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News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.accesswire.com

MORGANTOWN, VA / ACCESSWIRE / April 20, 2017 / Majestic Oil & Gas Inc. (OTC PINK: MJOG) ("Majestic" "MJOG," or the "Company") today announced that it has appointed Lawrence S. Zeliadt as its President and Member of the Board of Directors. Majestic is pleased to announce the appointment of Lawrence S. Zeliadt as its President and Member of the Board of Directors. Lawrence Zeliadt is from Des Moines, Iowa, where he attended Grandview College and the University of Iowa. Mr. Zeliadt served honorably in the United States Army as a pilot and was the founder a successful air charter company. Mr. Zeliadt is a seasoned executive and understands business at the highest levels. His philosophy and business acumen make him well suited to contribute to overall corporate governance. Mr. Zeliadt commented, "I am excited to be on the MJOG team and help lead the company in a new direction. It appears our future is bright and I am anxious to move forward helping to create shareholder value by implementing some major changes within the company." Lawrence will be replacing Phillip Malkemes as President and member of the Board of Directors. Mr. Malkemes will remain as marketing director and advisor. Except for historical information contained herein, the matters set forth above may include forward-looking statements that involve certain risks and uncertainties. Words such as "may," "could," "anticipate," "believe," "estimate," "expect," "intend," "plan," and similar expressions are used to identify forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are based on the current beliefs of management, as well as assumptions made by and information currently available to management. Actual results could differ materially from those contemplated by the forward-looking statements. Majestic does not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statements and cautions investors to consider all other risks and uncertainties, including those disclosed in Majestic’s filings with OTC Markets.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Donald Trump has reportedly appointed to a position overseeing the US’s family planning safety net a law professor who once stated that “contraception doesn’t work” and “family planning is something that occurs between a husband and a wife and God, and it doesn’t really involve the federal government.” The prospect of Teresa Manning becoming deputy assistant secretary for population affairs at the Department of Health and Human Services, first reported by PoliticoPro, has led reproductive rights activists to demand that Trump withdraw the appointment, saying his choice could jeopardize the federal program responsible for preventing millions of unplanned pregnancies, and by extension, abortions. Manning’s appointment would give her oversight of Title X, a quarter-of-a-billion-dollar federal program that provides contraceptive services to low-income and uninsured women and men, and a hand in guiding the federal government’s policy toward teen pregnancy, family planning, and pregnancy prevention. “Teresa Manning’s appointment is unacceptable,” said Dawn Laguens, Planned Parenthood’s executive vice-president. “This is the fox guarding the hen house, and women with low incomes will pay the price. We are at the lowest rate of unintended pregnancy in 30 years and a historic low for teen pregnancy because of access to birth control. Someone who promotes myths about birth control and reproductive care should not be in charge of the office that is responsible for family planning at HHS.” Manning is an adjunct law professor teaching legal research and writing at George Mason University. She previously worked with the National Right to Life Committee, an anti-abortion group, and the Family Research Council, an arch-conservative lobbying group known for its virulent opposition to LGBT rights. Manning once sued the University of Iowa law school for passing her over for a professorship, claiming the dean of the law school had discriminated on the basis of her political views. (The school claimed that Manning didn’t offer to fulfill all of the job’s requirements.) The administration has not publicly confirmed Manning’s appointment, but PoliticoPro reports that she already appears in the agency’s directory. Manning made her comments on contraception and family planning during a 2003 media tour to promote a book she had edited about the future of the anti-abortion movement. “I always shake my head,” she told C-Span, explaining her views on family planning. “You know, family planning is something that occurs between a husband and a wife and God, and it doesn’t really involve the federal government, much less the United Nations, where we hear about family planning all the time. What are they doing in that business?” In an interview with Boston’s NPR affiliate, Manning, who at the time went by Teresa Wagner, claimed that “contraception doesn’t work”. “Its efficacy is very low,” she said, “especially when you consider over years – which, a lot of contraception health advocates want to start women in their adolescent years, when they’re extremely fertile, incidentally, and continue for 10, 20, 30 years. The prospect that contraception would always prevent the conception of a child is preposterous.” In fact, many types of contraception, particularly IUDs and other implants designed to stay in the body for long periods of time, have a nearly 100% success rate at preventing pregnancy. The federal family planning program which Manning will oversee has provided thousands of such devices to US women. In 2014, Title X provided contraceptive drugs, devices, and counseling for nearly 4 million women who rely on the public safety net for their family planning needs. The same year, the program prevented nearly 1 million unintended pregnancies and more than 300,000 abortions.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

