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News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Dennis Joslin, Ph.D., will retire from his position as president and CEO of Nebraska Methodist College effective July 31, 2017. Dr. Joslin has served Nebraska Methodist College for the past 41 years after beginning his career in healthcare as a critical care staff nurse. Joslin then moved into teaching as a faculty member at Methodist School of Nursing. Prior to becoming president and CEO he held many positions within the college including executive vice president, vice president of academic affairs, dean of academic affairs and director of curriculum. Dr. Joslin earned his Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of Iowa, his Master of Science in Nursing from the University of Nebraska Medical Center and his Ph.D. in Higher Education Leadership from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Throughout his career, Joslin has promoted the expansion of roles and education for nursing and allied health professionals. As one of the first men to enter nursing in the 1970’s, Joslin saw the need for an expanding number of male nurses. The promotion of nursing as a profession for men is something that Joslin continues to support through his participation as a charter member in the Nebraska Chapter of the American Association for Men in Nursing. Under Joslin’s executive stewardship, the college experienced substantial transformation which included the first capital campaign for the college, the design, construction and opening of a state-of-the-art campus, annual record enrollments for each of the past 15 years (resulting in nearly tripling enrollment to 1,100 students), the launching of degree offerings at the doctoral level and the expansion of offerings at the master’s, bachelor’s and associate’s degree levels as well as several certificate level offerings. To ensure that the college’s mission of “promoting the health and well-being of the community” is realized, the college has developed numerous partnerships throughout the community to extend the reach of NMC students, faculty and staff. “The growth we’ve established, along with our consistently high job placement rates, lend credence to the idea that we are a premier school in the Omaha area for a healthcare education,” said Dr. Joslin. Deb Carlson, Ph.D., executive vice president, will assume the position of president and CEO on Aug. 1, 2017. The Nebraska Methodist College Board of Directors unanimously selected her to succeed Joslin as the next president. Carlson has been with NMC for 14 years and has served as a faculty member in the Arts and Sciences division, president of the Faculty Senate, director of the Office of Institutional Research, vice president of operations and, for the past three years, executive vice president. “Dr. Carlson is an outstanding educator and administrator who brings over 20 years of higher education experience from the University of Nebraska and Wayne State College,” said Joslin of his successor. “As a cognitive psychologist, she really understands people and excels in organizational development, strategic planning and accreditation. Deb is committed to serving the community with a focus on community-based healthcare, a direct reflection of the mission of the college.” The Omaha, Nebraska-based Nebraska Methodist College – the Josie Harper Campus has been teaching the meaning of care for 125 years and counting. An affiliate of Methodist Health System, NMC offers certificate, associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees both on campus and online. Nebraska Methodist College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.


The International Nurses Association is pleased to welcome Julie M. Weldon, RN, MSN, to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare. Julie M. Weldon is a Registered Nurse with extensive expertise in many facets of nursing. Julie is currently serving as Project Manager within the Mercy Accountable Care Organization, affiliated with Mercy Medical Center in Des Moines, Iowa. Julie M. Weldon graduated with her Bachelor of Science Degree in Biology in 1995 from Mount Mercy University. She subsequently gained her Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing in 1997 from Grand View University, followed by her Master of Science Degree in Nursing in 2005 from the University of Iowa. Appreciating the value of continuing education, Julie is currently enrolled in the PhD in Nursing program at the University of Iowa, with a projected graduation in 2021-2022. To keep up to date with the latest advances and developments in nursing, Julie maintains a professional membership with Sigma Theta Tau as a board member of her local chapter, Infusion Nurses Society, Association for Vascular Access, and Midwest Nursing Research Society. For her hard work and dedication, Julie was selected as one of Iowa’s 100 Great Iowa Nurses. She also has had opportunities in publications and presentations at the national, state and local level. She is thankful for her success related to her education, mentorship, and career opportunities. In her free time, Julie enjoys outdoor activities and spending time with her family. Learn more about Julie M. Weldon here: http://inanurse.org/network/index.php?do=/4135083/info/ and be sure to read her upcoming publication in Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare.


