Accra, Ghana
Accra, Ghana

The University of Ghana is the oldest and largest of the thirteen Ghanaian universities and tertiary institutions. It was founded in 1948 as the University College of the Gold Coast, and was originally an affiliate college of the University of London, which supervised its academic programmes and awarded degrees. It gained full university status in 1961, and now has nearly 40,000 students.The original emphasis was on the liberal arts, social science, basic science, agriculture, and medicine, but the curriculum was expanded to provide more technology-based and vocational courses and postgraduate training.The university is mainly based at Legon, about twelve kilometres northeast of the centre of Accra. The medical school is in Korle Bu, with a teaching hospital and secondary campus in the city of Accra. It also has a graduate school of nuclear and allied science at the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, making it one of the few universities on the Africa continent offering programmes in nuclear physics and nuclear engineering. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC1-PM-21-2016 | Award Amount: 7.69M | Year: 2017

The new challenge in global health is to achieve Universal Health Care (UHC) by 2030. Having an adequate workforce is critical to achieving UHC. Efforts are in place to scale up the numbers of health workers. Improving health workforce performance is equally important as the quantity of health workers, but more challenging. Workforce performance improvement can be achieved better at management levels close to front-line workers. The PERFORM project developed a problem-based management strengthening intervention for management teams at district level in three African countries to improve both health workforce performance and service delivery more generally. The evaluation of the management strengthening intervention (MSI) demonstrated its effectiveness in enabling the management teams to solve workforce performance and other problems locally which improved service delivery, and become better managers. To have a wider impact and thus contribute to the achievement of UHC the PERFORM management strengthening intervention needs to be scaled up and embedded. The aim of PERFORM2scale is to develop and evaluate a sustainable approach to scaling up a district level management strengthening intervention in different and changing contexts. A framework and strategy for scaling up the intervention will be developed with government agencies in Ghana, Malawi and Uganda each country. Capacity will be developed to implement the scale-up which will be carried out over three years in order to use the MSI at scale and embed the process at district level. The scale-up framework and strategy will be subjected to process evaluation (to identify opportunities and barriers) and outcome evaluation. Both the framework and strategy will be validated for use in the study countries and elsewhere for use and adaptation. The use of the management strengthening intervention at scale in countries will be a major contribution to achieving UHC.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: HEALTH.2010.3.4-1 | Award Amount: 3.79M | Year: 2011

The proposal addresses the workforce deficit in sub-Saharan countries in Africa by improving the overall performance of the workforce. Management strengthening activities will be tested to identify what improvements can be made within available resources in decentralised management structures. The management strengthening activities will develop integrated approaches to improving workforce performance based on a situation analysis and monitor the impact on workforce performance and on unintended systems effects. New knowledge will be developed on the effectiveness of an action-based approach to management strengthening and what strategies improve health workforce performance in different contexts.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INT-04-2015 | Award Amount: 3.72M | Year: 2016

This Project aims to address an increasingly pressing global challenge: How to achieve the EUs development goals and the UNs Sustainable Development Goals, while meeting the global target of staying within two degrees global warming and avoid transgressing other planetary boundaries. EU policies must align with sustainable development goals (Article 11 TFEU). The impacts of climate change and global loss of natural habitat undermine the progress achieved by pursuing the Millennium Development Goals and threaten the realisation of EU development policy goals. Our focus is the role of EUs public and private market actors. They have a high level of interaction with actors in emerging and developing economies, and are therefore crucial to achieving the EUs development goals. However, science does not yet cater for insights in how the regulatory environment influences their decision-making, nor in how we can stimulate them to make development-friendly, environmentally and socially sustainable decisions. Comprehensive, ground-breaking research is necessary into the regulatory complexity in which EU private and public market actors operate, in particular concerning their interactions with private and public actors in developing countries. Our Consortium, leading experts in law, economics, and applied environmental and social science, is able to analyse this regulatory complexity in a transdisciplinary and comprehensive perspective, both on an overarching level and in depth, in the form of specific product life-cycles: ready-made garments and mobile phones. We bring significant new evidence-based insights into the factors that enable or hinder coherence in EU development policy; we will advance the understanding of how development concerns can be successfully integrated in non-development policies and regulations concerning market actors; and we provide tools for improved PCD impact assessment as well as for better corporate sustainability assessment.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: ERC-AG | Phase: ERC-AG-ID1 | Award Amount: 2.95M | Year: 2012

