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MINNEAPOLIS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Capella Education Company today announced that Stephen G. Shank, the company’s founder and former CEO, will retire from the board of directors when his current term ends in May 2017. Mr. Shank founded the company in 1991 and served as chief executive officer until March 2009. He was chairman of the board of directors until February 2010, and has since continued to serve as a distinguished member of the board. “The work Capella is doing to transform the landscape of adult education is possible because of Steve Shank and the foundation he laid. Steve’s vision, leadership and determination changed the face of what is possible in adult education. I’m personally grateful for his service on our Board of Directors and for his wise counsel,” said Kevin Gilligan, chairman and chief executive officer of Capella Education Company. Mr. Shank has been involved with Capella Education Company for more than 25 years and is well known for his ability to work through strategic challenges and industry revolution. During the 1980s, as CEO of Tonka Corp., he led the company through acquisitions and new products. At Capella Education Company, he led the company to success during a time of significant change in higher education and in the macroeconomic environment. Mr. Shank has made great contributions to many local boards outside of Capella, including Polaris Industries, Tennant Company, and the Walker Art Center, and in 2016 was recognized by the Twin Cities Business Journal and the National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD) with a Lifetime Achievement award for his years of dedicated board service and recognized ability to look at long-term trends and provide counsel that leaders need. Mr. Shank served as a director of Capella University from 1993 to 2003 and 2006 to 2009, and as emeritus director of Capella University from 2003 to 2006. He earned a B.A. from the University of Iowa, an M.A. from the Fletcher School, a joint program of Tufts and Harvard Universities, and a J.D. from Harvard Law School. Capella Education Company (http://www.capellaeducation.com) is an educational services company that provides access to high-quality education through online postsecondary degree programs and job-ready skills offerings needed in today’s market. Capella’s portfolio of companies is dedicated to closing the skills gap by providing the most direct path between learning and employment.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Dennis Joslin, Ph.D., will retire from his position as president and CEO of Nebraska Methodist College effective July 31, 2017. Dr. Joslin has served Nebraska Methodist College for the past 41 years after beginning his career in healthcare as a critical care staff nurse. Joslin then moved into teaching as a faculty member at Methodist School of Nursing. Prior to becoming president and CEO he held many positions within the college including executive vice president, vice president of academic affairs, dean of academic affairs and director of curriculum. Dr. Joslin earned his Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of Iowa, his Master of Science in Nursing from the University of Nebraska Medical Center and his Ph.D. in Higher Education Leadership from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Throughout his career, Joslin has promoted the expansion of roles and education for nursing and allied health professionals. As one of the first men to enter nursing in the 1970’s, Joslin saw the need for an expanding number of male nurses. The promotion of nursing as a profession for men is something that Joslin continues to support through his participation as a charter member in the Nebraska Chapter of the American Association for Men in Nursing. Under Joslin’s executive stewardship, the college experienced substantial transformation which included the first capital campaign for the college, the design, construction and opening of a state-of-the-art campus, annual record enrollments for each of the past 15 years (resulting in nearly tripling enrollment to 1,100 students), the launching of degree offerings at the doctoral level and the expansion of offerings at the master’s, bachelor’s and associate’s degree levels as well as several certificate level offerings. To ensure that the college’s mission of “promoting the health and well-being of the community” is realized, the college has developed numerous partnerships throughout the community to extend the reach of NMC students, faculty and staff. “The growth we’ve established, along with our consistently high job placement rates, lend credence to the idea that we are a premier school in the Omaha area for a healthcare education,” said Dr. Joslin. Deb Carlson, Ph.D., executive vice president, will assume the position of president and CEO on Aug. 1, 2017. The Nebraska Methodist College Board of Directors unanimously selected her to succeed Joslin as the next president. Carlson has been with NMC for 14 years and has served as a faculty member in the Arts and Sciences division, president of the Faculty Senate, director of the Office of Institutional Research, vice president of operations and, for the past three years, executive vice president. “Dr. Carlson is an outstanding educator and administrator who brings over 20 years of higher education experience from the University of Nebraska and Wayne State College,” said Joslin of his successor. “As a cognitive psychologist, she really understands people and excels in organizational development, strategic planning and accreditation. Deb is committed to serving the community with a focus on community-based healthcare, a direct reflection of the mission of the college.” The Omaha, Nebraska-based Nebraska Methodist College – the Josie Harper Campus has been teaching the meaning of care for 125 years and counting. An affiliate of Methodist Health System, NMC offers certificate, associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees both on campus and online. Nebraska Methodist College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.newscientist.com