MINNEAPOLIS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Capella Education Company today announced that Stephen G. Shank, the company’s founder and former CEO, will retire from the board of directors when his current term ends in May 2017. Mr. Shank founded the company in 1991 and served as chief executive officer until March 2009. He was chairman of the board of directors until February 2010, and has since continued to serve as a distinguished member of the board. “The work Capella is doing to transform the landscape of adult education is possible because of Steve Shank and the foundation he laid. Steve’s vision, leadership and determination changed the face of what is possible in adult education. I’m personally grateful for his service on our Board of Directors and for his wise counsel,” said Kevin Gilligan, chairman and chief executive officer of Capella Education Company. Mr. Shank has been involved with Capella Education Company for more than 25 years and is well known for his ability to work through strategic challenges and industry revolution. During the 1980s, as CEO of Tonka Corp., he led the company through acquisitions and new products. At Capella Education Company, he led the company to success during a time of significant change in higher education and in the macroeconomic environment. Mr. Shank has made great contributions to many local boards outside of Capella, including Polaris Industries, Tennant Company, and the Walker Art Center, and in 2016 was recognized by the Twin Cities Business Journal and the National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD) with a Lifetime Achievement award for his years of dedicated board service and recognized ability to look at long-term trends and provide counsel that leaders need. Mr. Shank served as a director of Capella University from 1993 to 2003 and 2006 to 2009, and as emeritus director of Capella University from 2003 to 2006. He earned a B.A. from the University of Iowa, an M.A. from the Fletcher School, a joint program of Tufts and Harvard Universities, and a J.D. from Harvard Law School. Capella Education Company (http://www.capellaeducation.com) is an educational services company that provides access to high-quality education through online postsecondary degree programs and job-ready skills offerings needed in today’s market. Capella’s portfolio of companies is dedicated to closing the skills gap by providing the most direct path between learning and employment.


IRVINE, Calif., Feb. 22, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- ChromaDex Corporation (NASDAQ:CDXC) an innovator of proprietary health, wellness and nutritional ingredients that creates science-based solutions for dietary supplement, food and beverage, skin care, sports nutrition, and pharmaceutical products, announced today that University of Iowa researchers have published a study in the prestigious Journal of the International Association for the Study of Pain (PAIN) showing that NIAGEN® Nicotinamide Riboside (NR) ameliorates chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in an animal model. Results from this study suggest that NR may be an effective therapy in relieving chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in humans.  Access to the study was made available online on February 11, 2017. Currently, the American Society for Clinical Oncology considers the development of adjunctive therapy for the prevention and relief of CIPN as essential for patient care. This study provides an important proof of concept for the use of NR as a novel therapeutic approach in filling the unmet need for treatments that alleviate CIPN. ChromaDex CEO and co-founder, Frank Jaksch, Jr. stated, “This is another well-designed study that reinforces the role of NR in neuronal protection.  These results are particularly important given that this research may contribute to the discovery of a new therapeutic option for a significantly underserved patient population.” Led by Dr. Donna Hammond, Ph.D., the research team at the University of Iowa demonstrated that treatment with NR increased blood levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) by 50 percent after three weeks of daily administration.  NR was able to prevent the development of tactile hypersensitivity induced by the chemotherapeutic paclitaxel and reverse well-established tactile hypersensitivity, while also blunting escape/avoidance behaviors. Furthermore, the prophylactic effect was sustained for at least two weeks after treatment with NR ceased. Dr. Marta Hamity, Ph.D., the lead study author, indicated that the team embarked on the study based on evidence that suggested that increasing levels of NAD+ in the cells may protect against neuronal injury. The study used female Sprague-Dawley rats, clinically relevant doses of paclitaxel and incorporated measures that quantify the impact of CIPN on quality of life. “This is significant because the pain associated with CIPN can increase as the [chemotherapy] dose escalates, and at times it reaches a point where the patient is no longer able to tolerate the effective doses,” explained