Honolulu, HI, United States

University of Hawaii at Manoa

manoa.hawaii.edu
Honolulu, HI, United States

The University of Hawai'i at Mānoa is a public co-educational research university, and is the flagship campus of the greater University of Hawai'i system. The school is located in Mānoa, an affluent neighborhood of Honolulu, Honolulu County, Hawai'i, United States, approximately three miles east and inland from downtown Honolulu and one mile from Ala Moana and Waikiki. The campus occupies the eastern half of the mouth of Mānoa Valley. It is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges and is governed by the Hawaii State Legislature and a semi-autonomous board of regents, which in turn hires a president to be administrator. The university campus houses the main offices of the University of Hawai'i System. Wikipedia.

SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Patent
University of Hawaii at Manoa and Kineticor | Date: 2017-04-26

The disclosure herein provides methods, systems, and devices for removing prospective motion correction from medical imaging scans. In an embodiment, a computer-implemented method for removing motion correction from biomedical imaging scan data comprises tracking, by a computer system, motion of an object being scanned; generating, by the computer system, motion tracking data; adjusting, by the computer system, a biomedical imaging scanner, using the motion tracking data, to compensate in real time for object motion, such that raw image data generated by the scanner can be reconstructed into motion-corrected images; inverting, by the computer system, the motion tracking data; and applying, by the computer system, the inverted motion tracking data to the raw image data to generate de-corrected image data representative of what the scanner would produce had the scanner not compensated for motion, wherein the de- corrected image data can be reconstructed into de-corrected images, wherein the computer system comprises an electronic memory and a computer processor.


Patent
University of Hawaii at Manoa | Date: 2017-04-19

The embodiments herein are concerned with methods and hCVF compositions, including pharmaceutical formulations, useful in complement depletion, the reduction or prevention of unwanted immunogenicity or other immune-related reactions, especially as a consequence of administering a biologic therapy. Such methods and compositions have been found to be effective in complement depletion during more than one administration in the same subject, thereby being useful for prolonged/repeated use.


Patent
Cephalon Inc., University of Hawaii at Manoa and University of Utah | Date: 2016-10-14

Compounds of formula II are described: wherein D, n, R_(a), R_(b), and R_(c )are as herein defined, along with pharmaceutical compositions and methods of using compounds of formula II for treating or reducing the risk of peritoneal carcinomatosis in a patient.


Patent
Kineticor, University of Hawaii at Manoa and Albert Ludwigs University of Freiburg | Date: 2016-07-28

The systems, methods, and devices described herein generally relate to achieving accurate and robust motion correction by detecting and accounting for false movements in motion correction systems used in conjunction with medical imaging and/or therapeutic systems. In other words, in some embodiments of the systems, methods, and devices described herein can be configured to detect false movements for motion correction during a medical imaging scan and/or therapeutic procedure, and thereby ensure that such false movements are not accounted for in the motion correction process. Upon detection of false movements, the imaging or therapeutic system can be configured to transiently suppress and/or subsequently repeat acquisitions.


Patent
University of Hawaii at Manoa | Date: 2015-06-12

The embodiments herein are concerned with methods and hCVF compositions, including pharmaceutical formulations, useful in complement depletion, the reduction or prevention of unwanted immunogenicity or other immune-related reactions, especially as a consequence of administering a biologic therapy. Such methods and compositions have been found to be effective in complement depletion during more than one administration in the same subject, thereby being useful for prolonged/repeated use.


Patent
University of Hawaii at Manoa | Date: 2016-11-04

Systems and methods are disclosed for detecting a presence of a person in an area of coverage using radar. A transmitter can transmit radio signals in a first direction in an area of coverage defined by a wall and a floor. A receiver can receive the transmitted radio signals reflected back from the area of coverage. A signal conditioning circuit can process the received radio signals. One or more hardware processors can be programmed to analyze the processed radio signals and detect a presence of a person in the area of coverage based on the analysis. The analysis of the processed signals can be performed in both time and frequency domain. In addition to radar, an input from an infrared sensor can also be used in conjunction with radar based detection.