ISOLATION, radiation and other dangers could interact to pose a major risk to mental and physical health on long space missions, according to the US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The academies regularly review NASA’s research on how being in space affects health. Their latest report looks at eight recent studies on the dangers of long exploratory missions or a Mars trip. “Two of the most critical issues are the radiation exposure beyond low Earth orbit and the psychosocial effects of confinement and isolation,” says Carol Scott-Conner at the University of Iowa, chair of the committee behind the report. She calls them “potential showstoppers” that could cause missions to fail. Astronauts bound for distant destinations would share a small space with a few fellow crew members, and would be away from friends and family for years. They are also likely to be working hard, with their sleep patterns disrupted, and will lack real-time communication with Earth, all of which could affect mental and physical health. The report points out that it is hard to foresee and study how these and other challenges may aggravate each other. “It seems like all of the risks could potentially interact,” says Scott-Conner. NASA hopes to use genetic studies to understand each astronaut’s susceptibilities. This may make it possible to tailor space travel to take account of individuals’ needs. This article appeared in print under the headline “Space blues pose threat”


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The RE/MAX Northern Illinois network has long been a leading supporter of Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals (CMNH). Recently the network honored those members who led its fundraising efforts in 2016 when nearly $184,000 was donated to CMNH. That was an increase of more than $25,000 over the 2015 total. RE/MAX Northern Illinois has contributed more than $3 million to CMNH since 1992. Most funds raised by the network go to Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago. However, donations from offices in the far western portion of the RE/MAX Northern Illinois region benefit the University of Iowa Stead Family Children’s Hospital in Iowa City, Iowa. At its 40th Annual Awards Ceremony, held Feb. 17 at Navy Pier, RE/MAX honored the brokers and offices that were leading contributors to that effort in 2016. The awards they received featured artwork created by young patients at Lurie Children’s Hospital. Five companies received a CMNH Outstanding Citizen Award as the top fundraisers. As a group, the contributions of these companies accounted for 52 percent of the total donated to CMNH by RE/MAX Northern Illinois last year. The 64 offices honored as Miracle Offices reached that status by meeting a minimum donation requirement to CMNH during 2016. Those offices accounted for 61 percent of RE/MAX offices in the northern Illinois region, a new record for office participation. Angie Lotz of RE/MAX All Pro in Bloomingdale, Ill., was saluted as the 2016 Top Miracle Agent for donating $3,750 to CMNH. The Becker Group of RE/MAX Advantage Realty, Antioch, Ill., was named 2016 Top Miracle Team after donating $8,100. The following are the RE/MAX companies honored as Outstanding Citizens for their generous donations to CMNH, all of which benefited Lurie Children’s Hospital. They are listed in order based on the size of their donation, with the largest contributor first: 1. RE/MAX Suburban, with offices in Arlington Heights, Buffalo Grove, Glen Ellyn, Libertyville, Mt. Prospect, Schaumburg and Wheaton. 2. RE/MAX Unlimited Northwest, with offices in Algonquin, Bartlett, Crystal Lake, Huntley, Lake Zurich and Palatine. 3. RE/MAX Advantage Realty of Antioch. 4. RE/MAX Showcase, with offices in Gurnee, Long Grove and Waukegan. 5. RE/MAX All Pro of Bloomingdale, Sugar Grove and St. Charles. The 64 RE/MAX Northern Illinois Miracle Offices for 2016 are listed below, grouped by the county in which the office is located: RE/MAX agents consistently rank among the most productive in the industry. In 2016, RE/MAX Northern Illinois agents averaged 18 transaction sides. RE/MAX has been the leader in the northern Illinois real estate market since 1989 and is continually growing. The RE/MAX Northern Illinois network, with headquarters in Elgin, Ill., consists of more than 2,250 sales associates and 105 independently owned and operated RE/MAX offices that provide a full range of residential and commercial brokerage services. Its mobile real estate app, available for download at http://www.illinoisproperty.com, provides comprehensive information about residential and commercial property for sale in the region. The northern Illinois network is part of RE/MAX, a global real estate organization with 110,000+ sales associates in 100+ nations. EDITOR’S NOTE: RE/MAX® is a registered trademark. Please spell in all caps. Thank you. This release is posted at blog.illinoisproperty.com.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

