Newark, DE, United States
Newark, DE, United States

The University of Delaware is the largest university in Delaware. The main campus is in Newark, with satellite campuses in Dover, Wilmington, Lewes, and Georgetown. It is medium-sized – approximately 16,000 undergraduate and 3,500 graduate students. UD is a private university and receives public funding for being a land-grant, sea-grant, space-grant and urban-grant state-supported research institution. As of 2013, the school's endowment is valued at about US$1.171 billion. Delaware has been labeled one of the "Public Ivies," a publicly funded university considered as providing a quality of education comparable to those of the Ivy League.UD is classified as a research university with very high research activity by the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. The university's programs in engineering, science, business, hospitality management, education, urban affairs and public policy, public administration, agriculture, history, chemical and biomolecular engineering, chemistry and biochemistry have been highly ranked with some drawing from the historically strong presence of the nation's chemical and pharmaceutical industries in the state of Delaware, such as DuPont and W. L. Gore and Associates. It is one of only four schools in North America with a major in art conservation. UD was the first American university to begin a study abroad program.The school from which the university grew was founded in 1743, making it one of the oldest in the nation. However, UD was not chartered as an institution of higher learning until 1833. Its original class of ten students included George Read, Thomas McKean, and James Smith, all three of whom would go on to sign the Declaration of Independence. Wikipedia.


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Malware detection methods systems, and apparatus are described. Malware may be detected by obtaining a plurality of malware binary executables and a plurality of goodware binary executables, decompiling the plurality of malware binary executables and the plurality of goodware binary executable to extract corresponding assembly code for each of the plurality of malware binary executables and the plurality of goodware binary executable, constructing call graphs for each of the plurality of malware binary executables and the plurality of goodware binary executables from the corresponding assembly code, determining similarities between the call graphs using graph kernels applied to the call graphs for each of the plurality of malware binary executables and the plurality of goodware binary executables, building a malware detection model from the determined similarities between call graphs by applying a machine learning algorithm such as a deep neural network (DNN) algorithm to the determined similarities, and identifying whether a subject executable is malware by applying the built malware detection model to the subject executable.


Dietze M.C.,Boston University | Sala A.,University of Montana | Carbone M.S.,University of New Hampshire | Czimczik C.I.,University of California at Irvine | And 3 more authors.
Annual Review of Plant Biology | Year: 2014

Nonstructural carbon (NSC) provides the carbon and energy for plant growth and survival. In woody plants, fundamental questions about NSC remain unresolved: Is NSC storage an active or passive process? Do older NSC reserves remain accessible to the plant? How is NSC depletion related to mortality risk? Herein we review conceptual and mathematical models of NSC dynamics, recent observations and experiments at the organismal scale, and advances in plant physiology that have provided a better understanding of the dynamics of woody plant NSC. Plants preferentially use new carbon but can access decade-old carbon when the plant is stressed or physically damaged. In addition to serving as a carbon and energy source, NSC plays important roles in phloem transport, osmoregulation, and cold tolerance, but how plants regulate these competing roles and NSC depletion remains elusive. Moving forward requires greater synthesis of models and data and integration across scales from -omics to ecology. Copyright © 2014 by Annual Reviews.


Barhight L.R.,University of Delaware | Hubbard J.A.,University of Delaware | Hyde C.T.,BioAssessments
Child Development | Year: 2013

Study goals were to explore whether children clustered into groups based on reactions to witnessing bullying and to examine whether these reactions predicted bullying intervention. Seventy-nine children (M=10.80years) watched bullying videos in the laboratory while their heart rate (HR) was measured, and they self-reported on negative emotion after each video. Bullying intervention was assessed by school peers. Two groups emerged based on reactions to the bullying videos: The Emotional group (43% of children) displayed HR acceleration and reported high negative emotion, whereas the Unemotional group (57% of children) showed HR deceleration and reported low negative emotion. Group membership predicted bullying intervention, with peers reporting that Emotional children were more likely to stop a bully than Unemotional children. © 2012 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.


Safronova M.S.,University of Delaware | Kozlov M.G.,RAS Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute | Clark C.W.,U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology
Physical Review Letters | Year: 2011

We show that three group IIIB divalent ions, B +, Al +, and In +, have anomalously small blackbody radiation (BBR) shifts of the ns2 S01-nsnp P0o3 clock transitions. The fractional BBR shifts for these ions are at least 10 times smaller than those of any other present or proposed optical frequency standards at the same temperature, and are less than 0.3% of the Sr clock shift. We have developed a hybrid configuration-interaction + coupled-cluster method that provides accurate treatment of correlation corrections in such ions and yields a rigorous upper bound on the uncertainty of the final results. We reduce the BBR contribution to the fractional frequency uncertainty of the Al + clock to 4×10 -19 at T=300K. We also reduce the uncertainties due to this effect at room temperature to 10 -18 level for B + and In + to facilitate further development of these systems for metrology and quantum sensing. © 2011 American Physical Society.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: NMP-23-2015 | Award Amount: 7.15M | Year: 2016

The demand for lower dependency on critical raw materials (CRM) such as rare earths (RE) is not only a European but a global problem that demands immediate action. The purpose of this project is to exploit advanced theoretical and computation methods together with state-of-the-art materials preparation and characterization techniques, to develop the next generation RE-free/lean permanent magnets (PM). The material design will be driven by automated large computational screening of new and novel intermetallic compounds with uniaxial structure in order to achieve high saturation magnetisation, magnetocrystalline anisotropy and Curie temperature. The simulations will be based on a primary screening detecting the mechanisms that give rise to distorted phases and stabilize them, by adding doping atoms as stabilizers. In a further computation on successfully synthetized compounds, micromagnetic calculations will be used in order to design the optimal microstructure for the given phases that will maximise the coercivity needed for a PM. Extensive experimental processing and characterisation of the selected phases will result in a first proof of principle of the feasibility of NOVAMAG PMs. A multidisciplinary team of magnet experts consisting of chemists, material scientists, physicists and engineers from academia, national labs and industry is assembled to undertake a concerted, systematic and innovative study to overcome the problems involved and develop the next generation RE-free/lean PMs. Currently the demand for these PM s is even higher with the emerging markets of hybrid/electric vehicles and wind mill power systems. The proposed project will provide the fundamental innovations and breakthroughs which will have a major impact in re-establishing the Europe as a leader in the science, technology and commercialization of this very important class of materials and help decrease our dependence on China, which will in turn improve the competitiveness of EU manufacturers.


To date, three way catalytic converters (TWCs) have been established as the most effective engine exhaust after-treatment system. However, TWCs not only fail to address the issue of particulate matter (PM) emissions but are also the main industrial consumer of Critical Raw Materials (CRMs) mainly Platinum Group Metals (PGMs) and Rare Earth elements (REEs), with the automotive industry accounting for 65%-80% of total EU PGMs demand. The enforcement of new limits on PM emissions (EURO 6c/7) will require higher TWC performance, hence leading to further increase the CRMs content in autocatalysts. Addressing the necessity of CRMs reduction in catalysis, PARTIAL-PGMs proposes an integrated approach for the rational design of innovative nanostructured materials of low/zero PGMs/REEs content for a hybrid TWC/Gasoline Particulate Filter (GPF) for automotive emissions after-treatment with continuous particulates combustion also focusing on identifying and fine-tuning the parameters involved in their preparation, characterization and performance evaluation under realistic conditions. PARTIAL-PGMs approach is broad, covering multiscale modeling, synthesis and nanomaterials characterization, performance evaluation under realistic conditions as well as recyclability, health impact analysis and Life Cycle Assessment. The rational synthesis of nanomaterials to be used in these hybrid systems will allow for a reduction of more than 35% in PGMs and 20% in REEs content, either by increasing performance or by their replacement with transition metals. The compact nature of the new hybrid system not only will allow its accommodation in smaller cars but will also reduce cold start emissions and light-off times with performance aiming to anticipate both future emission control regulations and new advances in engines technology. Such R&D progress in autocatalysts is expected to pave the way to the widespread use of such low CRMs content materials in other catalytic applications.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2009.3.1.6.1 | Award Amount: 8.53M | Year: 2009

Coastal areas are vital economic hubs in terms of settlement, industry, agriculture, trade and tourism to mention some key sectors. There are already many coastal problems including erosion, flood risk and long-term habitat deterioration. As economies continue to develop the asset base at risk will grow, while accelerating climate change will increase the likelihood of damaging extreme events, as well as accelerate habitat decline. Existing coastal management and defence approaches are not well tuned to these challenges as they assume a static situation. THESEUS will develop a systematic approach to delivering both a low-risk coast for human use and healthy habitats for evolving coastal zones subject to multiple change factors. The innovative combined mitigation and adaptation technologies to be considered will include ecologically-based mitigation measures (such as restoration and/or creation of habitats), hydro-morphodynamic techniques (such as wave energy converters, sediment reservoirs, multi-purpose structures, overtop resistant dikes), actions to reduce the impact on society and economy (such as promotion of risk awareness or spatial planning) and GIS-based software to support defence planning. To integrate the best of these technical measures in a strategic policy context we will develop overarching THESEUS guidelines which will considers the environmental, social and economic issues raised in any coastal area. It is in this spirit that THESEUS will advance European and international experience in applying innovative technologies to reducing coastal risks. THESEUS activities will be carried out within a multidisciplinary framework using 8 study sites across Europe, with specific attention to the most vulnerable coastal environments such as deltas, estuaries and wetlands, where many large cities and industrial areas are located.


WAYNE, Pa., Jan. 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The Judge Group, a leading professional services firm, names Marty Judge, III as its next Chief Executive Officer. Marty Judge, III, who currently serves as Executive Vice President, will succeed Martin E. Judge, Jr., the company’s founder and CEO, effective immediately. Martin E. Judge, Jr. will remain with Judge in the role of Chairman of the Board. In his new role, Marty III will be responsible for the global growth and operations of the company, as well as universally promoting the Judge brand. Martin E. Judge, Jr. will assume the role of Chairman of the Board and will continue to serve Judge and its executive team in a consultative role. Martin Jr. will focus his day-to-day efforts on growing and promoting the China Arena Football League (CAFL), an American professional football league in China, which he founded. The CAFL held its inaugural season in the fall of 2016. Marty III holds a bachelor’s degree in finance, from the University of Delaware, and he has been with Judge for the past 12 years, serving in a number of roles. During his time with the company, he has learned the business from the ground up, starting out as a Technical Recruiter with the IT staffing division in the Philadelphia office. Marty has served as Executive Vice President since 2012, overseeing several Judge offices across the company and leading some of Judge’s biggest initiatives. More recently, he was in charge of the expansion of recruiting operations, with two National Recruiting Centers in Phoenix, AZ and Tampa, FL, and he assisted with the opening of the India office and practice. Martin E. Judge, Jr. founded The Judge Group in 1970 in Philadelphia. Over the next 47 years he served as CEO for the organization as it grew to over 35 offices across the US, Canada, China, and India and is responsible for the annual placement of over 4,500 professionals. Founded as a permanent placement firm, Judge has grown to become one of the leading professional services firms in the world, offering a comprehensive suite of services that include technology, talent, and learning solutions. “I am thrilled to be handing over the CEO role to Marty,” said Martin E. Judge, Jr., founder and Chairman of the Board.  “I founded Judge with $2,000 I borrowed from my father and had the pleasure to lead and watch it grow for the past 47 years. To be able to pass the reigns of the company on to a third generation of Judge is exciting. We have gone from a small three-person-company based out of one office, to a global organization with 35 offices in four countries and thousands of placements. The company is on solid ground, with a very accomplished management team led by Brian Anderson, great staff across the company, and a client base made up of many of the Fortune 100, as well as several promising startups. The future is very bright for Judge, and I know Marty is the right leader at the right time, to take on our goal of becoming a $1 billion organization.” “My father has built an amazing company that is made up of a strong management team and employees that are truly an extension of the Judge family,” said Marty Judge III, CEO of The Judge Group. “2016 was an incredible year for Judge, highlighted by the launch of Judge India, the relocation of our corporate headquarters, and record breaking efforts from several of our divisions and the company as a whole. I could not be more excited to serve as CEO of this organization. With the current team we have in place, The Judge Group is poised for continued success, and I am humbled to be in a position to lead this company.” The Judge Group, headquartered in suburban Philadelphia, is located at 151 South Warner Road, Suite 100, Wayne, PA 19087. The office can be reached at 1-800-650-0035. To learn more, visit www.judge.com. Working at the crossroads of people and transformative technologies, The Judge Group delivers innovative business solutions – powered by top talent – to help organizations reach their strategic goals and realize opportunities now and in the future. The Judge Group is a leading professional services firm specializing in talent, technology, and learning solutions. Our services are successfully delivered through a network of more than 35 offices in the United States, Canada, China, and India. The Judge Group serves more than 40 Fortune 100 companies and is responsible for the placement of more than 4,500 professionals annually across a wide range of industries.


News Article | February 20, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Researchers developing technologies to improve therapeutic success among radiotherapy patients, prevent chest wall collapses in pre-term infants with respiratory distress, and assist surgeons with pre-operative planning for femur fracture alignments will receive a total of $600,000 in funding through the ninth round of the University City Science Center’s QED Proof-of-Concept Program. The program, started in 2009, funds novel university technologies with market potential, bridging the gap between academic research and product commercialization. The awardees were selected from a pool of 64 applicants from 15 academic and research institutions in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware. The QED grants will support researchers at Penn State College of Medicine, Rowan University, and the University of Pennsylvania. Each team will receive $200,000; half of which will be contributed by the Science Center and half by the researchers’ institutions. Each project will also receive guidance from the Science Center’s experienced team of Business Advisors. Mohammad Abedin-Nasab, Ph.D. of Rowan University is improving patient outcomes with Robossis™, a robotic surgery device designed to assist surgeons with pre-operative planning and alignment of long bone fractures, leading to faster surgeries. David Cormode, D.Phil., M.Chem. of the University of Pennsylvania is revolutionizing cancer treatment options with a biodegradable gold nanoparticle-based technology that increases radiation absorption in tumors, creating improved therapeutic efficacy in cancer. Charles Palmer, MB, ChB, FCP, FAAP of Penn State College of Medicine is transforming neonatal care though a noninvasive assisted breathing device for pre-term infants with respiratory distress that uses negative pressure to prevent chest wall collapse. “Now in its ninth year, the QED program continues to highlight the treasure trove of technologies at our region’s universities. But as last year’s study into the impact of QED shows, the program’s value lies in its people,” says Science Center President & CEO Stephen S. Tang, Ph.D., MBA. “QED matches some of our region’s most accomplished scientists with Business Advisors and industry and investor professionals. This carefully facilitated connectivity and awareness among academic, entrepreneurial, and investor communities leads to more collaboration, research and commercialization throughout the region.” “The quality of proposals and teams coming through the QED program is a testament to the robust research coming out of Greater Philadelphia’s academic institutions” says QED Selection Team member, Jeannie Rojas, Ph.D., MBA, Portfolio Leader at Johnson & Johnson. “The powerful combination of innovative researchers matched with QED Business Advisors is bridging the gap between academic research and product commercialization – all with the potential to positively impact the region and the world.” Since the program’s inception in 2009, QED has screened 539 proposals from 21 participating academic and research institutions. Of the technologies screened, 105 projects have been accepted into the competitive program and paired with scientists and industry professionals. QED has awarded a total of $5.45 million to 31 projects, primarily in the therapeutic/biologic, device/diagnostic, and digital health sectors. Of these 31 projects, eight technologies have been licensed, while five have gone on to form startup companies. Projects awarded funding by the QED program have raised over $19 million in follow-on funding. A study of the impact of the program was completed by the Economy League of Greater Philadelphia in 2016. QED has received support from the U.S. Economic Development Administration, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s Ben Franklin Technology Development Authority, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s Department of Health, the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corporation, William Penn Foundation, and Wexford Science and Technology. About the Science Center Located in the heart of uCity Square, the Science Center is a mission-driven nonprofit organization that catalyzes and connects innovation to entrepreneurship and technology commercialization. For 50+ years, the Science Center has supported startups, research, and economic development in the life sciences, healthcare, physical sciences, and emerging technology sectors. As a result, graduate firms and current residents of the Science Center’s incubator support one out of every 100 jobs in the Greater Philadelphia region and drive $13 billion in economic activity in the region annually. By providing resources and programming for any stage of a business’s lifecycle, the Science Center helps scientists, entrepreneurs and innovators take their concepts from idea to IPO – and beyond. For more information about the Science Center, go to http://www.sciencecenter.org About the QED Program The QED Program was launched in April 2009. A common participation agreement that defines matching funds, indirect costs, and intellectual property management, has been signed by 21 universities and research institutions in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware: The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Delaware State University, Drexel University, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Harrisburg University of Science and Technology, Lankenau Institute for Medical Research, Lehigh University, Monell Chemical Senses Center, New Jersey Institute of Technology, The Pennsylvania State University, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Philadelphia University, Rowan University, Rutgers University, Temple University, Thomas Jefferson University, University of Delaware, University of Pennsylvania, University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, Widener University, and The Wistar Institute.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

PHILADELPHIA, March 01, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Penn Capital Management Company, Inc. (Penn Capital) is pleased to announce the addition of Heather Nolan and Samantha Lowry. Ms. Nolan joined Penn Capital in October 2016 as Senior Client Service Director focusing on Institutional Client Service. Ms. Nolan has 20 years of experience in the financial services industry including institutional client service and consultant relationship management, investment manager research, and sales support roles.  Prior to joining Penn Capital, Ms. Nolan spent nine years at CBRE Clarion Securities LLC, most recently as Assistant Vice President, Global Marketing and Client Service/Institutional Investor Relations. Ms. Nolan received a BS in Business Administration and an MBA in Finance from the University of Delaware. She holds FINRA Series 6, 7 and 63 securities licenses. Ms. Lowry joined Penn Capital in January 2017 as Director of Institutional Relationship Management focusing on both consultant and client relationships.  She has 20 years of experience in the financial services industry focused on consultant and client service relationship management.  Previously, Ms. Lowry has served as Director of Consultant Relations and Institutional Sales at Philadelphia International Advisors, as well as Senior Relationship Manager and Senior Consultant Relations Manager at Aberdeen Asset Management.  Ms. Lowry received a BA in English Literature from Temple University and an MBA in Management from St. Joseph’s University. Peter J. Moran, Partner, Executive Vice President, Global Distribution, says of Nolan and Lowry’s additions, “We are excited to have added Heather and Samantha to our team. Their combined experience and insights add depth to our institutional client service coverage and will enhance our consulting firm relationships.” Penn Capital, founded in 1987, is an independent investment management firm located in Philadelphia, PA.  Penn Capital maintains a fully integrated credit and equity research process and emphasizes Complete Capital Structure Analysis®  when analyzing investment opportunities.  Penn Capital has approximately $5.5 billion in assets under advisement (as of December 31, 2016) and specializes in high yield fixed income and micro-to-mid capitalization equity portfolios for institutions and individuals.                                                                                                                          All inquiries can be sent to Melissa Currie, Director of Marketing and Digital Solutions at mcurrie@penncapital.com or (215) 302-1539.