MORGANTOWN, VA / ACCESSWIRE / April 20, 2017 / Majestic Oil & Gas Inc. (OTC PINK: MJOG) ("Majestic" "MJOG," or the "Company") today announced that it has appointed Lawrence S. Zeliadt as its President and Member of the Board of Directors. Majestic is pleased to announce the appointment of Lawrence S. Zeliadt as its President and Member of the Board of Directors. Lawrence Zeliadt is from Des Moines, Iowa, where he attended Grandview College and the University of Iowa. Mr. Zeliadt served honorably in the United States Army as a pilot and was the founder a successful air charter company. Mr. Zeliadt is a seasoned executive and understands business at the highest levels. His philosophy and business acumen make him well suited to contribute to overall corporate governance. Mr. Zeliadt commented, "I am excited to be on the MJOG team and help lead the company in a new direction. It appears our future is bright and I am anxious to move forward helping to create shareholder value by implementing some major changes within the company." Lawrence will be replacing Phillip Malkemes as President and member of the Board of Directors. Mr. Malkemes will remain as marketing director and advisor. Except for historical information contained herein, the matters set forth above may include forward-looking statements that involve certain risks and uncertainties. Words such as "may," "could," "anticipate," "believe," "estimate," "expect," "intend," "plan," and similar expressions are used to identify forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are based on the current beliefs of management, as well as assumptions made by and information currently available to management. Actual results could differ materially from those contemplated by the forward-looking statements. Majestic does not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statements and cautions investors to consider all other risks and uncertainties, including those disclosed in Majestic’s filings with OTC Markets. MORGANTOWN, VA / ACCESSWIRE / April 20, 2017 / Majestic Oil & Gas Inc. (OTC PINK: MJOG) ("Majestic" "MJOG," or the "Company") today announced that it has appointed Lawrence S. Zeliadt as its President and Member of the Board of Directors. Majestic is pleased to announce the appointment of Lawrence S. Zeliadt as its President and Member of the Board of Directors. Lawrence Zeliadt is from Des Moines, Iowa, where he attended Grandview College and the University of Iowa. Mr. Zeliadt served honorably in the United States Army as a pilot and was the founder a successful air charter company. Mr. Zeliadt is a seasoned executive and understands business at the highest levels. His philosophy and business acumen make him well suited to contribute to overall corporate governance. Mr. Zeliadt commented, "I am excited to be on the MJOG team and help lead the company in a new direction. It appears our future is bright and I am anxious to move forward helping to create shareholder value by implementing some major changes within the company." Lawrence will be replacing Phillip Malkemes as President and member of the Board of Directors. Mr. Malkemes will remain as marketing director and advisor. Except for historical information contained herein, the matters set forth above may include forward-looking statements that involve certain risks and uncertainties. Words such as "may," "could," "anticipate," "believe," "estimate," "expect," "intend," "plan," and similar expressions are used to identify forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are based on the current beliefs of management, as well as assumptions made by and information currently available to management. Actual results could differ materially from those contemplated by the forward-looking statements. Majestic does not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statements and cautions investors to consider all other risks and uncertainties, including those disclosed in Majestic’s filings with OTC Markets.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

VIDEO:  New research shows children may struggle when crossing a busy road. Two reasons are perceptual judgment and motor skills, which were identified in a series of tests in which children... view more For adults, crossing the street by foot seems easy. You take stock of the traffic and calculate the time it will take to get from one side to the other without being hit. Yet it's anything but simple for a child. New research from the University of Iowa shows children under certain ages lack the perceptual judgment and motor skills to cross a busy road consistently without putting themselves in danger. The researchers placed children from 6 to 14 years old in a realistic simulated environment (see video) and asked them to cross one lane of a busy road multiple times. The results: Children up to their early teenage years had difficulty consistently crossing the street safely, with accident rates as high as 8 percent with 6-year-olds. Only by age 14 did children navigate street crossing without incident, while 12-year-olds mostly compensated for inferior road-crossing motor skills by choosing bigger gaps in traffic. "Some people think younger children may be able to perform like adults when crossing the street," says Jodie Plumert, professor in the UI's Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. "Our study shows that's not necessarily