IRVINE, CA--(Marketwired - March 01, 2017) - SmartBug Media, a leading inbound marketing agency assisting businesses in generating leads, increasing awareness, and building brand loyalty, is pleased to announce the recent hire of Jake Havenridge as Senior Paid Search Strategist, responsible for Paid Search recommendations and optimizations for clients. Havenridge was most recently a Director of Paid Search for Big Footprint Digital, where he had a lead role in the implementation and overall strategy of Paid Search campaigns across multiple ad-serving engines. He also managed over $1M in paid media per month and was a driving force behind a 2016 Colorado BMA Gold Key award for best search results. Prior to working at Big Footprint Digital, Havenridge was an Account Coordinator for Location3 Media, directly managing the Paid Search and Local Listings accounts for over 350 large to medium sized franchise partners. "SmartBug Media is a growing company and I am excited to be part of their digital strategy," says Havenridge." I look forward to building a strong Paid Search program that will be recognized in the industry for driving and maintaining results for clients." Havenridge has a B.A. degree from the University of Iowa in English, a minor in Fine Arts, and is Google certified in AdWords Search and Fundamentals. "Jake is a key player when it comes to understanding and developing Paid Search programs," said Ryan Malone, Founder and CEO of SmartBug Media." His in-depth PPC knowledge will benefit our clients as he understands how to create campaigns based on client goals and how to evaluate performance based on data. We look forward to the contributions that Jake will bring to our agency." About SmartBug For more than seven years, SmartBug Media has been helping businesses increase sales leads, close more customers, and enhance the reach of their brands. SmartBug is one of a handful of HubSpot Diamond partners in the world and is the highest rated agency in the history of the HubSpot ecosystem. SmartBug Media also boasts the highest ROI documented from any HubSpot partner -- 3,558% and 14,500% ROI on a six-month and three-year campaign. For a free inbound marketing or web design consultation, or to learn more, visit http://www.smartbugmedia.com/ or call 949-236-6448.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Findings may open new avenues to prevent transfer of health conditions from mothers to children Mothers contribute a lot of defining traits to their offspring, from eye color to toe length. But pregnant mothers with health complications, such as diabetes or hypertension, also can pass these symptoms to their children. What if we could prevent that? In a new study, researchers at the University of Iowa have shown they can reverse high blood pressure in offspring born to hypertensive rats. The results, though preliminary, may offer a promising avenue toward addressing "fetal programming," or the in utero transfer of certain health risks from mothers to children. The findings were published online this week in the journal Hypertension. In humans, gestational hypertension affects up to 15 percent of pregnancies. That percentage may rise because high blood pressure generally increases as we age, and American women are waiting longer to have children. Moreover, multiple studies have documented that offspring born to hypertensive mothers have higher blood pressure in childhood and are at higher risk of being hypertensive and contracting heart disease as adults. UI professor Alan Kim Johnson and his colleagues wanted to understand if gestational hypertension would affect blood pressure in baby rats and, if so, how the rats' brains might be involved. The group induced hypertension in mother rats during the perinatal period (three weeks before and after birth) and measured the blood pressure response in the offspring at 10 weeks, the rat equivalent of adulthood. The offspring were then given a hormone that elevates blood pressure to determine how they would respond. "What you see is enhanced, that is, a sensitized hypertensive response in animals where mothers had been hypertensive during pregnancy," says Johnson, F. Wendell Miller Distinguished Professor in the UI's Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. The researchers then administered a drug called Captopril, which is commonly used to treat high blood pressure in human adults, to the rats born to hypertensive mothers and that had also been given the blood-pressure hormone. The rats that received Captopril from three to nine weeks of age were then tested for hypertension at 10 weeks and showed no signs of enhanced high blood pressure. "That means we can, in effect, deprogram them," Johnson says. Whether this would translate to humans is far from clear. But it opens a path for further study of the neural and chemical changes that occur in the brains of offspring born to hypertensive mothers--or mothers with other health issues--and how those conditions ultimately are passed on. Johnson's team has begun to document that transfer by tracking how the brain and central nervous system react to high blood pressure stressors. One, caused by a hormone called angiotensin II, appears to activate pathways from the brain that trigger a "sympathetic" response from the central nervous system. In other words, the central nervous system becomes more prone to elevate blood pressure when it senses the hormone. Researchers hypothesize the sympathetic response may become more conditioned, or overly responsive, in humans