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Nabhan C.,University of Chicago | Zhou X.,RTI Health SolutionsNC | Day B.-M.,Genentech | Dawson K.,Genentech | And 5 more authors.
American Journal of Hematology | Year: 2016

We aimed to comprehensively study sex differences in disease and patients' characteristics, treatment and outcomes in patients with follicular lymphoma (FL) in the United States (USA) utilizing the National LymphoCare Study registry (2004–2014). Among evaluable males (n = 1277) and females (n = 1375) with FL, females less commonly received anthracyclines and were more likely to receive rituximab monotherapy. Overall response rates were comparable between sex groups. With a median follow-up of 8.1 years, male sex emerged as an adverse factor for PFS (HR, 0.84, 95% CI, 0.72–0.97). Lymphoma-related mortality (HR, 0.46; 0.23–0.93) and overall survival (HR, 0.63; 0.41–0.97) favored females aged ≤60 years. There are subtle differences in outcomes between male and female FL patients diagnosed and treated in the contemporary era. These data represent the largest prospective analysis of FL patients in the USA based on sex and can aid design of clinical trials for this disease. Am. J. Hematol. 91:770–775, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


PubMed | The University of Iowa
Type: | Journal: Psychiatry research | Year: 2016

Depressive disorders lack objective physiological measurements to characterize the affected population and facilitate study of relevant mechanisms. The melanopsin-mediated light signaling pathway may contribute to seasonal variation and can be measured non-invasively by pupillometry. We prospectively studied changes in melanopsin-mediated pupillary constriction in 19 participants with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 10 control across the summer and winter solstices. The melanopsin-mediated response, as measured by the pupils sustained constriction six s after a high intensity blue light stimulus, was marginally attenuated in those with MDD relative to controls (p=0.071). The participants with MDD unexpectedly showed a significantly reduced transient pupillary response to low intensity red (p=0.011) and blue light (p=0.013), but not high intensity red and blue light. Sustained pupillary constriction in response to high intensity blue light was more pronounced with increasing daylight hours (p=0.037) and was more strongly related to objectively measured versus estimated light exposure. Melanopsin-mediated impairments in pupil response may serve as a biological marker for vulnerability to depression in low light conditions. Assessment of these and other responses to light stimuli, such as response to low intensity light, may be useful for the study of the neurobiology of MDD and related mood disorders.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Dennis Joslin, Ph.D., will retire from his position as president and CEO of Nebraska Methodist College effective July 31, 2017. Dr. Joslin has served Nebraska Methodist College for the past 41 years after beginning his career in healthcare as a critical care staff nurse. Joslin then moved into teaching as a faculty member at Methodist School of Nursing. Prior to becoming president and CEO he held many positions within the college including executive vice president, vice president of academic affairs, dean of academic affairs and director of curriculum. Dr. Joslin earned his Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of Iowa, his Master of Science in Nursing from the University of Nebraska Medical Center and his Ph.D. in Higher Education Leadership from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Throughout his career, Joslin has promoted the expansion of roles and education for nursing and allied health professionals. As one of the first men to enter nursing in the 1970’s, Joslin saw the need for an expanding number of male nurses. The promotion of nursing as a profession for men is something that Joslin continues to support through his participation as a charter member in the Nebraska Chapter of the American Association for Men in Nursing. Under Joslin’s executive stewardship, the college experienced substantial transformation which included the first capital campaign for the college, the design, construction and opening of a state-of-the-art campus, annual record enrollments for each of the past 15 years (resulting in nearly tripling enrollment to 1,100 students), the launching of degree offerings at the doctoral level and the expansion of offerings at the master’s, bachelor’s and associate’s degree levels as well as several certificate level offerings. To ensure that the college’s mission of “promoting the health and well-being of the community” is realized, the college has developed numerous partnerships throughout the community to extend the reach of NMC students, faculty and staff. “The growth we’ve established, along with our consistently high job placement rates, lend credence to the idea that we are a premier school in the Omaha area for a healthcare education,” said Dr. Joslin. Deb Carlson, Ph.D., executive vice president, will assume the position of president and CEO on Aug. 1, 2017. The Nebraska Methodist College Board of Directors unanimously selected her to succeed Joslin as the next president. Carlson has been with NMC for 14 years and has served as a faculty member in the Arts and Sciences division, president of the Faculty Senate, director of the Office of Institutional Research, vice president of operations and, for the past three years, executive vice president. “Dr. Carlson is an outstanding educator and administrator who brings over 20 years of higher education experience from the University of Nebraska and Wayne State College,” said Joslin of his successor. “As a cognitive psychologist, she really understands people and excels in organizational development, strategic planning and accreditation. Deb is committed to serving the community with a focus on community-based healthcare, a direct reflection of the mission of the college.” The Omaha, Nebraska-based Nebraska Methodist College – the Josie Harper Campus has been teaching the meaning of care for 125 years and counting. An affiliate of Methodist Health System, NMC offers certificate, associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees both on campus and online. Nebraska Methodist College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.


The International Nurses Association is pleased to welcome Julie M. Weldon, RN, MSN, to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare. Julie M. Weldon is a Registered Nurse with extensive expertise in many facets of nursing. Julie is currently serving as Project Manager within the Mercy Accountable Care Organization, affiliated with Mercy Medical Center in Des Moines, Iowa. Julie M. Weldon graduated with her Bachelor of Science Degree in Biology in 1995 from Mount Mercy University. She subsequently gained her Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing in 1997 from Grand View University, followed by her Master of Science Degree in Nursing in 2005 from the University of Iowa. Appreciating the value of continuing education, Julie is currently enrolled in the PhD in Nursing program at the University of Iowa, with a projected graduation in 2021-2022. To keep up to date with the latest advances and developments in nursing, Julie maintains a professional membership with Sigma Theta Tau as a board member of her local chapter, Infusion Nurses Society, Association for Vascular Access, and Midwest Nursing Research Society. For her hard work and dedication, Julie was selected as one of Iowa’s 100 Great Iowa Nurses. She also has had opportunities in publications and presentations at the national, state and local level. She is thankful for her success related to her education, mentorship, and career opportunities. In her free time, Julie enjoys outdoor activities and spending time with her family. Learn more about Julie M. Weldon here: http://inanurse.org/network/index.php?do=/4135083/info/ and be sure to read her upcoming publication in Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare.


News Article | December 2, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

HigherEducation.com is proud to announce that it is partnering with The University of Iowa to offer an innovative Master of Arts in Teaching, Leadership, and Cultural Competency. This will be the first MA program in teaching offered entirely online by the university. The University of Iowa, long recognized as one of the top research universities in the country, has taken great care to design a program that provides teachers with the specific skills and training they need professionally and can be completed while maintaining a full-time role in the classroom. HigherEducation.com will ensure that this new program is available to the largest number of new students possible. “We were very intentional about designing the new Master of Arts in Teaching, Leadership, and Cultural Competency to support the needs of professionals who would like to continue their education and earn an advanced degree without having to leave their home or interrupt their career to return to school,” says Daniel Clay, the university’s dean of the College of Education. The new program is an excellent choice for any educator who wants theoretical and academic knowledge in addition to professional growth. For in-state students, the curriculum counts toward Iowa teacher licensure renewal units, providing another opportunity for teachers to meet their required professional obligation for continuing education. It seeks to support a more specialized education workforce by teaching advanced skillsets aimed at improving targeted learning outcomes for K-12 students, supporting programs like Iowa’s Teacher Leadership & Compensation program, as well as mentorship opportunities by helping to identify master teachers. “We’re excited to bring our online program management expertise to the University of Iowa, a school known around the world as a top research university and as a leader in all areas of academics. This new master’s program is impactful and focuses on key issues faced by today’s teachers, and it will provide schools and communities with the educators they need by providing them with advanced skillsets in a variety of areas. We are pleased to kick off our partnership with such an innovative and much-needed program,” says Patrick Gavin, CEO of HigherEducation.com. Enrollment for the new Master of Arts in Teaching & Learning: Teaching, Leadership, and Cultural Competency is now open. For more information, call (844) 542-8893 or email education-info@uiowa.edu. About University of Iowa With just over 33,300 students, the University of Iowa is one of the nation's top public research universities, a member of the Big Ten conference since 1899, and an Association of American Universities member since 1909. It's home to one of the nation's largest academic medical centers, the pioneering Iowa Writers' Workshop, and hundreds of options for affordable, accessible education. Learn more about the university at https://uiowa.edu/ About HigherEducation.com HigherEducation.com is the leader in end-to-end digital marketing services in the online education sector. Founded in 2007, H-E owns and operates a premium portfolio of education-focused websites that attract 75 million high-intent prospective education handraisers online annually. H-E works with postsecondary partners nationwide to deliver industry-leading marketing, inquiry generating and enrollment services to nonprofit universities. Learn more at http://www.highereducation.com/


MINNEAPOLIS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Capella Education Company today announced that Stephen G. Shank, the company’s founder and former CEO, will retire from the board of directors when his current term ends in May 2017. Mr. Shank founded the company in 1991 and served as chief executive officer until March 2009. He was chairman of the board of directors until February 2010, and has since continued to serve as a distinguished member of the board. “The work Capella is doing to transform the landscape of adult education is possible because of Steve Shank and the foundation he laid. Steve’s vision, leadership and determination changed the face of what is possible in adult education. I’m personally grateful for his service on our Board of Directors and for his wise counsel,” said Kevin Gilligan, chairman and chief executive officer of Capella Education Company. Mr. Shank has been involved with Capella Education Company for more than 25 years and is well known for his ability to work through strategic challenges and industry revolution. During the 1980s, as CEO of Tonka Corp., he led the company through acquisitions and new products. At Capella Education Company, he led the company to success during a time of significant change in higher education and in the macroeconomic environment. Mr. Shank has made great contributions to many local boards outside of Capella, including Polaris Industries, Tennant Company, and the Walker Art Center, and in 2016 was recognized by the Twin Cities Business Journal and the National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD) with a Lifetime Achievement award for his years of dedicated board service and recognized ability to look at long-term trends and provide counsel that leaders need. Mr. Shank served as a director of Capella University from 1993 to 2003 and 2006 to 2009, and as emeritus director of Capella University from 2003 to 2006. He earned a B.A. from the University of Iowa, an M.A. from the Fletcher School, a joint program of Tufts and Harvard Universities, and a J.D. from Harvard Law School. Capella Education Company (http://www.capellaeducation.com) is an educational services company that provides access to high-quality education through online postsecondary degree programs and job-ready skills offerings needed in today’s market. Capella’s portfolio of companies is dedicated to closing the skills gap by providing the most direct path between learning and employment.


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Study in mice suggests that protecting axons may prevent development of neurological problems associated with TBI More than 200,000 U.S. soldiers serving in the Middle East have experienced a blast-related traumatic brain injury, making it a common health problem and concern for that population. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can have various harmful long-term neurological effects, including problems with vision, coordination, memory, mood, and thinking. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, TBI from a head injury is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States, and close to 5 million Americans--soldiers and non-soldiers alike--are currently living with a TBI-related disability. Current therapy for these patients involves supportive care and rehabilitation, but no treatments are available that can prevent the development of chronic neurological symptoms. Researchers from the University of Iowa believe they may have identified a potential approach for preventing the development of neurological problems associated with TBI. Their research in mice suggests that protecting axons--the fiber-like projections that connect brain cells--prevents the long-term neuropsychiatric problems caused by blast-related traumatic brain injury. In a recent study, the UI team, led by Andrew Pieper, MD, PhD, professor of psychiatry at the UI Carver College of Medicine, investigated whether early damage to axons--an event that is strongly associated with many forms of brain injury, including blast-related TBI--is simply a consequence of the injury or whether it is a driving cause of the subsequent neurological and psychiatric symptoms. To answer that question, the researchers used mice with a genetic mutation that protects axons from some forms of damage. The mutation works by maintaining normal levels of an important energy metabolite known as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) in brain cells after injury. When mice with the mutation experienced blast-mediated TBI, their axons were protected from damage, and they did not develop the vision problems or the thinking and movement difficulties that were seen when mice without the mutation experienced blast-related TBI. The findings were published Oct. 11 in the online journal eNeuro. "Our work strongly suggests that early axonal injury appears to be a critical driver of neurobehavioral complications after blast-TBI," says Pieper, who also is a professor of neurology, radiation oncology, and a physician with the Iowa City Veterans Affairs Health Care System. "Therefore, future therapeutic strategies targeted specifically at protecting or augmenting the health of axons may provide a uniquely beneficial approach for preventing these patients from developing neurologic symptoms after blast exposure." In confirming the critical relationship between axon degeneration and development of subsequent neurological complication, the new study builds on previous work from Pieper's lab. The researchers also have discovered a series of neuroprotective compounds that appear to help axons survive the kind of early damage seen in TBI. These compounds activate a molecular pathway that preserves neuronal levels of NAD, the energy metabolite that has been shown to be critical to the health of axons. Pieper's team previously demonstrated that these neuroprotective compounds block axonal degeneration and protect mice from harmful neurological effects of blast-TBI, even when the compound are given 24 to 36 hours after the blast injury. In addition to Pieper, the research team included Terry Yin, Jaymie Voorhees, Rachel Genova, Kevin Davis, Ashley Madison, Jeremiah Britt, Coral Cinton, Latisha McDaniel, and Matthew Harper. Pieper also is a member of the Pappajohn Biomedical Institute at the UI. The research was supported by funds from Calico LLC (California Life Company) and the Mary Alice Smith Fund for Neuropsychiatry Research.