the case on busy roads where traffic doesn't stop." For parents, that means taking extra precautions. Be aware that your child may struggle with identifying gaps in traffic large enough to cross safely. Young children also may not have developed the fine motor skills to step into the street the moment a car has passed, like adults have mastered. And, your child may allow eagerness to outweigh reason when judging the best time to cross a busy street. "They get the pressure of not wanting to wait combined with these less-mature abilities," says Plumert, corresponding author on the study, which appears in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, published by the American Psychological Association. "And that's what makes it a risky situation." The National Center for Statistics and Analysis reported 8,000 injuries and 207 fatalities involving motor vehicles and pedestrians age 14 and younger in 2014. Plumert and her team wanted to understand the reasons behind the accident rates. For the study, they recruited children who were 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 years old, as well as a control group of adults. Each participant faced a string of approaching virtual vehicles travelling 25 mph (considered a benchmark speed for a residential neighborhood) and then crossed a single lane of traffic (about nine feet wide). The time between vehicles ranged from two to five seconds. Each participant negotiated a road crossing 20 times, for about 2,000 total trips involving the age groups. The crossings took place in an immersive, 3-D interactive space at the Hank Virtual Environments Lab on the UI campus. The simulated environment is "very compelling," says Elizabeth O'Neal, a graduate student in psychological and brain sciences and the study's first author. "We often had kids reach out and try to touch the cars." The researchers found 6-year-olds were struck by vehicles 8 percent of the time; 8-year-olds were struck 6 percent; 10-year-olds were struck 5 percent; and 12-year-olds were struck 2 percent. Those age 14 and older had no accidents. Children contend with two main variables when deciding whether it's safe to cross a street, according to the research. The first involves their perceptual ability, or how they judge the gap between a passing car and an oncoming vehicle, taking into account the oncoming car's speed and distance from the crossing. Younger children, the study found, had more difficulty making consistently accurate perceptual decisions. The second variable was their motor skills: How quickly do children time their step from the curb into the street after a car just passed? Younger children were incapable of timing that first step as precisely as adults, which in effect gave them less time to cross the street before the next car arrived. "Most kids choose similar size gaps (between the passing car and oncoming vehicle) as adults," O'Neal says, "but they're not able to time their movement into traffic as well as adults can." The researchers found children as young as 6 crossed the street as quickly as adults, eliminating crossing speed as a possible cause for pedestrian-vehicle collisions. So what's a child to do? One recommendation is for parents to teach their children to be patient and to encourage younger ones to choose gaps that are even larger than the gaps adults would choose for themselves, O'Neal says. Also, civic planners can help by identifying places where children are likely to cross streets and make sure those intersections have a pedestrian-crossing aid. "If there are places where kids are highly likely to cross the road, because it's the most efficient route to school, for example, and traffic doesn't stop there, it would be wise to have crosswalks," Plumert says. Yuanyuan Jiang, Luke Franzen, Pooya Rahimian, all graduate students in the UI's Department of Computer Science, and Joseph Kearney, computer science professor, are contributing authors. Paul Yon, who earned a master's degree at the UI, also contributed to the study. The U.S. National Science Foundation funded the work through grant awards BCS-1251694 and CNS-1305131.


Cancer is a huge obstacle and challenge in the medical world and numerous studies have been done in order to find ways to cure or treat the deadly disease. Some researchers focus on developing drugs that would help patients cope with the harsh effects of chemotherapy, while others look into natural treatments. Tech Times reported on March 24 that a doctor stumbled upon a cure for sepsis and the key is vitamin C. We also reported on March 27 that researchers from the University of Salford Manchester tested different natural substances on cancer stem cells and found that vitamin C seems the most promising in obliterating them. Now a team of researchers from the University of Iowa released the results of their clinical trials and it backs up the vitamin C claim. A team of researchers from the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Iowa looked into the effect of vitamin C in cancer cells, specifically, brain cancer glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The trials tested the idea that a regular high dose of vitamin C is a safe and effective anti-cancer agent when combined with chemotherapy and other radiation treatments. The researchers also focused on two specific forms of cancer that have the least improvement in terms of treatment. "These two diseases really haven't had a significant improvement in outcomes for two or three decades," study author and UI assistant professor of radiation oncology Bryan Allen said. There's a saying that anything in excess is bad for the body, but it seems the human body makes an exception when