Patent
University of Hawaii at Manoa | Date: 2017-03-01

A microwave stethoscope measurement method and sensor design employ a microwave transmission sensor and a microwave reception sensor placed on a patients chest in spaced-apart side-by-side configuration for monitoring patient vital signs, lung water content and other critical measurements. The side-by- side sensors are spaced apart a separation distance of about 1-3 cm in lateral chest orientation. The sensors may be formed with a textile fabric for wearer comfort and to improve contact with the patients skin. The microwave sensor measurements are digitally processed using a modified short time Fourier Transform (STFT) spectrum windowed-averaged algorithm. Output data extracted from the microwave sensor measurements may be transmitted wirelessly to a mobile device such as a smartphone for remote monitoring of the patients medical condition.


Takahashi L.K.,University of Hawaii at Manoa
Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience | Year: 2014

When prey animals detect the odor of a predator a constellation of fear-related autonomic, endocrine, and behavioral responses rapidly occur to facilitate survival. How olfactory sensory systems process predator odor and channel that information to specific brain circuits is a fundamental issue that is not clearly understood. However, research in the last 15 years has begun to identify some of the essential features of the sensory detection systems and brain structures that underlie predator odor fear. For instance, the main (MOS) and accessory olfactory systems (AOS) detect predator odors and different types of predator odors are sensed by specific receptors located in either the MOS or AOS. However, complex predator chemosignals may be processed by both the MOS and AOS, which complicate our understanding of the specific neural circuits connected directly and indirectly from the MOS and AOS to activate the physiological and behavioral components of unconditioned and conditioned fear. Studies indicate that brain structures including the dorsal periaqueductal gray (DPAG), paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, and the medial amygdala (MeA) appear to be broadly involved in predator odor induced autonomic activity and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress hormone secretion. The MeA also plays a key role in predator odor unconditioned fear behavior and retrieval of contextual fear memory associated with prior predator odor experiences. Other neural structures including the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the ventral hippocampus (VHC) appear prominently involved in predator odor fear behavior. The basolateral amygdala (BLA), medial hypothalamic nuclei, and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) are also activated by some but not all predator odors. Future research that characterizes how distinct predator odors are uniquely processed in olfactory systems and neural circuits will provide significant insights into the differences of how diverse predator odors activate fear. © 2014 Takahashi.


Tius M.A.,University of Hawaii at Manoa
Chemical Society Reviews | Year: 2014

The ease of synthesis and the exceptional reactivity of alkoxyallenes has led to their use in a large number of highly diverse applications. This Report describes their use in various versions of the allene ether Nazarov cyclization. Following a brief introduction to the Nazarov cyclization (Section 1), the oxidative cyclization of vinyl alkoxyallenes is discussed first (Section 2). Nazarov cyclizations of α-alkoxyallenyl vinyl ketones and of α-alkoxyallenyl vinyl tertiary carbinols are covered (Section 3). The discovery and the subsequent rational design of acetals that serve as chiral auxiliaries on the allene in highly enantioselective Nazarov cyclizations is explained (Section 4). Interrupted Nazarov cyclizations of alkoxyallenes that are generated in situ from the isomerization of propargyl ethers on solid supports are discussed, including the evolution of a highly diastereoselective, chiral auxiliary controlled version of the reaction. Some applications of the methodology to natural products total synthesis have been included so as to provide the reader with benchmarks with which to judge the utility of the methodology. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.


Hadfield M.G.,University of Hawaii at Manoa
Annual Review of Marine Science | Year: 2011

Communities of microorganisms form thin coats across solid surfaces in the sea. Larvae of many marine invertebrates use biofilm components as cues to appropriate settlement sites. Research on the tube-dwelling polychaete worm Hydroides elegans, a globally common member of biofouling communities, is described to exemplify approaches to understanding biofilm bacteria as a source of settlement cues and larvae as bearers of receptors for bacterial cues. The association of species of the bacterial genus Pseudoalteromonas with larval settlement in many phyla is described, and the question of whether cues are soluble or surface-bound is reviewed, concluding that most evidence points to surface-bound cues. Seemingly contradictory data for stimulation of barnacle settlement are discussed; possibly both explanations are true. Paleontological evidence reveals a relationship between metazoans and biofilms very early in metazoan evolution, and thus the receptors for bacterial cues of invertebrate larvae are very old and possibly unique. Finally, despite more than 60 years of intense investigation, we still know very little about either the bacterial ligands that stimulate larval settlement or the cellular basis of their detection by larvae. Copyright © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

Loading University of Hawaii at Manoa collaborators
Loading University of Hawaii at Manoa collaborators