News Article | March 30, 2016
Site: www.sciencenews.org

Hobbits disappeared from their island home nearly 40,000 years earlier than previously thought, new evidence suggests. This revised timeline doesn’t erase uncertainty about the evolutionary origins of these controversial Indonesian hominids. Nor will the new evidence resolve a dispute about whether hobbits represent a new species, Homo floresiensis, or were small-bodied Homo sapiens. Hobbits vanished about 50,000 years ago at Liang Bua Cave on Flores, an island situated between Borneo and Australia’s northern coast, say archaeologist Thomas Sutikna of the University of Wollongong, Australia, and his colleagues. Cave sediment dating to about 12,000 years ago, which lies just above soil that yielded H. floresiensis remains, provided an initial estimate of when these diminutive hominids died out. But that sediment washed into the cave long after H. floresiensis was gone, covering much older, hobbit-bearing soil, the researchers report in the March 31 Nature. Using the initial age estimate, researchers had previously concluded that hobbits survived for tens of thousands of years after Homo sapiens passed through Indonesia and reached Australia around 50,000 years ago. It now appears that hobbits instead hit an evolutionary dead end around that time, Sutikna’s group says. The centerpiece of hobbit finds, a partial skeleton, comes from an individual who lived well before then, the scientists add. Measurements of the decay of radioactive elements in an arm bone from the partial skeleton indicate that the find dates to between 86,900 and 71,500 years ago. Until now, researchers suspected these bones were only about 18,000 years old. Based on the new dates, “there was possibly no overlap or interactions between H. floresiensis and H. sapiens on Flores,” says paleoanthropologist Richard Potts of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. Hobbits disappeared before the earliest skeletal evidence of humans on Flores, says paleoanthropologist and study coauthor Matthew Tocheri of Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, Canada. H. sapiens bones date to around 11,000 years ago on the Indonesian island. That undermines a controversial argument that a partial hobbit skeleton comes from a human with a developmental disorder (SN: 11/18/06, p. 330), Tocheri says. Paleoanthropologist Russell Ciochon of the University of Iowa in Iowa City agrees. H. floresiensis probably descended from a large-bodied Asian Homo erectus group that reached Flores roughly 1 million years ago, he says. On islands, large-bodied mammals tend to become smaller, presumably in response to limited food sources and other factors. But in a joint e-mail to Science News, two researchers who regard hobbits as humans — and the partial hobbit skeleton as displaying signs of Down syndrome — stick to their guns. Regardless of the new dates from Liang Bua Cave, hobbit bones fall within the range of skeletal sizes and shapes observed in people today, assert Robert Eckhardt of Penn State and Maciej Henneberg of the University of Adelaide in Australia. H. sapiens could have reached Flores and nearby islands (SN: 2/6/16, p. 7) when Sutikna’s group says hobbits were alive, they claim. It’s not known whether humans or other Asian hominids, such as Denisovans (SN Online: 3/17/16), reached Flores more than 50,000 years ago at a time of lowered sea levels and possible drought on the island, Potts says. If they did, intruding species might have pushed an already reeling hobbit population to extinction. Liang Bua Cave excavations also suggest that other Flores animals, including vultures, giant marabou storks and an extinct elephant relative, vanished around the same time that the hobbits did. Annual excavations from 2007 through 2014 clarified how sediment accumulated in the cave. A thick soil deposit containing hobbit remains had substantially eroded before being covered by soil layers that washed into the cave starting around 20,000 years ago. Techniques for dating soil, rock, volcanic ash and bone indicated that hobbits’ skeletal remains ranged in age from 100,000 to 60,000 years ago. Stone tools probably made by hobbits dated to between around 190,000 and 50,000 years ago. Liang Bua Cave preserves a late slice of H. floresiensis life on an island probably reached by toolmaking hobbit ancestors around 1 million years ago (SN: 6/3/06, p. 341), Tocheri says. Researchers don’t know what happened during the roughly 800,000 years between hobbit ancestors’ arrival on Flores and hobbits’ last evolutionary stages. “If there was a book that chronicled the evolutionary history of H. floresiensis, we would have only a few tattered and torn pages with the rest missing,” Tocheri says. Editor’s Note: This story was updated April 4, 2016, to clarify the description of hobbits and the scientific discipline of one of the researchers.


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Robert J. Schmall, MD, Diagnostic Radiologist to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. Robert J. Schmall is a highly trained and qualified physician with an extensive expertise in all facets of his work, especially vascular and interventional radiology. Dr. Schmall has been in practice for 19 years and is currently serving patients within Radiology Consultants of Iowa in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Dr. Schmall attended the University of Iowa College of Medicine in Iowa City, where he graduated with his Medical Degree in 1991. He subsequently undertook his residency training in Radiology at the Naval Medical Center San Diego. Then he completed his fellowship training in Vascular and Interventional Radiology at the University of Michigan. Dr. Schmall is board certified in Diagnostic Radiology by the American Board of Radiology. He also has his Certificate of Additional Qualification in Vascular and Interventional Radiology. To keep up to date with the latest advances and developments in his field, he maintains professional memberships with the Radiology Society of North America, the American College of Radiology, and the Society of Interventional Radiology. He attributes his success to his hard work, and when he is not assisting his patients, Dr. Schmall likes to relax by reading and spending time with his family. Learn more about Dr. Schmall here: http://www.rciowa.com/ and be sure to read his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A new study in rats suggests that nicotinamide riboside (NR), a form of vitamin B3, may be useful for treating or preventing nerve pain (neuropathy) caused by chemotherapy drugs. The findings by researchers at the University of Iowa were published recently in the Journal of the International Association for the Study of Pain (PAIN) and lay the groundwork for testing whether this nutritional supplement can reduce nerve pain in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Although chemotherapies have improved cancer survival rates, many of these drugs also cause debilitating side effects that decrease the quality of life of patients and survivors. In particular, many anti-cancer drugs cause chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) -- nerve damage and pain. "Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy can both hinder continuation of treatment and persist long after treatment has ended, severely affecting the quality of life of cancer patients," says Marta Hamity, PhD, UI assistant research scientist and first author on the study. "Our findings support the idea that NR could potentially be used to prevent or mitigate CIPN in cancer patients, resulting in a meaningful improvement in their quality of life and the ability to sustain better and longer treatment." A recent report from the American Society for Clinical Oncology states that there is an unmet need for treatments that can alleviate CIPN. The new study led by Hamity and Donna Hammond, PhD, UI professor of anesthesia and pharmacology at the UI Carver College of Medicine, tested the effect of NR in female rats that were treated with paclitaxel, a chemotherapy commonly used to treat breast and ovarian cancer. The researchers found that paclitaxel, given at doses that mimicked the amount a human patient would receive, caused peripheral neuropathy in the rats, which lasted at least five weeks beyond the end of the chemotherapy. The team used a standard test to assess the pain caused by CIPN. They measured the rats' increased sensitivity to a light foot poke. Untreated rats did not withdraw their foot when light pressure was applied. However, treatment with paclitaxel made the rats hypersensitive to this light touch and caused them to withdraw their foot. NR boosts levels of an important cell metabolite called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). Previous animal studies, including work from the UI lab of study co-author Charles Brenner, PhD, have shown that increasing NAD+ levels with NR can protect against many types of nerve damage. The new study found that the NR supplement increased levels of NAD+ in the rats' blood by about 50 percent. Prophylactic treatment with daily doses of NR (200 mg/kg) for seven days before chemotherapy was started and continued for 24 days after the chemotherapy ended prevented the hypersensitivity to touch in the rats. This protective effect lasted for at least two weeks after the NR supplementation stopped. Furthermore, the UI researchers also devised a new method to measure how unpleasant the rats with CIPN found the light touch. Rats were given a choice between a dark environment, where their feet were repeatedly poked, and a brightly lit environment. By nature, rats prefer the dark. The team found that untreated rats tolerated many pokes before they were prompted to leave a darkened area. In contrast, rats with CIPN would leave the dark chamber after a fewer number of pokes and remain in the light. Rats getting both chemotherapy and the NR supplement behaved more like untreated rats and tolerated more poking before leaving the dark. "The touch sensitivity test measures the threshold where a light touch that normally is not painful is now perceived as painful because of the neuropathy. For example, people with CIPN can find the light touch of clothes or typing on a keyboard painful," Hamity explains. "In the case of the 'escape' test, we were trying to mimic how unpleasant a normal stimulus can be because of the neuropathy, and if that would cause you to avoid it even if it means choosing an activity that you don't enjoy. For example, typing can become so painful that you avoid doing it even if it means not being able to work." When NR treatment was started 14 days after the chemotherapy treatment, it reversed touch hypersensitivity in some, but not all, of the animals. However, it was still able to reduce the "escape" behavior in all the rats. The study is the first to measure this behavioral impact of CIPN as well as the hypersensitivity to touch. Measuring the effect of potential therapies on both dimensions of pain perception may provide better preclinical information that can lead to more successful clinical trials. The study also is among the first to use female rats to investigate CIPN. Hammond is encouraged by the study findings but cautious about what they may mean for human therapies. "The preclinical literature is rife with drugs that alleviate chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy but that fail to do so under rigorous clinical testing," she says. "We believe we are using a model that is more clinically relevant - but the true test of that will not be made until the clinical trial is done." In addition to Hamity, Hammond, and Brenner, the research team also included Stephanie White, Roxanne Walder, and Mark Schmidt. The research was supported by funds from the UI Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine and the Roy J. Carver Trust. The NR used in the study was provided by ChromaDex Corp. (NASDAQ: CDXC), free of charge. Brenner has invented intellectual property concerning NR that has been licensed by ChromaDex, Inc, and he is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board and stockholder of ChromaDex, Inc., He also is Chief Scientific Adviser and co-founder of ProHealthspan, LLC, which sells NR.


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Dr. Thomas M. O’Dorisio, MD to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. O’Dorisio holds over four decades of experience and an extensive expertise in all facets of his work. He is currently serving as the Director of the Neuroendocrine Tumor Program and Professor of Medicine within the University of Iowa, in Iowa City, Iowa. In addition, Dr. O’Dorisio is affiliated with the University of Iowa, the University of Iowa Family Medicine Clinic, and the Iowa City VA Health Care System. Dr. O’Dorisio’s career in medicine began in 1971 when he graduated with his Medical Degree from Creighton University, followed by his internship at the same educational venue. Dr. O’Dorisio went on to complete his Internal Medicine residency, and then Endocrinology fellowship at Ohio State University. He is board certified in Internal Medicine, and Endocrinology board eligible. Dr. O’Dorisio is a specialist in internal medicine, endocrinology, neuroendocrinology tumors, and carcinoid tumors. To keep up to date with the latest advances and developments in his field, Dr. O’Dorisio maintains a professional membership with the Endocrine Society, and the American Association for Cancer Research. For his excellence, he has been recognized as a Master Clinician Consultant within the Endocrine Society in 2015. Dr. O’Dorisio attributes his great success to his long time experience working with gastro hormones, as well as somatostatin and betts conjure hormones. When he is not assisting patients, Dr. O’Dorisio likes to relax by playing golf. Learn more about Dr. O’Dorisio by reading his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

If we know the cause, why can't we save boys from this deadly disease? Duchenne muscular dystrophy affects 1 in 3,500 boys, stealing their ability to walk by age 12 and typically killing them by their mid-20s. Doctors know what causes the muscle-wasting disease, but, frustratingly, experimental treatments consistently fail. University of Virginia researchers are out to change that, however, with the help of a $2.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. Researchers at UVA's School of Medicine and UVA's School of Engineering and Applied Science will use the funding to build an astonishingly sophisticated computer model of the disease to unlock the mysteries that have undermined efforts to develop new treatments. The model will incorporate every aspect of the research process, from the lab mice in which experimental treatments often show promise to the children in which those treatments subsequently fail. By taking a holistic, "multi-scale" approach, the researchers intend to determine what's going wrong and pave the way for breakthroughs that are both long-awaited and desperately needed. Duchenne is caused by the lack of a key cellular protein, dystrophin. The UVA researchers suspect that the difference in response to treatments in mice and people is the result of differences in both biomechanics and inflammation. "This complex disease is absolutely devastating," said researcher Silvia Blemker, PhD, a co-principal investigator of the effort. "We truly believe that multi-scale computer models can provide key insights that will unravel the complexities of this disease and ultimately lead to new treatments that will improve the quality of life for patients and families." The multi-year project will include everything from studying the effects of the disease at the microscopic level to using magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI) to examine the changes in muscle tissue over time. The researchers will start out by looking at the disease in mice, then create a computer simulation of that effect before simulating the effect of the disease in boys. Ultimately, they plan to conduct "virtual clinical trials" simulating the effect of Duchenne on human muscle tissue over the course of many years and examining the effects of potential new treatments. The researchers plan to use open-source software for their model so they can make it available to scientists everywhere to speed development of new treatments and, hopefully, a cure. While there have been tens of thousands of scientific papers published on Duchenne muscular dystrophy, very few have employed computational or mathematical modeling to get at the fundamental questions that remain unanswered. The researchers are optimistic that this new approach can shed light on the matter. "This project is an exciting collaboration that uniquely merges computational modeling from very disparate domains," said Shayn Peirce-Cottler, PhD, co-principal investigator. "Ultimately, the multi-scale modeling framework we will develop has broad applicability beyond muscular dystrophies to many other tissues and disease processes." The project goals are lofty, so the lead researchers have assembled a cross-disciplinary team of top scientists and doctors with expertise in everything from the disease itself to inflammation to biomechanical modeling and muscle physiology. The team includes Blemker and Peirce-Cottler, of UVA's Department of Biomedical Engineering; Fred Epstein, PhD, chairman of the Department of Biomedical Engineering; Rebecca Scharf, MD, of the UVA Children's Hospital; Robert Grange, PhD, of Virginia Tech's Department of Human Nutrition, Foods and Exercise and a member of Tech's Muscle Group; and Kevin Campbell, PhD, of the University of Iowa's Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The University of Iowa, long recognized as one of the top research universities in the country, has taken great care to design a program that provides teachers with the specific skills and training they need to teach English as a foreign language abroad and domestically. This online teaching certificate is ideal for post-baccalaureate students and HigherEducation.com is working to ensure that this new program is available to the largest number of students seeking this skillset possible. “The TEFL certificate is both convenient and robust. It is convenient because all of the courses are online and students can work at their own pace as long as they meet deadlines. It is robust because students take courses from prominent teachers, researchers, and leaders in the field of EFL education who are experts in preparing future teachers. Students who graduate from this program will immediately see their job prospects improve,” says David Cassels Johnson, associate professor of Foreign Language and ESL Education in the UI College of Education. As more teachers and travelers seek work teaching English to students in non-English speaking countries, the TEFL teaching certificate from the University of Iowa can be a significant differentiator for employers. More countries, especially in Asia, are implementing English-focused policies and programs, and the more prestigious programs prefer hiring instructors with a TEFL certificate in addition to an undergraduate degree. The University of Iowa’s new online TEFL certificate is unique in that it offers flexibility that working professionals need and carries UI’s prestigious reputation. The online TEFL certificate requires that students complete four 8-week courses, and students can earn their certificate in a year. This is a more affordable and faster alternative to highly specialized master’s programs with a similar focus. “HigherEducation.com is excited to support the launch of this new certificate program in this fast-growing education sector. This is as an affordable, flexible way for people to gain the skills they need to reach their goals,” says Patrick Gavin, CEO of HigherEducation.com. Enrollment for the new online certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language is now open. Students can enroll online, call (844) 542-8893 or email education-info(at)uiowa(dot)edu. About University of Iowa With just over 33,300 students, the University of Iowa is one of the nation's top public research universities, a member of the Big Ten conference since 1899, and an Association of American Universities member since 1909. It's home to one of the nation's largest academic medical centers, the pioneering Iowa Writers' Workshop, and hundreds of options for affordable, accessible education. Learn more about the university at https://uiowa.edu/ About HigherEducation.com HigherEducation.com is the leader in end-to-end digital marketing services in the online education sector. Founded in 2007, H-E owns and operates a premium portfolio of education-focused websites that attract 75 million high-intent prospective education handraisers online annually. H-E works with postsecondary partners nationwide to deliver industry-leading marketing, inquiry generating and enrollment services to nonprofit universities. Learn more at http://www.highereducation.com/


