence-based routines for assessing pain may aid in pain assessment situations.

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