Johannesburg, South Africa

University of Johannesburg

www.uj.ac.za/
Johannesburg, South Africa

The University of Johannesburg is a public university located in Johannesburg, South Africa. The University of Johannesburg came into existence on 1 January, 2005 as the result of a merger between the Rand Afrikaans University , the Technikon Witwatersrand and the Soweto and East Rand campuses of Vista University. Prior to the merger, the Daveyton and Soweto campuses of the former Vista University had been incorporated into RAU. As a result of the merger of Rand Afrikaans University , it is not uncommon for alumni to refer to the university incorrectly as RAU.The newly emerged institution is one of the largest comprehensive contact universities in South Africa, with nine faculties having more than 90 departments and an enrollment of approximately 48,000 students, spreading over four different campuses. The university is one of the largest residential universities in the Republic of South Africa. Wikipedia.

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Patent
University of Johannesburg | Date: 2017-07-19

The invention relates to an apparatus for applying foliar spray and more specifically, but not exclusively, to an apparatus for applying a carbon rich foliar spray. The apparatus (1) includes supply means (2) for supplying water (3) to the apparatus. The supply means (2) is in the form of a water tank (4) with pipe (5) extending from the tank, through a reverse osmosis water filtration unit (12), pump (6), and valve (7). A solute container (8) for holding solute (9) in the form an electrolyte solution of sodium ions (Na+) and bicarbonate ions (HCO3-) formed by mixing sodium bicarbonate and water (3) from the supply means (2). The combinatory part (10) is connected to an ion exchange part (15) through valve (19), pipe (17) and pump (18). The prepared solution is the product of passing the diluted electrolyte solution (11) through the ion exchange column (15). The prepared solution now contains mostly negatively charged bicarbonate anions (HCO3-) and may be applied to the foliage of plants (26) through pump (27), pipes (28), and finally micro sprayers (29).


Patent
University of Johannesburg | Date: 2015-05-13

This invention relates to a force and moment balance (1) including a support (9) therefor and more specifically, but not exclusively, to a force and moment balance (1) and a support (9) therefor for a wind tunnel. Force and moment balances are known in the art and are typically used in wind tunnels to measure the force and moment loads on a model in the wind tunnel. A problem with current balances is that there is inherent vertical movement associated with horizontal force. According to the invention, the balance (1) has a fixed end (3) and a movable end (6) with a number of supports (9) between the fixed end (3) and the movable end (6). Each support (9) includes compensation means to compensate for resultant movements caused by lateral movement of the movable end (6) relative to the fixed end (3).


Patent
University of Johannesburg | Date: 2017-03-22

This invention relates to a force and moment balance (1) including a support (9) therefor and more specifically, but not exclusively, to a force and moment balance (1) and a support (9) therefor for a wind tunnel. Force and moment balances are known in the art and are typically used in wind tunnels to measure the force and moment loads on a model in the wind tunnel. A problem with current balances is that there is inherent vertical movement associated with horizontal force. According to the invention, the balance (1) has a fixed end (3) and a movable end (6) with a number of supports (9) between the fixed end (3) and the movable end (6). Each support (9) includes compensation means to compensate for resultant movements caused by lateral movement of the movable end (6) relative to the fixed end (3).


Legare C.H.,University of Texas at Austin | Nielsen M.,University of Queensland | Nielsen M.,University of Johannesburg
Trends in Cognitive Sciences | Year: 2015

Imitation and innovation work in tandem to support cultural learning in children and facilitate our capacity for cumulative culture. Here we propose an integrated theoretical account of how the unique demands of acquiring instrumental skills and cultural conventions provide insight into when children imitate, when they innovate, and to what degree. For instrumental learning, with an increase in experience, high fidelity imitation decreases and innovation increases. By contrast, for conventional learning, imitative fidelity stays high, regardless of experience, and innovation stays low. We synthesize cutting edge research on the development of imitative flexibility and innovation to provide insight into the social learning mechanisms underpinning the uniquely human mind. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INT-03-2015 | Award Amount: 2.50M | Year: 2016