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

WILMINGTON, Del., Nov. 15, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- WSFS Financial Corporation (NASDAQ:WSFS), the parent company of WSFS Bank, today announced the promotion of Vernita L. Dorsey, Robert J. Hayman and Jason L. Spence to Senior Vice President. Photos accompanying this announcement are available at: Vernita L. Dorsey has been promoted to Senior Vice President, Director of Community Strategy. Ms. Dorsey has over 30 years of banking experience; she joined WSFS in 2010 when the Bank combined with Christiana Bank & Trust. As the Director of Community Strategy, Ms. Dorsey oversees Corporate Philanthropy for the company and leads the bank’s volunteer initiatives through Team WSFS. In addition, she serves as Secretary of the WSFS Foundation Board. Vernita is deeply committed to the community and currently chairs the board of Girls Inc. of Delaware. She also serves on the board of Downtown Visions and the advisory board of Henrietta Johnson Medical Center. Ms. Dorsey actively volunteers with many Delaware organizations and serves as the Lay Leader at her church, Coleman Memorial UMC. She also enjoys singing gospel hymns and she directs three choirs at her church. Robert J. Hayman has been promoted to Senior Vice President, Director of Facility Strategy and Vendor Management. Mr. Hayman joined the Bank in January 2012. In his role, he directs all vendor management functions, corporate insurance policies, facility operations and procurement. Mr. Hayman has over 35 years of experience in the financial services industry; he was a senior leader at MBNA America for 15 years and prior to joining WSFS, he held a leadership role with Wilmington Trust Company. He serves on the board of directors at Padua Academy and is an active member at St. John the Beloved Parish in Wilmington, DE. Mr. Hayman received his BSBA from the University of Delaware and his MBA from Widener University. Jason L. Spence has been promoted to Senior Vice President, Director of Credit Risk Management. Mr. Spence joined WSFS Bank in 2006. In his current role, Mr. Spence leads many of the Bank’s loan administration and credit risk functions, including asset quality & concentration reporting, allowance for loan & lease losses, valuation services & construction loan monitoring as well as the loan review function.  Mr. Spence has over 20 years of banking experience and prior to joining WSFS, he served in several management roles during a 13-year career at MBNA America.  Mr. Spence serves as Treasurer on the Risk Management Association – Philadelphia Chapter board of directors and is an active volunteer with the Blood Bank of Delmarva and Meals on Wheels. Mr. Spence is a graduate of the University of Delaware. “We are delighted to announce these promotions and we value the dedication, leadership and caring these Associates demonstrate on a daily basis,” said Peggy H. Eddens, Executive Vice President, Chief Human Capital Officer. “Learning, growing and achieving are cornerstones of our WSFS culture; we congratulate Vernita, Bob and Jason and we thank them for their heartfelt commitment to the communities we serve.” About WSFS Financial Corporation WSFS Financial Corporation is a multi-billion dollar financial services company. Its primary subsidiary, WSFS Bank, is the oldest locally-managed bank and trust company headquartered in Delaware and the Delaware Valley. As of September 30, 2016, WSFS Financial Corporation had $6.6 billion in assets on its balance sheet and $14.3 billion in fiduciary assets. WSFS operates from 76 offices located in Delaware (46), Pennsylvania (28), Virginia (1) and Nevada (1) and provides comprehensive financial services including commercial banking, retail banking, cash management and trust and wealth management. Other subsidiaries or divisions include Christiana Trust, WSFS Wealth Investments, Cypress Capital Management, LLC, Powdermill Financial Solutions, West Capital Management, Cash Connect®, WSFS Mortgage and Arrow Land Transfer. Serving the Delaware Valley since 1832, WSFS Bank is one of the ten oldest banks in the United States continuously operating under the same name. For more information, please visit wsfsbank.com.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

PHILADELPHIA, March 01, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Penn Capital Management Company, Inc. (Penn Capital) is pleased to announce the addition of Heather Nolan and Samantha Lowry. Ms. Nolan joined Penn Capital in October 2016 as Senior Client Service Director focusing on Institutional Client Service. Ms. Nolan has 20 years of experience in the financial services industry including institutional client service and consultant relationship management, investment manager research, and sales support roles.  Prior to joining Penn Capital, Ms. Nolan spent nine years at CBRE Clarion Securities LLC, most recently as Assistant Vice President, Global Marketing and Client Service/Institutional Investor Relations. Ms. Nolan received a BS in Business Administration and an MBA in Finance from the University of Delaware. She holds FINRA Series 6, 7 and 63 securities licenses. Ms. Lowry joined Penn Capital in January 2017 as Director of Institutional Relationship Management focusing on both consultant and client relationships.  She has 20 years of experience in the financial services industry focused on consultant and client service relationship management.  Previously, Ms. Lowry has served as Director of Consultant Relations and Institutional Sales at Philadelphia International Advisors, as well as Senior Relationship Manager and Senior Consultant Relations Manager at Aberdeen Asset Management.  Ms. Lowry received a BA in English Literature from Temple University and an MBA in Management from St. Joseph’s University. Peter J. Moran, Partner, Executive Vice President, Global Distribution, says of Nolan and Lowry’s additions, “We are excited to have added Heather and Samantha to our team. Their combined experience and insights add depth to our institutional client service coverage and will enhance our consulting firm relationships.” Penn Capital, founded in 1987, is an independent investment management firm located in Philadelphia, PA.  Penn Capital maintains a fully integrated credit and equity research process and emphasizes Complete Capital Structure Analysis®  when analyzing investment opportunities.  Penn Capital has approximately $5.5 billion in assets under advisement (as of December 31, 2016) and specializes in high yield fixed income and micro-to-mid capitalization equity portfolios for institutions and individuals.                                                                                                                          All inquiries can be sent to Melissa Currie, Director of Marketing and Digital Solutions at mcurrie@penncapital.com or (215) 302-1539.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: phys.org

A new risk model developed by a team of researchers from the University of Delaware's College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) and the Delaware Environmental Observing System (DEOS), will allow lima bean growers in the state to utilize a free on-line tool to help them assess the risk of having their fields hit with downy mildew, a fungal-like disease caused by Phytophthora phaseoli. The research was funded by a five-year, $1.5 million U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Specialty Crop Research Initiative grant (SCRI). The team includes Nicole Donofrio and Tom Evans, professors of plant pathology in CANR's Department of Plant and Soil Sciences; Gordon Johnson, assistant professor of plant and soil sciences and a fruit and vegetable specialist for Cooperative Extension; and Kevin Brinson, director of DEOS, which is housed in UD's Department of Geography in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment (CEOE). Matthew Shatley, computer research specialist, and Chris Hughes, environmental applications developer, both in CEOE, helped develop the website. Donofrio said one of the goals of the grant was to create a risk model that growers and processors could easily access for lima bean downy mildew, adding that this new user-friendly website will be "an excellent tool that our cooperators can use that will inform them when and if they need to spray fungicides." Evans, who has been working on prediction models for downy mildew for 15 years with multiple students conducting research both in the field and in greenhouses, said that an older model predicted based strictly on temperature and rainfall. This newer model uses that predictor but adds dew point and temperature, which is helpful as the ideal conditions for downy mildew may also be found in September when growers encounter heavy dews but not much rain. "The month of September typically has a lot of dew because we have high humidity and low night temperatures. The one that uses dew point is the one that's been predicting the most because most of the occurrences were in September. We haven't had any major epidemics in July and August, which is kind of when we have rainfall driven disease," said Evans. The risk model utilizes a numeric scale from one to 10 and allows growers to assess how much risk they are willing to take on, before taking action. "Everybody has a different risk tolerance and their tolerance has to be taken into account. My recommendation is that you're in high risk when you're in somewhere between seven, eight or nine, but there's a lot of variation in that depending on the field and the conditions," said Evans. To use the website, users request an account via email to deos-info@udel.edu and an account is set up for them. Once the user has an account, they can log in to the website to add their lima bean fields or view risk values of their existing fields. New fields are added to the system by providing GPS coordinates or by using a map interface to select the field's location. Weather data from the nearest stations in the DEOS network are determined using the field's geographic location. Additional information required for each field includes information on the lima bean cultivar planted as well as the field's downy mildew disease history. The website allows growers to look at a set of data and graphs that show them their fields' daily risk value for the occurrence of downy mildew. Knowing their individual risk factor allows them to know whether or not they need to spray their crops, which helps their economic bottom line. "This might cut two or three protectant fungicide sprays out in a year and that might save them $100 an acre. And that adds up over time," said Evans. The less fungicides that growers use, the better it is for the environment and it also gives downy mildew less of an opportunity to develop resistance to the fungicides that are being used. Evans said this model is unique to the state of Delaware and the researchers are in the stages of validating it so that that they can feel more comfortable about setting a general range for growers. "I have not found a system that operates quite like this but that's because we're a small state and it's free data. It's public data and it's being done by people that are employed by the state or the University or both," said Evans. Brinson said that the website should be launched in time for the spring growing season and that to validate the model, the researchers used data from lima bean fields owned by vegetable production companies that have scouts who regularly check their fields for downy mildew. "We loaded that data into the system and then ran the model and did all the calculations and as the risk scores got higher, they would go out and try to confirm the presence of downy mildew," said Brinson, noting that Evans would do a lot of the scouting himself. "I know Tom was literally driving around with his iPad looking at our tool and saying, 'Looks like this score is an eight so I want to drive to this field and check it out.' The research team has put a lot of work into certainly this disease but this particular crop, too," said Brinson.


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

WILMINGTON, Del., Nov. 15, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- WSFS Financial Corporation (NASDAQ:WSFS), the parent company of WSFS Bank, today announced the promotion of Vernita L. Dorsey, Robert J. Hayman and Jason L. Spence to Senior Vice President. Photos accompanying this announcement are available at: Vernita L. Dorsey has been promoted to Senior Vice President, Director of Community Strategy. Ms. Dorsey has over 30 years of banking experience; she joined WSFS in 2010 when the Bank combined with Christiana Bank & Trust. As the Director of Community Strategy, Ms. Dorsey oversees Corporate Philanthropy for the company and leads the bank’s volunteer initiatives through Team WSFS. In addition, she serves as Secretary of the WSFS Foundation Board. Vernita is deeply committed to the community and currently chairs the board of Girls Inc. of Delaware. She also serves on the board of Downtown Visions and the advisory board of Henrietta Johnson Medical Center. Ms. Dorsey actively volunteers with many Delaware organizations and serves as the Lay Leader at her church, Coleman Memorial UMC. She also enjoys singing gospel hymns and she directs three choirs at her church. Robert J. Hayman has been promoted to Senior Vice President, Director of Facility Strategy and Vendor Management. Mr. Hayman joined the Bank in January 2012. In his role, he directs all vendor management functions, corporate insurance policies, facility operations and procurement. Mr. Hayman has over 35 years of experience in the financial services industry; he was a senior leader at MBNA America for 15 years and prior to joining WSFS, he held a leadership role with Wilmington Trust Company. He serves on the board of directors at Padua Academy and is an active member at St. John the Beloved Parish in Wilmington, DE. Mr. Hayman received his BSBA from the University of Delaware and his MBA from Widener University. Jason L. Spence has been promoted to Senior Vice President, Director of Credit Risk Management. Mr. Spence joined WSFS Bank in 2006. In his current role, Mr. Spence leads many of the Bank’s loan administration and credit risk functions, including asset quality & concentration reporting, allowance for loan & lease losses, valuation services & construction loan monitoring as well as the loan review function.  Mr. Spence has over 20 years of banking experience and prior to joining WSFS, he served in several management roles during a 13-year career at MBNA America.  Mr. Spence serves as Treasurer on the Risk Management Association – Philadelphia Chapter board of directors and is an active volunteer with the Blood Bank of Delmarva and Meals on Wheels. Mr. Spence is a graduate of the University of Delaware. “We are delighted to announce these promotions and we value the dedication, leadership and caring these Associates demonstrate on a daily basis,” said Peggy H. Eddens, Executive Vice President, Chief Human Capital Officer. “Learning, growing and achieving are cornerstones of our WSFS culture; we congratulate Vernita, Bob and Jason and we thank them for their heartfelt commitment to the communities we serve.” About WSFS Financial Corporation WSFS Financial Corporation is a multi-billion dollar financial services company. Its primary subsidiary, WSFS Bank, is the oldest locally-managed bank and trust company headquartered in Delaware and the Delaware Valley. As of September 30, 2016, WSFS Financial Corporation had $6.6 billion in assets on its balance sheet and $14.3 billion in fiduciary assets. WSFS operates from 76 offices located in Delaware (46), Pennsylvania (28), Virginia (1) and Nevada (1) and provides comprehensive financial services including commercial banking, retail banking, cash management and trust and wealth management. Other subsidiaries or divisions include Christiana Trust, WSFS Wealth Investments, Cypress Capital Management, LLC, Powdermill Financial Solutions, West Capital Management, Cash Connect®, WSFS Mortgage and Arrow Land Transfer. Serving the Delaware Valley since 1832, WSFS Bank is one of the ten oldest banks in the United States continuously operating under the same name. For more information, please visit wsfsbank.com.