News Article | November 13, 2015
Site: www.sciencenews.org

With outposts in nearly every organ and a direct line into the brain stem, the vagus nerve is the nervous system’s superhighway. About 80 percent of its nerve fibers — or four of its five “lanes” — drive information from the body to the brain. Its fifth lane runs in the opposite direction, shuttling signals from the brain throughout the body. Doctors have long exploited the nerve’s influence on the brain to combat epilepsy and depression. Electrical stimulation of the vagus through a surgically implanted device has already been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a therapy for patients who don’t get relief from existing treatments. Now, researchers are taking a closer look at the nerve to see if stimulating its fibers can improve treatments for rheumatoid arthritis, heart failure, diabetes and even intractable hiccups. In one recent study, vagus stimulation made damaged hearts beat more regularly and pump blood more efficiently. Researchers are now testing new tools to replace implants with external zappers that stimulate the nerve through the skin. But there’s a lot left to learn. While studies continue to explore its broad potential, much about the vagus remains a mystery. In some cases, it’s not yet clear exactly how the nerve exerts its influence. And researchers are still figuring out where and how to best apply electricity. “The vagus has far-reaching effects,” says electrophysiologist Douglas Zipes of Indiana University in Indianapolis. “We’re only beginning to understand them.” Anchored in the brain stem, the vagus travels through the neck and into the chest, splitting into the left vagus and the right vagus. Each of these roads is composed of tens of thousands of nerve fibers that branch into the heart, lungs, stomach, pancreas and nearly every other organ in the abdomen. This broad meandering earned the nerve its name — vagus means “wandering” in Latin — and enables its diverse influence. The nerve plays a role in a vast range of the body’s functions. It controls heart rate and blood pressure as well as digestion, inflammation and immunity. It’s even responsible for sweating and the gag reflex. “The vagus is a huge communicator between the brain and the rest of the body,” says cardiologist Brian Olshansky of the University of Iowa in Iowa City. “There really isn’t any other nerve like that.” The FDA approved the first surgically implanted vagus nerve stimulator for epilepsy in 1997. Data from 15 years of vagus nerve stimulation in 59 patients at one hospital suggest that the implant is a safe, effective approach for combating epilepsy in some people, researchers in Spain reported in Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery in October. Twenty of the patients experienced at least 50 percent fewer seizures; two of those had a 90 percent drop in seizures. The most common side effects were hoarseness, neck pain and coughing. In other research, those effects often subsided when stimulation was stopped. Early on, researchers studying the effects of vagus stimulation on epilepsy noticed that patients experienced a benefit unrelated to seizure reduction: Their moods improved. Subsequent studies in adults without epilepsy found similar effects. In 2005, the FDA approved vagus nerve stimulation to treat drug-resistant depression. The vagus nerve detects inflammation or infection in the body and relays signals from the brain stem along its southbound fibers. This signal prompts other nerves to release norepinephrine, which makes immune T cells in the spleen release the chemical acetylcholine to depress inflammation via macrophages. Although many details about how stimulation affects the brain remain unclear, studies suggest that vagus stimulation increases levels of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine, which carries messages between nerve cells in parts of the brain implicated in mood disorders. Some antidepressant drugs work by boosting levels of norepinephrine. Silencing norepinephrine-producing brain cells in rats erased the antidepressant effect of vagus nerve stimulation, scientists reported in the Journal of Psychiatric Research in September. Vagus stimulation for epilepsy and depression attempts to target the nerve fibers that shuttle information from body to brain. But its fifth lane, which carries signals from brain to body, is a major conductor of messages controlling the body’s involuntary functions, including heart rhythms and gut activity. The nerve’s southbound fibers can also be a valuable target for stimulation. Around 15 years ago, scientists determined that the brain-to-body lane of the vagus plays a crucial role in controlling inflammation. While testing the effects of an anti-inflammatory drug in rats, neurosurgeon Kevin Tracey and his colleagues found that a tiny amount of the drug in the rats’ brains blocked the production of an inflammatory molecule in the liver and spleen. The researchers began cutting nerves one at a time to find the ones responsible for transmitting the anti-inflammatory signal from brain to body. “When we cut the vagus nerve, which runs from the brain stem down to the spleen, the effect was gone,” says Tracey, president and CEO of the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research in Manhasset, N.Y. Later research indicated that stimulating undamaged vagus fibers also had anti-inflammatory effects in animals. Vagus stimulation prompts release of acetylcholine, Tracey and colleagues reported in 2000. Acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter like norepinephrine, can prevent inflammation. In 2011, rheumatologist Paul-Peter Tak, of the University of Amsterdam, and his colleagues implanted vagus nerve stimulators into four men and four women who had rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune inflammatory condition that causes swollen, tender joints. After 42 days of vagus stimulation — one to four minutes per day — six of the eight arthritis patients experienced at least a 20 percent improvement in their pain and swelling. Two of the six had complete remission, the researchers reported at an American College of Rheumatology conference in 2012. “From a scientific perspective, it’s an extremely exciting result,” says Tak, who is also a senior vice president at GlaxoSmithKline pharmaceuticals based in Stevenage, England. Despite advances in treatments over the last two decades, rheumatoid arthritis patients need better options, he says. In 2014, Tak and his colleagues reported that vagus stimulation reduced inflammation and joint damage in rats with arthritis. After a week of once-daily, minute-long stimulation sessions, swelling in the rats’ ankles shrank by more than 50 percent, the scientists reported in PLOS ONE. If these results hold up in future studies, Tak hopes to see the procedure tested in a range of other chronic inflammatory illnesses, including inflammatory bowel disorders such as Crohn’s disease. Studies in animals have shown promise in this area: In 2011, researchers reported in Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical that vagus stimulation prevented weight loss in rats with inflamed colons. Treating inflammatory conditions with vagus stimulation is fundamentally different from treating epilepsy or depression, Tak says. More research with patients will be necessary to develop the technique. “We are entering a completely unknown area, because it’s such a new approach,” he says. There could be financial hurdles as well, he says. But GlaxoSmithKline, which Tak joined after initiating the arthritis study, has purchased shares of SetPoint Medical, a company in Valencia, Calif., that produces implantable vagus nerve stimulators, Tak says. As he and others put stimulation to the test for inflammation, some scientists are attempting to see if manipulating the nerve can help heal the heart. The vagus nerve has profound control over heart rate and blood pressure. Patients with heart failure, in which the heart fails to pump enough blood through the body, tend to have less active vagus nerves. Trying to correct the problem with electrical stimulation makes sense, says Michael Lauer, director of the cardiovascular sciences division at the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute in Bethesda, Md. “It’s a great idea.” Yet so far, results from studies on the effects of vagus stimulation on heart failure have been inconsistent. In 2011, researchers reported in the European Heart Journal that repeated vagus nerve stimulation improved quality of life and the heart’s blood-pumping efficiency in heart failure patients. A vagus stimulation trial of heart failure patients in India published in the Journal of Cardiac Failure in 2014 echoed these results. After six months of therapy, the patients’ left ventricles pumped an average of 4.5 percent more blood per beat. Last August, however, researchers reported that a six-month clinical trial of vagus stimulation failed to improve heart function in heart failure patients in Europe. This study had the most participants — 87 — but used the lowest average level of electrical stimulation. “All the results thus far are preliminary. The studies that have been finished to date are relatively small,” Lauer says. “But there certainly are promising findings that [suggest] we may be barking up the right tree.” Another group of scientists is testing more intense vagus stimulation for patients with heart failure. The trial, called INOVATE-HF, is funded by the Israeli medical device company BioControl Medical and uses a higher level of electrical current than the European study that showed no measurable improvements. “If you try to lower blood pressure and you take a quarter of a pill instead of one pill, blood pressure won’t change,” says cardiologist Peter Schwartz of the IRCCS Istituto Auxologico Italiano in Milan. It’s equally important to use the right dose of vagus stimulation, he says. The new trial is also much larger than earlier studies, with more than 700 patients enrolled internationally. Results are expected by the end of 2016. Vagus manipulation isn’t limited to heart failure research. It’s also being tried in atrial fibrillation, in which the heart flutters erratically. “When it flutters, it doesn’t really push blood very efficiently,” says clinical electrophysiologist Benjamin Scherlag of the University of Oklahoma in Oklahoma City. Atrial fibrillation is common in people over age 60, Scherlag says, and can ultimately lead to blood clots and strokes. Treatments include drugs that alter heart rhythm or thin the blood, but they don’t work for all patients and some have nasty side effects, Scherlag says. In the lab, scientists can use high-intensity vagus stimulation to alter heart rhythm and induce atrial fibrillation in animals. But milder stimulation that alters heart rate only slightly, if at all, can actually quell atrial fibrillation, animal studies and one human study show. Vagus stimulation for atrial fibrillation is still in its infancy, and clinical applications haven’t been adequately tested, says Indiana’s Zipes. “Nevertheless, the concept bears looking into.” In patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), stimulating the vagus through the right ear (blue) decreased the length of heart fluttering episodes. With no stimulation (red), episodes did not shorten. At intensities so low they didn’t cause any perceptible change in heart rate, vagus stimulation controlled atrial fibrillation in dogs, Scherlag and colleagues reported in 2011. In 20 people receiving surgery for atrial fibrillation, low-level vagus stimulation reduced the duration of heart fluttering episodes from an average of 16.7 minutes to an average of 10.4 minutes, Scherlag and his colleagues reported in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology in March. In their study, Scherlag and his colleagues didn’t implant a nerve stimulator. In fact, they didn’t directly contact the nerve at all. They accessed tendrils of the vagus through the skin of their patients’ ears. Other researchers are also testing devices that stimulate the nerve without surgery. “Vagal nerve stimulation is very nice, but in order to get to the vagus nerve … you have to cut down surgically,” Scherlag says. “This is not the kind of thing you want to do, except under extreme situations.” But in the ear, tiny fingers of the vagus’s fibers run close to the surface of the skin, primarily under the small flap of flesh, the tragus, that covers the ear’s opening. Studies have explored using stimulation of those fibers through the skin of the ear to treat heart failure, epilepsy and depression, as well as memory loss, headaches and even diabetes — a reflection of the nerve’s control over a variety of hormones in addition to acetylcholine and norepinephrine. Stimulating the vagus nerve through the ear of diabetic rats lowered and controlled blood sugar concentrations, researchers from China and Boston reported in PLOS ONE in April. The stimulation prompted the rats’ bodies to release the hormone melatonin, which controls other hormones that regulate blood sugar. Ear-based vagus stimulation appeared to improve memory slightly in 30 older adults in the Netherlands. After stimulation, study subjects were better able to recall whether they had been shown a particular face before, says study coauthor Heidi Jacobs, a clinical neuroscientist at Maastricht University in the Netherlands. The researchers, who reported the work in the May Neurobiology of Aging, plan to investigate whether these effects last over time and exactly how the stimulation affects the brain, Jacobs says. The ear isn’t the only nonsurgical target. The company electroCore, based in Basking Ridge, N.J., manufactures a small, handheld device that can stimulate the vagus when placed on the throat. The company initially tested the devices to reduce asthma symptoms — relying on the nerve’s anti-inflammatory action. But during testing, patients reported that their headaches were disappearing, says J.P. Errico, CEO of electroCore. Now, the company is investigating the use of an electroCore device to treat chronic cluster headaches, severe headache attacks that can come and go for over a year. People suffering from an average of 67.3 cluster headaches each month experienced around four fewer attacks per week on average when using the device along with standard treatments like drugs, researchers reported in Cephalalgia in September. Several researchers have reservations about skin-deep stimulation. “The advantages of the handheld devices are that there’s no surgery required,” says Feinstein Institute’s Tracey, who is a founder and consultant for implant maker SetPoint Medical. But patient compliance becomes an issue. “Patient compliance with anything, whether it’s swallowing a pill or holding a device, is notoriously difficult,” he says. If a stimulator is implanted, a patient can forget about it, Tak agrees. He and Tracey both predict that implants will soon become smaller and safer. Even for depression and epilepsy, Tak says, researchers still need to figure out the best ways of stimulating the vagus — exactly where to place a device, and how much of a shock to deliver. The nerve’s multitasking, two-way nature makes it a challenge to fully understand and control. It’s hard to know exactly what you’re zapping when you stimulate the vagus nerve, says physiologist Gareth Ackland of University College London. He compares vagus stimulation to flipping on a light switch in one room of a house and discovering that this endows other rooms in the house with magical powers. “I’m not sure which room it’s going to happen in, I’m not sure for how long and I’m not sure if, after a while, it’s going to work or not,” he says. The intensity of electrical current, duration of stimulation and each patient’s health status could all affect the results of a vagus stimulation trial, Ackland says. And it’s possible that a widespread effect, such as suppressing inflammation caused by the immune system, could even be harmful to some patients. Ackland says that he and his colleagues agree that the vagus nerve is important. And he’s not ready to discount vagus stimulation as a potential therapy for conditions such as heart failure. But he warns that there’s a good deal of biology left to understand. “There’s an awful lot of basic science and basic clinical research that is needed before launching into a variety of potential interventions,” he says. For Tracey, it’s about way more than the vagus. “Nobody should overpromise that the vagus nerve is the secret to everything,” he says. But with a better map of the body’s nerves and their functions, the lessons learned by studying the vagus could inform future therapies that use nerve stimulation, he says. If researchers can understand and manipulate a particular circuit in a nerve that controls a specific molecule — for example, a protein involved in pain or even cell division — they could zero in on crucial targets. “The promise,” he says, “is for tremendous precision.” This article appears in the November 28, 2015, issue of Science News with the headline, "Waking the Vagus."