GLOBUS critically assesses the EUs impact on justice in a global system characterised by uncertainty, risk and ambiguity. GLOBUS defines a new research agenda for the study of the EUs global role. This agenda directs attention to underlying political and structural challenges to global justice that are prior to the distributive problem, as well as to the fact that what is just is contested both by theorists and policy makers. GLOBUS provides in depth knowledge of how the EU proceeds to promote justice within the specific fields of climate change, trade, development, asylum/migration and security while also speaking to the key horizontal issues of gender and human rights within each of these fields. Rather than focusing on a single dimension GLOBUS develops three different conceptions of justice. This nuanced conceptual scheme allows GLOBUS to address the multifaceted challenge of justice, and to specify the EUs real impact. GLOBUS takes heed of the reality of the foreign will through intense engagement with partners outside Europe. This provides a reality check of the limits and potential for the EUs future place in a multi-polar order. The three conceptions of justice as non-dominance, as impartiality and as mutual recognition all have limitations as they prioritise some challenges to global justice over others. These limitations are important in order to empirically discern inhibiting factors for global political justice such as power, unequal competences and the prevailing system of states as well as in order to specify how the EU contributes to justice. In order to develop a feasible model of justice promotion, we return to theory when data is collected and revise and amend the analytical model. We further factor in the viewpoints and experience of practitioners and stakeholders, GLOBUS provides policy-relevant recommendations that take into consideration ideal requirements while at the same time not losing sight of the realities of power.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: SC5-13f-2015 | Award Amount: 1.98M | Year: 2015

STRADE addresses the long-term security and sustainability of the European raw material supply from European and non-European countries. It will develop dialogue-based, innovative policy recommendations for a European strategy on future raw-material supplies. STRADE will initially concentrate on the industry perspective. Based on an analysis of the European mineral raw-material mining sectors competitiveness, the objective is to provide a strategy on how the EU can work to promote mining investment into and within the EU. Areas in which there is a need to revisit and improve present policies and conditions to advance European competitiveness for inward investments will be identified. STRADE also addresses equipment and service suppliers, exploration companies and investors. EU-level dialogues should be initiated with mineral-producing countries to support European businesses in these sectors within non-EU countries. These activities will also serve as a gateway to future cooperation between the EU and other raw-material-producing countries and will often address environmental challenges in the mining sector. Subsequently, STRADE will focus on government level and the EUs relation to mineral-producing countries. Based to the mapping of present EU and member-state engagements as well as those engagements of non-EU countries, it will provide analyses on how the EU can renew its engagement with mineral-producing countries aiming at a larger EU strategy to ensure fair and unrestricted access to mineral raw materials worldwide. A specific objective towards the goals of environmental and social sustainability is the development of new concepts for Europes role in international action towards sustainable mining and processing. Stakeholder workshops on possible contributions of EU /member states to an international resource governance alliance and internationally accepted sustainability evaluation and certification schemes will be conducted.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: GARRI-6-2014 | Award Amount: 2.65M | Year: 2015

The goal of the TRUST Project is to catalyse a global collaborative effort to improve adherence to high ethical standards around the world. Achieving equity in international research is one of the pressing concerns of the 21st century. Many international groups and organisations are working on governance frameworks and standards to guide research activities after progressive globalization. However, their efforts are disparate and lacking a guiding vision. In an interdisciplinary collaboration between multi-level ethics bodies, policy advisors, civil society organisations, funding organisations, industry and academic scholars from a range of disciplines, this project combines long-standing, highly respected efforts to build international governance structures with new exciting network opportunities between Europe, India, Sub-Saharan Africa, China and Russia. TRUST will open up new horizons in improving adherence to high ethical standards in research globally. The projects strategic output are three sets of tools based on participatory engagement covering all continents: (1) a global code of conduct for funders, (2) a fair research contracting on-line tool and (3) a compliance and ethics follow-up tool, which takes limited resources into account.


Razzaque S.,University of Johannesburg
Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology | Year: 2013

The center of the Milky Way is a host to energetic phenomena across many electromagnetic wave bands and now possibly of high-energy neutrinos. We show that 5 out of 21 IceCube showerlike events, including a PeV event, likely originated from the Galactic Center region. A hard spectrum and flux inferred from these events are inconsistent with atmospheric neutrinos. The flux of these neutrinos is consistent with an extrapolation of the gamma-ray flux measured by Fermi-LAT from the inner Galactic region. This indicates a common hadronic origin of both, powered by supernovae. Three other showerlike events are spatially correlated with the Fermi bubbles, originating from the Galactic Center activity, within the uncertainty of reconstructing their arrival directions. The origin of the other neutrino events, including 7 tracklike events, is still elusive. © 2013 American Physical Society.