An effective malaria vaccine is needed, particularly against P. falciparum as this species causes more human mortality than all other eukaryotic pathogens combined. An understanding of natural selection operating on parasites in local endemic populations can enable understanding of core molecular mechanisms of global relevance. The objectives are to - Advance understanding of alternative pathways of erythrocyte invasion by malaria parasites - Advance understanding of immune evasion by malaria parasites - Identify optimal combinations of parasite proteins as malaria vaccine candidates - Develop the interface between population genomic and functional studies of malaria parasites The research programme will take an integrated approach to understanding pathogen adaptation, by designing experiments that are based on analysis at the molecular, functional, and population levels. (i) Population genetic analyses of P. falciparum in sites of contrasting endemicity in West Africa, to finely determine signatures of selection with high-resolution throughout the genome, and help refine hypotheses on mechanisms used by merozoites to invade erythrocytes and evade acquired immune responses. (ii) Experimental culture analysis of merozoite invasion into erythrocytes to identify the receptor-ligand interactions used by different parasite populations ex vivo. Novel receptor knockdown assays on cultured erythrocytes will be employed, and parasite adaptation experiments conducted to identify constraints on the use of alternative invasion pathways (iii) Innovative approaches to select individual parasites and characterise cell tropism, transcript profiles, and genome sequences. This is aimed to validate population level findings and revolutionise approaches to genetics and phenotyping of parasites in the future. Candidate molecule discoveries will be taken forwards to receptor-ligand interaction assays, antibody inhibition and immuno-epidemiological studies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: HEALTH.2011.2.4.3-4 | Award Amount: 3.85M | Year: 2012

Migration from Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) to Europe is increasing. The limited evidence suggests that the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity among SSA migrants is higher than among their SSA peers living in Africa and European host populations. The reasons for these observations are only poorly understood, but may involve migration-related changes in lifestyle, genetic predisposition as well as peculiarities in perceptions and practises. Contrasting the increasing number of African migrants in Europe, the health status and needs of these populations remain largely unexamined, and have only insufficiently been integrated into national plans, policies and strategies. Implementation of tailored intervention programmes among migrants implicitly requires the identification and the disentanglement of environmental, lifestyle and genetic factors modifying T2D and obesity risk. The RODAM project addresses these fundamental health issues among a homogeneous, and one of the largest SSA migrant groups in Europe (i.e. Ghanaians). RODAM thus aims to contribute to the understanding of the complex interplay between environment, lifestyle, (epi)genetic as well as social factors in T2D and obesity among SSA immigrants, and to identify specific risk factors to guide intervention and prevention and to provide a basis for improving diagnosis and treatment. In a multi-centre study, 6,250 Ghanaians aged >25 years will be recruited in rural and urban Ghana, Germany, the Netherlands, and the UK. The differences in prevalence rates within Ghana on the one hand, and three European countries on the other, will allow us to unravel environmental, lifestyle and (epi)genetic as well as social factors in relation to T2D and obesity. The proposed study will generate relevant results that will ultimately guide intervention programmes and will provide a basis for improving diagnosis and treatment among SSA migrants in Europe as well as in their counterparts in Africa and beyond.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: SSH.2011.4.1-2 | Award Amount: 3.50M | Year: 2012

The overall objective of the African Rural-City Connections (RurbanAfrica) project is to explore the connections between rural transformations, mobility, and urbanization processes and analyze how these contribute to an understanding of the scale, nature and location of poverty in sub-Saharan Africa. The RurbanAfrica project will advance the research agenda on rural-city connections in sub-Saharan Africa by addressing a range of crucial components: agricultural transformations, rural livelihoods, city dynamics, and access to services in cities. In this respect the project will challenge a number of generally accepted truths about rural and city development, and the importance and implication of migration in shaping these. It will thereby question the overall negative interpretations of the economic role of rural-urban mobility and migration in sub-Saharan Africa and generate new insights into the relationship between rural-city connections and poverty dynamics. The project will include nine partners; four European, one international, and four sub-Saharan African. RurbanAfrica focuses on four country cases: Rwanda, Tanzania, Cameroon and Ghana and examine in-depth two rural-city connections in each of the case countries. Research is organized into six work packages: Agricultural transformation, rural livelihoods, city dynamics, access to services, knowledge platform and policy dialogue, and synthesis, dissemination and management. Central to the approach is the on-going integration of policy research, policy dialogue, knowledge sharing and empirical research. Through ongoing collaboration between senior and junior researchers from European and sub-Saharan African partners, and co-supervising of PhD students, the project will contribute to capacity building and potentially impact curriculum development. The research and dissemination process will be supported by a scientific advisory board, with members from European and sub-Saharan African research institutions.