IRVINE, Calif., Feb. 22, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- ChromaDex Corporation (NASDAQ:CDXC) an innovator of proprietary health, wellness and nutritional ingredients that creates science-based solutions for dietary supplement, food and beverage, skin care, sports nutrition, and pharmaceutical products, announced today that University of Iowa researchers have published a study in the prestigious Journal of the International Association for the Study of Pain (PAIN) showing that NIAGEN® Nicotinamide Riboside (NR) ameliorates chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in an animal model. Results from this study suggest that NR may be an effective therapy in relieving chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in humans.  Access to the study was made available online on February 11, 2017. Currently, the American Society for Clinical Oncology considers the development of adjunctive therapy for the prevention and relief of CIPN as essential for patient care. This study provides an important proof of concept for the use of NR as a novel therapeutic approach in filling the unmet need for treatments that alleviate CIPN. ChromaDex CEO and co-founder, Frank Jaksch, Jr. stated, “This is another well-designed study that reinforces the role of NR in neuronal protection.  These results are particularly important given that this research may contribute to the discovery of a new therapeutic option for a significantly underserved patient population.” Led by Dr. Donna Hammond, Ph.D., the research team at the University of Iowa demonstrated that treatment with NR increased blood levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) by 50 percent after three weeks of daily administration.  NR was able to prevent the development of tactile hypersensitivity induced by the chemotherapeutic paclitaxel and reverse well-established tactile hypersensitivity, while also blunting escape/avoidance behaviors. Furthermore, the prophylactic effect was sustained for at least two weeks after treatment with NR ceased. Dr. Marta Hamity, Ph.D., the lead study author, indicated that the team embarked on the study based on evidence that suggested that increasing levels of NAD+ in the cells may protect against neuronal injury. The study used female Sprague-Dawley rats, clinically relevant doses of paclitaxel and incorporated measures that quantify the impact of CIPN on quality of life. “This is significant because the pain associated with CIPN can increase as the [chemotherapy] dose escalates, and at times it reaches a point where the patient is no longer able to tolerate the effective doses,” explained Hammond. “The American Society of Clinical Oncology has issued a position paper that there is an unmet need for treatments that can alleviate CIPN,” stated Hammond. “This study has provided positive data which is particularly exciting considering the unmet need for therapies in this area. We believe that further development of NR as a therapy for CIPN is warranted.” NR has been the subject of nearly 200 peer-reviewed journal publications and is currently at the center of over 100 collaborative studies between ChromaDex and leading universities and research institutions around the world such as the National Institute of Aging, MIT and the Scripps Research Institute representing an estimated $40-50 million in NR research. In November, 2016 ChromaDex announced that it met with FDA to gain Agency guidance on the requirements needed to successfully file an Investigational New Drug (IND) application to initiate a Phase I/II clinical trial in patients with Cockayne Syndrome. Jaksch commented, “ChromaDex is working towards completing IND-enabling preclinical studies for Cockayne Syndrome and filing that IND sometime in 2017.” ChromaDex, being publicly traded on NASDAQ, gives the public an opportunity for investing in the business of science-based technologies for healthy aging and longevity. To date, ChromaDex has invested millions in safety, toxicology and human clinical trials on NR. Most of ChromaDex’s recent revenue growth has come from its proprietary ingredients, in particular NIAGEN®. ChromaDex’s NIAGEN® is the only commercially available form of NR and is supported by five patents issued and several pending, with patents rights acquired from Cornell University, Dartmouth College and Washington University. In addition to human clinical studies, ChromaDex is actively collaborating with numerous leading universities and research institutes studying the health benefits of NIAGEN®. For additional information about ChromaDex and NIAGEN®, visit www.Chromadex.com. Additional research and news about NR and NAD+ can be found at www.AboutNR.com. About ChromaDex: ChromaDex leverages its complementary business units to discover, acquire, develop and commercialize patented and proprietary ingredient technologies that address the dietary supplement, food, beverage, skin care and pharmaceutical markets. In addition to our ingredient technologies unit, we also have business units focused on natural product fine chemicals (known as "phytochemicals"), chemistry and analytical testing services, and product regulatory and safety consulting (known as Spherix Consulting). As a result of our relationships with leading universities and research institutions, we are able to discover and license early stage, IP-backed ingredient technologies. We then utilize our in-house chemistry, regulatory and safety consulting business units to develop commercially viable ingredients. Our ingredient portfolio is backed with clinical and scientific research, as well as extensive IP protection. Our portfolio of patented ingredient technologies includes NIAGEN® nicotinamide riboside; pTeroPure® pterostilbene; PURENERGY®, a caffeine-pTeroPure® co-crystal; IMMULINA™, a spirulina extract; and AnthOrigin™, anthocyanins derived from a domestically-produced, water-extracted purple corn. To learn more about ChromaDex, please visit www.ChromaDex.com. Forward-Looking Statements: This release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, including statements related to results and significance of the NIAGEN® study  and the likelihood that NR will be an effective tool in relieving chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, whether NIAGEN® may be used in a therapeutic approach in filling the unmet need for treatments that alleviate CIPN and the likelihood of ChromaDex initiating a Phase I/II clinical trial in patients with Cockayne Syndrome. Statements that are not a description of historical facts constitute forward-looking statements and may often, but not always, be identified by the use of such words as "expects", "anticipates", "intends", "estimates", "plans", "potential", "possible", "probable", "believes", "seeks", "may", "will", "should", "could" or the negative of such terms or other similar expressions. More detailed information about ChromaDex and the risk factors that may affect the realization of forward-looking statements is set forth in ChromaDex's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016, ChromaDex's Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and other filings submitted by ChromaDex to the SEC, copies of which may be obtained from the SEC's website at www.sec.gov. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date hereof, and actual results may differ materially from those suggested by these forward-looking statements. All forward-looking statements are qualified in their entirety by this cautionary statement and ChromaDex undertakes no obligation to revise or update this release to reflect events or circumstances after the date hereof. ChromaDex provided research materials and a portion of the grant funding as a collaborator for the study.


IRVINE, Calif., Feb. 22, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- ChromaDex Corporation (NASDAQ:CDXC) an innovator of proprietary health, wellness and nutritional ingredients that creates science-based solutions for dietary supplement, food and beverage, skin care, sports nutrition, and pharmaceutical products, announced today that University of Iowa researchers have published a study in the prestigious Journal of the International Association for the Study of Pain (PAIN) showing that NIAGEN® Nicotinamide Riboside (NR) ameliorates chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in an animal model. Results from this study suggest that NR may be an effective therapy in relieving chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in humans.  Access to the study was made available online on February 11, 2017. Currently, the American Society for Clinical Oncology considers the development of adjunctive therapy for the prevention and relief of CIPN as essential for patient care. This study provides an important proof of concept for the use of NR as a novel therapeutic approach in filling the unmet need for treatments that alleviate CIPN. ChromaDex CEO and co-founder, Frank Jaksch, Jr. stated, “This is another well-designed study that reinforces the role of NR in neuronal protection.  These results are particularly important given that this research may contribute to the discovery of a new therapeutic option for a significantly underserved patient population.” Led by Dr. Donna Hammond, Ph.D., the research team at the University of Iowa demonstrated that treatment with NR increased blood levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) by 50 percent after three weeks of daily administration.  NR was able to prevent the development of tactile hypersensitivity induced by the chemotherapeutic paclitaxel and reverse well-established tactile hypersensitivity, while also blunting escape/avoidance behaviors. Furthermore, the prophylactic effect was sustained for at least two weeks after treatment with NR ceased. Dr. Marta Hamity, Ph.D., the lead study author, indicated that the team embarked on the study based on evidence that suggested that increasing levels of NAD+ in the cells may protect against neuronal injury. The study used female Sprague-Dawley rats, clinically relevant doses of paclitaxel and incorporated measures that quantify the impact of CIPN on quality of life. “This is significant because the pain associated with CIPN can increase as the [chemotherapy] dose escalates, and at times it reaches a point where the patient is no longer able to tolerate the effective doses,” explained Hammond. “The American Society of Clinical Oncology has issued a position paper that there is an unmet need for treatments that can alleviate CIPN,” stated Hammond. “This study has provided positive data which is particularly exciting considering the unmet need for therapies in this area. We believe that further development of NR as a therapy for CIPN is warranted.” NR has been the subject of nearly 200 peer-reviewed journal publications and is currently at the center of over 100 collaborative studies between ChromaDex and leading universities and research institutions around the world such as the National Institute of Aging, MIT and the Scripps Research Institute representing an estimated $40-50 million in NR research. In November, 2016 ChromaDex announced that it met with FDA to gain Agency guidance on the requirements needed to successfully file an Investigational New Drug (IND) application to initiate a Phase I/II clinical trial in patients with Cockayne Syndrome. Jaksch commented, “ChromaDex is working towards completing IND-enabling preclinical studies for Cockayne Syndrome and filing that IND sometime in 2017.” ChromaDex, being publicly traded on NASDAQ, gives the public an opportunity for investing in the business of science-based technologies for healthy aging and longevity. To date, ChromaDex has invested millions in safety, toxicology and human clinical trials on NR. Most of ChromaDex’s recent revenue growth has come from its proprietary ingredients, in particular NIAGEN®. ChromaDex’s NIAGEN® is the only commercially available form of NR and is supported by five patents issued and several pending, with patents rights acquired from Cornell University, Dartmouth College and Washington University. In addition to human clinical studies, ChromaDex is actively collaborating with numerous leading universities and research institutes studying the health benefits of NIAGEN®. For additional information about ChromaDex and NIAGEN®, visit www.Chromadex.com. Additional research and news about NR and NAD+ can be found at www.AboutNR.com. About ChromaDex: ChromaDex leverages its complementary business units to discover, acquire, develop and commercialize patented and proprietary ingredient technologies that address the dietary supplement, food, beverage, skin care and pharmaceutical markets. In addition to our ingredient technologies unit, we also have business units focused on natural product fine chemicals (known as "phytochemicals"), chemistry and analytical testing services, and product regulatory and safety consulting (known as Spherix Consulting). As a result of our relationships with leading universities and research institutions, we are able to discover and license early stage, IP-backed ingredient technologies. We then utilize our in-house chemistry, regulatory and safety consulting business units to develop commercially viable ingredients. Our ingredient portfolio is backed with clinical and scientific research, as well as extensive IP protection. Our portfolio of patented ingredient technologies includes NIAGEN® nicotinamide riboside; pTeroPure® pterostilbene; PURENERGY®, a caffeine-pTeroPure® co-crystal; IMMULINA™, a spirulina extract; and AnthOrigin™, anthocyanins derived from a domestically-produced, water-extracted purple corn. To learn more about ChromaDex, please visit www.ChromaDex.com. Forward-Looking Statements: This release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, including statements related to results and significance of the NIAGEN® study  and the likelihood that NR will be an effective tool in relieving chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, whether NIAGEN® may be used in a therapeutic approach in filling the unmet need for treatments that alleviate CIPN and the likelihood of ChromaDex initiating a Phase I/II clinical trial in patients with Cockayne Syndrome. Statements that are not a description of historical facts constitute forward-looking statements and may often, but not always, be identified by the use of such words as "expects", "anticipates", "intends", "estimates", "plans", "potential", "possible", "probable", "believes", "seeks", "may", "will", "should", "could" or the negative of such terms or other similar expressions. More detailed information about ChromaDex and the risk factors that may affect the realization of forward-looking statements is set forth in ChromaDex's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016, ChromaDex's Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and other filings submitted by ChromaDex to the SEC, copies of which may be obtained from the SEC's website at www.sec.gov. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date hereof, and actual results may differ materially from those suggested by these forward-looking statements. All forward-looking statements are qualified in their entirety by this cautionary statement and ChromaDex undertakes no obligation to revise or update this release to reflect events or circumstances after the date hereof. ChromaDex provided research materials and a portion of the grant funding as a collaborator for the study.


IRVINE, Calif., Feb. 22, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- ChromaDex Corporation (NASDAQ:CDXC) an innovator of proprietary health, wellness and nutritional ingredients that creates science-based solutions for dietary supplement, food and beverage, skin care, sports nutrition, and pharmaceutical products, announced today that University of Iowa researchers have published a study in the prestigious Journal of the International Association for the Study of Pain (PAIN) showing that NIAGEN® Nicotinamide Riboside (NR) ameliorates chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in an animal model. Results from this study suggest that NR may be an effective therapy in relieving chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in humans.  Access to the study was made available online on February 11, 2017. Currently, the American Society for Clinical Oncology considers the development of adjunctive therapy for the prevention and relief of CIPN as essential for patient care. This study provides an important proof of concept for the use of NR as a novel therapeutic approach in filling the unmet need for treatments that alleviate CIPN. ChromaDex CEO and co-founder, Frank Jaksch, Jr. stated, “This is another well-designed study that reinforces the role of NR in neuronal protection.  These results are particularly important given that this research may contribute to the discovery of a new therapeutic option for a significantly underserved patient population.” Led by Dr. Donna Hammond, Ph.D., the research team at the University of Iowa demonstrated that treatment with NR increased blood levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) by 50 percent after three weeks of daily administration.  NR was able to prevent the development of tactile hypersensitivity induced by the chemotherapeutic paclitaxel and reverse well-established tactile hypersensitivity, while also blunting escape/avoidance behaviors. Furthermore, the prophylactic effect was sustained for at least two weeks after treatment with NR ceased. Dr. Marta Hamity, Ph.D., the lead study author, indicated that the team embarked on the study based on evidence that suggested that increasing levels of NAD+ in the cells may protect against neuronal injury. The study used female Sprague-Dawley rats, clinically relevant doses of paclitaxel and incorporated measures that quantify the impact of CIPN on quality of life. “This is significant because the pain associated with CIPN can increase as the [chemotherapy] dose escalates, and at times it reaches a point where the patient is no longer able to tolerate the effective doses,” explained Hammond. “The American Society of Clinical Oncology has issued a position paper that there is an unmet need for treatments that can alleviate CIPN,” stated Hammond. “This study has provided positive data which is particularly exciting considering the unmet need for therapies in this area. We believe that further development of NR as a therapy for CIPN is warranted.” NR has been the subject of nearly 200 peer-reviewed journal publications and is currently at the center of over 100 collaborative studies between ChromaDex and leading universities and research institutions around the world such as the National Institute of Aging, MIT and the Scripps Research Institute representing an estimated $40-50 million in NR research. In November, 2016 ChromaDex announced that it met with FDA to gain Agency guidance on the requirements needed to successfully file an Investigational New Drug (IND) application to initiate a Phase I/II clinical trial in patients with Cockayne Syndrome. Jaksch commented, “ChromaDex is working towards completing IND-enabling preclinical studies for Cockayne Syndrome and filing that IND sometime in 2017.” ChromaDex, being publicly traded on NASDAQ, gives the public an opportunity for investing in the business of science-based technologies for healthy aging and longevity. To date, ChromaDex has invested millions in safety, toxicology and human clinical trials on NR. Most of ChromaDex’s recent revenue growth has come from its proprietary ingredients, in particular NIAGEN®. ChromaDex’s NIAGEN® is the only commercially available form of NR and is supported by five patents issued and several pending, with patents rights acquired from Cornell University, Dartmouth College and Washington University. In addition to human clinical studies, ChromaDex is actively collaborating with numerous leading universities and research institutes studying the health benefits of NIAGEN®. For additional information about ChromaDex and NIAGEN®, visit www.Chromadex.com. Additional research and news about NR and NAD+ can be found at www.AboutNR.com. About ChromaDex: ChromaDex leverages its complementary business units to discover, acquire, develop and commercialize patented and proprietary ingredient technologies that address the dietary supplement, food, beverage, skin care and pharmaceutical markets. In addition to our ingredient technologies unit, we also have business units focused on natural product fine chemicals (known as "phytochemicals"), chemistry and analytical testing services, and product regulatory and safety consulting (known as Spherix Consulting). As a result of our relationships with leading universities and research institutions, we are able to discover and license early stage, IP-backed ingredient technologies. We then utilize our in-house chemistry, regulatory and safety consulting business units to develop commercially viable ingredients. Our ingredient portfolio is backed with clinical and scientific research, as well as extensive IP protection. Our portfolio of patented ingredient technologies includes NIAGEN® nicotinamide riboside; pTeroPure® pterostilbene; PURENERGY®, a caffeine-pTeroPure® co-crystal; IMMULINA™, a spirulina extract; and AnthOrigin™, anthocyanins derived from a domestically-produced, water-extracted purple corn. To learn more about ChromaDex, please visit www.ChromaDex.com. Forward-Looking Statements: This release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, including statements related to results and significance of the NIAGEN® study  and the likelihood that NR will be an effective tool in relieving chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, whether NIAGEN® may be used in a therapeutic approach in filling the unmet need for treatments that alleviate CIPN and the likelihood of ChromaDex initiating a Phase I/II clinical trial in patients with Cockayne Syndrome. Statements that are not a description of historical facts constitute forward-looking statements and may often, but not always, be identified by the use of such words as "expects", "anticipates", "intends", "estimates", "plans", "potential", "possible", "probable", "believes", "seeks", "may", "will", "should", "could" or the negative of such terms or other similar expressions. More detailed information about ChromaDex and the risk factors that may affect the realization of forward-looking statements is set forth in ChromaDex's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016, ChromaDex's Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and other filings submitted by ChromaDex to the SEC, copies of which may be obtained from the SEC's website at www.sec.gov. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date hereof, and actual results may differ materially from those suggested by these forward-looking statements. All forward-looking statements are qualified in their entirety by this cautionary statement and ChromaDex undertakes no obligation to revise or update this release to reflect events or circumstances after the date hereof. ChromaDex provided research materials and a portion of the grant funding as a collaborator for the study.