Hammond. “The American Society of Clinical Oncology has issued a position paper that there is an unmet need for treatments that can alleviate CIPN,” stated Hammond. “This study has provided positive data which is particularly exciting considering the unmet need for therapies in this area. We believe that further development of NR as a therapy for CIPN is warranted.” NR has been the subject of nearly 200 peer-reviewed journal publications and is currently at the center of over 100 collaborative studies between ChromaDex and leading universities and research institutions around the world such as the National Institute of Aging, MIT and the Scripps Research Institute representing an estimated $40-50 million in NR research. In November, 2016 ChromaDex announced that it met with FDA to gain Agency guidance on the requirements needed to successfully file an Investigational New Drug (IND) application to initiate a Phase I/II clinical trial in patients with Cockayne Syndrome. Jaksch commented, “ChromaDex is working towards completing IND-enabling preclinical studies for Cockayne Syndrome and filing that IND sometime in 2017.” ChromaDex, being publicly traded on NASDAQ, gives the public an opportunity for investing in the business of science-based technologies for healthy aging and longevity. To date, ChromaDex has invested millions in safety, toxicology and human clinical trials on NR. Most of ChromaDex’s recent revenue growth has come from its proprietary ingredients, in particular NIAGEN®. ChromaDex’s NIAGEN® is the only commercially available form of NR and is supported by five patents issued and several pending, with patents rights acquired from Cornell University, Dartmouth College and Washington University. In addition to human clinical studies, ChromaDex is actively collaborating with numerous leading universities and research institutes studying the health benefits of NIAGEN®. For additional information about ChromaDex and NIAGEN®, visit www.Chromadex.com. Additional research and news about NR and NAD+ can be found at www.AboutNR.com. About ChromaDex: ChromaDex leverages its complementary business units to discover, acquire, develop and commercialize patented and proprietary ingredient technologies that address the dietary supplement, food, beverage, skin care and pharmaceutical markets. In addition to our ingredient technologies unit, we also have business units focused on natural product fine chemicals (known as "phytochemicals"), chemistry and analytical testing services, and product regulatory and safety consulting (known as Spherix Consulting). As a result of our relationships with leading universities and research institutions, we are able to discover and license early stage, IP-backed ingredient technologies. We then utilize our in-house chemistry, regulatory and safety consulting business units to develop commercially viable ingredients. Our ingredient portfolio is backed with clinical and scientific research, as well as extensive IP protection. Our portfolio of patented ingredient technologies includes NIAGEN® nicotinamide riboside; pTeroPure® pterostilbene; PURENERGY®, a caffeine-pTeroPure® co-crystal; IMMULINA™, a spirulina extract; and AnthOrigin™, anthocyanins derived from a domestically-produced, water-extracted purple corn. To learn more about ChromaDex, please visit www.ChromaDex.com. Forward-Looking Statements: This release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, including statements related to results and significance of the NIAGEN® study  and the likelihood that NR will be an effective tool in relieving chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, whether NIAGEN® may be used in a therapeutic approach in filling the unmet need for treatments that alleviate CIPN and the likelihood of ChromaDex initiating a Phase I/II clinical trial in patients with Cockayne Syndrome. Statements that are not a description of historical facts constitute forward-looking statements and may often, but not always, be identified by the use of such words as "expects", "anticipates", "intends", "estimates", "plans", "potential", "possible", "probable", "believes", "seeks", "may", "will", "should", "could" or the negative of such terms or other similar expressions. More detailed information about ChromaDex and the risk factors that may affect the realization of forward-looking statements is set forth in ChromaDex's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016, ChromaDex's Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and other filings submitted by ChromaDex to the SEC, copies of which may be obtained from the SEC's website at www.sec.gov. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date hereof, and actual results may differ materially from those suggested by these forward-looking statements. All forward-looking statements are qualified in their entirety by this cautionary statement and ChromaDex undertakes no obligation to revise or update this release to reflect events or circumstances after the date hereof. ChromaDex provided research materials and a portion of the grant funding as a collaborator for the study.


