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Guelph, Canada

The University of Guelph, also known as U of G, is a comprehensive public research university in Guelph, Ontario, Canada. It was established in 1964 after the amalgamation of Ontario Agricultural College, the Macdonald Institute, and the Ontario Veterinary College, and has since grown to an institution of more than 21,000 students and academic staff. Wikipedia.


Mason G.J.,University of Guelph
Trends in Ecology and Evolution | Year: 2010

Approximately 26 billion animals, spanning over 10 000 species, are kept on farms and in zoos, conservation breeding centers, research laboratories and households. Captive animals are often healthier, longer-lived and more fecund than free-living conspecifics, but for some species the opposite is true. Captivity is a very long way from the ideal 'common garden' often assumed by evolutionary and ecological researchers using data for captive animals. The use of comparative methods to investigate the fundamental biological causes of these species differences would help to improve husbandry and enclosure design, and might even reveal relationships between susceptibilities to poor captive welfare and susceptibilities to anthropogenic threat in the wild. Studies of these species differences could also inspire and facilitate 'evo-mecho' research into the functions of behavioral control mechanisms. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Sharom F.J.,University of Guelph
Essays in Biochemistry | Year: 2011

Pgp (P-glycoprotein) (ABCB1) is an ATP-powered efflux pump which can transport hundreds of structurally unrelated hydrophobic amphipathic compounds, including therapeutic drugs, peptides and lipid-like compounds. This 170 kDa polypeptide plays a crucial physiological role in protecting tissues from toxic xenobiotics and endogenous metabolites, and also affects the uptake and distribution of many clinically important drugs. It forms a major component of the blood-brain barrier and restricts the uptake of drugs from the intestine. The protein is also expressed in many human cancers, where it probably contributes to resistance to chemotherapy treatment. Many chemical modulators have been identified that block the action of Pgp, and may have clinical applications in improving drug delivery and treating cancer. Pgp substrates are generally lipid-soluble, and partition into the membrane before the transporter expels them into the aqueous phase, much like a 'hydrophobic vacuum cleaner'. The transporter may also act as a 'flippase', moving its substrates from the inner to the outer membrane leaflet. An X-ray crystal structure shows that drugs interact with Pgp within the transmembrane regions by fitting into a large flexible binding pocket, which can accommodate several substrate molecules simultaneously. The nucleotide-binding domains of Pgp appear to hydrolyse ATP in an alternating manner; however, it is still not clear whether transport is driven by ATP hydrolysis or ATP binding. Details of the steps involved in the drug-transport process, and how it is coupled to ATP hydrolysis, remain the object of intensive study. © 2011 Biochemical Society. Source


Schattat M.H.,University of Guelph
The Plant cell | Year: 2012

Stroma-filled tubules named stromules are sporadic extensions of plastids. Earlier, photobleaching was used to demonstrate fluorescent protein diffusion between already interconnected plastids and formed the basis for suggesting that all plastids are able to form networks for exchanging macromolecules. However, a critical appraisal of literature shows that this conjecture is not supported by unequivocal experimental evidence. Here, using photoconvertible mEosFP, we created color differences between similar organelles that enabled us to distinguish clearly between organelle fusion and nonfusion events. Individual plastids, despite conveying a strong impression of interactivity and fusion, maintained well-defined boundaries and did not exchange fluorescent proteins. Moreover, the high pleomorphy of etioplasts from dark-grown seedlings, leucoplasts from roots, and assorted plastids in the accumulation and replication of chloroplasts5 (arc5), arc6, and phosphoglucomutase1 mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana suggested that a single plastid unit might be easily mistaken for interconnected plastids. Our observations provide succinct evidence to refute the long-standing dogma of interplastid connectivity. The ability to create and maintain a large number of unique biochemical factories in the form of singular plastids might be a key feature underlying the versatility of green plants as it provides increased internal diversity for them to combat a wide range of environmental fluctuations and stresses. Source


Spriet L.L.,University of Guelph
Sports Medicine | Year: 2014

Caffeine is a popular work-enhancing supplement that has been actively researched since the 1970s. The majority of research has examined the effects of moderate to high caffeine doses (5–13 mg/kg body mass) on exercise and sport. These caffeine doses have profound effects on the responses to exercise at the whole-body level and are associated with variable results and some undesirable side effects. Low doses of caffeine (<3 mg/kg body mass, ~200 mg) are also ergogenic in some exercise and sport situations, although this has been less well studied. Lower caffeine doses (1) do not alter the peripheral whole-body responses to exercise; (2) improve vigilance, alertness, and mood and cognitive processes during and after exercise; and (3) are associated with few, if any, side effects. Therefore, the ergogenic effect of low caffeine doses appears to result from alterations in the central nervous system. However, several aspects of consuming low doses of caffeine remain unresolved and suffer from a paucity of research, including the potential effects on high-intensity sprint and burst activities. The responses to low doses of caffeine are also variable and athletes need to determine whether the ingestion of ~200 mg of caffeine before and/or during training and competitions is ergogenic on an individual basis. © 2014, The Author(s). Source


Whitfield C.,University of Guelph | Stephen Trent M.,University of Texas at Austin
Annual Review of Biochemistry | Year: 2014

Lipopolysaccharide molecules represent a unique family of glycolipids based on a highly conserved lipid moiety known as lipid A. These molecules are produced by most gram-negative bacteria, in which they play important roles in the integrity of the outer-membrane permeability barrier and participate extensively in host-pathogen interplay. Few bacteria contain lipopolysaccharide molecules composed only of lipid A. In most forms, lipid A is glycosylated by addition of the core oligosaccharide that, in some bacteria, provides an attachment site for a long-chain O-antigenic polysaccharide. The complexity of lipopolysaccharide structures is reflected in the processes used for their biosynthesis and export. Rapid growth and cell division depend on the bacterial cell's capacity to synthesize and export lipopolysaccharide efficiently and in large amounts. We review recent advances in those processes, emphasizing the reactions that are essential for viability. Copyright © 2014 by Annual Reviews. Source

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