IRVINE, Calif., Feb. 22, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- ChromaDex Corporation (NASDAQ:CDXC) an innovator of proprietary health, wellness and nutritional ingredients that creates science-based solutions for dietary supplement, food and beverage, skin care, sports nutrition, and pharmaceutical products, announced today that University of Iowa researchers have published a study in the prestigious Journal of the International Association for the Study of Pain (PAIN) showing that NIAGEN® Nicotinamide Riboside (NR) ameliorates chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in an animal model. Results from this study suggest that NR may be an effective therapy in relieving chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in humans.  Access to the study was made available online on February 11, 2017. Currently, the American Society for Clinical Oncology considers the development of adjunctive therapy for the prevention and relief of CIPN as essential for patient care. This study provides an important proof of concept for the use of NR as a novel therapeutic approach in filling the unmet need for treatments that alleviate CIPN. ChromaDex CEO and co-founder, Frank Jaksch, Jr. stated, “This is another well-designed study that reinforces the role of NR in neuronal protection.  These results are particularly important given that this research may contribute to the discovery of a new therapeutic option for a significantly underserved patient population.” Led by Dr. Donna Hammond, Ph.D., the research team at the University of Iowa demonstrated that treatment with NR increased blood levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) by 50 percent after three weeks of daily administration.  NR was able to prevent the development of tactile hypersensitivity induced by the chemotherapeutic paclitaxel and reverse well-established tactile hypersensitivity, while also blunting escape/avoidance behaviors. Furthermore, the prophylactic effect was sustained for at least two weeks after treatment with NR ceased. Dr. Marta Hamity, Ph.D., the lead study author, indicated that the team embarked on the study based on evidence that suggested that increasing levels of NAD+ in the cells may protect against neuronal injury. The study used female Sprague-Dawley rats, clinically relevant doses of paclitaxel and incorporated measures that quantify the impact of CIPN on quality of life. “This is significant because the pain associated with CIPN can increase as the [chemotherapy] dose escalates, and at times it reaches a point where the patient is no longer able to tolerate the effective doses,” explained Hammond. “The American Society of Clinical Oncology has issued a position paper that there is an unmet need for treatments that can alleviate CIPN,” stated Hammond. “This study has provided positive data which is particularly exciting considering the unmet need for therapies in this area. We believe that further development of NR as a therapy for CIPN is warranted.” NR has been the subject of nearly 200 peer-reviewed journal publications and is currently at the center of over 100 collaborative studies between ChromaDex and leading universities and research institutions around the world such as the National Institute of Aging, MIT and the Scripps Research Institute representing an estimated $40-50 million in NR research. In November, 2016 ChromaDex announced that it met with FDA to gain Agency guidance on the requirements needed to successfully file an Investigational New Drug (IND) application to initiate a Phase I/II clinical trial in patients with Cockayne Syndrome. Jaksch commented, “ChromaDex is working towards completing IND-enabling preclinical studies for Cockayne Syndrome and filing that IND sometime in 2017.” ChromaDex, being publicly traded on NASDAQ, gives the public an opportunity for investing in the business of science-based technologies for healthy aging and longevity. To date, ChromaDex has invested millions in safety, toxicology and human clinical trials on NR. Most of ChromaDex’s recent revenue growth has come from its proprietary ingredients, in particular NIAGEN®. ChromaDex’s NIAGEN® is the only commercially available form of NR and is supported by five patents issued and several pending, with patents rights acquired from Cornell University, Dartmouth College and Washington University. In addition to human clinical studies, ChromaDex is actively collaborating with numerous leading universities and research institutes studying the health benefits of NIAGEN®. For additional information about ChromaDex and NIAGEN®, visit www.Chromadex.com. Additional research and news about NR and NAD+ can be found at www.AboutNR.com. About ChromaDex: ChromaDex leverages its complementary business units to discover, acquire, develop and commercialize patented and proprietary ingredient technologies that address the dietary supplement, food, beverage, skin care and pharmaceutical markets. In addition to our ingredient technologies unit, we also have business units focused on natural product fine chemicals (known as "phytochemicals"), chemistry and analytical testing services, and product regulatory and safety consulting (known as Spherix Consulting). As a result of our relationships with leading universities and research institutions, we are able to discover and license early stage, IP-backed ingredient technologies. We then utilize our in-house chemistry, regulatory and safety consulting business units to develop commercially viable ingredients. Our ingredient portfolio is backed with clinical and scientific research, as well as extensive IP protection. Our portfolio of patented ingredient technologies includes NIAGEN® nicotinamide riboside; pTeroPure® pterostilbene; PURENERGY®, a caffeine-pTeroPure® co-crystal; IMMULINA™, a spirulina extract; and AnthOrigin™, anthocyanins derived from a domestically-produced, water-extracted purple corn. To learn more about ChromaDex, please visit www.ChromaDex.com. Forward-Looking Statements: This release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, including statements related to results and significance of the NIAGEN® study  and the likelihood that NR will be an effective tool in relieving chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, whether NIAGEN® may be used in a therapeutic approach in filling the unmet need for treatments that alleviate CIPN and the likelihood of ChromaDex initiating a Phase I/II clinical trial in patients with Cockayne Syndrome. Statements that are not a description of historical facts constitute forward-looking statements and may often, but not always, be identified by the use of such words as "expects", "anticipates", "intends", "estimates", "plans", "potential", "possible", "probable", "believes", "seeks", "may", "will", "should", "could" or the negative of such terms or other similar expressions. More detailed information about ChromaDex and the risk factors that may affect the realization of forward-looking statements is set forth in ChromaDex's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016, ChromaDex's Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and other filings submitted by ChromaDex to the SEC, copies of which may be obtained from the SEC's website at www.sec.gov. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date hereof, and actual results may differ materially from those suggested by these forward-looking statements. All forward-looking statements are qualified in their entirety by this cautionary statement and ChromaDex undertakes no obligation to revise or update this release to reflect events or circumstances after the date hereof. ChromaDex provided research materials and a portion of the grant funding as a collaborator for the study.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

FOREST CITY, IA--(Marketwired - February 22, 2017) - Winnebago Industries, Inc. ( : WGO), a leading United States recreation vehicle manufacturer, today announced the appointment of John Murabito to its Board of Directors, effective April 1, 2017. Murabito will also sit on the Human Resources Committee and the Nominating and Governance Committee of the Board. Murabito is the Executive Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer of Cigna Corporation ( : CI), a global health insurance company with 2016 annual revenues of approximately $39 billion. Other roles Murabito has held include Chief Human Resources Officer at Monsanto Company and Group Vice President, Human Resources for Frito-Lay, Inc., a division of PepsiCo. "We welcome Mr. Murabito to the Board and look forward to the insight he will provide to further our newly refreshed vision for Winnebago Industries," said Michael Happe, President and Chief Executive Officer. "John is a highly accomplished global executive, and will certainly provide valued counsel as to how Winnebago can strengthen its overall talent management processes, leverage our well-known brands in the marketplace, and profitably drive growth across an increasingly diverse portfolio." "With a great deal of expertise in human resources and his diversified experience spanning a number of different industries, Mr. Murabito will provide a unique voice as our Board and Executive Leadership Teams work together to improve our end customers overall experience," said Bob Chiusano, Chairman of the Board of Winnebago Industries. "Establishing great customer experiences ultimately will result in long-term value for our shareholders." Murabito received an M.A. in Industrial Relations from the University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, and a B.A. in Economics from Augustana College, Rock Island, Illinois. Winnebago is a leading U.S. manufacturer of recreation vehicles under the Winnebago and Grand Design brands, which are used primarily in leisure travel and outdoor recreation activities. The Company builds quality motorhomes, travel trailers and fifth wheel products. Winnebago has multiple facilities in Iowa, Indiana, Oregon and Minnesota. The Company's common stock is listed on the New York and Chicago Stock Exchanges and traded under the symbol WGO. Options for the Company's common stock are traded on the Chicago Board Options Exchange. For access to Winnebago's investor relations material or to add your name to an automatic email list for Company news releases, visit http://investor.wgo.net. This press release may contain forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Investors are cautioned that forward-looking statements are inherently uncertain. A number of factors could cause actual results to differ materially from these statements, including, but not limited to increases in interest rates, availability of credit, low consumer confidence, availability of labor, significant increase in repurchase obligations, inadequate liquidity or capital resources, availability and price of fuel, a slowdown in the economy, increased material and component costs, availability of chassis and other key component parts, sales order cancellations, slower than anticipated sales of new or existing products, new product introductions by competitors, the effect of global tensions, integration of operations relating to mergers and acquisitions activities, any unexpected expenses related to ERP, risks relating to the integration of our acquisition of Grand Design including: risks inherent in the achievement of cost synergies and the timing thereof, risks related to the disruption of the transaction to Winnebago and Grand Design and its management, the effect of announcement of the transaction on Grand Design's ability to retain and hire key personnel and maintain relationships with customers, suppliers and other third parties, risk related to compliance with debt covenants and leverage ratios, risks related to integration of the two companies and other factors. Additional information concerning certain risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from that projected or suggested is contained in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) over the last 12 months, copies of which are available from the SEC or from the Company upon request. The Company disclaims any obligation or undertaking to disseminate any updates or revisions to any forward looking statements contained in this release or to reflect any changes in the Company's expectations after the date of this release or any change in events, conditions or circumstances on which any statement is based, except as required by law.


CHICAGO, Dec. 19, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Alvin G. Wee, DDS, M.S., M.P.H., Ph.D. was elected the Education & Research Division Director of the American College of Prosthodontists (ACP).   "It is an honor and a privilege to be able to serve my speciality in this capacity as Director of Education and Research Division of the ACP. I will work hard to move the education and research agenda of the College forward with the purpose of benefiting all prosthodontists. " said Dr. Wee.   Dr. Wee received his dental degree from National University of Singapore and was awarded a Rotary International Foundation Multi-Year Ambassadorial Scholarship to continue his studies in the US. He completed his Prosthodontic residency with an M.S. degree at the University of Iowa and continued his Maxillofacial Prosthetic fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. His professional career started at The Ohio State University which he was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure, and continued at University of Nebraska Medical Center (Dept. of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery) and Creighton University. During that time in full time academics, he also completed an M.P.H., a Ph.D. and a D.D.S. degree. He currently serves as Section Head of Maxillofacial Prosthodontist at the Veterans Affairs Nebraska-Western Iowa Health Care System in Omaha, Nebraska where has a practice limited to prosthodontics. He continues to teach part time and also directs his clinical translational research laboratory.   Dr. Wee has been a member of the ACP for the last 22 years and most recently served as the Regional Membership Director of Region IV (Rockies and Plains) and as a member on the ACP Board of Directors for the last two terms. He is also serving as the Treasurer for the International Academy of Oral and Facial Rehabilitation, Recording Secretary for the American Academy of Maxillofacial Prosthetics, Assistant Editor of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, and Associate Editor for the Journal of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery.   Apart from serving his specialty, he has been awarded several teaching awards, including being the inaugural national recipient of the American Academy of Fixed Prosthodontic's Claude R. Baker Teaching Award for Excellence in Teaching Predoctoral Fixed Prosthodontics. Dr. Wee has also authored 78 peer-reviewed publications, 59 peer-reviewed abstracts, one pending patent, and chapters in three textbooks. Dr. Wee has received research funding as principal investigator (NIH R15 and NIH K23) and co-investigator (NIH R01 and VA RR &D) from the National Institutes of Health, Department of Veteran's Affairs, as well as several other agencies, totaling more than $2.6 million in grant funding. His research focuses on the clinical translational aspects of color science with regard to teeth/skin and their respective restorative materials. With the receipt of the Prevent Cancer Foundation fellowship and an NIH K23 award, he has expanded his research focus to the early detection of oral and/or oropharngeal cancer.   Prosthodontists are specialized dentists with advanced training in oral health issues, who are committed to improving patient outcomes. From implants, crowns, veneers, and tooth whitening, to full-mouth reconstruction, prosthodontists specialize in digital dentistry, cosmetic dentistry, and sleep apnea solutions.   The ACP is the only prosthodontic specialty organization whose membership is based solely on education credentials. ACP members must be in or have completed an ADA-accredited advanced education program in prosthodontics. About the ACP The American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) is the official sponsoring organization for the specialty of prosthodontics, which is one of only nine recognized specialties of the American Dental Association. Founded in 1970, ACP is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to enhancing patient care, advancing the art and science of prosthodontics, promoting the specialty of prosthodontics to the public and other dentists and healthcare professionals, ensuring the quality of prosthodontic education, and providing professional services to its membership. For more consumer information visit GoToAPro.org, professionals can visit Prosthodontics.org. A photo accompanying this release is available at: http://www.globenewswire.com/newsroom/prs/?pkgid=42012