IRVINE, Calif., Feb. 22, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- ChromaDex Corporation (NASDAQ:CDXC) an innovator of proprietary health, wellness and nutritional ingredients that creates science-based solutions for dietary supplement, food and beverage, skin care, sports nutrition, and pharmaceutical products, announced today that University of Iowa researchers have published a study in the prestigious Journal of the International Association for the Study of Pain (PAIN) showing that NIAGEN® Nicotinamide Riboside (NR) ameliorates chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in an animal model. Results from this study suggest that NR may be an effective therapy in relieving chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in humans.  Access to the study was made available online on February 11, 2017. Currently, the American Society for Clinical Oncology considers the development of adjunctive therapy for the prevention and relief of CIPN as essential for patient care. This study provides an important proof of concept for the use of NR as a novel therapeutic approach in filling the unmet need for treatments that alleviate CIPN. ChromaDex CEO and co-founder, Frank Jaksch, Jr. stated, “This is another well-designed study that reinforces the role of NR in neuronal protection.  These results are particularly important given that this research may contribute to the discovery of a new therapeutic option for a significantly underserved patient population.” Led by Dr. Donna Hammond, Ph.D., the research team at the University of Iowa demonstrated that treatment with NR increased blood levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) by 50 percent after three weeks of daily administration.  NR was able to prevent the development of tactile hypersensitivity induced by the chemotherapeutic paclitaxel and reverse well-established tactile hypersensitivity, while also blunting escape/avoidance behaviors. Furthermore, the prophylactic effect was sustained for at least two weeks after treatment with NR ceased. Dr. Marta Hamity, Ph.D., the lead study author, indicated that the team embarked on the study based on evidence that suggested that increasing levels of NAD+ in the cells may protect against neuronal injury. The study used female Sprague-Dawley rats, clinically relevant doses of paclitaxel and incorporated measures that quantify the impact of CIPN on quality of life. “This is significant because the pain associated with CIPN can increase as the [chemotherapy] dose escalates, and at times it reaches a point where the patient is no longer able to tolerate the effective doses,” explained Hammond. “The American Society of Clinical Oncology has issued a position paper that there is an unmet need for treatments that can alleviate CIPN,” stated Hammond. “This study has provided positive data which is particularly exciting considering the unmet need for therapies in this area. We believe that further development of NR as a therapy for CIPN is warranted.” NR has been the subject of nearly 200 peer-reviewed journal publications and is currently at the center of over 100 collaborative studies between ChromaDex and leading universities and research institutions around the world such as the National Institute of Aging, MIT and the Scripps Research Institute representing an estimated $40-50 million in NR research. In November, 2016 ChromaDex announced that it met with FDA to gain Agency guidance on the requirements needed to successfully file an Investigational New Drug (IND) application to initiate a Phase I/II clinical trial in patients with Cockayne Syndrome. Jaksch commented, “ChromaDex is working towards completing IND-enabling preclinical studies for Cockayne Syndrome and filing that IND sometime in 2017.” ChromaDex, being publicly traded on NASDAQ, gives the public an opportunity for investing in the business of science-based technologies for healthy aging and longevity. To date, ChromaDex has invested millions in safety, toxicology and human clinical trials on NR. Most of ChromaDex’s recent revenue growth has come from its proprietary ingredients, in particular NIAGEN®. ChromaDex’s NIAGEN® is the only commercially available form of NR and is supported by five patents issued and several pending, with patents rights acquired from Cornell University, Dartmouth College and Washington University. In addition to human clinical studies, ChromaDex is actively collaborating with numerous leading universities and research institutes studying the health benefits of NIAGEN®. For additional information about ChromaDex and NIAGEN®, visit www.Chromadex.com. Additional research and news about NR and NAD+ can be found at www.AboutNR.com. About ChromaDex: ChromaDex leverages its complementary business units to discover, acquire, develop and commercialize patented and proprietary ingredient technologies that address the dietary supplement, food, beverage, skin care and pharmaceutical markets. In addition to our ingredient technologies unit, we also have business units focused on natural product fine chemicals (known as "phytochemicals"), chemistry and analytical testing services, and product regulatory and safety consulting (known as Spherix Consulting). As a result of our relationships with leading universities and research institutions, we are able to discover and license early stage, IP-backed ingredient technologies. We then utilize our in-house chemistry, regulatory and safety consulting business units to develop commercially viable ingredients. Our ingredient portfolio is backed with clinical and scientific research, as well as extensive IP protection. Our portfolio of patented ingredient technologies includes NIAGEN® nicotinamide riboside; pTeroPure® pterostilbene; PURENERGY®, a caffeine-pTeroPure® co-crystal; IMMULINA™, a spirulina extract; and AnthOrigin™, anthocyanins derived from a domestically-produced, water-extracted purple corn. To learn more about ChromaDex, please visit www.ChromaDex.com. Forward-Looking Statements: This release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, including statements related to results and significance of the NIAGEN® study  and the likelihood that NR will be an effective tool in relieving chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, whether NIAGEN® may be used in a therapeutic approach in filling the unmet need for treatments that alleviate CIPN and the likelihood of ChromaDex initiating a Phase I/II clinical trial in patients with Cockayne Syndrome. Statements that are not a description of historical facts constitute forward-looking statements and may often, but not always, be identified by the use of such words as "expects", "anticipates", "intends", "estimates", "plans", "potential", "possible", "probable", "believes", "seeks", "may", "will", "should", "could" or the negative of such terms or other similar expressions. More detailed information about ChromaDex and the risk factors that may affect the realization of forward-looking statements is set forth in ChromaDex's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016, ChromaDex's Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and other filings submitted by ChromaDex to the SEC, copies of which may be obtained from the SEC's website at www.sec.gov. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date hereof, and actual results may differ materially from those suggested by these forward-looking statements. All forward-looking statements are qualified in their entirety by this cautionary statement and ChromaDex undertakes no obligation to revise or update this release to reflect events or circumstances after the date hereof. ChromaDex provided research materials and a portion of the grant funding as a collaborator for the study.