Background: Malaria transmission intensity is traditionally estimated from entomological studies as the entomological inoculation rate (EIR), but this is labour intensive and also raises sampling issues due to the large variation from house to house. Incidence of malaria in the control group of a trial or in a cohort study can be used but is difficult to interpret and to compare between different places and between age groups because of differences in levels of acquired immunity. The reversible catalytic model has been developed to estimate malaria transmission intensity using age-stratified serological data. However, the limitation of this model is that it does not allow for persons to have their seropositivity boosted by exposure while they are already seropositive. The aim of this paper is to develop superinfection mathematical models that allow for antibody response to be boosted by exposure. Method. The superinfection models were fitted to age-stratified serological data using maximum likelihood method. Results: The results showed that estimates of seroconversion rate were higher using the superinfection model than catalytic model. This difference was milder when the level of transmission was lower. This suggests that the catalytic model is underestimating the transmission intensity by up to 31%. The duration of seropositivity is shorter with superinfection model, but still seems too long. Conclusion: The model is important because it can produce more realistic estimates of the duration of seropositivity. This is analogous to Dietz model, which allowed for superinfection and produced more realistic estimates of the duration of infection as compared to the original Ross-MacDonald malaria model, which also ignores superinfection. © 2014 Bosomprah; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IIFR | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-IIF | Award Amount: 15.00K | Year: 2015

This Fellowships purpose is a comparative assessment of the protection for, and health of, academic freedom in the African nations, currently a vastly under-researched field, and a subsequent analysis of most relevant best practice for the protection of academic freedom in the EU, which can then aid the derivation of an African model of the concept, which will be disseminated across, and embedded within, universities in Africa. To achieve this, the project will unite the Fellow, who has a wide knowledge of academic freedom and human rights issues in Africa, with the Researcher in Charge, who has experience and expertise in assessing the protection of academic freedom in different states, to produce together new knowledge which will be disseminated across both Africa and the EU. The long-term effect of this research will be to substantially increase the institutional collaboration between universities in Africa and the European Union, enabling greater protection of academic freedom via the joint development of governance structures, processes and protocols. Additionally, through the mobility to the EU of a leading African human rights researcher, the project will facilitate aid and encourage greater teaching links and research collaboration, and academic and scientific outputs between the universities in the two continents. The main academic subject areas which relate to academic freedom are higher education policy and international law. However, by promoting greater collaboration at institutional, rather than subject, level this project will generate greater intercontinental collaboration across a wide range of academic disciplines, via increases in the number of EU-African university collaborations.


Patent
Tokyo Medical, Dental University, Center For Scientific Research Into Plant Medicine, University of Ghana and Nagasaki International University | Date: 2014-01-07

The present invention provides anti-trypanosomal agent for treating, preventing Trypanosomiasis of mammals, which comprises a compound having the tetracyclic iridoid skeleton represented by a general formula (I).


Amanor K.S.,University of Ghana
Journal of Peasant Studies | Year: 2012

This paper places land grabbing within the context of developments within agribusiness within the last 30 years, tracing the various trajectories of increasing competition and concentration and pressures on commodity prices that have resulted in increasing dispossession of smallholders and a move in some agri-food chains towards large estate production. The paper explores the ways in which contemporary agricultural policies and neoliberal market reforms reflect these developments and examines recent framing of land policies in Africa in the context of the development of agrarian capital and agribusiness. Competitiveness results in dispossession of less successful smallholders from below by commercial smallholders, and from above by large estates vertically integrated into agribusiness marketing chains. This is illustrated with examples from the cocoa sector in Côte d'Ivoire and pineapples in Ghana. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

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