News Article | November 18, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

University of Delaware student Jonathon Cottone knows the tell-tale signs that rice plants are getting sick: the yellowing leaves, the faint football-shaped lesions. Cottone, a junior from Wilmington, Delaware, is working with Harsh Bais, associate professor of plant and soil sciences at UD, on research to help this globally important grain cope with increasing stress. Recently, the UD team found that when rice plants are subjected to multiple threats -- including increasing concentrations of poisonous arsenic in water and soil, an urgent concern in Southeast Asia, plus a fungal disease called rice blast -- the plants aren't necessarily goners. Rather, the UD researchers have shown for the first time that a combination of beneficial soil microbes can be applied to the infected plants to boost their natural defenses, combating both problems. The findings, published in Frontiers in Plant Science, provide new evidence about the potential benefit of "biostacking" -- putting multiple microbes together to protect plants from stress. The research also lends further support for a natural, chemical-free approach to protecting a crop that over half the world's population depends on for food. "We wanted to see if we could use a combinatorial approach -- a 'cocktail' of organisms -- that would help rice plants with two simultaneous stresses attacking them," Bais said, from his laboratory at the Delaware Biotechnology Institute. In addition to Bais and Cottone, the team included Venkatachalam Lakshmanan, a former postdoctoral researcher at UD who is now working at the Oklahoma-based Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation. Previously, the UD team identified two species of bacteria that come to the rescue of rice plants when the plants are under attack. The two microbes naturally inhabit the rhizosphere, the soil around the plant roots. Pseudomonas chlororaphis EA105 can trigger a system-wide defense against the rice blast fungus, which destroys enough rice to feed an estimated 60 million people each year. EA105 inhibits formation of the fungus's attack machinery, the appressoria, which acts like a battering ram, putting pressure on a plant leaf until it is punctured. A second microbe, EA106, mobilizes an iron plaque, or shield, to begin accumulating on the roots of rice plants when arsenic is present, effectively blocking uptake of the poison. "What's happening in Southeast Asia from high levels of arsenic in water and soil has been called the largest mass poisoning in history," Bais said. "The EA106 microbe has multiple benefits. The iron shield it deploys blocks the arsenic. This iron, absorbed into the rice grain, could help address another big health problem in many developing countries -- iron deficiency." In their laboratory studies with hydroponically grown rice plants, the UD team treated plants with arsenic, then treated them with EA105 and EA106. Seven days later, they infected the same plants with blast disease. Along the way, they examined the overall genetic responses when arsenic, beneficial bacteria, and fungal disease were incorporated. The resulting data clearly showed that the microbial cocktail could bolster plant defenses against both arsenic and rice blast disease. But there were some surprises. For example, the researchers thought if arsenic was taken up by rice plants, that poison might be detrimental to the blast fungus. But that was not the case. The ability of the blast fungus to tolerate arsenic is a direct story of evolution, according to Bais. The fungus has become more and more resistant to arsenic over time. "To prevent arsenic toxicity, we think the fungus put the arsenic in 'a safehouse' -- storing it in its vacuole -- before the toxin gets loaded to the grain," explained Bais. So how could beneficial microbes such as EA105 and EA106 be applied to protect rice plants? A seed treatment, or microbial coating, would be the most practical route in formulating an economical, effective product, Bais said. Next semester, Bais will travel home to India while on sabbatical leave to give talks at universities, collaborate on research and meet with people who do work in the field. "A real opportunity for India's next generation of sustainable agriculture will be this area of plant probiotics, using microbes that naturally occur in the soil to help plants," Bais said. Meanwhile, Cottone, who recently was named a DENIN Environmental Scholar at UD, will continue his research in the Bais lab, skyping with Bais while he is away. Ironically, Cottone didn't know a lot about plants until he took Bais's introductory botany course last year. Then a whole new world opened up to him, and he's now decided to pursue a double major in plant science and animal science. "This work has a huge humanitarian bent in that the majority of countries affected by arsenic poisoning are developing countries," Cottone said. "So this work could really help a lot of people who really are not in a position to help themselves." "Jonathon is doing a fantastic job," Bais said. "He puts in long hours. He's mastered how to grow rice and manages the entire greenhouse now. He's already co-authored a scientific paper as an undergrad." And he's got lots of room to flex his research muscles. The complex relationships between plants and the microorganisms living with them, their "microbiome," provide countless avenues to explore in the quest to improve plant health. "Plants are exposed to multiple stresses these days, many driven by changing climate. Plants are just confused. They don't know what to do," Bais said. "We're trying to help them cope."


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

WILMINGTON, Del., Nov. 15, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- WSFS Financial Corporation (NASDAQ:WSFS), the parent company of WSFS Bank, today announced the promotion of Vernita L. Dorsey, Robert J. Hayman and Jason L. Spence to Senior Vice President. Photos accompanying this announcement are available at: Vernita L. Dorsey has been promoted to Senior Vice President, Director of Community Strategy. Ms. Dorsey has over 30 years of banking experience; she joined WSFS in 2010 when the Bank combined with Christiana Bank & Trust. As the Director of Community Strategy, Ms. Dorsey oversees Corporate Philanthropy for the company and leads the bank’s volunteer initiatives through Team WSFS. In addition, she serves as Secretary of the WSFS Foundation Board. Vernita is deeply committed to the community and currently chairs the board of Girls Inc. of Delaware. She also serves on the board of Downtown Visions and the advisory board of Henrietta Johnson Medical Center. Ms. Dorsey actively volunteers with many Delaware organizations and serves as the Lay Leader at her church, Coleman Memorial UMC. She also enjoys singing gospel hymns and she directs three choirs at her church. Robert J. Hayman has been promoted to Senior Vice President, Director of Facility Strategy and Vendor Management. Mr. Hayman joined the Bank in January 2012. In his role, he directs all vendor management functions, corporate insurance policies, facility operations and procurement. Mr. Hayman has over 35 years of experience in the financial services industry; he was a senior leader at MBNA America for 15 years and prior to joining WSFS, he held a leadership role with Wilmington Trust Company. He serves on the board of directors at Padua Academy and is an active member at St. John the Beloved Parish in Wilmington, DE. Mr. Hayman received his BSBA from the University of Delaware and his MBA from Widener University. Jason L. Spence has been promoted to Senior Vice President, Director of Credit Risk Management. Mr. Spence joined WSFS Bank in 2006. In his current role, Mr. Spence leads many of the Bank’s loan administration and credit risk functions, including asset quality & concentration reporting, allowance for loan & lease losses, valuation services & construction loan monitoring as well as the loan review function.  Mr. Spence has over 20 years of banking experience and prior to joining WSFS, he served in several management roles during a 13-year career at MBNA America.  Mr. Spence serves as Treasurer on the Risk Management Association – Philadelphia Chapter board of directors and is an active volunteer with the Blood Bank of Delmarva and Meals on Wheels. Mr. Spence is a graduate of the University of Delaware. “We are delighted to announce these promotions and we value the dedication, leadership and caring these Associates demonstrate on a daily basis,” said Peggy H. Eddens, Executive Vice President, Chief Human Capital Officer. “Learning, growing and achieving are cornerstones of our WSFS culture; we congratulate Vernita, Bob and Jason and we thank them for their heartfelt commitment to the communities we serve.” About WSFS Financial Corporation WSFS Financial Corporation is a multi-billion dollar financial services company. Its primary subsidiary, WSFS Bank, is the oldest locally-managed bank and trust company headquartered in Delaware and the Delaware Valley. As of September 30, 2016, WSFS Financial Corporation had $6.6 billion in assets on its balance sheet and $14.3 billion in fiduciary assets. WSFS operates from 76 offices located in Delaware (46), Pennsylvania (28), Virginia (1) and Nevada (1) and provides comprehensive financial services including commercial banking, retail banking, cash management and trust and wealth management. Other subsidiaries or divisions include Christiana Trust, WSFS Wealth Investments, Cypress Capital Management, LLC, Powdermill Financial Solutions, West Capital Management, Cash Connect®, WSFS Mortgage and Arrow Land Transfer. Serving the Delaware Valley since 1832, WSFS Bank is one of the ten oldest banks in the United States continuously operating under the same name. For more information, please visit wsfsbank.com.


News Article | November 19, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Leading higher education information and resource site AffordableCollegesOnline.org has released its list of the Best Online Accelerated Nursing Degrees & Programs in the nation for 2016-2017. Using a variety of cost and educational outcome data to compare accredited programs side by side, the list rates the University of Saint Mary, University of Wyoming, The Sage Colleges, University of Indianapolis and Samford University as the top-scoring schools for accelerated nursing students. "As the demand for qualified nurses grows, more colleges are implementing fast-track education options for nursing students,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and Founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. "These programs are rigorous, but the schools on our list stand out for providing the best quality education and support to help students comprehend quickly and ultimately start their careers in nursing sooner.” AffordableCollegesOnline.org required schools to meet several basic requirements to be considered for the Best Online Accelerated Nursing Degrees & Programs list. Each college must be accredited by the Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) or Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN) and be a public or private not-for-profit institution to be included. They must also offer students job placement and academic counseling services to qualify. Individual school scores are then determined by weighing a variety of qualitative and quantitative data points, such as nursing certification pass rates, tuition costs and more. The Top 50 list of schools, as well as specific details on data and methodology used to determine ranking and scoring can be found at the link below: An alphabetical list of schools on the Best Online Accelerated Nursing Programs list for 2016-2017: Adelphi University Albany State University Ball State University Barry University Baylor University Clemson University Creighton University DeSales University Drexel University Duquesne University East Carolina University Georgia Southwestern State University Indiana Wesleyan University Jacksonville University Lewis University Loyola University Chicago Lynchburg College New Mexico State University - Main Campus New York University Northern Arizona University Ohio University - Main Campus Olivet Nazarene University Quinnipiac University Robert Morris University Rutgers University - Newark Saint Xavier University Samford University Seton Hall University Shenandoah University Simmons College Southern Nazarene University Texas Christian University The College of Saint Scholastica The Sage Colleges University of Alabama at Birmingham University of Arizona University of Delaware University of Hawaii at Manoa University of Indianapolis University of Memphis University of Miami University of North Florida University of Northern Colorado University of Saint Joseph University of Saint Mary University of Wyoming Utica College Valparaiso University West Virginia University Wilkes University AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.


News Article | November 2, 2016
Site: www.rdmag.com

A new study published today in Scientific Reports by University of Delaware researchers and colleagues reveals that 100 feet below the surface of the ocean is a critical depth for ecological activity in the Arctic polar night -- a period of near continuous winter darkness. It is at this depth, the researchers said, that atmospheric light diminishes in the water column and bioluminescence from marine organisms becomes the dominant light source. It also is the site of significant changes in the composition of luminescent organisms present in the water column. "It turns out that approximately 100 feet in depth is an important transition zone," said Jonathan Cohen, a UD assistant professor in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment and co-author on the paper. The research team has been studying how much biological activity takes place in the Arctic polar night since 2012, when UD's Mark Moline, director of the School of Marine Science and Policy and colleagues in Norway and Scotland began exploring how sea life copes with continuous winter darkness in Svalbard, Norway. Prevailing scientific thought until then was that the food web remained dormant during the polar night. The researchers said that bioluminescence can help explain how some organisms feed and maintain activity during the polar night period and how light can still be involved in ecological processes even during a time of darkness. One interesting finding in the current study is that as depth increased, the amount of bioluminescence in the water column increased and the zooplankton community composition changed. "As you go deeper into the water, we saw fewer dinoflagellates and more copepods, krill and ctenophores, which give off brighter bioluminescent light," said Cohen, who joined the research team in 2013. This community change is not associated with any physical conditions of the water, the researchers said. Rather, it correlates to what the researchers term "bioluminescence compensation depth," the transition point at which atmospheric light diminishes in the water column and bioluminescence takes over. "This points to the functionality of bioluminescence structuring the vertical distribution through behavior possibly independent of migration," said Moline. This is an important finding as the Barents Sea south of Svalbard, Norway, is home to a large and globally important fishery. Fishermen in the region are tremendously interested in understanding how changes in zooplankton -- like copepods -- and zooplankton availability will affect commercially important fish species like cod and herring. The researchers knew from other studies that the distribution of zooplankton and krill in the water column increased at around 100 feet. "When the sky gets brighter at midday during the polar night period there is more atmospheric light available underwater for predation than at night, so marine organisms like copepods retreat lower into the water column where it is darker. We wanted to know how this light interacted with bioluminescence to influence life in the water column," Cohen said. The researchers first attacked this issue by taking atmospheric light measurements in 2014 and 2015, while also measuring bioluminescence in the water. This led to a more detailed study in 2015 of which planktonic species produced light. Finally, they put it all together to think about how bioluminescence can be a light source during the polar night. Then UD graduate student Heather Cronin, working with Cohen and Moline, created what is called a photon budget, or light budget, to measure how much light comes from the atmosphere and how much light comes from inside the water itself with organisms glowing through bioluminescence. To quantify the amount of bioluminescence and to identify what marine organisms were present, the researchers used a pumping system in the water column to drive the organisms into a specialized device equipped with a sensitive light meter. As the organisms entered the device, turbulence created by the pump stimulated the animals to luminesce or glow. Using luminescence kinetics, or the time course of light production and dissipation, the researchers measured how the light intensity inside the pump changed with time in order to identify the marine species present. "Luminescent marine organisms each have a unique light signature. By looking at the time series light generated by a flash within the instrument, we were able to determine who was there making the flash," Cohen explained. "It's a useful tool, particularly at this time of year when relatively few species are present." Bioluminescence is known to play a critical role in helping marine organisms avoid predators and even hide themselves in plain site. At the same time, Cohen continued, it appears that krill and potentially fish are using the additional bioluminescent light from the copepods to find food. "We know from analysis of gut contents that fish and seabirds are active and feeding in Svalbard fjords during polar night," Cohen explained. "Our research suggests that bioluminescent light may be one of the ways that they find food in the dark." One looming concern under climate change scenarios is the loss of sea ice. According to Cohen, scientists are just beginning to appreciate that climate change will change the light environment, which will impact the timing of the ice algae and phytoplankton blooms that spur the spring growing season, maybe even causing it to occur earlier in the year. In the Arctic, for example, sea ice is part of what makes the water column dark. So, if the depth at which atmospheric light transitions to bioluminescent light is important in structuring the zooplankton community and the ecological interactions among organisms, then understanding how much atmospheric light will be present in the water column with less sea ice is significant for understanding food web dynamics. The novelty in the team's work is the focus on putting numbers and data to the processes that occur directly before the spring cycle begins. The next step is to make similar measurements further away from Svalbard to validate their findings in the open ocean. "Being able to measure this transition depth gives us something to look at across seasons and across years that could have important implications for food web impacts in a rapidly changing Arctic," Cohen said.


News Article | November 25, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The nation’s best Online Engineering Degree Programs are being highlighted by leading higher education information and resource provider AffordableCollegesOnline.org for 2016-2017. The site released its ranking of the top 50 four-year schools and top 33 two-year schools offering engineering degrees online, honoring Siena Heights University, Eastern Michigan University, Texas A&M University, Indiana State University and Missouri State University Springfield as the highest scoring four-year schools and Holmes Community College, East Mississippi Community College, Crowder College, Tulsa Community College and Diablo Valley College as the highest scoring two-year schools. "Surveys show one of the most popular college major choices for high school seniors is engineering,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and Founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. “As we see more colleges take their programs online to meet the growing demand, it’s important for us to highlight schools going the extra mile by offering the best combination of affordability and quality online engineering curriculum for students.” Colleges must meet specific minimum requirements to qualify for a spot on the AffordableCollegesOnline.org ranking. Each must be regionally accredited and hold public or private not-for-profit status. Maximum in-state tuition cost requirements are also set at $5,000 or less annually for two-year schools and $25,000 or less annually for four-year schools. Eligible colleges are scored based on more than a dozen unique data points, including financial aid offerings, graduation rates and variety of online programs. Final rankings are determined based on these school-specific scores. An alphabetical list of the schools on the 2016-2017 Best Online Engineering Degrees list can be found below. See the attached map for school count by state. Full rankings and further details on data and methodology can be found at the link below: Two-Year Schools on the 2016-2017 Best Online Engineering Degrees list: Arapahoe Community College Big Sandy Community and Technical College Bluegrass Community and Technical College Central Georgia Technical College Central Texas College College of the Siskiyous Columbus State Community College Cowley County Community College Crowder College Diablo Valley College East Mississippi Community College Eastern Iowa Community College District Elizabethtown Community and Technical College Gateway Community and Technical College Holmes Community College Hudson Valley Community College Iowa Central Community College Ivy Tech Community College Kansas City Kansas Community College Merced College North Dakota State College of Science Ocean County College Odessa College Ozarks Technical Community College Schoolcraft College Stark State College State Fair Community College Three Rivers Community College Truckee Meadows Community College Tulsa Community College Wake Technical Community College Washtenaw Community College Western Wyoming Community College Four-Year Schools on the 2016-2017 Best Online Engineering Degrees list: Arkansas State University - Main Campus Baker College of Muskegon Bemidji State University Clarion University of Pennsylvania Clemson University Daytona State College Delta State University East Carolina University Eastern Michigan University Eastern New Mexico University - Main Campus Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University - Worldwide Ferris State University Florida Atlantic University Fort Hays State University Indiana State University Indiana University - East Kennesaw State University Liberty University Missouri State University - Springfield Morehead State University National University Northern Arizona University Oklahoma State University - Main Campus Old Dominion University Pittsburg State University Saint Cloud State University Siena Heights University Southeast Missouri State University State College of Florida - Manatee-Sarasota Stony Brook University Texas A & M University - College Station The University of Alabama The University of Texas of the Permian Basin University of Arizona University of Arkansas at Little Rock University of Central Florida University of Delaware University of Massachusetts - Lowell University of Minnesota - Twin Cities University of Nebraska at Omaha University of North Carolina at Charlotte University of North Dakota University of South Carolina - Upstate University of Southern Mississippi University of Toledo University of Virginia-Main Campus Utah Valley University Vaughn College of Aeronautics and Technology Washburn University Western Kentucky University AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

In August 2015, University of Delaware oceanographer Andreas Muenchow and colleagues deployed the first UD ocean sensors underneath Petermann Glacier in North Greenland, which connects the great Greenland ice sheet directly with the ocean. Petermann Glacier is the second largest floating ice shelf in the northern hemisphere. Located approximately 16 to 2,300 feet below the glacier, the five ocean sensors are connected to a weather station at the surface, creating the first cabled observatory on a floating, moving, and rapidly melting Greenland glacier. The researchers recently reported in the journal Oceanography that sensor data from August 2015 to February 2016 confirms that that the floating ice shelf is strongly coupled, or tied, to the ocean below and to Nares Strait, and temperatures vary with the tides and seasons. Specifically, the paper found that the same water that has been measured in the fjord is under the glacier, lending credence to the idea that the continuity of the glacier depends on the conditions outside the glacier in the fjord. This water is warming an average of 0.03 degrees Celsius per year, with temperatures at the deepest ocean sensors sometimes exceeding 0.3 degrees Celsius or 33 degrees Fahrenheit, Muenchow said. These temperature values are consistent at various water depths, and match data from a 2003-09 study in adjacent Nares Strait, which connects to both the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans. "This correlation tells us this is the same water and that this is what's causing the melting of the glacier, which could influence sea level rise," said Muenchow, an associate professor of oceanography in UD's School of Marine Science and Policy, which is housed in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment (CEOE). The scientists theorize that warmer Atlantic water will continue to arrive inside Petermann Fjord and below the ice shelf from Nares Strait in the next one-to-two years. Co-authors on the paper include Keith W. Nicholls, an oceanographer with the British Antarctic Survey; Peter Washam, a UD doctoral student; and Laurie Padman, a senior scientist at Oregon State University.