IRVINE, Calif., Feb. 22, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- ChromaDex Corporation (NASDAQ:CDXC) an innovator of proprietary health, wellness and nutritional ingredients that creates science-based solutions for dietary supplement, food and beverage, skin care, sports nutrition, and pharmaceutical products, announced today that University of Iowa researchers have published a study in the prestigious Journal of the International Association for the Study of Pain (PAIN) showing that NIAGEN® Nicotinamide Riboside (NR) ameliorates chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in an animal model. Results from this study suggest that NR may be an effective therapy in relieving chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in humans.  Access to the study was made available online on February 11, 2017. Currently, the American Society for Clinical Oncology considers the development of adjunctive therapy for the prevention and relief of CIPN as essential for patient care. This study provides an important proof of concept for the use of NR as a novel therapeutic approach in filling the unmet need for treatments that alleviate CIPN. ChromaDex CEO and co-founder, Frank Jaksch, Jr. stated, “This is another well-designed study that reinforces the role of NR in neuronal protection.  These results are particularly important given that this research may contribute to the discovery of a new therapeutic option for a significantly underserved patient population.” Led by Dr. Donna Hammond, Ph.D., the research team at the University of Iowa demonstrated that treatment with NR increased blood levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) by 50 percent after three weeks of daily administration.  NR was able to prevent the development of tactile hypersensitivity induced by the chemotherapeutic paclitaxel and reverse well-established tactile hypersensitivity, while also blunting escape/avoidance behaviors. Furthermore, the prophylactic effect was sustained for at least two weeks after treatment with NR ceased. Dr. Marta Hamity, Ph.D., the lead study author, indicated that the team embarked on the study based on evidence that suggested that increasing levels of NAD+ in the cells may protect against neuronal injury. The study used female Sprague-Dawley rats, clinically relevant doses of paclitaxel and incorporated measures that quantify the impact of CIPN on quality of life. “This is significant because the pain associated with CIPN can increase as the [chemotherapy] dose escalates, and at times it reaches a point where the patient is no longer able to tolerate the effective doses,” explained Hammond. “The American Society of Clinical Oncology has issued a position paper that there is an unmet need for treatments that can alleviate CIPN,” stated Hammond. “This study has provided positive data which is particularly exciting considering the unmet need for therapies in this area. We believe that further development of NR as a therapy for CIPN is warranted.” NR has been the subject of nearly 200 peer-reviewed journal publications and is currently at the center of over 100 collaborative studies between ChromaDex and leading universities and research institutions around the world such as the National Institute of Aging, MIT and the Scripps Research Institute representing an estimated $40-50 million in NR research. In November, 2016 ChromaDex announced that it met with FDA to gain Agency guidance on the requirements needed to successfully file an Investigational New Drug (IND) application to initiate a Phase I/II clinical trial in patients with Cockayne Syndrome. Jaksch commented, “ChromaDex is working towards completing IND-enabling preclinical studies for Cockayne Syndrome and filing that IND sometime in 2017.” ChromaDex, being publicly traded on NASDAQ, gives the public an opportunity for investing in the business of science-based technologies for healthy aging and longevity. To date, ChromaDex has invested millions in safety, toxicology and human clinical trials on NR. Most of ChromaDex’s recent revenue growth has come from its proprietary ingredients, in particular NIAGEN®. ChromaDex’s NIAGEN® is the only commercially available form of NR and is supported by five patents issued and several pending, with patents rights acquired from Cornell University, Dartmouth College and Washington University. In addition to human clinical studies, ChromaDex is actively collaborating with numerous leading universities and research institutes studying the health benefits of NIAGEN®. For additional information about ChromaDex and NIAGEN®, visit www.Chromadex.com. Additional research and news about NR and NAD+ can be found at www.AboutNR.com. About ChromaDex: ChromaDex leverages its complementary business units to discover, acquire, develop and commercialize patented and proprietary ingredient technologies that address the dietary supplement, food, beverage, skin care and pharmaceutical markets. In addition to our ingredient technologies unit, we also have business units focused on natural product fine chemicals (known as "phytochemicals"), chemistry and analytical testing services, and product regulatory and safety consulting (known as Spherix Consulting). As a result of our relationships with leading universities and research institutions, we are able to discover and license early stage, IP-backed ingredient technologies. We then utilize our in-house chemistry, regulatory and