due to natural causes, such as with the children of mothers who had high blood pressure during their pregnancy. Johnson compares the process to a memory being made. In this case, the brain is establishing a "memory" of high blood pressure that's passed on to the offspring. But, importantly, researchers showed in the rat experiments that the memory can be altered, even erased. "We've changed the information that was laid down in the brain," Johnson says. "This study on rats sheds some light on how maternal health during pregnancy impacts long-term cardiovascular health of the offspring, says Christine Maric-Bilkan, program officer of the Division of Cardiovascular Sciences of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI). "These findings suggest a potential therapeutic strategy for prevention of elevated blood pressure in adults who were born to mothers that themselves had elevated blood pressure during pregnancy." Baojian Xue, in the UI Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at the UI, is the first author. Contributing authors, also with the psychological and brain sciences department, are Fang Guo, Terry Beltz, and Robert Thunhorst. Haifeng Yin, a visiting professor now at Hebei North University in China, also contributed to the research. Johnson also is affiliated with the UI's pharmacology program and the Francois Abboud Cardiovascular Research Center. The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, part of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, funded the research through grants to Johnson.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

A new study with rats shows it is possible to reverse high blood pressure in offspring born to hypertensive mothers. Scientists say the results, though preliminary, may offer promise toward addressing “fetal programming,” or the in utero transfer of certain health risks from mothers to children. In humans, gestational hypertension affects up to 15 percent of pregnancies. That percentage may rise because high blood pressure generally increases as we age—and American women are waiting longer to have children. Further, multiple studies have documented that offspring born to hypertensive mothers have higher blood pressure in childhood and are at higher risk of being hypertensive and contracting heart disease as adults. For the study in the journal Hypertension, researchers wanted to understand if gestational hypertension would affect blood pressure in baby rats and, if so, how the rats’ brains might be involved. They induced hypertension in mother rats during the perinatal period (three weeks before and after birth) and measured the blood pressure response in the offspring at 10 weeks, the rat equivalent of adulthood. Offspring were then given a hormone that elevates blood pressure to determine how they would respond. “What you see is enhanced, that is, a sensitized hypertensive response in animals where mothers had been hypertensive during pregnancy,” says Alan Kim Johnson, professor of psychological and brain sciences at the University of Iowa. The researchers then administered a drug called Captopril, which is commonly used to treat high blood pressure in human adults, to the rats born to hypertensive mothers and that had also been given the blood-pressure hormone. The rats that received Captopril from three to nine weeks of age were then tested for hypertension at 10 weeks and showed no signs of enhanced high blood pressure. “That means we can, in effect, deprogram them,” Johnson says. Whether this would translate to humans is far from clear. But it opens a path for further study of the neural and chemical changes that occur in the brains of offspring born to hypertensive mothers—or mothers with other health issues—and how those conditions ultimately are passed on. Johnson and colleagues have begun to document that transfer by tracking how the brain and central nervous system react to high blood pressure stressors. One, caused by a hormone called angiotensin II, appears to activate pathways from the brain that trigger a “sympathetic” response from the central nervous system. In other words, the central nervous system becomes more prone to elevate blood pressure when it senses the hormone. Researchers hypothesize the sympathetic response may become more conditioned, or overly responsive, in humans due to natural causes, such as with the children of mothers who had high blood pressure during their pregnancy. Johnson compares the process to a memory being made. In this case, the brain is establishing a “memory” of high blood pressure that’s passed on to the offspring. But, importantly, researchers showed in the rat experiments that the memory can be altered, even erased. “We’ve changed the information that was laid down in the brain,” Johnson says. “This study on rats sheds some light on how maternal health during pregnancy impacts long-term cardiovascular health of the offspring,” says Christine Maric-Bilkan, program officer of the Division of Cardiovascular Sciences of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. “These findings suggest a potential therapeutic strategy for prevention of elevated blood pressure in adults who were born to mothers that themselves had elevated blood pressure during pregnancy.” The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, funded the research.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