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

WILMINGTON, Del., Nov. 15, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- WSFS Financial Corporation (NASDAQ:WSFS), the parent company of WSFS Bank, today announced the promotion of Vernita L. Dorsey, Robert J. Hayman and Jason L. Spence to Senior Vice President. Photos accompanying this announcement are available at: Vernita L. Dorsey has been promoted to Senior Vice President, Director of Community Strategy. Ms. Dorsey has over 30 years of banking experience; she joined WSFS in 2010 when the Bank combined with Christiana Bank & Trust. As the Director of Community Strategy, Ms. Dorsey oversees Corporate Philanthropy for the company and leads the bank’s volunteer initiatives through Team WSFS. In addition, she serves as Secretary of the WSFS Foundation Board. Vernita is deeply committed to the community and currently chairs the board of Girls Inc. of Delaware. She also serves on the board of Downtown Visions and the advisory board of Henrietta Johnson Medical Center. Ms. Dorsey actively volunteers with many Delaware organizations and serves as the Lay Leader at her church, Coleman Memorial UMC. She also enjoys singing gospel hymns and she directs three choirs at her church. Robert J. Hayman has been promoted to Senior Vice President, Director of Facility Strategy and Vendor Management. Mr. Hayman joined the Bank in January 2012. In his role, he directs all vendor management functions, corporate insurance policies, facility operations and procurement. Mr. Hayman has over 35 years of experience in the financial services industry; he was a senior leader at MBNA America for 15 years and prior to joining WSFS, he held a leadership role with Wilmington Trust Company. He serves on the board of directors at Padua Academy and is an active member at St. John the Beloved Parish in Wilmington, DE. Mr. Hayman received his BSBA from the University of Delaware and his MBA from Widener University. Jason L. Spence has been promoted to Senior Vice President, Director of Credit Risk Management. Mr. Spence joined WSFS Bank in 2006. In his current role, Mr. Spence leads many of the Bank’s loan administration and credit risk functions, including asset quality & concentration reporting, allowance for loan & lease losses, valuation services & construction loan monitoring as well as the loan review function.  Mr. Spence has over 20 years of banking experience and prior to joining WSFS, he served in several management roles during a 13-year career at MBNA America.  Mr. Spence serves as Treasurer on the Risk Management Association – Philadelphia Chapter board of directors and is an active volunteer with the Blood Bank of Delmarva and Meals on Wheels. Mr. Spence is a graduate of the University of Delaware. “We are delighted to announce these promotions and we value the dedication, leadership and caring these Associates demonstrate on a daily basis,” said Peggy H. Eddens, Executive Vice President, Chief Human Capital Officer. “Learning, growing and achieving are cornerstones of our WSFS culture; we congratulate Vernita, Bob and Jason and we thank them for their heartfelt commitment to the communities we serve.” About WSFS Financial Corporation WSFS Financial Corporation is a multi-billion dollar financial services company. Its primary subsidiary, WSFS Bank, is the oldest locally-managed bank and trust company headquartered in Delaware and the Delaware Valley. As of September 30, 2016, WSFS Financial Corporation had $6.6 billion in assets on its balance sheet and $14.3 billion in fiduciary assets. WSFS operates from 76 offices located in Delaware (46), Pennsylvania (28), Virginia (1) and Nevada (1) and provides comprehensive financial services including commercial banking, retail banking, cash management and trust and wealth management. Other subsidiaries or divisions include Christiana Trust, WSFS Wealth Investments, Cypress Capital Management, LLC, Powdermill Financial Solutions, West Capital Management, Cash Connect®, WSFS Mortgage and Arrow Land Transfer. Serving the Delaware Valley since 1832, WSFS Bank is one of the ten oldest banks in the United States continuously operating under the same name. For more information, please visit wsfsbank.com.


At Palmer Station, a U.S. research base located along the WAP, scientists have been monitoring Adélie penguin population declines for decades. There were 15,000 breeding pairs of Adélie penguins in 1975; but today only a few thousand pairs are left. Now, in a study reported in the Nature publication Scientific Reports, University of Delaware oceanographers consider whether Adélie penguins and gentoo penguins—newcomers to the Palmer Station region over the last two decades—may be competing for the same food resources and whether this might exacerbate the Adélie population decline. An ecological theory called the competitive exclusion principle, also known as Gause's law, states that "two species that compete for the exact same resources cannot stably coexist." "So we set out to explore whether the Adélies and gentoos were eating out of the same lunch box, so to speak," explained Megan Cimino, a doctoral candidate in UD's College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment and the paper's lead author. Co-authors on the paper, "Climate-Driven Sympatry May Not Lead to Foraging Competition Between Cogeneric Top-Predators," include UD's Mark A. Moline, director of the School of Marine Science and Policy, and Matthew J. Oliver, Patricia and Charles Robertson Professor of Marine Science and Policy; and William R. Fraser and Donna L. Patterson-Fraser from Polar Ocean's Research Group. To test whether the species were competing, the researcher's tagged penguins with small satellite transmitters and depth recorders to track where the penguins went and how deep they were diving. The tags were attached to a different penguin every three days over the month-long 2011 study which took place during the chick-feeding phase of the breeding cycle when adults are feeding chicks and the parental foraging ranges of both species overlap. Each penguin completed a few foraging trips and hundreds to thousands of dives while tagged. Additionally, the research team used an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) called a REMUS to sample the water where the penguins were foraging, something few researchers have done before. The REMUS provided important measurements on temperature, salinity and how much light was in the water (important for visual predators like penguins). It also measured the amount of phytoplankton and krill, the main food source for both penguin species, present in the water, systematically allowing the researchers to measure multiple levels of the food chain in the same study, from phytoplankton to krill to penguins. "Gaining an understanding of where krill are in relation to their food, and where penguins are in relation to their food was an important part of the study," Cimino said. "Without the REMUS—which can swim at about the same speed and dive almost as deep as a penguin—we would not know what's going on in the waters where the penguins are, we would only know that the penguins were there." An analysis of the data on thousands of foraging dives revealed that while the Adélie and gentoo penguins generally foraged in different areas, there was a small area of overlap between the two populations. Interestingly, when the species overlapped, the gentoos shifted behavior and foraged at deeper depths—nearly 35 percent—below the Adélie penguins. Both penguin species are capable of foraging as deep as 150 meters below the ocean surface, yet over the study period, the Adélies foraged in the upper 50 meters of the water and they didn't change their behavior at all when their foraging area overlapped with the gentoos. The gentoos, however, often foraged as deep as 150 meters when in overlapping areas. The researchers theorize this may be a strategy to limit competition. "It was unexpected to see the Adélies foraging much shallower than the gentoos when we know they are capable of deeper dives," Cimino said. Furthermore, the fact that both penguin species were provisioning chicks during the satellite tracking implied that the adults were returning to the nest with enough food, further suggesting that competition was not limiting food resources. Krill, the penguin's main food source, are an important prey in the Southern Ocean because they aggregate in large groups and have high nutritional value. The researchers used the REMUS to test whether krill were affiliated with any specific water properties. The team found that krill were mostly associated with areas where the water became darker at a shallower depth and the bulk of phytoplankton, it's food source, was located deeper in the water. Since there are few places to hide in the open ocean except in darkness, this led the research team to determine that the krill were selecting for areas where they could eat, but also avoid being eaten by visual predators, such as penguins. "The novel aspect of the study was that the environmental sampling done by the robot was informed by the location of the penguins. By doing this, we could couple the behavior of these two species with the distribution of their prey and make distinctions that were not possible beforehand," explained Moline. More work to be done While recent theories have suggested that increased competition for krill is a main driver of Adélie penguin population declines, the oceanographers suspect the Adélie declines along the WAP may be more likely due to direct and indirect climate impacts on their life histories. Last year UD researchers and colleagues reported a connection between local weather conditions and the weight of Adélie penguin chicks. Previous research studies near Palmer Station demonstrated how climate and weather influence penguin breeding habits, the marine foraging environment and foraging trip duration. If the WAP climate continues to warm, sea ice extent and coverage duration will continue to decrease, potentially altering the food web and raising questions about what effect changes in winter habitat will have on the species' survival, Cimino said. Adélie penguins are migratory and leave their breeding colony in winter and stay out at sea. Gentoo penguins are non-migratory and remain at the breeding colony all winter. "It is cool to see that two species can exist in very close quarters—less than 20 kilometers apart—and have different foraging habitats. But if their winter habitats are changing as well, for better or worse, it will likely have a direct effect on their population and how many penguins come back to breed each season," Cimino said. Explore further: Researchers get better view of penguins with affixed cameras and accelerometers (w/ video) More information: Megan A. Cimino et al. Climate-driven sympatry may not lead to foraging competition between congeneric top-predators, Scientific Reports (2016). DOI: 10.1038/srep18820


The Energy Department’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) has selected 16 projects for a combined $35 million in funding under the new program “Renewable Energy to Fuels Through Utilization of Energy-Dense Liquids (REFUEL)”. (Earlier post.) The 16 REFUEL projects seek to develop scalable technologies for converting water and molecules from the air into energy-dense, carbon-neutral liquid fuels (CNLFs) using electrical energy from renewable sources. REFUEL projects will convert low-cost renewable energy into a transportable chemical fuel and use these fuels for transportation applications, while reducing production costs and environmental impact. Most of the selected REFUEL projects target the production of ammonia or its conversion to hydrogen or electricity, due ammonia’s attractiveness as a hydrogen and energy carrier. State-of-the-art industrial ammonia production using the Haber-Bosch process requires a hydrogen source (usually natural gas), remains highly capital and energy intensive, and is only economical at a large scale. Many projects seek to overcome these limitations to enable economically competitive, distributed production of this prototypical CNLF. The program is focused in two areas: (1) the synthesis of CNLFs using intermittent renewable energy sources and water and air (N2 and CO2) as the only chemical input streams; and (2) the conversion of CNLFs delivered to the end point to another form of energy (e.g. hydrogen or electricity). REFUEL Projects Organization Description Funding Bettergy Corporation Low Temperature Ammonia Cracking Membrane Reactor for Hydrogen Generation (Category 2)The Bettergy Corporation team will develop a system to “crack,” or break apart, ammonia, releasing pure hydrogen, using a non-precious metal catalyst at temperatures below 450 °C. Bettergy’s innovation creates a one-step cracking process during which ammonia is separated and the hydrogen passes through a selective membrane, leaving only harmless nitrogen as a byproduct. If successful, this breakthrough technology would transform the process of hydrogen production, providing low-cost, on-demand generating options for hydrogen refueling stations. $1,524,607 FuelCell Energy, Inc. Protonic Ceramics for Energy Storage and Electricity Generation with Ammonia (Category 1 & 2)The FuelCell Energy, Inc. team will build a reversible electrochemical cell to produce ammonia from nitrogen and water or consume ammonia to generate electricity. The FuelCell team’s innovation relies on an electrode incorporating a ruthenium catalyst—a material that reduces the energy requirement of the reaction—that has shown to be more active for ammonia production than traditional methods. If successful, the FuelCell team will increase ammonia production rates to 100 times current electrochemical methods—comparable with commercial processes while avoiding the need for separate hydrogen production thanks to its use of water, thus decreasing feedstock costs. $3,100,000 Gas Technology Institute A Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactor for DME Synthesis from Renewable Resources (Category 1)The Gas Technology Institute team will develop a reactor to synthesize dimethyl ether (DME), which functions as a substitute for diesel fuel, from carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and electricity. The team will integrate an advanced membrane reactor design with a novel dual-function catalyst and high-performance product purification to create a scalable, low-cost DME synthesis platform. $2,300,000 Giner, Inc. High-Efficiency Ammonia Production from Water and Nitrogen (Category 1) The Giner, Inc. team will develop a variety of novel catalyst materials to improve nitrogen reduction reactions, which are key to the efficient production of ammonia, an easily portable and storable hydrogen and energy carrier. Giner will also use high-performance hydroxide exchange membranes to further boost ammonia production rates, integrating this and the catalysts into its water electrolysis platform to maximize cell performance. If successful, the team will reduce ammonia production capital and operating costs by 30-40 percent compared to the conventional Haber-Bosch process. $1,500,000 Materials and Systems Research, Inc. Cost-Effective, Intermediate-Temperature Fuel Cell for Carbon-Free Power Generation (Category 2)The Materials and Systems Research, Inc. (MSRI) team will develop a new solid oxide fuel cell design that generates power directly from ammonia at temperatures under 650 °C. The team also seeks to develop a manufacturing process for the cell. If successful, the MSRI team will greatly reduce the cost of solid oxide fuel cells while providing a high-efficiency, long-life power generating option with a reduced carbon footprint. $1,100,000 Molecule Works, Inc. Novel Electrochemical Membrane Reactor for Synthesis of Ammonia from Air and Water at Low Temperature and Low Pressure (Category 1)The Molecule Works, Inc. team will develop a modular reactor for producing ammonia using air and water at low temperatures. The team will build an anion exchange membrane (AEM) using a thin porous ceramic/metal sheet, allowing the cell to operate between 50 and 180 °C. The porous metal sheet cathode will provide a large catalytic reaction area per unit volume and greatly increase the diffusion rate of nitrogen gas within the cell compared to conventional approaches. $2,300,000 Opus 12, Inc. Renewable Electricity-Powered Carbon Dioxide Conversion to Ethanol for Storage and Transportation (Category 1)The Opus 12, Inc. project team will develop a device to facilitate the direct conversion of carbon dioxide to ethanol using a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer system. PEM systems are commonly used for hydrogen generation, and Opus 12’s innovation changes the environment of the PEM electrolyzer to have high selectivity for carbon dioxide utilization. The one-step synthesis process contributes to system efficiency, keeps capital costs low, and if successful, the project would integrate seamlessly into existing ethanol purification infrastructure. $1,903,268 RTI International Innovative Renewable Energy-Based Catalytic Ammonia Production (Category 1)The RTI International team will build an improved Haber-Bosch ammonia synthesis system with an innovative process design to respond to changes in available power, making it ideal for intermittent renewable energy resources. By using a breakthrough catalyst to synthesize ammonia, the team seeks to enable operation at temperatures at least 20 percent lower, and with reduced pressures compared to traditional Haber-Bosch catalysts. If successful, the project will result in a small-scale ammonia synthesis system that is economically viable and can start and stop in synchronization with intermittent renewable power sources. $3,111,910 SAFCell, Inc. Distributed Electrochemical Production and Conversion of Carbon-Neutral Ammonia (Category 2)The SAFCell project team will build a high-pressure stack designed to generate hydrogen from ammonia, purify it, and pressurize it in a single device, greatly simplifying the infrastructure required to get hydrogen fuel to refueling stations and store it there. Solid acid stacks operate at intermediate temperatures of around 250 °C and are highly tolerant of compounds that normally damage anode catalysts like carbon monoxide, ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide. If successful, the SAFCell team expects low cost, long-life, on-demand compressed hydrogen production from a distributed system with a quick start-up time. $3,000,000 Storagenergy Technologies, Inc. High Rate Ammonia Synthesis by Intermediate Temperature Solid-State Alkaline Electrolyzer (Category 1)The Storagenergy Technologies, Inc. team will build a system to produce ammonia from water and nitrogen. Storagenergy’s innovation relies on a cell containing an electrolyte made from a solid composite and nanostructured catalysts for nitrogen reduction reactions. If successful, the Storagenergy team will create a cell capable of producing ammonia at temperatures between 100 and 300 °C without the need for separate hydrogen production, thus decreasing feedstock costs. $2,523,958 Sustainable Innovations, Inc. Electricity from an Energy-Dense, Carbon-Neutral Energy Carrier (Category 1)The Sustainable Innovations, Inc. team will use electricity, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen to create a sustainable and economic source of dimethyl ether (DME), a fuel similar to diesel. The Sustainable Innovations team seeks to take waste carbon dioxide from industrial or chemical processes and—using an electrochemical cell and water—convert it to methanol, with subsequent conversion to DME producing only oxygen and water as byproducts. If successful, the project could create a large new market for carbon dioxide and offer compelling applications for fuel cell vehicles, stationary power, grid energy storage, and as a diesel fuel substitute. $1,200,000 University of Delaware Direct Ammonia Fuel Cells for Transport Applications (Category 2)The University of Delaware team will build a fuel cell with a hydroxide-ion conducting membrane electrolyte that consumes ammonia directly to generate electricity. Use of such a fuel cell for transport will be facilitated by a lower-cost polymer electrolyte and catalysts capable of oxidizing ammonia effectively around 100 °C. The team goal is an ammonia-fed fuel cell generating 500 mW per cm2 of cell active area, with rapid startup enabled by the low operating temperature. $2,500,000 University of Minnesota Twin Cities Small Scale Ammonia Synthesis Using Stranded Wind Energy (Category 1)The University of Minnesota Twin Cities team will insert an inorganic absorbent material in the ammonia synthesis loop of a traditional Haber-Bosch process to remove ammonia from the gas stream. Doing so will allow increased single-pass conversion and increase production rates. Once the material is loaded with ammonia, it will be regenerated and release ammonia. This approach will allow for ammonia production at 10 times lower pressure than the Haber-Bosch process, thus making it better suited for small-scale systems using renewable power. $2,900,000 University of South Carolina A Novel Hollow Fiber Membrane Reactor for High Purity Hydrogen Generation from Thermal Catalytic Ammonia Decomposition (Category 2)The University of South Carolina team will build a membrane reactor to generate hydrogen fuel from ammonia decomposition, which may then be used by a hydrogen fuel cell vehicle or stationary generator. The team will use an innovative hollow fiber membrane reactor design with a highly active ruthenium-based catalyst to increase ammonia conversion at lower temperatures while reducing catalyst cost. If successful, the project would serve as a low-cost ammonia decomposition system and could contribute greatly to solving the issues surrounding hydrogen transportation and storage. $1,600,000 West Virginia University Research Corporation Renewable Energy to Fuels Through Plasma Catalytic Synthesis of Ammonia (Category 1)The West Virginia University Research Corporation (WVURC) team will develop a method to produce ammonia from hydrogen and nitrogen using a microwave plasma. Using low temperatures and pressure, the project team expects to produce ammonia at five times the conversion rate of the Haber-Bosch process. Temperature and pressure requirements are also amenable to intermittent renewable energy sources, as warm-up times can be substantially shorter. If successful, the WVURC will produce a test reactor capable of producing 1 kg of ammonia per day. $1,250,000 Wichita State University Alkaline Membrane-Based Ammonia Electrosynthesis with High Efficiency for Renewable and Scalable Liquid Fuel Production (Category 1)The Wichita State University team will demonstrate a method for creating ammonia from air using a hydroxide- exchange membrane (HEM) powered by renewable electricity. Current methods of generating ammonia are energy-intensive and suffer from inefficiencies that drive up costs. If successful, the team’s HEM approach could increase the selectivity for ammonia product—making it more efficient—while the device’s tolerance for high electrical current would help lower costs relative to other electrochemical approaches to synthesize ammonia. $855,000