safety consulting business units to develop commercially viable ingredients. Our ingredient portfolio is backed with clinical and scientific research, as well as extensive IP protection. Our portfolio of patented ingredient technologies includes NIAGEN® nicotinamide riboside; pTeroPure® pterostilbene; PURENERGY®, a caffeine-pTeroPure® co-crystal; IMMULINA™, a spirulina extract; and AnthOrigin™, anthocyanins derived from a domestically-produced, water-extracted purple corn. To learn more about ChromaDex, please visit www.ChromaDex.com. Forward-Looking Statements: This release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, including statements related to results and significance of the NIAGEN® study  and the likelihood that NR will be an effective tool in relieving chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, whether NIAGEN® may be used in a therapeutic approach in filling the unmet need for treatments that alleviate CIPN and the likelihood of ChromaDex initiating a Phase I/II clinical trial in patients with Cockayne Syndrome. Statements that are not a description of historical facts constitute forward-looking statements and may often, but not always, be identified by the use of such words as "expects", "anticipates", "intends", "estimates", "plans", "potential", "possible", "probable", "believes", "seeks", "may", "will", "should", "could" or the negative of such terms or other similar expressions. More detailed information about ChromaDex and the risk factors that may affect the realization of forward-looking statements is set forth in ChromaDex's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016, ChromaDex's Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and other filings submitted by ChromaDex to the SEC, copies of which may be obtained from the SEC's website at www.sec.gov. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date hereof, and actual results may differ materially from those suggested by these forward-looking statements. All forward-looking statements are qualified in their entirety by this cautionary statement and ChromaDex undertakes no obligation to revise or update this release to reflect events or circumstances after the date hereof. ChromaDex provided research materials and a portion of the grant funding as a collaborator for the study.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Findings may open new avenues to prevent transfer of health conditions from mothers to children Mothers contribute a lot of defining traits to their offspring, from eye color to toe length. But pregnant mothers with health complications, such as diabetes or hypertension, also can pass these symptoms to their children. What if we could prevent that? In a new study, researchers at the University of Iowa have shown they can reverse high blood pressure in offspring born to hypertensive rats. The results, though preliminary, may offer a promising avenue toward addressing "fetal programming," or the in utero transfer of certain health risks from mothers to children. The findings were published online this week in the journal Hypertension. In humans, gestational hypertension affects up to 15 percent of pregnancies. That percentage may rise because high blood pressure generally increases as we age, and American women are waiting longer to have children. Moreover, multiple studies have documented that offspring born to hypertensive mothers have higher blood pressure in childhood and are at higher risk of being hypertensive and contracting heart disease as adults. UI professor Alan Kim Johnson and his colleagues wanted to understand if gestational hypertension would affect blood pressure in baby rats and, if so, how the rats' brains might be involved. The group induced hypertension in mother rats during the perinatal period (three weeks before and after birth) and measured the blood pressure response in the offspring at 10 weeks, the rat equivalent of adulthood. The offspring were then given a hormone that elevates blood pressure to determine how they would respond. "What you see is enhanced, that is, a sensitized hypertensive response in animals where mothers had been hypertensive during pregnancy," says Johnson, F. Wendell Miller Distinguished Professor in the UI's Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. The researchers then administered a drug called Captopril, which is commonly used to treat high blood pressure in human adults, to the rats born to hypertensive mothers and that had also been given the blood-pressure hormone. The rats that received Captopril from three to nine weeks of age were then tested for hypertension at 10 weeks and showed no signs of enhanced high blood pressure. "That means we can, in effect, deprogram them," Johnson says. Whether this would translate to humans is far from clear. But it opens a path for further study of the neural and chemical changes that occur in the brains of offspring born to hypertensive mothers--or mothers with other health issues--and how those conditions ultimately are passed on. Johnson's team has begun to document that transfer by tracking how the brain and central nervous system react to high blood pressure stressors. One, caused by a hormone called angiotensin II, appears to activate pathways from the brain that trigger a "sympathetic" response from the central nervous system. In other words, the central nervous system becomes more prone to elevate blood pressure when it senses the