it comes to fighting cancer. This is because the dosage of vitamin C that is delivered intravenously is actually 1,000 times higher than the concentration a healthy person has in their blood stream, which is about 70 micromolar. How so? The target is to get the cancer patient's blood to have up to 20,000 micromolar of vitamin C. What happens is that the high concentration of vitamin C messes up the cancer cell metabolism by disrupting the iron levels in the cells. This, in turn, causes excess iron to react to the vitamin C and generate free radicals that can weaken and kill DNA. When this happens, the chemotherapy and radiation can easily kill the cancer cells. The best part is that the trials showed no serious side effects to the patients who participated and there was also an overall increase in the survival rate. The research, titled "O2⋅- and H2O2-Mediated Disruption of Fe Metabolism Causes the Differential Susceptibility of NSCLC and GBM Cancer Cells to Pharmacological Ascorbate," was published in the journal Cancer Cell on March 30. It contains the results of the first phase of the clinical trials, as well as a small portion of the Phase II results. "Results look promising but we're not going to know if this approach really improves therapy response until we complete these phase II trials," Allen said. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

DELRAY BEACH, Fla.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Progeny Genetics LLC (Progeny), a leading risk modeling pedigree software for clinicians, announced today that Jamie L’Heureux, MS, CGC has been appointed to the role of Chief Executive Officer. For 20 years, Progeny has assisted healthcare providers with patient screening, risk analysis, order processing, clinical review, and letter generation. Ms. L’Heureux brings over 12 years of experience in both research and clinical genetics as a Board Certified genetic counselor. She received her Master’s degree in Medical Genetics from the University of Cincinnati’s Genetic Counseling Training Program and began her career at the University of Iowa as a Research Coordinator for several international research projects. Ms. L’Heureux’s strong background in software development includes implementing new laboratory information management systems and designing patient-facing Family History Questionnaires. For the past three years, Ms. L’Heureux served as Software Product Manager at Progeny, and was integral to development of Progeny’s letter generation feature and integrated risk models. “I am excited to be able to use my past experience as a Progeny user, both in the research and clinical genetic counseling settings, to help build upon the strong foundation that Progeny already has established, and make it even more user-friendly for our healthcare provider customers and their patients,” said Ms. L’Heureux. “We have some exciting improvements coming up that are focused on saving clinicians’ time and simplifying their workflow.” As a prominent member of the Progeny leadership team, Ms. L’Heureux helps guide the future of the company by leveraging her extensive experience as a genetic counselor. In addition, her software development knowledge provides a solid foundation for Ms. L’Heureux to harness the needs of Progeny’s healthcare provider clientele. Progeny’s software is available in over 2,400 unique sites in 80 countries worldwide. Progeny has played a prominent role in advancing science by bringing family history to the forefront of genetic healthcare, with the intention that the information provided to healthcare providers will assist them with early detection and intervention to patients with genetic predispositions. Progeny became a subsidiary of Ambry Genetics (Ambry), a genetic testing company based in Aliso Viejo, California, in April 2015. Progeny’s software helps healthcare providers analyze hereditary family history data so clinicians can effectively identify genetic risk factors in patients and their families. For more information about Progeny’s services and support, visit here. Progeny is a subsidiary of Ambry Genetics, providing customizable family history, pedigree, sample, and genetic data management software solutions to healthcare providers worldwide. Using Progeny’s sophisticated technology, healthcare providers can collect family history from patients, review and edit pedigrees, run integrated risk models, order and review genetic testing, and integrate into the electronic medical record, allowing healthcare providers to embrace personalized healthcare like never before. For more information about Progeny, visit www.progenygenetics.com. Ambry Genetics is both College of American Pathologists (CAP)-accredited and Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified. Ambry leads in clinical genetic diagnostics and genetics software solutions, combining both to offer the most comprehensive testing menu in the industry. Ambry has established a reputation for sharing data while safeguarding patient privacy, unparalleled service, and responsibly applying new technologies to the clinical molecular diagnostics market. For more information about Ambry Genetics, visit www.ambrygen.com.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