CHICAGO, Feb. 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- AveXis, Inc. (NASDAQ:AVXS), a clinical-stage gene therapy company developing treatments for patients suffering from rare and life-threatening neurological genetic diseases, today announced the appointment of Rick Modi to the executive management team as Senior Vice President and Chief Business Officer. Mr. Modi brings more than 15 years of commercial, business, and corporate experience to the position, and is responsible for all aspects of the company’s commercial functions. Modi reports to Sean Nolan, President and Chief Executive Officer of AveXis. “As AveXis continues to build and looks to the future, we are excited to expand the management team with someone with extensive commercial experience,” Mr. Nolan said. “With Rick’s experience in pre-launch preparation and global product launches in rare disease settings, we are pleased to welcome him to our management team.” Rick Modi, Senior Vice President and Chief Business Officer Prior to AveXis, Mr. Modi held roles of increasing responsibilities in sales, marketing, access and corporate strategy at Centocor (Johnson & Johnson), Medimmune (AstraZeneca) and InterMune (Roche), where he played leadership roles in product launches in multiple different specialty and rare disease indications. Most recently, Mr. Modi served as Chief Business Officer at Catabasis Pharmaceuticals. Mr. Modi earned a BS degree in Pharmacy from the University of Iowa and an MBA from the Wharton School. About SMA SMA is a severe neuromuscular disease characterized by the loss of motor neurons leading to progressive muscle weakness and paralysis. SMA is caused by a genetic defect in the SMN1 gene that codes SMN, a protein necessary for survival of motor neurons. The incidence of SMA is approximately one in 10,000 live births. SMA is the leading genetic cause of infant mortality. The most severe form of SMA is Type 1, a lethal genetic disorder characterized by motor neuron loss and associated muscle deterioration, which results in mortality or the need for permanent ventilation support before the age of two for greater than 90 percent of patients. About AVXS-101 AVXS-101 is a proprietary gene therapy candidate of a one-time treatment for SMA Type 1 and is designed to address the monogenic root cause of SMA and prevent further muscle degeneration by addressing the defective and/or loss of the primary SMN1 gene. AVXS-101 also targets motor neurons providing rapid onset of effect, and crosses the blood brain barrier allowing an IV dosing route and effective targeting of both central and systemic features. About AveXis, Inc. AveXis is a clinical-stage gene therapy company developing treatments for patients suffering from rare and life-threatening neurological genetic diseases. The company’s initial proprietary gene therapy candidate, AVXS-101, is in an ongoing Phase 1 clinical trial for the treatment of SMA Type 1. For additional information, please visit www.avexis.com.


SEATTLE--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Jose Antonio Vargas, founder of the non-profit organization Define American and the media start-up #EmergingUS, is bringing his insights about race, immigration, identity and citizenship to the new digital media network TheMaven (symbol MVEN). “Jose is a bold and compelling journalist, filmmaker and advocate for the underdog,” said James Heckman, CEO of TheMaven. “This is the meeting of his brilliant mind and unique point of view, with our state-of-the-art platform.” Vargas is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Emmy-nominated filmmaker, and media entrepreneur whose work centers on the changing American identity and elevating the conversation around immigration and citizenship. His channel on TheMaven, launching this spring, will have a similar focus. “I am thrilled to be a partner in what promises to be a pioneering media company,” Vargas says of TheMaven. “James and his team have an unimpeachable track record in building digital properties. In a crowded media ecosystem, I am confident that TheMaven will make its mark and I’m honored to be a part of it.” A former Washington Post reporter and Huffington Post editor, Vargas is the CEO of Define American, which he launched in 2011 with the aim of using powerful, real-life storytelling to advocate for immigrants and their families and promote an environment in which they are seen as human beings. In 2011, the New York Times Magazine published a groundbreaking essay Vargas wrote in which he revealed and chronicled his life in America as an undocumented immigrant. A year later, Vargas appeared on the cover of Time Magazine alongside other undocumented immigrants, with the headline “Not Legal, Not Leaving.” In one of the rare instances in the history of Time, Vargas wrote the cover story himself. In addition to his advocacy work, Vargas is also a media entrepreneur, producing original video content through #EmergingUS. He has produced three documentaries, including the autobiographical “Documented,” which received a 2015 NAACP Image Award nomination for Outstanding Documentary, and “White People,” an MTV special that was nominated for an Emmy Award. “As ad and social platforms evolve, TheMaven provides independent leaders, like Jose, an end-to-end business home, to continue to distribute on platforms like Facebook and Twitter but as part of a fully-integrated, unified strategy, which includes advertising, technology and distribution,” added Heckman. “Our business model has always been to hand-pick and invest in the elite, independent content leaders in a particular category and Jose certainly is the leader in his space -- and the timing couldn’t be more appropriate. We’re proud to include his