hormone. Researchers hypothesize the sympathetic response may become more conditioned, or overly responsive, in humans due to natural causes, such as with the children of mothers who had high blood pressure during their pregnancy. Johnson compares the process to a memory being made. In this case, the brain is establishing a "memory" of high blood pressure that's passed on to the offspring. But, importantly, researchers showed in the rat experiments that the memory can be altered, even erased. "We've changed the information that was laid down in the brain," Johnson says. "This study on rats sheds some light on how maternal health during pregnancy impacts long-term cardiovascular health of the offspring, says Christine Maric-Bilkan, program officer of the Division of Cardiovascular Sciences of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI). "These findings suggest a potential therapeutic strategy for prevention of elevated blood pressure in adults who were born to mothers that themselves had elevated blood pressure during pregnancy." Baojian Xue, in the UI Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at the UI, is the first author. Contributing authors, also with the psychological and brain sciences department, are Fang Guo, Terry Beltz, and Robert Thunhorst. Haifeng Yin, a visiting professor now at Hebei North University in China, also contributed to the research. Johnson also is affiliated with the UI's pharmacology program and the Francois Abboud Cardiovascular Research Center. The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, part of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, funded the research through grants to Johnson.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

CHICAGO, Feb. 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- AveXis, Inc. (NASDAQ:AVXS), a clinical-stage gene therapy company developing treatments for patients suffering from rare and life-threatening neurological genetic diseases, today announced the appointment of Rick Modi to the executive management team as Senior Vice President and Chief Business Officer. Mr. Modi brings more than 15 years of commercial, business, and corporate experience to the position, and is responsible for all aspects of the company’s commercial functions. Modi reports to Sean Nolan, President and Chief Executive Officer of AveXis. “As AveXis continues to build and looks to the future, we are excited to expand the management team with someone with extensive commercial experience,” Mr. Nolan said. “With Rick’s experience in pre-launch preparation and global product launches in rare disease settings, we are pleased to welcome him to our management team.” Rick Modi, Senior Vice President and Chief Business Officer Prior to AveXis, Mr. Modi held roles of increasing responsibilities in sales, marketing, access and corporate strategy at Centocor (Johnson & Johnson), Medimmune (AstraZeneca) and InterMune (Roche), where he played leadership roles in product launches in multiple different specialty and rare disease indications. Most recently, Mr. Modi served as Chief Business Officer at Catabasis Pharmaceuticals. Mr. Modi earned a BS degree in Pharmacy from the University of Iowa and an MBA from the Wharton School. About SMA SMA is a severe neuromuscular disease characterized by the loss of motor neurons leading to progressive muscle weakness and paralysis. SMA is caused by a genetic defect in the SMN1 gene that codes SMN, a protein necessary for survival of motor neurons. The incidence of SMA is approximately one in 10,000 live births. SMA is the leading genetic cause of infant mortality. The most severe form of SMA is Type 1, a lethal genetic disorder characterized by motor neuron loss and associated muscle deterioration, which results in mortality or the need for permanent ventilation support before the age of two for greater than 90 percent of patients. About AVXS-101 AVXS-101 is a proprietary gene therapy candidate of a one-time treatment for SMA Type 1 and is designed to address the monogenic root cause of SMA and prevent further muscle degeneration by addressing the defective and/or loss of the primary SMN1 gene. AVXS-101 also targets motor neurons providing rapid onset of effect, and crosses the blood brain barrier allowing an IV dosing route and effective targeting of both central and systemic features. About AveXis, Inc. AveXis is a clinical-stage gene therapy company developing treatments for patients suffering from rare and life-threatening neurological genetic diseases. The company’s initial proprietary gene therapy candidate, AVXS-101, is in an ongoing Phase 1 clinical trial for the treatment of SMA Type 1. For additional information, please visit www.avexis.com.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