IMAGE:  The Penn-led research team characterized the underlying mechanism that leads to the blinding Best disease; a loss of the microvilli that support and "feed " photoreceptor cells. The contrast can be... view more Named for Friedrich Best, who characterized the disease in 1905, Best disease, also known as vitelliform macular dystrophy, affects children and young adults and can cause severe declines in central vision as patients age. The disease is one in a group of conditions known as bestrophinopathies, all linked to mutations in the BEST1 gene. This gene is expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium, or RPE, a layer of cells that undergirds and nourishes photoreceptor cells, the rods and cones responsible for vision. Despite the century of work on bestrophinopathies and the identification of genetic mutations responsible for the conditions, no one had identified the underlying mechanism that led to the vision loss seen in Best disease until now. Using an animal model of Best disease in combination with biochemical and optical assays, a team of researchers at the University of Pennsylvania has pinpointed a number of abnormalities that give rise to the impairments seen in the disease. "The genetic cause of the disease has been known for 20 years, but no one had samples of patients at the stage when the disease starts," said Karina E. Guziewicz, research assistant professor of ophthalmology in Penn's School of Veterinary Medicine and lead author on the study. But "we were now able to pinpoint this early stage and find out what factors trigger the development of lesions." The new information sets the team up for testing a gene therapy to treat the disease, as the researchers will be able to observe whether or not these structural and biochemical abnormalities have been corrected. "Now that we understand what we're seeing, it allows us to judge the success of a particular therapy," said Gustavo D. Aguirre, professor of medical genetics and ophthalmology at Penn Vet. Kathleen Boesze-Battaglia, a professor in the Department of Biochemistry in Penn's School of Dental Medicine, also contributed her expertise in lipid biochemistry and spectral analysis of lipid debris to the study, which was published in the journal Progress in Retinal and Eye Research, the top ranked journal in the eye-research field. "Interestingly, the lipid debris accumulation is similar to cholesterol rich plaque formation, compounded by a complexity of vitamin A metabolism," said Boesze-Battaglia. "Alterations in lipid metabolism likely contribute to the secondary disease pathology in this model." The main puzzle surrounding Best disease was why, despite the BEST1 gene being mutated in the RPE throughout the retina, vision loss struck the macula and fovea, the central areas of the retina responsible for reading and tasks requiring high-resolution vision, while seeming to spare the rest. Researchers had observed lesions in this area, but it was unknown why they developed. In this study, the Penn-led team discovered that this predilection of the macula to develop lesions has to do with differences in the supporting structures of rods versus cones. Rods, which make up more than 90 percent of photoreceptor cells in the retina and are responsible for dim-light vision, have a cluster of supporting structures known as RPE microvilli that cup the cell like stakes holding up a plant. In contrast, cones, the color-sensing photoreceptors that make up 3 to 5 percent of all photoreceptors but are overrepresented in the macula, are engulfed in a sheath of microvilli. In addition, cones are supported by an insoluble matrix. Examining cross-sections of the fovea-like region in the canine macula of dogs affected with the canine equivalent of Best disease, the researchers found that the microvilli don't form and that the matrix is fragmented. The susceptibility of the macula is due to the fact that cones are the predominant cell type there and rely on the matrix for support and nutrient exchange. "We were not expecting to find such dramatic structural abnormalities," Guziewicz said. "For a hundred years, this has been thought to be a disease of the RPE, but we have now identified this as a disease of the RPE-photoreceptor interface." "The RPE provides transport of nutrients to the cones and engulfs the discarded part of cones and rods," said Aguirre. "When you lose the matrix, you lose the connection between those cells and the RPE and that leads to disease." To determine if the same would be true in humans, the researchers looked at human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived RPE from Best disease patients and found similar signatures: microvilli numbers were decreased in length and density. These experiments were conducted in collaboration with David Gamm's laboratory from the McPherson Eye Research Institute at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Looking ahead, the research team would like to continue to probe the biochemical signals that lead to the improper development of the microvilli and matrix and push ahead with developing and testing a gene-therapy approach to treating bestrophinopathies. "Knowing where the disruptions occur will allow us to develop proper outcome measures for a gene therapy, which is in the works," said Guziewicz. The paper's other authors were Penn Dental Medicine's Néstor M. Gómez and Anuradha Dhingra, Penn Vet's Kathryn Zorych and Emily V. Dutrow, the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Divya Sinha and David Gamm and the University of Iowa's Robert F. Mullins and Edwin M. Stone. The research was supported in part by the Foundation Fighting Blindness, the Macula Vision Research Foundation, the National Eye Institute, Research to Prevent Blindness, the Retina Research Foundation, the Van Sloun Fund for Canine Genetic Research and Hope for Vision.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.bbc.co.uk