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The University City Science Center will unveil a new evaluation report of the QED Proof-of-Concept program at the QED Round Seven Showcase on November 2, 2016 at Quorum at the University City Science Center. Closing the Gap: University City Science Center’s QED Proof-of-Concept Program, prepared by the Economy League of Greater Philadelphia, quantifies the performance and impact of the program on the Greater Philadelphia region’s innovation ecosystem. Since the program’s inception in 2009, QED has screened 475 proposals from 21 participating academic and research institutions. Of the technologies screened, 94 projects have been accepted into the competitive program and paired with scientists and industry professionals. QED has awarded a total of $4.85 million to 28 projects, primarily in the therapeutic/biologic, device/diagnostic, and digital health sectors. Of these 28 projects, eight technologies have been licensed, while five have gone on to form startup companies. Projects awarded funding by the QED program have raised over $19 million in follow-on funding. The four researchers who received awards in the seventh round of the QED Program in 2014 will have an opportunity to share their progress over the last two years at the QED Round Seven Showcase. Dr. Chao Zhou of Lehigh University is developing a diagnostic instrument that will allow faster, more sensitive eye exams for macular degeneration and glaucoma, improving an approach known as optical coherence tomography (OCT). Dr. Steven Levison of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is developing a new product for culturing neural stem cells that simplifies and improves the ability of researchers to grow these cells for experimental and therapeutic use. Dr. William Wuest of Temple University is developing the next generation of disinfectants for a variety of commercial industries including healthcare, transportation, water, and energy. Dr. Sunday Shoyele of Thomas Jefferson University is developing a product for delivering highly-degradable gene inhibitors to cancer and other cells using antibody-based nanoparticles. 5:00 - 5:30 PM – Registration and networking 5:30 - 5:40 PM – Welcoming Remarks and QED Impact Study Highlights 5:40 - 5:50 PM – Round 7 Awardee Presentations 5:50 - 7:30 PM – Networking and refreshments among Round 7 Awardee Exhibit Tables The QED Program provides business development support and critical funding for academic researchers developing early-stage life sciences and healthcare IT technologies with high commercial potential. The program’s primary goal is to reduce commercialization risk in early-stage projects, thus increasing their attractiveness to,established companies and private investors. QED has received support from the U.S. Economic Development Administration, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s Ben Franklin Technology Development Authority, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s Department of Health, the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corporation, William Penn Foundation, and Wexford Science and Technology. About the Science Center Located in the heart of uCity Square, the University City Science Center is a dynamic hub for innovation, and entrepreneurship and technology development in the Greater Philadelphia region. Founded in 1963 as the nation’s first urban research park, it provides business incubation, programming, lab and office facilities, and support services for entrepreneurs, start-ups, and growing and established companies. Graduate firms and current residents of the Science Center’s business incubator support one out of every 100 jobs in Greater Philadelphia and drive $12.9 billion in economic activity in the region annually. For more information about the Science Center, go to http://www.sciencecenter.org. About the QED Program The QED Program was launched in April 2009. A common participation agreement that defines matching funds, indirect costs, and intellectual property management, has been signed by 21 universities and research institutions in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware: The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Delaware State University, Drexel University, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Harrisburg University of Science and Technology, Lankenau Institute for Medical Research, Lehigh University, Monell Chemical Senses Center, New Jersey Institute of Technology, The Pennsylvania State University, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Philadelphia University, Rowan University, Rutgers University, Temple University, Thomas Jefferson University, University of Delaware, University of Pennsylvania, University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, Widener University, and The Wistar Institute.


ARLINGTON, VA - February 16, 2017 - Joe Biden, 47th Vice President of the United States, will receive Research!America's Gordon and Llura Gund Leadership Award for his commitment to accelerating cancer research as the driving force behind the White House Cancer Moonshot. The Cancer Moonshot, and now the Biden Cancer Initiative, aim to speed the pace in which effective therapies are made available to patients and improve efforts to prevent and detect cancer at an early stage. The Gund Award is presented to individuals who have made a significant contribution to increasing the level of advocacy for medical or health research at the local, state or national level. Biden, who expressed hope in doubling the rate of progress toward ending cancer as we know it, will be honored at the 21st Annual Advocacy Awards at the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington, D.C. The awards dinner, to be held March 15, brings more than 400 leaders from government, industry, academia and health advocacy organizations together to recognize top medical and health research advocates who have made an impact in advancing the nation's commitment to research. "The energy behind the Cancer Moonshot is a result of Joe Biden's unflinching determination to prevent and halt the progression of cancer," said Governor Mike Castle, Research!America Board of Directors Vice Chair. "He's a true visionary who has the capacity to marshal the necessary brainpower and resources to help us make greater strides in cancer research." Cancer is expected to take the lives of more than 600,000 people in the U.S. this year and an estimated 1.6 million new cancer cases will be diagnosed. Biden's son, former Delaware Attorney General Beau Biden, died from brain cancer in 2015. Under Biden's leadership, the White House Cancer Moonshot Task Force facilitated novel, innovative and impactful collaborations among twenty government agencies, departments and White House offices, and over 70 private sector collaborations designed to achieve a decade's worth of progress in five years in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Biden also helped lead the effort to pass the 21st Century Cures Act which provides $1.8 billion over seven years for the Cancer Moonshot's scientific priorities. "Biden reinvigorated the scientific community with his bold vision for putting cancer research on a faster track, bringing renewed hope for patients and their loved ones," said Mary Woolley, president and CEO, Research!America. "We are honored to recognize his extraordinary achievements and perseverance in the fight against such a complex, deadly disease." In recognition for his public service, Biden was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, with distinction. The Biden Foundation, announced in February 2017, will build upon Joe Biden's and Dr. Jill Biden's lifelong commitment to protect and advance the rights and opportunities of all people through educational programming and public policy analysis. The Foundation's areas of focus include: The Cancer Initiative, foreign policy, community colleges and military families, protecting children, equality, ending violence against women and strengthening the middle class. Biden will also serve as the Benjamin Franklin Presidential Practice Professor at the Penn Biden Center for Diplomacy and Global Engagement at the University of Pennsylvania, and lead the Biden Institute based at the University of Delaware, a research and policy center focused on public policy, economic reform and civil rights, among other issues. He has been named chair of the board of trustees of the National Constitution Center, a nonpartisan museum focused on educating and informing American people about the Constitution. Other 2017 Research!America Advocacy Award honorees are Senator Lamar Alexander (R-TN) who will receive the Edwin C. Whitehead Award for Medical Research Advocacy; Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at the NIH, who is the recipient of the Legacy Award; Kathy Bates, award-winning actress and Lymphatic Education & Research Network (LE&RN) spokesperson; Phillip A. Sharp, Ph.D., Nobel Laureate and Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Leland H. Hartwell, Ph.D., Nobel Laureate and co-director of the Center for Sustainable Health at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute and Virginia G. Piper Chair of Personalized Medicine; and The Lupus Foundation of America. The annual Research!America Advocacy Awards program was established in 1996 by the Board of Directors to honor outstanding advocates for medical, health and scientific research. Recognized individuals and organizations are those whose extraordinary leadership efforts have been effective in advancing our nation's commitment to medical, health and other scientific research. This year the awards event will take place on March 15, 2017, at the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington, D.C. For more information, visit http://www. . Research!America is the nation's largest nonprofit public education and advocacy alliance working to make research to improve health a higher national priority. Founded in 1989, Research!America is supported by member organizations representing 125 million Americans. Visit http://www. .


News Article | November 18, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

University of Delaware student Jonathon Cottone knows the tell-tale signs that rice plants are getting sick: the yellowing leaves, the faint football-shaped lesions. Cottone, a junior from Wilmington, Delaware, is working with Harsh Bais, associate professor of plant and soil sciences at UD, on research to help this globally important grain cope with increasing stress. Recently, the UD team found that when rice plants are subjected to multiple threats -- including increasing concentrations of poisonous arsenic in water and soil, an urgent concern in Southeast Asia, plus a fungal disease called rice blast -- the plants aren't necessarily goners. Rather, the UD researchers have shown for the first time that a combination of beneficial soil microbes can be applied to the infected plants to boost their natural defenses, combating both problems. The findings, published in Frontiers in Plant Science, provide new evidence about the potential benefit of "biostacking" -- putting multiple microbes together to protect plants from stress. The research also lends further support for a natural, chemical-free approach to protecting a crop that over half the world's population depends on for food. "We wanted to see if we could use a combinatorial approach -- a 'cocktail' of organisms -- that would help rice plants with two simultaneous stresses attacking them," Bais said, from his laboratory at the Delaware Biotechnology Institute. In addition to Bais and Cottone, the team included Venkatachalam Lakshmanan, a former postdoctoral researcher at UD who is now working at the Oklahoma-based Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation. Previously, the UD team identified two species of bacteria that come to the rescue of rice plants when the plants are under attack. The two microbes naturally inhabit the rhizosphere, the soil around the plant roots. Pseudomonas chlororaphis EA105 can trigger a system-wide defense against the rice blast fungus, which destroys enough rice to feed an estimated 60 million people each year. EA105 inhibits formation of the fungus's attack machinery, the appressoria, which acts like a battering ram, putting pressure on a plant leaf until it is punctured. A second microbe, EA106, mobilizes an iron plaque, or shield, to begin accumulating on the roots of rice plants when arsenic is present, effectively blocking uptake of the poison. "What's happening in Southeast Asia from high levels of arsenic in water and soil has been called the largest mass poisoning in history," Bais said. "The EA106 microbe has multiple benefits. The iron shield it deploys blocks the arsenic. This iron, absorbed into the rice grain, could help address another big health problem in many developing countries -- iron deficiency." In their laboratory studies with hydroponically grown rice plants, the UD team treated plants with arsenic, then treated them with EA105 and EA106. Seven days later, they infected the same plants with blast disease. Along the way, they examined the overall genetic responses when arsenic, beneficial bacteria, and fungal disease were incorporated. The resulting data clearly showed that the microbial cocktail could bolster plant defenses against both arsenic and rice blast disease. But there were some surprises. For example, the researchers thought if arsenic was taken up by rice plants, that poison might be detrimental to the blast fungus. But that was not the case. The ability of the blast fungus to tolerate arsenic is a direct story of evolution, according to Bais. The fungus has become more and more resistant to arsenic over time. "To prevent arsenic toxicity, we think the fungus put the arsenic in 'a safehouse' -- storing it in its vacuole -- before the toxin gets loaded to the grain," explained Bais. So how could beneficial microbes such as EA105 and EA106 be applied to protect rice plants? A seed treatment, or microbial coating, would be the most practical route in formulating an economical, effective product, Bais said. Next semester, Bais will travel home to India while on sabbatical leave to give talks at universities, collaborate on research and meet with people who do work in the field. "A real opportunity for India's next generation of sustainable agriculture will be this area of plant probiotics, using microbes that naturally occur in the soil to help plants," Bais said. Meanwhile, Cottone, who recently was named a DENIN Environmental Scholar at UD, will continue his research in the Bais lab, skyping with Bais while he is away. Ironically, Cottone didn't know a lot about plants until he took Bais's introductory botany course last year. Then a whole new world opened up to him, and he's now decided to pursue a double major in plant science and animal science. "This work has a huge humanitarian bent in that the majority of countries affected by arsenic poisoning are developing countries," Cottone said. "So this work could really help a lot of people who really are not in a position to help themselves." "Jonathon is doing a fantastic job," Bais said. "He puts in long hours. He's mastered how to grow rice and manages the entire greenhouse now. He's already co-authored a scientific paper as an undergrad." And he's got lots of room to flex his research muscles. The complex relationships between plants and the microorganisms living with them, their "microbiome," provide countless avenues to explore in the quest to improve plant health. "Plants are exposed to multiple stresses these days, many driven by changing climate. Plants are just confused. They don't know what to do," Bais said. "We're trying to help them cope."


News Article | November 4, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

A new study published in Scientific Reports by University of Delaware researchers and colleagues reveals that 100 feet below the surface of the ocean is a critical depth for ecological activity in the Arctic polar night -- a period of near continuous winter darkness. It is at this depth, the researchers said, that atmospheric light diminishes in the water column and bioluminescence from marine organisms becomes the dominant light source. It also is the site of significant changes in the composition of luminescent organisms present in the water column. "It turns out that approximately 100 feet in depth is an important transition zone," said Jonathan Cohen, a UD assistant professor in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment and co-author on the paper. The research team has been studying how much biological activity takes place in the Arctic polar night since 2012, when UD's Mark Moline, director of the School of Marine Science and Policy and colleagues in Norway and Scotland began exploring how sea life copes with continuous winter darkness in Svalbard, Norway. Prevailing scientific thought until then was that the food web remained dormant during the polar night. The researchers said that bioluminescence can help explain how some organisms feed and maintain activity during the polar night period and how light can still be involved in ecological processes even during a time of darkness. One interesting finding in the current study is that as depth increased, the amount of bioluminescence in the water column increased and the zooplankton community composition changed. "As you go deeper into the water, we saw fewer dinoflagellates and more copepods, krill and ctenophores, which give off brighter bioluminescent light," said Cohen, who joined the research team in 2013. This community change is not associated with any physical conditions of the water, the researchers said. Rather, it correlates to what the researchers term "bioluminescence compensation depth," the transition point at which atmospheric light diminishes in the water column and bioluminescence takes over. "This points to the functionality of bioluminescence structuring the vertical distribution through behavior possibly independent of migration," said Moline. This is an important finding as the Barents Sea south of Svalbard, Norway, is home to a large and globally important fishery. Fishermen in the region are tremendously interested in understanding how changes in zooplankton -- like copepods -- and zooplankton availability will affect commercially important fish species like cod and herring. The researchers knew from other studies that the distribution of zooplankton and krill in the water column increased at around 100 feet. "When the sky gets brighter at midday during the polar night period there is more atmospheric light available underwater for predation than at night, so marine organisms like copepods retreat lower into the water column where it is darker. We wanted to know how this light interacted with bioluminescence to influence life in the water column," Cohen said. The researchers first attacked this issue by taking atmospheric light measurements in 2014 and 2015, while also measuring bioluminescence in the water. This led to a more detailed study in 2015 of which planktonic species produced light. Finally, they put it all together to think about how bioluminescence can be a light source during the polar night. Then UD graduate student Heather Cronin, working with Cohen and Moline, created what is called a photon budget, or light budget, to measure how much light comes from the atmosphere and how much light comes from inside the water itself with organisms glowing through bioluminescence. To quantify the amount of bioluminescence and to identify what marine organisms were present, the researchers used a pumping system in the water column to drive the organisms into a specialized device equipped with a sensitive light meter. As the organisms entered the device, turbulence created by the pump stimulated the animals to luminesce or glow. Using luminescence kinetics, or the time course of light production and dissipation, the researchers measured how the light intensity inside the pump changed with time in order to identify the marine species present. "Luminescent marine organisms each have a unique light signature. By looking at the time series light generated by a flash within the instrument, we were able to determine who was there making the flash," Cohen explained. "It's a useful tool, particularly at this time of year when relatively few species are present." Bioluminescence is known to play a critical role in helping marine organisms avoid predators and even hide themselves in plain site. At the same time, Cohen continued, it appears that krill and potentially fish are using the additional bioluminescent light from the copepods to find food. "We know from analysis of gut contents that fish and seabirds are active and feeding in Svalbard fjords during polar night," Cohen explained. "Our research suggests that bioluminescent light may be one of the ways that they find food in the dark." One looming concern under climate change scenarios is the loss of sea ice. According to Cohen, scientists are just beginning to appreciate that climate change will change the light environment, which will impact the timing of the ice algae and phytoplankton blooms that spur the spring growing season, maybe even causing it to occur earlier in the year. In the Arctic, for example, sea ice is part of what makes the water column dark. So, if the depth at which atmospheric light transitions to bioluminescent light is important in structuring the zooplankton community and the ecological interactions among organisms, then understanding how much atmospheric light will be present in the water column with less sea ice is significant for understanding food web dynamics. The novelty in the team's work is the focus on putting numbers and data to the processes that occur directly before the spring cycle begins. The next step is to make similar measurements further away from Svalbard to validate their findings in the open ocean. "Being able to measure this transition depth gives us something to look at across seasons and across years that could have important implications for food web impacts in a rapidly changing Arctic," Cohen said.