CHICAGO, Dec. 19, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Alvin G. Wee, DDS, M.S., M.P.H., Ph.D. was elected the Education & Research Division Director of the American College of Prosthodontists (ACP).   "It is an honor and a privilege to be able to serve my speciality in this capacity as Director of Education and Research Division of the ACP. I will work hard to move the education and research agenda of the College forward with the purpose of benefiting all prosthodontists. " said Dr. Wee.   Dr. Wee received his dental degree from National University of Singapore and was awarded a Rotary International Foundation Multi-Year Ambassadorial Scholarship to continue his studies in the US. He completed his Prosthodontic residency with an M.S. degree at the University of Iowa and continued his Maxillofacial Prosthetic fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. His professional career started at The Ohio State University which he was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure, and continued at University of Nebraska Medical Center (Dept. of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery) and Creighton University. During that time in full time academics, he also completed an M.P.H., a Ph.D. and a D.D.S. degree. He currently serves as Section Head of Maxillofacial Prosthodontist at the Veterans Affairs Nebraska-Western Iowa Health Care System in Omaha, Nebraska where has a practice limited to prosthodontics. He continues to teach part time and also directs his clinical translational research laboratory.   Dr. Wee has been a member of the ACP for the last 22 years and most recently served as the Regional Membership Director of Region IV (Rockies and Plains) and as a member on the ACP Board of Directors for the last two terms. He is also serving as the Treasurer for the International Academy of Oral and Facial Rehabilitation, Recording Secretary for the American Academy of Maxillofacial Prosthetics, Assistant Editor of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, and Associate Editor for the Journal of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery.   Apart from serving his specialty, he has been awarded several teaching awards, including being the inaugural national recipient of the American Academy of Fixed Prosthodontic's Claude R. Baker Teaching Award for Excellence in Teaching Predoctoral Fixed Prosthodontics. Dr. Wee has also authored 78 peer-reviewed publications, 59 peer-reviewed abstracts, one pending patent, and chapters in three textbooks. Dr. Wee has received research funding as principal investigator (NIH R15 and NIH K23) and co-investigator (NIH R01 and VA RR &D) from the National Institutes of Health, Department of Veteran's Affairs, as well as several other agencies, totaling more than $2.6 million in grant funding. His research focuses on the clinical translational aspects of color science with regard to teeth/skin and their respective restorative materials. With the receipt of the Prevent Cancer Foundation fellowship and an NIH K23 award, he has expanded his research focus to the early detection of oral and/or oropharngeal cancer.   Prosthodontists are specialized dentists with advanced training in oral health issues, who are committed to improving patient outcomes. From implants, crowns, veneers, and tooth whitening, to full-mouth reconstruction, prosthodontists specialize in digital dentistry, cosmetic dentistry, and sleep apnea solutions.   The ACP is the only prosthodontic specialty organization whose membership is based solely on education credentials. ACP members must be in or have completed an ADA-accredited advanced education program in prosthodontics. About the ACP The American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) is the official sponsoring organization for the specialty of prosthodontics, which is one of only nine recognized specialties of the American Dental Association. Founded in 1970, ACP is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to enhancing patient care, advancing the art and science of prosthodontics, promoting the specialty of prosthodontics to the public and other dentists and healthcare professionals, ensuring the quality of prosthodontic education, and providing professional services to its membership. For more consumer information visit GoToAPro.org, professionals can visit Prosthodontics.org. A photo accompanying this release is available at: http://www.globenewswire.com/newsroom/prs/?pkgid=42012


CHICAGO, Dec. 19, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Alvin G. Wee, DDS, M.S., M.P.H., Ph.D. was elected the Education & Research Division Director of the American College of Prosthodontists (ACP).   "It is an honor and a privilege to be able to serve my speciality in this capacity as Director of Education and Research Division of the ACP. I will work hard to move the education and research agenda of the College forward with the purpose of benefiting all prosthodontists. " said Dr. Wee.   Dr. Wee received his dental degree from National University of Singapore and was awarded a Rotary International Foundation Multi-Year Ambassadorial Scholarship to continue his studies in the US. He completed his Prosthodontic residency with an M.S. degree at the University of Iowa and continued his Maxillofacial Prosthetic fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. His professional career started at The Ohio State University which he was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure, and continued at University of Nebraska Medical Center (Dept. of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery) and Creighton University. During that time in full time academics, he also completed an M.P.H., a Ph.D. and a D.D.S. degree. He currently serves as Section Head of Maxillofacial Prosthodontist at the Veterans Affairs Nebraska-Western Iowa Health Care System in Omaha, Nebraska where has a practice limited to prosthodontics. He continues to teach part time and also directs his clinical translational research laboratory.   Dr. Wee has been a member of the ACP for the last 22 years and most recently served as the Regional Membership Director of Region IV (Rockies and Plains) and as a member on the ACP Board of Directors for the last two terms. He is also serving as the Treasurer for the International Academy of Oral and Facial Rehabilitation, Recording Secretary for the American Academy of Maxillofacial Prosthetics, Assistant Editor of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, and Associate Editor for the Journal of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery.   Apart from serving his specialty, he has been awarded several teaching awards, including being the inaugural national recipient of the American Academy of Fixed Prosthodontic's Claude R. Baker Teaching Award for Excellence in Teaching Predoctoral Fixed Prosthodontics. Dr. Wee has also authored 78 peer-reviewed publications, 59 peer-reviewed abstracts, one pending patent, and chapters in three textbooks. Dr. Wee has received research funding as principal investigator (NIH R15 and NIH K23) and co-investigator (NIH R01 and VA RR &D) from the National Institutes of Health, Department of Veteran's Affairs, as well as several other agencies, totaling more than $2.6 million in grant funding. His research focuses on the clinical translational aspects of color science with regard to teeth/skin and their respective restorative materials. With the receipt of the Prevent Cancer Foundation fellowship and an NIH K23 award, he has expanded his research focus to the early detection of oral and/or oropharngeal cancer.   Prosthodontists are specialized dentists with advanced training in oral health issues, who are committed to improving patient outcomes. From implants, crowns, veneers, and tooth whitening, to full-mouth reconstruction, prosthodontists specialize in digital dentistry, cosmetic dentistry, and sleep apnea solutions.   The ACP is the only prosthodontic specialty organization whose membership is based solely on education credentials. ACP members must be in or have completed an ADA-accredited advanced education program in prosthodontics. About the ACP The American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) is the official sponsoring organization for the specialty of prosthodontics, which is one of only nine recognized specialties of the American Dental Association. Founded in 1970, ACP is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to enhancing patient care, advancing the art and science of prosthodontics, promoting the specialty of prosthodontics to the public and other dentists and healthcare professionals, ensuring the quality of prosthodontic education, and providing professional services to its membership. For more consumer information visit GoToAPro.org, professionals can visit Prosthodontics.org. A photo accompanying this release is available at: http://www.globenewswire.com/newsroom/prs/?pkgid=42012


CHICAGO, Dec. 19, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Alvin G. Wee, DDS, M.S., M.P.H., Ph.D. was elected the Education & Research Division Director of the American College of Prosthodontists (ACP).   "It is an honor and a privilege to be able to serve my speciality in this capacity as Director of Education and Research Division of the ACP. I will work hard to move the education and research agenda of the College forward with the purpose of benefiting all prosthodontists. " said Dr. Wee.   Dr. Wee received his dental degree from National University of Singapore and was awarded a Rotary International Foundation Multi-Year Ambassadorial Scholarship to continue his studies in the US. He completed his Prosthodontic residency with an M.S. degree at the University of Iowa and continued his Maxillofacial Prosthetic fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. His professional career started at The Ohio State University which he was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure, and continued at University of Nebraska Medical Center (Dept. of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery) and Creighton University. During that time in full time academics, he also completed an M.P.H., a Ph.D. and a D.D.S. degree. He currently serves as Section Head of Maxillofacial Prosthodontist at the Veterans Affairs Nebraska-Western Iowa Health Care System in Omaha, Nebraska where has a practice limited to prosthodontics. He continues to teach part time and also directs his clinical translational research laboratory.   Dr. Wee has been a member of the ACP for the last 22 years and most recently served as the Regional Membership Director of Region IV (Rockies and Plains) and as a member on the ACP Board of Directors for the last two terms. He is also serving as the Treasurer for the International Academy of Oral and Facial Rehabilitation, Recording Secretary for the American Academy of Maxillofacial Prosthetics, Assistant Editor of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, and Associate Editor for the Journal of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery.   Apart from serving his specialty, he has been awarded several teaching awards, including being the inaugural national recipient of the American Academy of Fixed Prosthodontic's Claude R. Baker Teaching Award for Excellence in Teaching Predoctoral Fixed Prosthodontics. Dr. Wee has also authored 78 peer-reviewed publications, 59 peer-reviewed abstracts, one pending patent, and chapters in three textbooks. Dr. Wee has received research funding as principal investigator (NIH R15 and NIH K23) and co-investigator (NIH R01 and VA RR &D) from the National Institutes of Health, Department of Veteran's Affairs, as well as several other agencies, totaling more than $2.6 million in grant funding. His research focuses on the clinical translational aspects of color science with regard to teeth/skin and their respective restorative materials. With the receipt of the Prevent Cancer Foundation fellowship and an NIH K23 award, he has expanded his research focus to the early detection of oral and/or oropharngeal cancer.   Prosthodontists are specialized dentists with advanced training in oral health issues, who are committed to improving patient outcomes. From implants, crowns, veneers, and tooth whitening, to full-mouth reconstruction, prosthodontists specialize in digital dentistry, cosmetic dentistry, and sleep apnea solutions.   The ACP is the only prosthodontic specialty organization whose membership is based solely on education credentials. ACP members must be in or have completed an ADA-accredited advanced education program in prosthodontics. About the ACP The American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) is the official sponsoring organization for the specialty of prosthodontics, which is one of only nine recognized specialties of the American Dental Association. Founded in 1970, ACP is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to enhancing patient care, advancing the art and science of prosthodontics, promoting the specialty of prosthodontics to the public and other dentists and healthcare professionals, ensuring the quality of prosthodontic education, and providing professional services to its membership. For more consumer information visit GoToAPro.org, professionals can visit Prosthodontics.org. A photo accompanying this release is available at: http://www.globenewswire.com/newsroom/prs/?pkgid=42012


CHICAGO, Dec. 19, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Alvin G. Wee, DDS, M.S., M.P.H., Ph.D. was elected the Education & Research Division Director of the American College of Prosthodontists (ACP).   "It is an honor and a privilege to be able to serve my speciality in this capacity as Director of Education and Research Division of the ACP. I will work hard to move the education and research agenda of the College forward with the purpose of benefiting all prosthodontists. " said Dr. Wee.   Dr. Wee received his dental degree from National University of Singapore and was awarded a Rotary International Foundation Multi-Year Ambassadorial Scholarship to continue his studies in the US. He completed his Prosthodontic residency with an M.S. degree at the University of Iowa and continued his Maxillofacial Prosthetic fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. His professional career started at The Ohio State University which he was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure, and continued at University of Nebraska Medical Center (Dept. of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery) and Creighton University. During that time in full time academics, he also completed an M.P.H., a Ph.D. and a D.D.S. degree. He currently serves as Section Head of Maxillofacial Prosthodontist at the Veterans Affairs Nebraska-Western Iowa Health Care System in Omaha, Nebraska where has a practice limited to prosthodontics. He continues to teach part time and also directs his clinical translational research laboratory.   Dr. Wee has been a member of the ACP for the last 22 years and most recently served as the Regional Membership Director of Region IV (Rockies and Plains) and as a member on the ACP Board of Directors for the last two terms. He is also serving as the Treasurer for the International Academy of Oral and Facial Rehabilitation, Recording Secretary for the American Academy of Maxillofacial Prosthetics, Assistant Editor of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, and Associate Editor for the Journal of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery.   Apart from serving his specialty, he has been awarded several teaching awards, including being the inaugural national recipient of the American Academy of Fixed Prosthodontic's Claude R. Baker Teaching Award for Excellence in Teaching Predoctoral Fixed Prosthodontics. Dr. Wee has also authored 78 peer-reviewed publications, 59 peer-reviewed abstracts, one pending patent, and chapters in three textbooks. Dr. Wee has received research funding as principal investigator (NIH R15 and NIH K23) and co-investigator (NIH R01 and VA RR &D) from the National Institutes of Health, Department of Veteran's Affairs, as well as several other agencies, totaling more than $2.6 million in grant funding. His research focuses on the clinical translational aspects of color science with regard to teeth/skin and their respective restorative materials. With the receipt of the Prevent Cancer Foundation fellowship and an NIH K23 award, he has expanded his research focus to the early detection of oral and/or oropharngeal cancer.   Prosthodontists are specialized dentists with advanced training in oral health issues, who are committed to improving patient outcomes. From implants, crowns, veneers, and tooth whitening, to full-mouth reconstruction, prosthodontists specialize in digital dentistry, cosmetic dentistry, and sleep apnea solutions.   The ACP is the only prosthodontic specialty organization whose membership is based solely on education credentials. ACP members must be in or have completed an ADA-accredited advanced education program in prosthodontics. About the ACP The American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) is the official sponsoring organization for the specialty of prosthodontics, which is one of only nine recognized specialties of the American Dental Association. Founded in 1970, ACP is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to enhancing patient care, advancing the art and science of prosthodontics, promoting the specialty of prosthodontics to the public and other dentists and healthcare professionals, ensuring the quality of prosthodontic education, and providing professional services to its membership. For more consumer information visit GoToAPro.org, professionals can visit Prosthodontics.org. A photo accompanying this release is available at: http://www.globenewswire.com/newsroom/prs/?pkgid=42012