passion and brilliance with the rest of our inspiring leaders.” TheMaven is an expert-driven, group media network whose state-of-the-art platform serves, by invitation-only, professional, independent channel partners to provide broader distribution, greater community engagement, and efficient advertising and membership programs. TheMaven enables channel partners to focus on the key ingredients to their business: creating, informing, sharing, discovering, leading and interacting with the communities and constituencies they serve. TheMaven Network will launch this quarter in beta as channel partner signings continue to be announced. For more information, visit themaven.net. Based in Seattle, TheMaven is publicly traded in the OTC Markets Group, under the ticker symbol MVEN. Key members of the leadership team include: Founder and CEO, James Heckman, has extensive experience in digital media, advertising, video and online communities for major public companies and several times as founder. He served as Head of Global Media Strategy for Yahoo!, leading all significant transactions and revenue strategy under Ross Levinsohn’s tenure. As Chief Strategy Officer at Fox Digital, he architected the market-changing, $900 million social media ad alliance between Google and Myspace and was instrumental in Hulu’s formation. Prior to Yahoo!, Mr. Heckman was founder/CEO of 5to1.com (sold to Yahoo!), CSO of Zazzle.com, Founder/CEO of Scout.com (sold to Fox), Founder/CEO of Rivals.com and Rivals.net (sold to Yahoo!, post tenure and 365-Sports, respectively) and held the position of President and Publisher of NFL Exclusive, official publication for every NFL team. Heckman holds a BA in Communications from the University of Washington. Co-founder and COO, William Sornsin, ran MSN's Core Technology team before joining Rivals as co-founder and CTO in 1999, co-founded Scout.com as CTO/COO; was VP Engineering & Operations at Fox Interactive Media after Scout acquisition. Earlier, Sornsin held a variety of product and program management roles at Microsoft. He holds a BS Electrical/Computer Engineering from the University of Iowa and an MBA from UCLA. Co-founder and CTO, Benjamin Joldersma’s career spans nearly two decades of large-scale platform development, including CTO and chief architect of Scout.com. Ben held the role of Senior software engineer, Geo/Imagery at Google, a Principal Software Engineer at Yahoo!, Chief Architect at 5to1 and held senior engineering roles at aQuantive, Rivals.com and Microsoft. Ben studied Computer Science at University of Puget Sound. Director, Ross Levinsohn is a leading industry figure who has long focused on the convergence of technology and media. He served as CEO at Yahoo in 2012 and prior to that role was Executive Vice President, Americas and Head of Global Media from 2010 to 2012. Levinsohn served as President of Fox Interactive where he helped create one of the largest digital businesses amongst the traditional media companies, and was instrumental in the formation of what is now Hulu. He serves on several public and private media and technology boards, including Tribune Media, mobile advertising marketplace YieldMo, Vubiquity, Zefr, and the National Association of Television Program Executives. He was Executive Chairman and Director of Scout Media, Inc. from 2014-2016, previously served as the Chief Executive Officer of Guggenheim Digital Media and co-founded 5to1 Holding Corp, serving as its Executive Chairman. He co-founded Fuse Capital in 2005 and served as its Managing Director and Managing Partner. He served as General Manager at AltaVista Network and Vice President of Programming and Executive Producer at CBS Sportsline. Mr. Levinsohn received a BA in Broadcast Communications from American University, and is a trustee there.


The International Nurses Association is pleased to welcome Julie M. Weldon, RN, MSN, to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare. Julie M. Weldon is a Registered Nurse with extensive expertise in many facets of nursing. Julie is currently serving as Project Manager within the Mercy Accountable Care Organization, affiliated with Mercy Medical Center in Des Moines, Iowa. Julie M. Weldon graduated with her Bachelor of Science Degree in Biology in 1995 from Mount Mercy University. She subsequently gained her Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing in 1997 from Grand View University, followed by her Master of Science Degree in Nursing in 2005 from the University of Iowa. Appreciating the value of continuing education, Julie is currently enrolled in the PhD in Nursing program at the University of Iowa, with a projected graduation in 2021-2022. To keep up to date with the latest advances and developments in nursing, Julie maintains a professional membership with Sigma Theta Tau as a board member of her local chapter, Infusion Nurses Society, Association for Vascular Access, and Midwest Nursing Research Society. For her hard work and dedication, Julie was selected as one of Iowa’s 100 Great Iowa Nurses. She also has had opportunities in publications and presentations at the national, state and local level. She is thankful for her success related to her education, mentorship, and career opportunities. In her free time, Julie enjoys outdoor activities and spending time with her family. Learn more about Julie M. Weldon here: http://inanurse.org/network/index.php?do=/4135083/info/ and be sure to read her upcoming publication in Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare.

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