IRVINE, CA--(Marketwired - March 01, 2017) - SmartBug Media, a leading inbound marketing agency assisting businesses in generating leads, increasing awareness, and building brand loyalty, is pleased to announce the recent hire of Jake Havenridge as Senior Paid Search Strategist, responsible for Paid Search recommendations and optimizations for clients. Havenridge was most recently a Director of Paid Search for Big Footprint Digital, where he had a lead role in the implementation and overall strategy of Paid Search campaigns across multiple ad-serving engines. He also managed over $1M in paid media per month and was a driving force behind a 2016 Colorado BMA Gold Key award for best search results. Prior to working at Big Footprint Digital, Havenridge was an Account Coordinator for Location3 Media, directly managing the Paid Search and Local Listings accounts for over 350 large to medium sized franchise partners. "SmartBug Media is a growing company and I am excited to be part of their digital strategy," says Havenridge." I look forward to building a strong Paid Search program that will be recognized in the industry for driving and maintaining results for clients." Havenridge has a B.A. degree from the University of Iowa in English, a minor in Fine Arts, and is Google certified in AdWords Search and Fundamentals. "Jake is a key player when it comes to understanding and developing Paid Search programs," said Ryan Malone, Founder and CEO of SmartBug Media." His in-depth PPC knowledge will benefit our clients as he understands how to create campaigns based on client goals and how to evaluate performance based on data. We look forward to the contributions that Jake will bring to our agency." About SmartBug For more than seven years, SmartBug Media has been helping businesses increase sales leads, close more customers, and enhance the reach of their brands. SmartBug is one of a handful of HubSpot Diamond partners in the world and is the highest rated agency in the history of the HubSpot ecosystem. SmartBug Media also boasts the highest ROI documented from any HubSpot partner -- 3,558% and 14,500% ROI on a six-month and three-year campaign. For a free inbound marketing or web design consultation, or to learn more, visit http://www.smartbugmedia.com/ or call 949-236-6448.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

A new study with rats shows it is possible to reverse high blood pressure in offspring born to hypertensive mothers. Scientists say the results, though preliminary, may offer promise toward addressing “fetal programming,” or the in utero transfer of certain health risks from mothers to children. In humans, gestational hypertension affects up to 15 percent of pregnancies. That percentage may rise because high blood pressure generally increases as we age—and American women are waiting longer to have children. Further, multiple studies have documented that offspring born to hypertensive mothers have higher blood pressure in childhood and are at higher risk of being hypertensive and contracting heart disease as adults. For the study in the journal Hypertension, researchers wanted to understand if gestational hypertension would affect blood pressure in baby rats and, if so, how the rats’ brains might be involved. They induced hypertension in mother rats during the perinatal period (three weeks before and after birth) and measured the blood pressure response in the offspring at 10 weeks, the rat equivalent of adulthood. Offspring were then given a hormone that elevates blood pressure to determine how they would respond. “What you see is enhanced, that is, a sensitized hypertensive response in animals where mothers had been hypertensive during pregnancy,” says Alan Kim Johnson, professor of psychological and brain sciences at the University of Iowa. The researchers then administered a drug called Captopril, which is commonly used to treat high blood pressure in human adults, to the rats born to hypertensive mothers and that had also been given the blood-pressure hormone. The rats that received Captopril from three to nine weeks of age were then tested for hypertension at 10 weeks and showed no signs of enhanced high blood pressure. “That means we can, in effect, deprogram them,” Johnson says. Whether this would translate to humans is far from clear. But it opens a path for further study of the neural and chemical changes that occur in the brains of offspring born to hypertensive mothers—or mothers with other health issues—and how those conditions ultimately are passed on. Johnson and colleagues have begun to document that transfer by tracking how the brain and central nervous system react to high blood pressure stressors. One, caused by a hormone called angiotensin II, appears to activate pathways from the brain that trigger a “sympathetic” response from the central nervous system. In other words, the central nervous system becomes more prone to elevate blood pressure when it senses the hormone. Researchers hypothesize the sympathetic response may become more conditioned, or overly responsive, in humans due to natural causes, such as with the children of mothers who had high blood pressure during their pregnancy. Johnson compares the process to a memory being made. In this case, the brain is establishing a “memory” of high blood pressure that’s passed on to the offspring. But, importantly, researchers showed in the rat experiments that the memory can be altered, even erased. “We’ve changed the information that was laid down in the brain,” Johnson says. “This study on rats sheds some light on how maternal health during pregnancy impacts long-term cardiovascular health of the offspring,” says Christine Maric-Bilkan, program officer of the Division of Cardiovascular Sciences of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. “These findings suggest a potential therapeutic strategy for prevention of elevated blood pressure in adults who were born to mothers that themselves had elevated blood pressure during pregnancy.” The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, funded the research.

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