CHICAGO, Dec. 19, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Alvin G. Wee, DDS, M.S., M.P.H., Ph.D. was elected the Education & Research Division Director of the American College of Prosthodontists (ACP).   "It is an honor and a privilege to be able to serve my speciality in this capacity as Director of Education and Research Division of the ACP. I will work hard to move the education and research agenda of the College forward with the purpose of benefiting all prosthodontists. " said Dr. Wee.   Dr. Wee received his dental degree from National University of Singapore and was awarded a Rotary International Foundation Multi-Year Ambassadorial Scholarship to continue his studies in the US. He completed his Prosthodontic residency with an M.S. degree at the University of Iowa and continued his Maxillofacial Prosthetic fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. His professional career started at The Ohio State University which he was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure, and continued at University of Nebraska Medical Center (Dept. of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery) and Creighton University. During that time in full time academics, he also completed an M.P.H., a Ph.D. and a D.D.S. degree. He currently serves as Section Head of Maxillofacial Prosthodontist at the Veterans Affairs Nebraska-Western Iowa Health Care System in Omaha, Nebraska where has a practice limited to prosthodontics. He continues to teach part time and also directs his clinical translational research laboratory.   Dr. Wee has been a member of the ACP for the last 22 years and most recently served as the Regional Membership Director of Region IV (Rockies and Plains) and as a member on the ACP Board of Directors for the last two terms. He is also serving as the Treasurer for the International Academy of Oral and Facial Rehabilitation, Recording Secretary for the American Academy of Maxillofacial Prosthetics, Assistant Editor of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, and Associate Editor for the Journal of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery.   Apart from serving his specialty, he has been awarded several teaching awards, including being the inaugural national recipient of the American Academy of Fixed Prosthodontic's Claude R. Baker Teaching Award for Excellence in Teaching Predoctoral Fixed Prosthodontics. Dr. Wee has also authored 78 peer-reviewed publications, 59 peer-reviewed abstracts, one pending patent, and chapters in three textbooks. Dr. Wee has received research funding as principal investigator (NIH R15 and NIH K23) and co-investigator (NIH R01 and VA RR &D) from the National Institutes of Health, Department of Veteran's Affairs, as well as several other agencies, totaling more than $2.6 million in grant funding. His research focuses on the clinical translational aspects of color science with regard to teeth/skin and their respective restorative materials. With the receipt of the Prevent Cancer Foundation fellowship and an NIH K23 award, he has expanded his research focus to the early detection of oral and/or oropharngeal cancer.   Prosthodontists are specialized dentists with advanced training in oral health issues, who are committed to improving patient outcomes. From implants, crowns, veneers, and tooth whitening, to full-mouth reconstruction, prosthodontists specialize in digital dentistry, cosmetic dentistry, and sleep apnea solutions.   The ACP is the only prosthodontic specialty organization whose membership is based solely on education credentials. ACP members must be in or have completed an ADA-accredited advanced education program in prosthodontics. About the ACP The American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) is the official sponsoring organization for the specialty of prosthodontics, which is one of only nine recognized specialties of the American Dental Association. Founded in 1970, ACP is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to enhancing patient care, advancing the art and science of prosthodontics, promoting the specialty of prosthodontics to the public and other dentists and healthcare professionals, ensuring the quality of prosthodontic education, and providing professional services to its membership. For more consumer information visit GoToAPro.org, professionals can visit Prosthodontics.org. A photo accompanying this release is available at: http://www.globenewswire.com/newsroom/prs/?pkgid=42012


News Article | November 21, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Five of the University of South Florida's leading scientific researchers have been named to the new class of Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world's largest and one of its most prestigious scientific societies. Spanning medicine, public health, and technology research, the new group of USF AAAS Fellows are among some of the university's most accomplished faculty members, representing decades of scientific accomplishments and more than 50 patented technologies. The new designations bring the total number of AAAS Fellows among USF's faculty to 61. "The global recognition of the accomplishments and careers of these five stellar scientists says much about the quality and impact of research across the University of South Florida System," said Paul Sanberg, senior vice president for research, innovation and economic development at USF and himself a AAAS Fellow. "These five faculty members are on the leading edge of discovery in areas that have great impact on the daily lives of people everywhere. Their scientific accomplishments have led to better healthcare and more advanced technology that serve humankind in a myriad of ways. We're very proud these individuals are leaders in our community here at USF and among scientists around the world." With this year's new Fellows class, USF again ranks fourth among all organizations worldwide, tied with University of Florida, in the designation of new AAAS Fellows, joining Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, Texas A&M University, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, University of Texas at Austin, and University of Wisconsin-Madison. USF and UF lead Florida universities in new AAAS Fellows selection. Election as a AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. This year 391 members have been awarded this honor by AAAS because of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. New Fellows will be presented with an official certificate and a gold and blue rosette pin in February during the 2017 AAAS Annual Meeting in Boston. The tradition of AAAS Fellows began in 1874. The five faculty members from USF are: John H. Adams, Ph.D. Elected AAAS Fellow in the Biological Sciences Section Citation: For pioneering efforts and distinguished contributions in fundamental and translational malaria research, particularly in discoveries to improve antimalarial drugs and vaccines. Adams is a Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Global Health, in the College of Public Health. He also holds joint appointments in the Department of Molecular Medicine and Division of Infectious Disease & International Medicine, and Department of Internal Medicine in the Morsani College of Medicine. He is an internationally recognized scientist who has distinguished himself in the field of malaria research and dedicated his career to finding solutions for one of the leading causes of death and disease throughout the world. Early in his career he identified and characterized the proteins of Plasmodium vivax, one of the five types of malaria parasites that infect humans. He also assisted in the sequencing of the complete genome of Plasmodium falciparum, another human malaria, in 2008, published as a cover story in the journal Nature, which has stimulated new research pathways for potential drug targets and vaccines. He received an $8.5 million grant in 2010 (as PI) from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to lead an interdisciplinary multi-national team to develop new technologies to advance research on Plasmodium vivax. The development of these state of the art genomic and functional tools for both Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax greatly propelled the field of anti-malarial drug discovery and vaccine development. He has published more than 120 articles, and is an inventor on 6 patents. He earned his M.Sc. and Ph.D. at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In addition to AAAS, he is an active member of the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), American Society of Parasitologists, American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH), and the Society of Protozoologists. Dmitry B. Goldgof, Ph.D. Elected AAAS Fellow in the Information, Computing, and Communication Section Citation: For distinguished contributions to the fields of computer vision, pattern recognition and biomedical applications, particularly in biomedical image analysis. Goldgof is a Professor in the USF Department of Computer Science & Engineering in the College of Engineering, and the Department of Oncological Sciences in the Morsani College of Medicine, and a Member of the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute. His expertise spans the research areas of computer vision, image analysis, and pattern recognition, with an emphasis in biomedical applications. For example, he developed a system that automatically identifies tumors in human brain MRI scans, and techniques for automated tracking of deformation in cardiac MRIs. These developments have led to faster and more precise evaluations of medical imaging. He has also made significant advances in the area of biometrics and facial analysis for security applications. He holds five patents and published five edited volumes, 20 book chapters, and more than 85 journal articles. In addition to AAAS, he is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and International Association for Pattern Recognition (IAPR); and member of the International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE), Optical Society of America (OSA), Pattern Recognition Society, and Sigma Xi: The Scientific Research Society. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, his M.S. at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and his B.S. from Moscow Forest Engineering Institute, Moscow, Russia. Dennis K. Killinger, Ph.D. Elected AAAS Fellow in the Physics Section Citation: For pioneering contributions in tunable laser spectroscopy and atmospheric remote sensing, especially new techniques for Lidar sensing of global CO2 and environmental trace species. Killinger is a USF Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Physics and Director of the Lidar Remote Sensing Laboratory in the College of Arts and Sciences. He is also President and CEO of SenOptics, Inc., a developer of patented LIF and Lidar sensors. He was one of the early pioneers in the field of laser remote sensing more than 30 years ago, and he is responsible for some of the major advances of this field, such as the understanding of "noise" in these systems, and for developing parameters to determine signal-to-noise ratio, among many other leading contributions. He is a past Member of the National Academy/NRC Committee on Optical Science and Engineering (COSE) to assess the future technology trends in optics and lasers: Harnessing Light; and University Representative to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) Southeastern Science Policy Colloquium. In addition to AAAS, he is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America (OSA) and SPIE; founding member of the National Academy of Inventors; and Senior Member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). He has published eight patents and more than 100 papers and book chapters. He earned his doctorate from the University of Michigan, M.S. from DePauw University, and B.A. from the University of Iowa. Charles J. Lockwood, MD, MHCM Elected AAAS Fellow in the Medical Sciences Section Citation: For distinguished contributions to reproductive science particularly discovery of the first biochemical marker of preterm birth, fetal fibronectin, and the molecular mechanisms underlying uterine hemostasis. Lockwood is the Senior Vice President for USF Health and Dean of the Morsani College of Medicine. At USF Health, Lockwood leads the Morsani College of Medicine and the Colleges of Nursing, Public Health and Pharmacy; and the School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences. He also oversees the USF Physicians Group, the faculty group practice of the medical school -- and the largest multispecialty group practice on the West Coast of Florida. He is a Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Public Health at USF. Lockwood is an internationally recognized health care and research leader who earned a Sc.B., magna cum laude, with distinction, from Brown University, his medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and his Master of Science in Health Care Management degree from the Harvard School of Public Health. He served his residency in obstetrics and gynecology at Pennsylvania Hospital and his fellowship in maternal-fetal medicine at the Yale-New Haven Hospital. Lockwood is the recipient of multiple research grant awards from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the March of Dimes and other foundations. He has authored 290 peer-reviewed publications and 170 editorials, authored or co-authored three books, and co-edited seven major textbooks. He led a research team that discovered fetal fibronectin, the first biochemical predictor of prematurity. His clinical interests include prevention of recurrent pregnancy loss, preterm delivery and maternal thrombosis, and he maintains an active laboratory at USF Health dedicated to research in these areas. Lockwood is also member of the March of Dimes Board of Trustees. Shyam S. Mohapatra, Ph.D., MBA, FAAAAI, FNAI, FAIMBE Elected AAAS Fellow in the Pharmaceutical Sciences Section Citation: For outstanding contributions in the field of pharmaceutical and health sciences, particularly for pioneering achievements in advancing biomedical nanotechnology for inflammatory diseases. Mohapatra is a Distinguished USF Health Professor; Associate Dean of Graduate Programs and Professor in the College of Pharmacy; Director of Translational Medicine; Distinguished Professor in the Institute for Advanced Discovery & Innovation; and Vice Chair of Research in the Department of Internal Medicine, Morsani College of Medicine. His research on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), atrial natriuretic peptides (ANPs), and Nanoparticle-mediated gene/drug delivery has helped guide the fields of immunology, infectious disease, biotherapeutics and translational medicine. RSV infection is a condition which afflicts primarily infants, but also adults and the elderly. Even 45 years after the discovery of RSV, there is no vaccine or other effective therapy against RSV, however, Mohapatra's research has led to the unraveling of the molecular mechanisms underlying RSV infection and resulting illnesses, and the development of a potential multi-gene vaccine against RSV. He has also pioneered novel treatment approaches for lung cancer, respiratory viral infections, respiratory allergies, and other chronic lung diseases. He also founded the USF Center for Research & Education in Nanobioengineering in 2010. In addition to AAAS, he is a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineers (AIMBE), and American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Clinical Immunology; member of the National Academy of Inventors; and among the inaugural inductees of the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame. He holds 28 patents, and has published nearly 200 articles and book chapters. He earned his Ph.D. from the Australian National University; M.S. from the GB Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, India; and B.S. from Orissa University of Agriculture & Technology, India. This year's AAAS Fellows will be formally announced in the AAAS News & Notes section of the journal Science on Nov. 25. The University of South Florida is a high-impact, global research university dedicated to student success. USF is a Top 25 research university among public institutions nationwide in total research expenditures, according to the National Science Foundation. Serving over 48,000 students, the USF System has an annual budget of $1.6 billion and an annual economic impact of $4.4 billion. USF is a member of the American Athletic Conference. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is the world's largest general scientific society and publisher of the journal Science as well as Science Translational Medicine, Science Signaling, a digital, open-access journal, Science Advances, Science Immunology, and Science Robotics. AAAS was founded in 1848 and includes nearly 250 affiliated societies and academies of science, serving 10 million individuals. Science has the largest paid circulation of any peer-reviewed general science journal in the world. The non-profit AAAS is open to all and fulfills its mission to "advance science and serve society" through initiatives in science policy, international programs, science education, public engagement, and more. For the latest research news, log onto EurekAlert!, the premier science-news Web site, a service of AAAS. See http://www. .


News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

PITTSBURGH, Dec. 7, 2016 - Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) and Magee-Womens Research Institute (MWRI) have discovered molecular changes in the primary tumor of breast cancer patients who developed brain metastases. The finding is expected to lead to improved diagnosis and targeted therapies. The results, to be published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Oncology and presented this week at the 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, indicate that patients' treatments should be tailored not only for the original breast cancer, but also the brain tumors, said Adrian Lee, Ph.D., director of the Institute for Precision Medicine, a joint effort by UPMC and the University of Pittsburgh, and director of the Women's Cancer Research Center, a collaboration between UPCI and MWRI. "The brain is a common and catastrophic site of metastasis for breast cancer patients," said Lee. "Our study showed that despite the large degree of similarity between the initial breast tumor and the brain metastatic tumor, there were enough alterations to support comprehensive profiling of metastases to potentially alter the course of treatment." There are many types of breast cancers, and about 20 percent of them are identified as HER2-positive, meaning the cancer cells have more of a protein called HER2 that causes the cells to grow faster than those with normal levels of the protein. These patients' cancers typically respond to targeted therapies. However, breast cancer patients with brain metastases who are identified as HER2-negative do not respond favorably to the same therapies. Lee's research team set out to determine if there were molecular differences in the primary breast tumors and their patient-matched brain metastatic tumors that would enhance treatment options. Little research is available because there are few opportunities to study primary breast tissue with their patient-matched brain metastases. The research team tested tumors from 20 patients from two academic institutions, the University of Pittsburgh and the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Among the discoveries was that the primary tumor initially identified as HER2-negative actually switched to HER2-positive in the metastatic brain tumor. "This now means we can screen for presence of HER2 so that we can change and target the therapy to improve outcomes for our patients," said Dr. Lee. Additional authors on this study are Nolan Priedigkeit, B.S., Yijing Chen, B.S., Ahmed Basudan, B.S., Rebecca J. Watters, Ph.D., Roby Thomas, M.D., Peter C. Lucas, M.D., Ph.D., Rohit Bhargava, M.D., Ronald L. Hamilton, M.D., Shannon L. Puhalla, M.D., Nancy E. Davidson, M.D., Steffi Oesterreich, Ph.D., and Adam M. Brufsky, M.D., Ph.D., all of UPCI; Ryan J. Hartmaier, Ph.D., and Juliann Chmielecki, Ph.D., both of the Foundation Medicine, Cambridge, Massachusetts; Damir Vareslija, Ph.D., and Leonie Young, Ph.D., both of the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland; and Jose P. Leone, M.D., of the University of Iowa. This research was supported by the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, National Cancer Institute grant P30CA047904, Fashion Footwear Association of New York, the Shear Family Foundation, Magee-Womens Research Institute and Foundation, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, National Institute of General Medical Sciences grants 2T32GM008424-21 and 5F30CA203095, and the Irish Cancer Society Collaborative Cancer Research Centre grant CCRC13GAL. Several of the authors disclosed conflicts of interest, which can be viewed on the JAMA Oncology publication. As the only NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center in western Pennsylvania, UPCI is a recognized leader in providing innovative cancer prevention, detection, diagnosis, and treatment; bio-medical research; compassionate patient care and support; and community-based outreach services. Investigators at UPCI, a partner with UPMC CancerCenter, are world-renowned for their work in clinical and basic cancer research.