Razzaque S.,University of Johannesburg
Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology | Year: 2013

Long duration gamma-ray bursts are powerful sources that can accelerate particles to ultrahigh energies. Acceleration of protons in the forward shock of the highly relativistic gamma-ray burst (GRB) blastwave allows PeV-EeV neutrino production by photopion interactions of ultrahigh energy protons with x-ray to optical photons of the GRB afterglow emission. Four different blastwave evolution scenarios are considered: adiabatic and fully radiative blastwaves in a constant density circumburst medium and in a wind environment with the particle density in the wind decreasing inversely proportional to the square of the radius from the center of the burst. The duration of the neutrino flux depends on the evolution of the blastwave and can last up to a day in the case of an adiabatic blastwave in a constant density medium. Neutrino fluxes from the three other blastwave evolution scenarios are also calculated. Diffuse neutrino fluxes calculated using the observed rate of long-duration GRBs are consistent with the recent IceCube upper limit on the prompt GRB neutrino flux below PeV. The diffuse neutrino flux needed to explain the two neutrino events at PeV energies recently detected by IceCube can partially come from the presented GRB blastwave diffuse fluxes. Future observations by IceCube and upcoming huge radio Askaryan experiments will be able to probe the flux models presented here or constrain the GRB blastwave properties. © 2013 American Physical Society.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: NERC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 177.06K | Year: 2016

This project aims to support the use of eco-system services evidence to inform policy-making that is more relevant to the realities and multitudes of people living in LMICs and their complex use of eco-system services. By generating practical tools, supporting capacity, and increasing research demand and awareness, this research aims to influence the behaviour of decision-makers in order to support pro-poor eco-system services policy-making in Sub-Saharan Africa. It uses evidence synthesis, evidence mapping and systematic review methodologies to provide answers for policy and practice across the region. The first step set out in the research will be to understand the nature and extent of the evidence-base generated by the ESPA programme in relation to eco-system services in LMICs, particularly Sub-Saharan Africa. We will go on to search comprehensively for research evidence from the region to produce a systematic evidence map. This will be the basis for a user-friendly evidence interface to enable an active dialogue between decision-makers in government, NGOs, and researchers. This evidence interface will be tailored to inform decision-making in a policy context and allow policy-makers to critically interrogate the gaps and policy-relevance of the existing research evidence. We will launch the evidence interface at a high-level meeting of senior African environmental policy-makers, the International Biodiversity Research and Evidence Indaba. As a result of this stakeholder engagement, we will agree four demand-driven syntheses, which will then be produced during the remainder of the project. These four pieces of more focused work will synthesise evidence to answer four specific questions in the region as prioritized by our government partners. These have been preliminarily scoped with government colleagues as follows, but will be refined in consultation with stakeholders: i) what works in the management of ecosystems services in drylands in the region, ii) how best to provide effective governance of ecosystems services in low income countries, iii) what guidelines and decision-making tools are available to support decision-makers and do these include multiple dimensional measures of poverty? and iv) how can research methodologies be better aligned to decision-makers needs? We will engage in an active process of co-production with government colleagues to answer research questions (iii) and (iv). That is, these two evidence syntheses will be produced by an active collaboration between the research team and government colleagues. This will include direct mentoring, applied learning, and on-demand capacity-building. It will allow us to not just synthesise insights on decision-making tools and applied research methods; but to also adapt and develop new decision-making tools and to enhance policy-makers understanding and appraisal of the existing evidence-base. The project will therefore leave eco-system service policy-makers in Sub-Saharan Africa with two tangible tools to support their decision-making. The first tool refers to the evidence interface, while the second refers to the jointly-produced (or adapted) decision-making tool, which is assumed to be more policy-relevant and by design of the synthesis will pay particular attention to multi-dimensional poverty measures. This work will be led from the University of Johannesburg by their Evidence to Action team, with support from specialists in evidence synthesis (at University College Londons EPPI-Centre), from international leaders in understanding multi-dimensional poverty in Africa (from the Southern Africa Social Poverty Research Institute - SASPRI), and from specialists in eco-systems services (including the South African National Biodiversity Institute - SANBI). Last but certainly not least, this proposal has been driven by colleagues from South Africas national Department for Environmental Affairs, and their recognised priorities across the region.

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