Small traces of the world's most widely used insecticides have been detected in tap water for the first time. Samples taken by scientists in the US state of Iowa showed that levels of neonicotinoid chemicals remained constant despite treatment. However drinking water treated using a different method of filtration showed big reductions in neonic levels. Scientists say they cannot draw any conclusions relating to human health but argue that further study is needed. The use of neonicotinoids has increased rapidly since their introduction in the early 1990s. These systemic chemicals were seen as an advance because they are usually applied as a seed coating and are lethal to insects but not to other species. In the US, sales of seeds pre-treated with neonics tripled from 2004 to 2014. However concerns over their environmental impacts have also grown and they have been consistently associated with causing harm to bees. So great has the worry been, that there has been a moratorium on their use on flowering crops in the European Union since 2013. A study in 2015 from the US Geological Survey (USGS) found that neonics were widespread in water samples collected from 48 different rivers and streams in the US. This new study from the USGS and the University of Iowa, looked at tap water that was treated in two different filtration systems. Samples from the University of Iowa treatment plant barely removed any of the three main neonic chemicals, clothianidin, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam. Water taken from the Iowa City treatment facility removed 100%, 94% and 85% respectively, of these substances. Drinking water from the less effective system had 0.24 to 57.3 nanograms of individual neonicotinoids per litre. "These are very low levels, these are nanograms per litre which means parts per trillion, a very low concentration," said Prof Gregory LeFevre, one of the authors from the University of Iowa. "But at the same time there are concerns about what those low levels might do from an exposure standpoint." In the US, the Environmental Protection Agency regulates contaminants in water but as of now, neonics are not considered a threat. "At this point in time, these results don't indicate any violation of the system, we are trying to bring these contaminants to light more than saying this is or isn't a safe level," Prof LeFevre told BBC News. One of the issues of concern is not the direct exposure of humans to neonics in water, but how the insecticides might be transformed by the filtration process into other substances that pose a greater threat. "Based on some of the literature that has been published, the nitro group has the potential to be removed in the filtration processes and that is the group that confers the selectivity to insects," said lead author Kathryn Klarich from the University of Iowa. "If that were the case that could be a concern," she told BBC News. However the study also presents evidence that the presence of neonics in drinking water can be essentially negated if activated carbon filtration systems are used. "We were pleasantly surprised to see how well the activated carbon worked," said Prof LeFevre. "It is relatively economical compared to other technologies that are energy expensive. We need to do more research to understand how well these can work but it is encouraging." The authors believe that, given the scale of research looking at the impacts of neonics on bees and other creatures, it is important that further studies are carried out on drinking water to work out the levels of exposure around the world. "Without really good toxicity data it is hard to ascertain the scale of this, but whenever we have pesticides in the drinking water that is something that raises a flag no matter what type of concentration it is," said Prof LeFevre. The study has been published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters. Follow Matt on Twitter and on Facebook.


News Article | April 23, 2017
Site: scienceblogs.com

Day 1 of the meeting was as inspiring as usual. The Porter Fellow Reunion Reception took place this evening. This 50 year-old program is designed to support trainees as they conduct research projects in physiology and learn to become independent researchers. It was amazing to see so many past and present fellows and to hear about their accomplishments since receiving the award. Following the Porter reception, I moseyed on over to the Walter B. Cannon memorial lecture. This year’s recipient of the award is Dr. Michael Welsh from the University of Iowa. His lab focuses on the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis and the development of therapies for this devastating disease. Globally, cystic fibrosis affects more than 70,000 people. It is a disease caused by a faulty gene. So, instead of producing watery mucus, sweat or digestive juices, people with cystic fibrosis develop thick, sticky mucus that can block tubes and airways in the body leading to many of the complications shown below.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

A group of teenagers become unlikely heroes in an engaging new novel released by Dog Ear Publishing. “The Sun Jumpers” received a literary award from the publishing company. Idyllwild, CA, April 26, 2017 --( “The Sun Jumpers” begins 10,000 year ago as the Kishoki, cave-dwelling people, are facing extreme hardship, including starvation. Ty, a headstrong young boy, and Sita, who hopes to become the tribe’s next shaman, as well as two of their friends, Ko and Shum, set off on a quest to find a tribe that seems to be thriving. They are armed only with a spear, bone knives, their courage and powder Sita received from their shaman. But when Sita creates a potion to save them, the four friends find themselves in mountains near modern-day Los Angeles. Believing the young people to be a rap group, young filmmaker Darren brings them to his home and shares his love of