(Philadelphia, PA) - Mitochondria - the energy-generating powerhouses of cells - are also a site for oxidative stress and cellular calcium regulation. The latter two functions have long been suspected of being linked mechanistically, and now new research at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University (LKSOM) shows precisely how, with the common connection centering on a protein complex known as the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU). "MCU had been known for its part in driving mitochondrial calcium uptake for cellular energy production, which protects cells from bioenergetic crisis, and for its role in eliciting calcium overload-induced cell death," explained senior investigator on the study, Muniswamy Madesh, PhD, Professor in the Department of Medical Genetics and Molecular Biochemistry and Center for Translational Medicine at LKSOM. "Now, we show that MCU has a functional role in both calcium regulation and the sensing of levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within mitochondria." The study, published online March 2 in the journal Molecular Cell, is the first to identify a direct role for MCU in mitochondrial ROS-sensing. In previous work, Dr. Madesh and colleagues were the first to show how the MCU protein complex comes together to effect mitochondrial calcium uptake. "We know from that work, and from existing work in the field, that as calcium accumulates in mitochondria, the organelles generate increasing amounts of ROS," Dr. Madesh said. "Mitochondria have a way of dealing with that ROS surge, and because of the relationship between mitochondrial calcium uptake and ROS production, we suspected ROS-targeting of MCU was involved in that process." In the new study, Dr. Madesh and colleagues employed advanced biochemical, cell biological, and superresolution imaging to examine MCU oxidation in the mitochondrion. Critically, they discovered that MCU contains several cysteine molecules in its amino acid structure, only one of which, Cys-97, is capable of undergoing an oxidation-induced reaction known as S-glutathionylation. Structural analyses showed that oxidation-induced S-glutathionylation of Cys-97 triggers conformational changes within MCU. Those changes in turn regulate MCU activity during inflammation, hypoxia, and cardiac stimulation. They also appear to be relevant to cell survival - elimination of ROS-sensing via Cys-97 mutation resulted in persistent MCU channel activity and an increased rate of calcium-uptake, with cells eventually dying from calcium overload. Importantly, Dr. Madesh and colleagues found that S-glutathionylation of Cys-97 is reversible. "Reversible oxidation is essential to the regulation of protein function," Dr. Madesh explained. When switched on by oxidation, Cys-97 augments MCU channel activity that perpetuates cell death. Oxidation reverses when the threat has subsided. The findings could have implications for the understanding of metabolic disorders and neurological and cardiovascular diseases. "Abnormalities in ion homeostasis are a central feature of metabolic disease," Dr. Madesh said. "We plan next to explore the functional significance of ROS and MCU activity in a mouse model using genome editing technology, which should help us answer fundamental questions about MCU's biological functions in mitochondrial ROS-sensing." Other researchers involved in the study include Zhiwei Dong, Santhanam Shanmughapriya, Dhanendra Tomar, Neeharika Nemani, Sarah L. Breves, Aparna Tripathi, Palaniappan Palaniappan, Massimo F. Riitano, Alison Worth, Ajay Seelam, Edmund Carvalho, Ramasamy Subbiah, Fabia?n Jan?a, and Sudarsan Rajan, Department of Medical Genetics and Molecular Biochemistry and the Center for Translational Medicine at LKSOM; Jonathan Soboloff, Department of Medical Genetics and Molecular Biochemistry at LKSOM; Xueqian Zhang and Joseph Y. Cheung, Center for Translational Medicine at LKSOM; Naveed Siddiqui and Peter B. Stathopulos, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada; Solomon Lynch and Jeffrey Caplan, Department of Biological Sciences, Delaware Biotechnology Institute, University of Delaware; Suresh K. Joseph, MitoCare Center, Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia; Yizhi Peng and Zhiwei Dong, Institute of Burn Research, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China. The research was supported in part by National Institutes of Health grants R01GM109882, R01HL086699, R01HL119306, 1S10RR027327, P01 DA037830, and RO1DK103558. Temple University Health System (TUHS) is a $1.6 billion academic health system dedicated to providing access to quality patient care and supporting excellence in medical education and research. The Health System consists of Temple University Hospital (TUH), ranked among the "Best Hospitals" in the region by U.S. News & World Report; TUH-Episcopal Campus; TUH-Northeastern Campus; Fox Chase Cancer Center, an NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center; Jeanes Hospital, a community-based hospital offering medical, surgical and emergency services; Temple Transport Team, a ground and air-ambulance company; and Temple Physicians, Inc., a network of community-based specialty and primary-care physician practices. TUHS is affiliated with the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University. The Lewis Katz School of Medicine (LKSOM), established in 1901, is one of the nation's leading medical schools. Each year, the School of Medicine educates approximately 840 medical students and 140 graduate students. Based on its level of funding from the National Institutes of Health, the Katz School of Medicine is the second-highest ranked medical school in Philadelphia and the third-highest in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. According to U.S. News & World Report, LKSOM is among the top 10 most applied-to medical schools in the nation. Temple Health refers to the health, education and research activities carried out by the affiliates of Temple University Health System (TUHS) and by the Katz School of Medicine. TUHS neither provides nor controls the provision of health care. All health care is provided by its member organizations or independent health care providers affiliated with TUHS member organizations. Each TUHS member organization is owned and operated pursuant to its governing documents.


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

WILMINGTON, Del., Nov. 15, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- WSFS Financial Corporation (NASDAQ:WSFS), the parent company of WSFS Bank, today announced the promotion of Vernita L. Dorsey, Robert J. Hayman and Jason L. Spence to Senior Vice President. Photos accompanying this announcement are available at: Vernita L. Dorsey has been promoted to Senior Vice President, Director of Community Strategy. Ms. Dorsey has over 30 years of banking experience; she joined WSFS in 2010 when the Bank combined with Christiana Bank & Trust. As the Director of Community Strategy, Ms. Dorsey oversees Corporate Philanthropy for the company and leads the bank’s volunteer initiatives through Team WSFS. In addition, she serves as Secretary of the WSFS Foundation Board. Vernita is deeply committed to the community and currently chairs the board of Girls Inc. of Delaware. She also serves on the board of Downtown Visions and the advisory board of Henrietta Johnson Medical Center. Ms. Dorsey actively volunteers with many Delaware organizations and serves as the Lay Leader at her church, Coleman Memorial UMC. She also enjoys singing gospel hymns and she directs three choirs at her church. Robert J. Hayman has been promoted to Senior Vice President, Director of Facility Strategy and Vendor Management. Mr. Hayman joined the Bank in January 2012. In his role, he directs all vendor management functions, corporate insurance policies, facility operations and procurement. Mr. Hayman has over 35 years of experience in the financial services industry; he was a senior leader at MBNA America for 15 years and prior to joining WSFS, he held a leadership role with Wilmington Trust Company. He serves on the board of directors at Padua Academy and is an active member at St. John the Beloved Parish in Wilmington, DE. Mr. Hayman received his BSBA from the University of Delaware and his MBA from Widener University. Jason L. Spence has been promoted to Senior Vice President, Director of Credit Risk Management. Mr. Spence joined WSFS Bank in 2006. In his current role, Mr. Spence leads many of the Bank’s loan administration and credit risk functions, including asset quality & concentration reporting, allowance for loan & lease losses, valuation services & construction loan monitoring as well as the loan review function.  Mr. Spence has over 20 years of banking experience and prior to joining WSFS, he served in several management roles during a 13-year career at MBNA America.  Mr. Spence serves as Treasurer on the Risk Management Association – Philadelphia Chapter board of directors and is an active volunteer with the Blood Bank of Delmarva and Meals on Wheels. Mr. Spence is a graduate of the University of Delaware. “We are delighted to announce these promotions and we value the dedication, leadership and caring these Associates demonstrate on a daily basis,” said Peggy H. Eddens, Executive Vice President, Chief Human Capital Officer. “Learning, growing and achieving are cornerstones of our WSFS culture; we congratulate Vernita, Bob and Jason and we thank them for their heartfelt commitment to the communities we serve.” About WSFS Financial Corporation WSFS Financial Corporation is a multi-billion dollar financial services company. Its primary subsidiary, WSFS Bank, is the oldest locally-managed bank and trust company headquartered in Delaware and the Delaware Valley. As of September 30, 2016, WSFS Financial Corporation had $6.6 billion in assets on its balance sheet and $14.3 billion in fiduciary assets. WSFS operates from 76 offices located in Delaware (46), Pennsylvania (28), Virginia (1) and Nevada (1) and provides comprehensive financial services including commercial banking, retail banking, cash management and trust and wealth management. Other subsidiaries or divisions include Christiana Trust, WSFS Wealth Investments, Cypress Capital Management, LLC, Powdermill Financial Solutions, West Capital Management, Cash Connect®, WSFS Mortgage and Arrow Land Transfer. Serving the Delaware Valley since 1832, WSFS Bank is one of the ten oldest banks in the United States continuously operating under the same name. For more information, please visit wsfsbank.com.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

PHILADELPHIA, March 01, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Penn Capital Management Company, Inc. (Penn Capital) is pleased to announce the addition of Heather Nolan and Samantha Lowry. Ms. Nolan joined Penn Capital in October 2016 as Senior Client Service Director focusing on Institutional Client Service. Ms. Nolan has 20 years of experience in the financial services industry including institutional client service and consultant relationship management, investment manager research, and sales support roles.  Prior to joining Penn Capital, Ms. Nolan spent nine years at CBRE Clarion Securities LLC, most recently as Assistant Vice President, Global Marketing and Client Service/Institutional Investor Relations. Ms. Nolan received a BS in Business Administration and an MBA in Finance from the University of Delaware. She holds FINRA Series 6, 7 and 63 securities licenses. Ms. Lowry joined Penn Capital in January 2017 as Director of Institutional Relationship Management focusing on both consultant and client relationships.  She has 20 years of experience in the financial services industry focused on consultant and client service relationship management.  Previously, Ms. Lowry has served as Director of Consultant Relations and Institutional Sales at Philadelphia International Advisors, as well as Senior Relationship Manager and Senior Consultant Relations Manager at Aberdeen Asset Management.  Ms. Lowry received a BA in English Literature from Temple University and an MBA in Management from St. Joseph’s University. Peter J. Moran, Partner, Executive Vice President, Global Distribution, says of Nolan and Lowry’s additions, “We are excited to have added Heather and Samantha to our team. Their combined experience and insights add depth to our institutional client service coverage and will enhance our consulting firm relationships.” Penn Capital, founded in 1987, is an independent investment management firm located in Philadelphia, PA.  Penn Capital maintains a fully integrated credit and equity research process and emphasizes Complete Capital Structure Analysis®  when analyzing investment opportunities.  Penn Capital has approximately $5.5 billion in assets under advisement (as of December 31, 2016) and specializes in high yield fixed income and micro-to-mid capitalization equity portfolios for institutions and individuals.                                                                                                                          All inquiries can be sent to Melissa Currie, Director of Marketing and Digital Solutions at mcurrie@penncapital.com or (215) 302-1539.


News Article | December 13, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

HOUSTON, Dec. 13, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Vinson & Elkins announces the promotion of eight lawyers to its partnership, effective January 1, 2017: Mark Brasher, Jason McIntosh, Becky Petereit, Bailey Pham, Simon Rootsey, Lande Spottswood, Thomas Zentner and Craig Zieminski. "Our new partners are outstanding attorneys who have shown tremendous dedication to the firm and its clients," said V&E Chairman Mark Kelly. "From the courtroom to the boardroom, each of these exceptional lawyers has demonstrated a high level of skill in their respective practice area. We are thrilled to call them partners." The new partners span six of the firm's key practice areas, including complex commercial litigation, energy transactions and projects, finance, mergers and acquisitions and capital markets, restructuring and reorganization and tax. "We are proud to welcome these talented and accomplished lawyers to the firm's partnership," said V&E Managing Partner Scott Wulfe. "We are grateful for the contributions these deserving attorneys have made to V&E and we look forward to their continued success." The following is a list of V&E's new partners by practice: Craig Zieminski, Dallas. Zieminski's practice focuses on representing companies and their directors in lawsuits brought by Delaware stockholders, master limited partnership (MLP) unitholders and deal partners. Zieminski has helped secure key victories for major energy clients. He played a significant role on the V&E team that represented Energy Transfer Equity in its successful defense of litigation concerning a $37.7 billion merger with The Williams Companies. Zieminski also helped win dismissal of a stockholder suit challenging C&J Energy's $2.9 billion merger with a unit of Nabors Industries. He has also helped companies defeat expedited lawsuits seeking to enjoin major transactions, such as a lawsuit that sought to enjoin Targa Resources' $6.7 billion merger with an affiliated entity and a lawsuit that attempted to enjoin Inergy's $2 billion merger with an affiliated partnership. Zieminski received his law degree from Stanford Law School in 2008 and graduated from Southern Methodist University in 2005 with degrees in economics and accounting. Mark Brasher, Houston. Brasher's practice focuses on project development and related business transactions concerning domestic and international energy and infrastructure projects. His clients include a wide range of participants in the oil and gas industry, renewable energy companies, power producers, infrastructure developers, banks and private equity funds. Brasher is the lead attorney advising Noble Energy on the project development aspects of its 20Tcf Leviathan natural gas project, offshore Israel. He counsels a number of Occidental Petroleum's business units in relation to projects in the United States and the Middle East. He is also an integral member of the V&E team representing Texas Central Partners in connection with the Dallas to Houston high-speed rail project. Recently, Brasher played a key role advising Riverstone in its acquisition from Kinder Morgan of a 50 percent interest in the Utopia Pipeline Project, a common carrier pipeline that will connect ethane gas sources from Ohio to Sarnia, Canada. Brasher received his LL.M. from the University of Texas at Austin in 2011 and his LL.B. from Monash University in Australia in 2006. Bailey Pham, Dallas. Pham's practice focuses on representing financial institutions, corporate lenders and businesses in all types of financing arrangements, including acquisition loans, asset-based loans and energy loans. She assists in the representation of both agent banks, including JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. and Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., and borrowers in domestic and international syndicated loan transactions, particularly in secured, leveraged credits covering various markets and industries, including retail, manufacturing and oilfield services. Pham has also advised on a number of high-stakes deals, including Holly Corporation's $7 billion merger with Frontier Oil Corporation, which created one of the largest independent refiners in the United States. Pham received her law degree from Southern Methodist University in 2008 and her bachelor's and master's degrees in accountancy from Wake Forest University in 2002. Simon Rootsey, London. Rootsey's practice focuses on cross-border M&A and private equity, advising on all aspects of private cross-border M&A, private equity transactions, joint ventures and public takeovers. His experience includes advising the Vitol Group on its recent sale of a 50% stake in the VTTI Group to Buckeye Partners for US$1.15 billion, and advising the Vitol Group and Helios Investment Partners in their US$1 billion acquisition of an 80 percent stake in the African downstream oil operations of Royal Dutch Shell plc, and acquisition of a 60 percent stake in the Nigerian downstream oil operations of Oando plc. On the private equity side, he advises leading private equity houses based in Europe and the United States investing in the U.K., Europe and Africa. Rootsey is a graduate of the University of Western Australia, where he received both his Bachelor of Laws (Honours) and his Bachelor of Commerce. Lande Spottswood, Houston. Spottswood advises public and private companies, including MLPs, private equity investors and their portfolio companies, in connection with mergers, acquisitions, dispositions, restructurings, spinoffs, joint ventures and other strategic transactions. She also advises on public company change-of-control transactions. Her experience also includes advising issuers in initial public offerings, as well as public and private offerings of equity and debt securities, and on general corporate matters. She has teamed on some of V&E's largest recent deals, including representing Sunoco Logistics in its pending $22 billion acquisition of Energy Transfer; Plains GP Holdings in its simplification transaction with Plains All American Pipeline for $7.2 billion; Nexeo Solution's $1.575 billion merger with WL Ross Holding Corp.; and Western Refining's $2.4 billion merger agreement with Northern Tier Energy LP. Spottswood received her law degree from Harvard Law School in 2008 and her bachelor's degree from Harvard College in 2005. Thomas Zentner, Houston. Zentner's practice focuses on corporate finance and securities law, including securities offerings, mergers and acquisitions and general corporate representation. His capital markets experience includes representation of both issuers and underwriters in initial public offerings, as well as public and private offerings of equity and debt securities. He also works with public and private companies, including private equity funds and their portfolio companies, in connection with mergers, acquisitions, dispositions and strategic investments. Zentner advised Anadarko Petroleum Corporation in its $2.1 billion public offering of common stock and in its $3 billion offering of senior notes. He also advised Targa Resources Corp. in its $360 million initial public offering and in its $6.7 billion acquisition of Targa Resources Partners in an all stock-for-unit transaction. Zentner received his law degree in 2008 and bachelor's degree in 2005, both from the University of Texas at Austin. Becky Petereit, Dallas. Petereit's practice focuses on all aspects of restructuring and reorganization work, including the representation of debtors, lenders, creditors, landlords and trustees. She represents clients in lawsuits, contested matters, adversary proceedings and other actions before federal district courts, state courts and bankruptcy courts with respect to all types of litigation arising from financially distressed situations. She has represented debtors in complex cross-border insolvency proceedings; tried several fraudulent transfer actions (both jury and bench trials); represented the administrative agent for syndicated secured lenders who were owed approximately $7 billion in a Chapter 11 case of one of the largest publishers of yellow pages directories in the United States; and represented the liquidating trustee of a bankrupt financial services firm in litigation against its former officers and directors. Petereit received her J.D. from University of California, Los Angeles School of Law in 2005 and her bachelor's degree from University of Delaware in 2002. Jason McIntosh, Houston. McIntosh focuses on tax planning with respect to complex international and domestic transactions. His experience spans a broad range of industries, including energy, banking and finance, power generation, petrochemicals, shipping and transport, aircraft leasing and sales, manufacturing and distribution of consumer products and real estate. Among his notable representations, McIntosh was part of the V&E team advising Riverstone Holdings in the formation and $525 million (aggregate) initial capitalization of Sierra Oil & Gas, Mexico's first independent exploration and production company. He recently represented Buckeye Partners in structuring its $1.15 billion acquisition of a 50% interest in VTTI BV, which operates one of the world's largest global energy terminal businesses. McIntosh received his law degree from the University of Virginia School of Law and his bachelor's degree from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Vinson & Elkins LLP is an international law firm with approximately 700 lawyers across 16 offices worldwide. For more information, please contact Carrie Dugas at +1.713.758.4330. This communication may be considered advertising under law regulating the use of e-mail. This communication is provided by Vinson & Elkins LLP for educational and informational purposes only and is not intended, nor should it be construed, as legal advice.