Lopes C.T.,Federal University of São Paulo | Lopes C.T.,University of Sao Paulo | Brunori E.F.R.,Dante Pazzanese Institute of Cardiology | Cavalcante A.M.R.Z.,Federal University of São Paulo | And 4 more authors.
Heart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care | Year: 2016

Objective: To identify factors associated with excessive bleeding (ExB) after cardiac surgery in adults. Background: Excessive bleeding after cardiac surgery must be anticipated for implementation of timely interventions. Methods: A prospective cohort study with 323 adults requiring open-chest cardiac surgery. Potential factors associated with ExB were investigated through univariate analysis and logistic regression. The accuracy of the relationship between the independent variables and the outcome was depicted through the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Results: The factors associated with ExB included gender, body mass index (BMI), preoperative platelet count, intraoperative heparin doses and intraoperative platelet transfusion. The ROC curve cut-off points were 26.35 for the BMI; 214,000 for the preoperative platelet count, and 6.25 for intraoperative heparin dose. This model had an accuracy = 77.3%, a sensitivity = 81%, and a specificity = 62%. Conclusions: Male gender, BMI, preoperative platelet count, dose of intraoperative heparin >312.5 mg without subsequent platelet transfusion, are factors associated with ExB. © 2016 Elsevier Inc.


Martinez A.,University of Iowa | Spak S.N.,University of Iowa | Spak S.N.,The University of Iowa | Petrich N.T.,University of Iowa | And 3 more authors.
Atmospheric Environment | Year: 2015

Indiana Harbor and Ship Canal (IHSC) in East Chicago is an industrial waterway on Lake Michigan and a source of PCBs to Lake Michigan and the overlying air. We hypothesized that IHSC is an important source of airborne PCBs to surrounding communities. We used AERMOD to model hourly PCB concentrations, utilizing emission fluxes from a prior study and hourly meteorology provided by the State of Indiana. We also assessed dispersion using hourly observed meteorology from a local airport and high resolution profiles simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting model. We found that emissions from IHSC waters contributed about 15% of the observed ∑PCB concentrations close to IHSC when compared on an hourly basis and about 10% of observed annual concentrations at a nearby school. Concentrations at the school due to emissions from IHSC ranged from 0 to 18,000 pg m- 3, up to 20 times higher than observed background levels, with an annual geometric mean (GSD) of 19 (31) pg m- 3. Our findings indicate that IHSC is an important source of PCBs to East Chicago, but not the only source. Four observed enriched PCB3 samples suggest a nearby non-Aroclor source. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | The University of Iowa and University of Iowa
Type: | Journal: Computerized medical imaging and graphics : the official journal of the Computerized Medical Imaging Society | Year: 2016

The internal limiting membrane (ILM) separates the retina and optic nerve head (ONH) from the vitreous. In the optical coherence tomography volumes of glaucoma patients, while current approaches for the segmentation of the ILM in the peripapillary and macular regions are considered robust, current approaches commonly produce ILM segmentation errors at the ONH due to the presence of blood vessels and/or characteristic glaucomatous deep cupping. Because a precise segmentation of the ILM surface at the ONH is required for computing several newer structural measurements including Bruchs membrane opening-minimum rim width (BMO-MRW) and cup volume, in this study, we propose a multimodal multiresolution graph-based method to precisely segment the ILM surface within ONH-centered spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) volumes. In particular, the gradient vector flow (GVF) field, which is computed from a multiresolution initial segmentation, is employed for calculating a set of non-overlapping GVF-based columns perpendicular to the initial segmentation. The GVF columns are utilized to resample the volume and also serve as the columns to the graph construction. The ILM surface in the resampled volume is fairly smooth and does not contain the steep slopes. This prior shape knowledge along with the blood vessel information, obtained from registered fundus photographs, are incorporated in a graph-theoretic approach in order to identify the location of the ILM surface. The proposed method is tested on the SD-OCT volumes of 44 subjects with various stages of glaucoma and significantly smaller segmentation errors were obtained than that of current approaches.


PubMed | National Cheng Kung University, The University of Iowa and University of Iowa
Type: | Journal: Computer methods and programs in biomedicine | Year: 2016

Faster and more accurate methods for registration of images are important for research involved in conducting population-based studies that utilize medical imaging, as well as improvements for use in clinical applications. We present a novel computation- and memory-efficient multi-level method on graphics processing units (GPU) for performing registration of two computed tomography (CT) volumetric lung images.We developed a computation- and memory-efficient Diffeomorphic Multi-level B-Spline Transform Composite (DMTC) method to implement nonrigid mass-preserving registration of two CT lung images on GPU. The framework consists of a hierarchy of B-Spline control grids of increasing resolution. A similarity criterion known as the sum of squared tissue volume difference (SSTVD) was adopted to preserve lung tissue mass. The use of SSTVD consists of the calculation of the tissue volume, the Jacobian, and their derivatives, which makes its implementation on GPU challenging due to memory constraints. The use of the DMTC method enabled reduced computation and memory storage of variables with minimal communication between GPU and Central Processing Unit (CPU) due to ability to pre-compute values. The method was assessed on six healthy human subjects.Resultant GPU-generated displacement fields were compared against the previously validated CPU counterpart fields, showing good agreement with an average normalized root mean square error (nRMS) of 0.0440.015. Runtime and performance speedup are compared between single-threaded CPU, multi-threaded CPU, and GPU algorithms. Best performance speedup occurs at the highest resolution in the GPU implementation for the SSTVD cost and cost gradient computations, with a speedup of 112 times that of the single-threaded CPU version and 11 times over the twelve-threaded version when considering average time per iteration using a Nvidia Tesla K20X GPU.The proposed GPU-based DMTC method outperforms its multi-threaded CPU version in terms of runtime. Total registration time reduced runtime to 2.9min on the GPU version, compared to 12.8min on twelve-threaded CPU version and 112.5min on a single-threaded CPU. Furthermore, the GPU implementation discussed in this work can be adapted for use of other cost functions that require calculation of the first derivatives.


PubMed | The University of Iowa
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Current opinion in clinical nutrition and metabolic care | Year: 2015

Here, we discuss a recently developed experimental strategy for discovering small molecules with potential to prevent and treat skeletal muscle atrophy.Muscle atrophy involves and requires widespread changes in skeletal muscle gene expression, which generate complex but measurable patterns of positive and negative changes in skeletal muscle mRNA levels (a.k.a. mRNA expression signatures of muscle atrophy). Many bioactive small molecules generate their own characteristic mRNA expression signatures, and by identifying small molecules whose signatures approximate mirror images of muscle atrophy signatures, one may identify small molecules with potential to prevent and/or reverse muscle atrophy. Unlike a conventional drug discovery approach, this strategy does not rely on a predefined molecular target but rather exploits the complexity of muscle atrophy to identify small molecules that counter the entire spectrum of pathological changes in atrophic muscle. We discuss how this strategy has been used to identify two natural compounds, ursolic acid and tomatidine, that reduce muscle atrophy and improve skeletal muscle function.Discovery strategies based on mRNA expression signatures can elucidate new approaches for preserving and restoring muscle mass and function.


PubMed | The University of Iowa
Type: | Journal: Medical image analysis | Year: 2016

Clinical acceptance of 3-D OCT retinal imaging brought rapid development of quantitative 3-D analysis of retinal layers, vasculature, retinal lesions as well as facilitated new research in retinal diseases. One of the cornerstones of many such analyses is segmentation and thickness quantification of retinal layers and the choroid, with an inherently 3-D simultaneous multi-layer LOGISMOS (Layered Optimal Graph Image Segmentation for Multiple Objects and Surfaces) segmentation approach being extremely well suited for the task. Once retinal layers are segmented, regional thickness, brightness, or texture-based indices of individual layers can be easily determined and thus contribute to our understanding of retinal or optic nerve head (ONH) disease processes and can be employed for determination of disease status, treatment responses, visual function, etc. Out of many applications, examples provided in this paper focus on image-guided therapy and outcome prediction in age-related macular degeneration and on assessing visual function from retinal layer structure in glaucoma.


PubMed | The University of Iowa
Type: | Journal: Progress in retinal and eye research | Year: 2015

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common and devastating disease that can result in severe visual dysfunction. Over the last decade, great progress has been made in identifying genetic variants that contribute to AMD, many of which lie in genes involved in the complement cascade. In this review we discuss the significance of complement activation in AMD, particularly with respect to the formation of the membrane attack complex in the aging choriocapillaris. We review the clinical, histological and biochemical data that indicate that vascular loss in the choroid occurs very early in the pathogenesis of AMD, and discuss the potential impact of vascular dropout on the retinal pigment epithelium, Bruchs membrane and the photoreceptor cells. Finally, we present a hypothesis for the pathogenesis of early AMD and consider the implications of this model on the development of new therapies.


PubMed | The University of Iowa and University of Iowa
Type: | Journal: Chemosphere | Year: 2016

Hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls (OH-PCBs) have been detected in human specimens and some are suspected as being more toxic than their parent compounds. We compared 58 OH-PCB congeners (in 51 chromatographic peaks) in serum samples from participants in the AESOP Study, a longitudinal cohort study of adolescents and their mothers living in urban and rural areas in the United States. We hypothesized that adolescents would have lower levels of OH-PCBs than their mothers and that serum concentration of OH-PCBs would be stable over a 3-year period. We found statistically significant differences in total OH-PCBs between age groups in both East Chicago (p = 0.001) and Columbus Junction (p < 0.001), with adolescents having lower concentrations than their mothers. We observed that lower-chlorinated OH-PCBs were rarely detected, suggesting that they are not retained in serum and/or rapidly biotransformed into other forms. Twelve OH-PCBs, including several that are rarely reported (4,4-diOH-PCB 202, 4-OH-PCB 208, and 4-OH-PCB 163) were detected in over 60% of participants. Lastly, from repeated measures within subject serum for three OH-PCBs, concentrations of 4-OH-PCB 107 and 4-OH-PCB 187 changed significantly over three years of the study.


PubMed | The University of Iowa and University of Iowa
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Toxicology in vitro : an international journal published in association with BIBRA | Year: 2014

Emerging evidence indicates that persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), are involved in the development of diabetes. Dysfunctional adipocytes play a significant role in initiating insulin resistance. Preadipocytes make up a large portion of adipose tissue and are necessary for the generation of functional mature adipocytes through adipogenesis. PCB126 is a dioxin-like PCB and a potent aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist. We hypothesized that PCB126 may be involved in the development of diabetes through disruption of adipogenesis. Using a newly developed human preadipocyte cell line called NPAD (Normal PreADipocytes), we found that exposure of preadipocytes to PCB126 resulted in significant reduction in their subsequent ability to fully differentiate into adipocytes, more so than when the cells were exposed to PCB126 during differentiation. Reduction in differentiation by PCB126 was associated with downregulation of transcript levels of a key adipocyte transcription factor, PPAR, and late adipocyte differentiation genes. An AhR antagonist, CH223191, blocked this effect. These studies indicate that preadipocytes are particularly sensitive to the effects of PCB126 and suggest that AhR activation inhibits PPAR transcription and subsequent adipogenesis. Our results validate the NPAD cell line as a useful model for studying the effects of POPs on adipogenesis.


News Article | December 20, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Scientists have used systems biology tools to map out molecular pathways and signaling circuits that come into play when the immune system acts against infections and cancer. Important immune cells, called CD8+ T cells, play a pivotal role in immune response, but their gene regulatory circuits are not well understood. Researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Iowa used sophisticated sequencing and computational techniques to investigate the molecular mechanisms during each stage of the CD8+ T cells' responses. By identifying novel biological pathways and publishing details of these interactions, the study team aims to help uncover useful targets in developing better vaccines and cancer treatments. "We have revealed novel components and connections in the regulatory network underlying how these T cells mount an immune response," said study co-leader Kai Tan, PhD, of the Center for Childhood Cancer Research and the Departments of Pediatrics and Biomedical and Health Informatics at CHOP. "We found highly dynamic processes as these cells develop. In addition to adding to our knowledge of cell biology, these findings may help advance vaccine development and cancer immunotherapy." Tan and colleagues at CHOP co-authored the study with a team led by Hai-Hui Xue, MD, PhD, of the Carver College of Medicine at the University of Iowa. The research appeared online Dec. 13 in Immunity and in print today. The researchers investigated how CD8+ T cells in laboratory mice respond to infections. In mice, humans and other mammals, those cells begin in a naïve pre-infected state, but after encountering an antigen, differentiate into large quantities of effector cells to clear an infection. After the infection, cell numbers diminish, but central memory T cells retain a long-term ability to defend against reinfection by microorganisms that carry the same antigen. The three stages of CD8+ T cell development are well known, but the current study identifies a detailed map of the regulatory circuitry, such as interactions between enhancers and promoters--genetic regulatory regions that function together in driving genes to transcribe proteins to carry out biological processes. Using bioinformatics tools to identify and map out specific components and regulatory interconnections, the study team found highly dynamic activities during CD8+ T cell responses: a distinct repertoire of super enhancers -- groups of enhancers that interact with promoters to drive gene transcription, new groups of enhancers that jump into activity only in the memory cell stage, and extensive re-wiring of regulatory circuits from one cell stage to another. "Better understanding of these mechanisms is important because increasing the quantity and quality of memory CD8+ T cells is a key goal in developing more effective vaccines and immunotherapeutic strategies," said Tan. "In addition, although many shared properties exist between infection and cancer, future studies identifying distinct regulatory wiring in cancer-infiltrating T cells are essential for the continued progress of cancer immunotherapy." The researchers created a website to hold datasets resulting from this study, including a "roadmap" of methods for extracting useful clues for further study by other researchers. "We expect this resource will suggest novel targets for researchers in immunology and oncology," said Tan. He added that the immediate next step is to perform experimental testing and refining of the circuit models from this study. Primary support for this study came from the National Institutes of Health (grant AI115149), with additional support from 10 other NIH grants to various co-authors. The co-first authors are Bing He, PhD, from CHOP, and Shaojun Xing, PhD, from the University of Iowa. Bing He et al, "CD8+M/sup> T Cells Utilize Highly Dynamic Enhancer Repertoires and Regulatory Circuitry in Response to Infections," Immunity, published online Dec. 13, 2016, in print Dec.20. http://doi. About The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia was founded in 1855 as the nation's first pediatric hospital. Through its long-standing commitment to providing exceptional patient care, training new generations of pediatric healthcare professionals, and pioneering major research initiatives, Children's Hospital has fostered many discoveries that have benefited children worldwide. Its pediatric research program is among the largest in the country. In addition, its unique family-centered care and public service programs have brought the 535-bed hospital recognition as a leading advocate for children and adolescents. For more information, visit http://www.

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