movies, frozen pizza, skateboarding and the mall. Eventually the dark-skinned prehistoric youths convince him of their true nature, and Darren realizes he must help them find a way back to save their people. Will they make it back in time with a miracle or will Sita’s potion send them to another more dangerous time? Can their courage inspire Darren to stand up against his father and learn how to make his own way in the world? The book, aimed at youths 11 to 14 years old, is appropriate for readers of all ages. Its unforgettable characters and unique story led to its earning the Dog Ear Publishing Award of Literary Excellence. The publishing company’s editorial team determines award winners, with the managing editor, editorial services manager and publisher reviewing recommendations. Winning books include the award logo on their covers. The author, who has been writing all his life, has published two of the four or five novels he has written, and he’s written screenplays for film and television and directed theater, television and movies. Luber has a BA from Ripon College, attended graduate school at the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop and is a graduate Fellow of the American Film Institute in writing and directing. Luber also wrote “Everybody’s Shadow,” a book of poetry. His first novel, “Match to the Heart,” is available on Amazon.com, e-platforms, and bookstores. He is working on a new novel, “Falling From the Sky,” and is working with a composer on “Esperanza – the Musical of Hope.” For additional information and reviews, please visit www. thesunjumpers.com The Sun Jumpers Ken Luber Dog Ear Publishing ISBN: 978-1-4575-5046-1 296 pages $16.99. US Available at Ingram, Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble and fine bookstores everywhere. Dog Ear Publishing partners with authors to shape content that resonates with readers as diverse as the books we publish. Our mission is to leverage expertise, technology and relationships to form a meaningful and lasting bond between creators, content and culture as a whole. Dog Ear Publishing is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, and can be contacted by phone at (317) 228-3656 or through our website, www.dogearpublishing.net. Idyllwild, CA, April 26, 2017 --( PR.com )-- When four teenagers in prehistoric times set out on a vision quest, they have no idea that their lives will change forever. Ken Luber’s new book, “The Sun Jumpers,” takes its readers on a journey of discovery and adventure, interwoven with deeper themes of bigotry, relationships between parents and children, and the power of truth. It has earned the Dog Ear Publishing Award of Literary Excellence.“The Sun Jumpers” begins 10,000 year ago as the Kishoki, cave-dwelling people, are facing extreme hardship, including starvation. Ty, a headstrong young boy, and Sita, who hopes to become the tribe’s next shaman, as well as two of their friends, Ko and Shum, set off on a quest to find a tribe that seems to be thriving.They are armed only with a spear, bone knives, their courage and powder Sita received from their shaman. But when Sita creates a potion to save them, the four friends find themselves in mountains near modern-day Los Angeles.Believing the young people to be a rap group, young filmmaker Darren brings them to his home and shares his love of movies, frozen pizza, skateboarding and the mall. Eventually the dark-skinned prehistoric youths convince him of their true nature, and Darren realizes he must help them find a way back to save their people. Will they make it back in time with a miracle or will Sita’s potion send them to another more dangerous time? Can their courage inspire Darren to stand up against his father and learn how to make his own way in the world?The book, aimed at youths 11 to 14 years old, is appropriate for readers of all ages. Its unforgettable characters and unique story led to its earning the Dog Ear Publishing Award of Literary Excellence. The publishing company’s editorial team determines award winners, with the managing editor, editorial services manager and publisher reviewing recommendations. Winning books include the award logo on their covers.The author, who has been writing all his life, has published two of the four or five novels he has written, and he’s written screenplays for film and television and directed theater, television and movies. Luber has a BA from Ripon College, attended graduate school at the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop and is a graduate Fellow of the American Film Institute in writing and directing.Luber also wrote “Everybody’s Shadow,” a book of poetry. His first novel, “Match to the Heart,” is available on Amazon.com, e-platforms, and bookstores. He is working on a new novel, “Falling From the Sky,” and is working with a composer on “Esperanza – the Musical of Hope.”For additional information and reviews, please visit www. thesunjumpers.comThe Sun JumpersKen LuberDog Ear PublishingISBN: 978-1-4575-5046-1 296 pages $16.99. USAvailable at Ingram, Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble and fine bookstores everywhere.Dog Ear Publishing partners with authors to shape content that resonates with readers as diverse as the books we publish. Our mission is to leverage expertise, technology and relationships to form a meaningful and lasting bond between creators, content and culture as a whole. Dog Ear Publishing is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, and can be contacted by phone at (317) 228-3656 or through our website, www.dogearpublishing.net. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Dog Ear Publishing

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