News Article | December 1, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Leading higher education information and resource provider AffordableCollegesOnline.org has released its ranking of the Best Online Registered Nursing (RN) Programs in the U.S. for 2016-2017. Analyzing more than a dozen unique data points on colleges and universities who offer online RN programs, the site honored 65 schools for providing the best overall value and quality for students. East Carolina University, Allen College, Seton Hall University, University of Alabama in Huntsville and West Virginia University were among the highest scoring four-year schools, while New Mexico Junior College, Amarillo College, West Kentucky Community and Technical College, Hopkinsville Community College and Kansas City Kansas Community College were among the highest scoring two-year schools. "There is a growing demand for health care workers, and quality registered nursing programs are growing more and more competitive,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and Founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. “Our list of schools gives registered nursing students a better idea of which programs offer the best combination of cost, quality curriculum and online learning flexibility.” AffordableCollegesOnline.org requires schools to meet several minimum requirements to be eligible for placement on their rankings. Colleges must be accredited, public or private not-for-profit institutions and must offer in-state tuition rates below $5,000 annually at two-year schools or below $25,000 annually at four-year schools. Qualifying schools are scored and ranked based on a comparison of more than a dozen qualitative and quantitative statistics, including financial aid offerings and graduation rates by school. More details on data and methodology used to rank each online criminal justice program and a complete list of schools and scores is available at: Two-year schools with the Best Online Registered Nurse Programs for 2016-2017: Amarillo College Ashland Community and Technical College Bluegrass Community and Technical College Columbus State Community College Community College of Philadelphia Henderson Community College Hopkinsville Community College Jefferson Community and Technical College Kansas City Kansas Community College Madisonville Community College Minnesota West Community and Technical College New Mexico Junior College San Antonio College Somerset Community College Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College West Kentucky Community and Technical College Four-year schools with the Best Online Registered Nurse Programs for 2016-2017: Allen College Aurora University Ball State University Barry University Clayton State University Columbus State University Concordia University - Wisconsin Drexel University East Carolina University East Tennessee State University Fitchburg State University Gannon University Gardner-Webb University Georgia College and State University Graceland University - Lamoni Indiana State University La Salle University Loyola University Chicago Minot State University Missouri State University-Springfield New Mexico State University - Main Campus North Carolina Central University Northern Arizona University Olivet Nazarene University Sacred Heart University Seton Hall University South Dakota State University The College of Saint Scholastica University of Alabama in Huntsville University of Arkansas University of Central Florida University of Cincinnati-Main Campus University of Colorado, Colorado Springs University of Delaware University of Hawaii at Manoa University of Massachusetts - Amherst University of Massachusetts - Boston University of Massachusetts - Lowell University of Memphis University of North Alabama University of North Dakota University of North Florida University of Northern Colorado University of Southern Indiana University of the Incarnate Word University of Toledo Villanova University Wayland Baptist University West Virginia University Western Kentucky University AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

PHILADELPHIA, March 01, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Penn Capital Management Company, Inc. (Penn Capital) is pleased to announce the addition of Heather Nolan and Samantha Lowry. Ms. Nolan joined Penn Capital in October 2016 as Senior Client Service Director focusing on Institutional Client Service. Ms. Nolan has 20 years of experience in the financial services industry including institutional client service and consultant relationship management, investment manager research, and sales support roles.  Prior to joining Penn Capital, Ms. Nolan spent nine years at CBRE Clarion Securities LLC, most recently as Assistant Vice President, Global Marketing and Client Service/Institutional Investor Relations. Ms. Nolan received a BS in Business Administration and an MBA in Finance from the University of Delaware. She holds FINRA Series 6, 7 and 63 securities licenses. Ms. Lowry joined Penn Capital in January 2017 as Director of Institutional Relationship Management focusing on both consultant and client relationships.  She has 20 years of experience in the financial services industry focused on consultant and client service relationship management.  Previously, Ms. Lowry has served as Director of Consultant Relations and Institutional Sales at Philadelphia International Advisors, as well as Senior Relationship Manager and Senior Consultant Relations Manager at Aberdeen Asset Management.  Ms. Lowry received a BA in English Literature from Temple University and an MBA in Management from St. Joseph’s University. Peter J. Moran, Partner, Executive Vice President, Global Distribution, says of Nolan and Lowry’s additions, “We are excited to have added Heather and Samantha to our team. Their combined experience and insights add depth to our institutional client service coverage and will enhance our consulting firm relationships.” Penn Capital, founded in 1987, is an independent investment management firm located in Philadelphia, PA.  Penn Capital maintains a fully integrated credit and equity research process and emphasizes Complete Capital Structure Analysis®  when analyzing investment opportunities.  Penn Capital has approximately $5.5 billion in assets under advisement (as of December 31, 2016) and specializes in high yield fixed income and micro-to-mid capitalization equity portfolios for institutions and individuals.                                                                                                                          All inquiries can be sent to Melissa Currie, Director of Marketing and Digital Solutions at mcurrie@penncapital.com or (215) 302-1539.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

PHILADELPHIA, March 01, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Penn Capital Management Company, Inc. (Penn Capital) is pleased to announce the addition of Heather Nolan and Samantha Lowry. Ms. Nolan joined Penn Capital in October 2016 as Senior Client Service Director focusing on Institutional Client Service. Ms. Nolan has 20 years of experience in the financial services industry including institutional client service and consultant relationship management, investment manager research, and sales support roles.  Prior to joining Penn Capital, Ms. Nolan spent nine years at CBRE Clarion Securities LLC, most recently as Assistant Vice President, Global Marketing and Client Service/Institutional Investor Relations. Ms. Nolan received a BS in Business Administration and an MBA in Finance from the University of Delaware. She holds FINRA Series 6, 7 and 63 securities licenses. Ms. Lowry joined Penn Capital in January 2017 as Director of Institutional Relationship Management focusing on both consultant and client relationships.  She has 20 years of experience in the financial services industry focused on consultant and client service relationship management.  Previously, Ms. Lowry has served as Director of Consultant Relations and Institutional Sales at Philadelphia International Advisors, as well as Senior Relationship Manager and Senior Consultant Relations Manager at Aberdeen Asset Management.  Ms. Lowry received a BA in English Literature from Temple University and an MBA in Management from St. Joseph’s University. Peter J. Moran, Partner, Executive Vice President, Global Distribution, says of Nolan and Lowry’s additions, “We are excited to have added Heather and Samantha to our team. Their combined experience and insights add depth to our institutional client service coverage and will enhance our consulting firm relationships.” Penn Capital, founded in 1987, is an independent investment management firm located in Philadelphia, PA.  Penn Capital maintains a fully integrated credit and equity research process and emphasizes Complete Capital Structure Analysis®  when analyzing investment opportunities.  Penn Capital has approximately $5.5 billion in assets under advisement (as of December 31, 2016) and specializes in high yield fixed income and micro-to-mid capitalization equity portfolios for institutions and individuals.                                                                                                                          All inquiries can be sent to Melissa Currie, Director of Marketing and Digital Solutions at mcurrie@penncapital.com or (215) 302-1539.


News Article | November 2, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A new study published today in Scientific Reports by University of Delaware researchers and colleagues reveals that 100 feet below the surface of the ocean is a critical depth for ecological activity in the Arctic polar night -- a period of near continuous winter darkness. It is at this depth, the researchers said, that atmospheric light diminishes in the water column and bioluminescence from marine organisms becomes the dominant light source. It also is the site of significant changes in the composition of luminescent organisms present in the water column. "It turns out that approximately 100 feet in depth is an important transition zone," said Jonathan Cohen, a UD assistant professor in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment and co-author on the paper. The research team has been studying how much biological activity takes place in the Arctic polar night since 2012, when UD's Mark Moline, director of the School of Marine Science and Policy and colleagues in Norway and Scotland began exploring how sea life copes with continuous winter darkness in Svalbard, Norway. Prevailing scientific thought until then was that the food web remained dormant during the polar night. The researchers said that bioluminescence can help explain how some organisms feed and maintain activity during the polar night period and how light can still be involved in ecological processes even during a time of darkness. One interesting finding in the current study is that as depth increased, the amount of bioluminescence in the water column increased and the zooplankton community composition changed. "As you go deeper into the water, we saw fewer dinoflagellates and more copepods, krill and ctenophores, which give off brighter bioluminescent light," said Cohen, who joined the research team in 2013. This community change is not associated with any physical conditions of the water, the researchers said. Rather, it correlates to what the researchers term "bioluminescence compensation depth," the transition point at which atmospheric light diminishes in the water column and bioluminescence takes over. "This points to the functionality of bioluminescence structuring the vertical distribution through behavior possibly independent of migration," said Moline. This is an important finding as the Barents Sea south of Svalbard, Norway, is home to a large and globally important fishery. Fishermen in the region are tremendously interested in understanding how changes in zooplankton -- like copepods -- and zooplankton availability will affect commercially important fish species like cod and herring. The researchers knew from other studies that the distribution of zooplankton and krill in the water column increased at around 100 feet. "When the sky gets brighter at midday during the polar night period there is more atmospheric light available underwater for predation than at night, so marine organisms like copepods retreat lower into the water column where it is darker. We wanted to know how this light interacted with bioluminescence to influence life in the water column," Cohen said. The researchers first attacked this issue by taking atmospheric light measurements in 2014 and 2015, while also measuring bioluminescence in the water. This led to a more detailed study in 2015 of which planktonic species produced light. Finally, they put it all together to think about how bioluminescence can be a light source during the polar night. Then UD graduate student Heather Cronin, working with Cohen and Moline, created what is called a photon budget, or light budget, to measure how much light comes from the atmosphere and how much light comes from inside the water itself with organisms glowing through bioluminescence. To quantify the amount of bioluminescence and to identify what marine organisms were present, the researchers used a pumping system in the water column to drive the organisms into a specialized device equipped with a sensitive light meter. As the organisms entered the device, turbulence created by the pump stimulated the animals to luminesce or glow. Using luminescence kinetics, or the time course of light production and dissipation, the researchers measured how the light intensity inside the pump changed with time in order to identify the marine species present. "Luminescent marine organisms each have a unique light signature. By looking at the time series light generated by a flash within the instrument, we were able to determine who was there making the flash," Cohen explained. "It's a useful tool, particularly at this time of year when relatively few species are present." Bioluminescence is known to play a critical role in helping marine organisms avoid predators and even hide themselves in plain site. At the same time, Cohen continued, it appears that krill and potentially fish are using the additional bioluminescent light from the copepods to find food. "We know from analysis of gut contents that fish and seabirds are active and feeding in Svalbard fjords during polar night," Cohen explained. "Our research suggests that bioluminescent light may be one of the ways that they find food in the dark." One looming concern under climate change scenarios is the loss of sea ice. According to Cohen, scientists are just beginning to appreciate that climate change will change the light environment, which will impact the timing of the ice algae and phytoplankton blooms that spur the spring growing season, maybe even causing it to occur earlier in the year. In the Arctic, for example, sea ice is part of what makes the water column dark. So, if the depth at which atmospheric light transitions to bioluminescent light is important in structuring the zooplankton community and the ecological interactions among organisms, then understanding how much atmospheric light will be present in the water column with less sea ice is significant for understanding food web dynamics. The novelty in the team's work is the focus on putting numbers and data to the processes that occur directly before the spring cycle begins. The next step is to make similar measurements further away from Svalbard to validate their findings in the open ocean. "Being able to measure this transition depth gives us something to look at across seasons and across years that could have important implications for food web impacts in a rapidly changing Arctic," Cohen said. Co-authors on the paper include Heather Cronin (the paper's lead author and former UD masters student), Jonathan Cohen, Jørgen Berge (UiT The Arctic University of Norway and University Centre in Svalbard), Geir Johnsen (University Centre in Svalbard and Norwegian University of Science and Technology) and Mark Moline, director of the School of Marine Science and Policy at University of Delaware.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The water crisis in Flint, Michigan put the need to protect and invest in clean drinking water front and center in the minds of many Americans. But how to go about investing, as well as how to get the public on board with such spending, is a difficult challenge that faces policymakers. A new study from the University of Delaware has found that when given the choice, people prefer to invest their money in conservation, such as protecting key areas of a watershed -- also referred to as green infrastructure -- than traditional water treatment plants-- also referred to as gray infrastructure. They also found that different messages related to climate change, global warming, extreme weather events and decaying infrastructure affect people's willingness to contribute to projects. The study was led by Kent Messer, the Unidel Howard Cosgrove Chair for the Environment and director of the Center for Experimental and Applied Economics (CEAE) in the University's College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR). The results were recently published in the Agricultural and Resource Economics Review. Participants in the study's field experiment heavily favored green infrastructure over gray infrastructure. "People are much more willing to pay for conservation," Messer said. "They like the idea of permanently protecting the waters from their source and avoiding having to do technological fixes." Using a field experiment involving 251 adult participants from sites throughout northern Delaware -- including UD's Ag Day, the New Castle County Farmers Market and the Southbridge community in Wilmington -- the researchers had participants perform a simple task in which they earned money for that action and were then asked if they would like to donate the funds to an organization that could help in alleviating water quality issues in the future. "People didn't just show up and automatically receive money. They earned their money. Then, we asked if they wanted to donate it to either a conservation cause (green infrastructure) or to help drinking water utilities (gray infrastructure)," said Messer who added that the CEAE likes to apply a charitable giving context to their research to see what people will actually do with the money as sometimes surveys aren't always aligned with actual behavior. Participants could donate to either the American Water Works Association (AWWA), representing the traditional gray infrastructure, or the Conservation Fund, representing green infrastructure. Will Allen, vice president for sustainable programs and director of conservation planning and integrated services at the Conservation Fund, said the organization is involved in many projects that utilize green infrastructure, such as a project called Greenseams in Milwaukee. According to the Conservation Fund's website, Greenseams launched in 2001 as a flood management program partnership between the organization and the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewage District. The group purchased land and conservation easements upstream from the city where major suburban growth was expected to occur. More than 100 properties have been protected, preserving 3,142 acres of flood-prone land within greater Milwaukee, including 28 communities and 1.1 million people. The wetlands protected and restored by the program are capable of holding an estimated 1.3 billion gallons of water. Allen said the goal of green infrastructure is not just to ensure that water is clean and improve the quality of a city's drinking water, but also to deal with flood mitigation. "Milwaukee is unluckily a poster child for flooding. It's just really flat and all the water just kind of drains into the city and they can have some catastrophic floods," said Allen. Flooding can be especially problematic in American cities that have aging systems in which floods can cause water to mix with sewage. Green infrastructure is beneficial in helping prevent flooding before it happens, something that gray infrastructure can sometimes have trouble dealing with. "If you can avoid having a lot of water go into those storm water systems then you can avoid the combined sewer overflows," said Allen. The survey also examined how different messages affected people's choices. They found that when it comes to developing a message to inform citizens why protecting water is important, people were more willing to give when climate change or global warming was discussed compared to messages that emphasized extreme weather events. "The big surprise was that messages stating that 'storms are increasing in frequency due to extreme weather events,' led to a dramatic decrease in people's willingness to pay for either conservation or gray infrastructure" said Messer. "This has important implications for how politicians and conservation leaders talk about drinking water protection." Messer said that when it comes to policymaking, there has been a debate on whether it was more effective to avoid discussion of climate change and instead focus on large storms. This study suggests focusing on extreme weather events may have a negative impact. "This research suggests the emphasis on large storms like Hurricane Sandy will actually make people less willing to take action as it appears that people perceive these large storms as being out of human control," he said. "If it's just decaying infrastructure, normal storms, or even climate change, then people might feel they can do something about it. But when you start really emphasizing these large magnitude storms, there becomes a sense of hopelessness." The research was supported by the National Science Foundation North East Water Resources Network (NEWRNet) project and the USDA-funded national Center for Behavioral and Experimental Agri-Environmental Research (CBEAR), of which Messer is also the co-director. The research also involved Sean Ellis, a doctoral student in the Alfred Lerner College of Business and Economics; Matthew Miller, a doctoral student in CANR; and Jacob Fooks, a UD alumnus now working with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Economic Research Service.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.nature.com

The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has upheld a series of patents granted to the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard for the CRISPR–Cas9 gene-editing technology. The hotly anticipated decision could conclude a contentious battle between the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and the University of California over intellectual-property rights to the potentially lucrative technology. Although the Broad was awarded its patents first, the University of California was the first of the two to apply for a patent on the technology. The California contingent also argues that its team in Berkeley invented the technique before investigators at the Broad. Lawyers representing the University of California filed for an ‘interference’ proceeding, in an effort to have the Broad’s patents thrown out. But on 15 February, patent judges determined that there was no interference, meaning that the Broad’s invention is distinct from that of the University of California, and the Broad patents will stand. The University of California’s patent application will now be referred back to an examiner, but legal challenges could continue. Throughout the interference proceeding, which was announced in January 2016, the Broad’s lawyers argued that the University of California’s patent application did not specify how CRISPR–Cas9 editing could be adapted for use in eukaryotic cells — such as those in mice or people. The Broad’s patents did make that distinction: as a result, the lawyers argued, the two patent families would not overlap. The strategy would give the Broad control of what are likely to be the most lucrative applications of CRISPR–Cas9 gene editing in plants, livestock and humans. In the wake of the USPTO decision, however, officials at the University of California said that its patent would nevertheless cover the use of CRISPR–Cas9 in all cells: eukaryotic or otherwise. One of the inventors on that patent, molecular biologist Jennifer Doudna of the University of California, Berkeley, likened the situation to licensing permission to someone who wants to use green tennis balls. “They will have a patent on the green tennis balls,” she said, referring to the Broad patents. “We will have a patent on all tennis balls.” Even so, stock in Editas Medicine — a biotechnology firm in Cambridge, Massachusetts, that has licensed the patents from the Broad Institute — surged shortly after the USPTO verdict was announced. “We are pleased with the USPTO’s decision,” said Editas president Katrine Bosley in a statement. “This important decision affirms the inventiveness of the Broad’s work.” “I think this decision is fair,” says Catherine Coombes, a patent lawyer at intellectual-property specialists HGF in York, UK. The University of California’s invention would cover the design of the RNA molecule that guides the key step in CRISPR–Cas9 gene editing, directing the Cas9 enzyme to a specific site in the genome. But getting that system to work in eukaryotes was an additional inventive step, Coombes says. At a press conference soon after the decision was released, University of California attorney Lynn Pasahow said that the team had not yet decided whether it would appeal. The two teams could also still reach a settlement, notes Kevin Noonan, a partner at the law firm McDonnell Boehnen Hulbert & Berghoff in Chicago, Illinois. The patent battle was unusually fierce, given that inventors on both sides worked for academic institutions, and their inability to settle the case before moving to an interference proceeding surprised some. For now, the USPTO decision creates uncertainty for companies that may want to use the technology in eukaryotic cells, says Noonan. “Everybody gets to keep their patents,” he says. “This is maximum uncertainty for people because you don’t know if you have to get licences from both sides.” If companies are forced to seek licences from both sides, the cost of commercializing CRISPR–Cas9 gene editing could increase, he adds. “These things should be able to be settled between universities,” says Noonan. “This will give a lot of fodder for those who think universities shouldn’t be in the patenting business.”Doudna argued at the press conference that the patent battle had not hampered research, given the speed with which researchers had taken up the technique and companies had rushed to commercialize it. At the University of Delaware in Newark, technology-transfer officer Joy Goswami started to follow the patent case when a large company wavered over whether to license some of his university’s patents on applications of CRISPR–Cas9 in agriculture. The uncertainty around the patent landscape probably contributed to the hesitation, he says — but such uncertainty is not uncommon in biotechnology, particularly in the first few years after a hot invention. “I don’t know if this is a big impact,” he says. “In general, I can tell that there has been a sense of cautiousness.”


News Article | November 8, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

MidAtlantic Farm Credit recently announced the hiring of Jennifer Feindt as a loan officer, based out of the association’s Dover, Delaware office. She will report to Martin Desmond, Farm Credit’s regional lending manager. “Jennifer is not only very experienced in the agriculture industry, but she is also a native of this area, making her a wonderful addition to our team,” says Desmond. “We look forward to her getting to know our customers and helping them reach their business goals.” “Our sales team staff is not only well-versed in financial management, but they have real-world agricultural experience, setting them apart from many other lenders today,” says Stuart Cooper, MidAtlantic Farm Credit’s DelMarVa Division Vice President. “Jennifer will make our department that much stronger, and we’re excited to bring her on board.” Feindt graduated from University of Delaware’s College of Agriculture with a bachelor’s degree in environmental soil science and a minor in plant biology. She also holds a master’s of business administration from Wilmington University. “Agriculture has played an integral role in Delaware’s history and continues to be a vital part of our local economy,” says Feindt. “I am looking forward to working with our local ag producers to meet their financial goals, both now and in the future, so that we can continue this tradition.” Prior to joining Farm Credit, Feindt worked for the United States Department of Agriculture, Farm Service Agency, and as a branch manager for a community bank. As a loan officer with Farm Credit, she will help current and potential customers determine which financial solutions will suit their business best and help them plan for the future. About MidAtlantic Farm Credit MidAtlantic Farm Credit is an agricultural lending cooperative owned by its member‐borrowers. It provides farm loans for land, equipment, livestock and production; crop insurance; and rural home mortgages. The co-op has over 11,100 members and over $2.5 billion in loans outstanding. MidAtlantic Farm Credit has branches serving Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. It is part of the national Farm Credit System, a network of financial cooperatives established in 1916 to provide a dependable source of credit to farmers and rural America.


News Article | November 25, 2016
Site: cleantechnica.com

A recent study from the Max Planck Institute investigating the efficiency of large-scale wind farms claims that large-scale wind energy deployment slows down winds in and around a wind farm, therefore reducing wind turbine efficiency. However, the assumptions made in this study bear little to no relation to the reality of future wind energy deployment, subsequently casting unnecessary doubt on the issue. In my time here at CleanTechnica I have covered a lot of wind energy stories, and read a lot more. Subsequently, I had already come across studies over the past few years which have dealt with the potential loss of efficiency in a wind farm. Wind turbine placement is imperative to reaching the highest level of efficiency possible for any wind farm. Stick a wind turbine directly behind another, and there will be an obvious loss of wind making it through to the second turbine. Back in 2011 computer researchers from the University of Adelaide in Australia and MIT in the US were using a “selection of the fittest” step-by-step approach to determine the best placement for wind turbines. In 2013, a study from the University of Delaware concluded that efficiently spacing or staggering wind turbines can increase offshore wind energy by up to 33%. Looking farther afield, a study published in 2014 found that the development of wind farms in Europe only have “an extremely limited impact” on the continental climate, meaning that the number of wind turbines installed (through to 2020) are unlikely to be causing changes to the climate by literally stealing wind from the atmosphere. And in 2015, a study conducted by an international research group continued the studies into the impact a wind farm might have on the climate and lower atmosphere, but concluded that at the time there was no project operating or currently planned that came even close to the size and concentration of wind turbines to begin yielding diminishing returns. So when I came across a study from the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry in Jena, Germany, with suggestions that lowered the expectations of wind energy when used at large scales, I was immediately suspicious. The report highlights what has been highlighted before — that every wind turbine takes kinetic wind energy out of the atmosphere and converts it to energy. The authors of the study state the obvious, that there will be a reduction in wind speeds across a large-scale wind farm — though that’s not their primary point. As we have seen, proper placement of wind turbines do a lot to mitigate these diminishing returns. Rather, the Max Planck study ran two models which provided them with results suggesting that if there were too many large-scale wind farms in a close area — say in the North Sea, for example — they would begin affecting one another, and reduce the available wind speeds and kinetic energy in the region. “One should not assume that wind speeds are going to stay the same with a lot of wind turbines in a region,” said Dr. Lee Miller, first author of the study. “Wind speeds in climate models may not be completely realistic, but climate models can simulate the effect that many wind turbines have on wind speeds while observations cannot capture their effect.” Specifically, the authors found that when wind energy was used at its maximum potential in a given region, each turbine in the presence of others would on average only generate about 20% of the electricity compared to an isolated wind turbine. Further, on land, the authors of the study determined that only 3% to 4% of land areas have the potential to generate more than 1 watt of electricity per square meter of land surface, with a more typical potential of about 0.5 watt per square meter or less. Given all of this, I decided to take my concerns to my friends at the American Wind Energy Association. Michael Goggin, AWEA’s Senior Director of Research, sums up what I initially thought: “While interesting as an academic exercise, this paper has no bearing on the prospects for wind deployment in the real world.” Specifically, Michael Goggin explained that “The level of wind deployment examined in this analysis is absurd, blanketing the entire planet, including the oceans, with enough wind turbines to meet humanity’s electricity needs 100 times over. For reference, the study assumes the installation of 5,400,000 GW of wind, around 12,000 times more than the 450 GW of wind installed globally today.” Michael Goggin explained to me that, at a recent gathering of leading wind energy experts at Harvard, the unanimous verdict of all present regarding the wake effects of wind production was that there was no chance these effects would hinder wind energy’s potential to meet humanity’s energy needs. The reality is, wind energy resources are so staggering and widespread, that in many cases a region or country’s wind energy resources could supply total electricity coverage numerous times over. We saw that back in 2015 when the Lake Erie Energy Development Corporation studied the offshore wind energy potential for America. Michael Goggin similarly pointed to an analysis by the Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory which concluded that the US has enough developable, high-quality wind energy resources to supply the country’s electricity needs more than a dozen times over — an estimate which is probably now conservative, as it is based on older wind energy technology such as 80-meter wind turbines. In this day and age where there is so much political activity surrounding energy resources, it should come as no real surprise that there are studies and reputable institutions putting out research which is less than legitimate. Whether or not this was the intent of the Max Planck Institute is up for debate, but the facts don’t speak well of their methodology. Buy a cool T-shirt or mug in the CleanTechnica store!   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech daily newsletter or weekly newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.


News Article | November 2, 2016
Site: www.rdmag.com

A new study published today in Scientific Reports by University of Delaware researchers and colleagues reveals that 100 feet below the surface of the ocean is a critical depth for ecological activity in the Arctic polar night -- a period of near continuous winter darkness. It is at this depth, the researchers said, that atmospheric light diminishes in the water column and bioluminescence from marine organisms becomes the dominant light source. It also is the site of significant changes in the composition of luminescent organisms present in the water column. "It turns out that approximately 100 feet in depth is an important transition zone," said Jonathan Cohen, a UD assistant professor in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment and co-author on the paper. The research team has been studying how much biological activity takes place in the Arctic polar night since 2012, when UD's Mark Moline, director of the School of Marine Science and Policy and colleagues in Norway and Scotland began exploring how sea life copes with continuous winter darkness in Svalbard, Norway. Prevailing scientific thought until then was that the food web remained dormant during the polar night. The researchers said that bioluminescence can help explain how some organisms feed and maintain activity during the polar night period and how light can still be involved in ecological processes even during a time of darkness. One interesting finding in the current study is that as depth increased, the amount of bioluminescence in the water column increased and the zooplankton community composition changed. "As you go deeper into the water, we saw fewer dinoflagellates and more copepods, krill and ctenophores, which give off brighter bioluminescent light," said Cohen, who joined the research team in 2013. This community change is not associated with any physical conditions of the water, the researchers said. Rather, it correlates to what the researchers term "bioluminescence compensation depth," the transition point at which atmospheric light diminishes in the water column and bioluminescence takes over. "This points to the functionality of bioluminescence structuring the vertical distribution through behavior possibly independent of migration," said Moline. This is an important finding as the Barents Sea south of Svalbard, Norway, is home to a large and globally important fishery. Fishermen in the region are tremendously interested in understanding how changes in zooplankton -- like copepods -- and zooplankton availability will affect commercially important fish species like cod and herring. The researchers knew from other studies that the distribution of zooplankton and krill in the water column increased at around 100 feet. "When the sky gets brighter at midday during the polar night period there is more atmospheric light available underwater for predation than at night, so marine organisms like copepods retreat lower into the water column where it is darker. We wanted to know how this light interacted with bioluminescence to influence life in the water column," Cohen said. The researchers first attacked this issue by taking atmospheric light measurements in 2014 and 2015, while also measuring bioluminescence in the water. This led to a more detailed study in 2015 of which planktonic species produced light. Finally, they put it all together to think about how bioluminescence can be a light source during the polar night. Then UD graduate student Heather Cronin, working with Cohen and Moline, created what is called a photon budget, or light budget, to measure how much light comes from the atmosphere and how much light comes from inside the water itself with organisms glowing through bioluminescence. To quantify the amount of bioluminescence and to identify what marine organisms were present, the researchers used a pumping system in the water column to drive the organisms into a specialized device equipped with a sensitive light meter. As the organisms entered the device, turbulence created by the pump stimulated the animals to luminesce or glow. Using luminescence kinetics, or the time course of light production and dissipation, the researchers measured how the light intensity inside the pump changed with time in order to identify the marine species present. "Luminescent marine organisms each have a unique light signature. By looking at the time series light generated by a flash within the instrument, we were able to determine who was there making the flash," Cohen explained. "It's a useful tool, particularly at this time of year when relatively few species are present." Bioluminescence is known to play a critical role in helping marine organisms avoid predators and even hide themselves in plain site. At the same time, Cohen continued, it appears that krill and potentially fish are using the additional bioluminescent light from the copepods to find food. "We know from analysis of gut contents that fish and seabirds are active and feeding in Svalbard fjords during polar night," Cohen explained. "Our research suggests that bioluminescent light may be one of the ways that they find food in the dark." One looming concern under climate change scenarios is the loss of sea ice. According to Cohen, scientists are just beginning to appreciate that climate change will change the light environment, which will impact the timing of the ice algae and phytoplankton blooms that spur the spring growing season, maybe even causing it to occur earlier in the year. In the Arctic, for example, sea ice is part of what makes the water column dark. So, if the depth at which atmospheric light transitions to bioluminescent light is important in structuring the zooplankton community and the ecological interactions among organisms, then understanding how much atmospheric light will be present in the water column with less sea ice is significant for understanding food web dynamics. The novelty in the team's work is the focus on putting numbers and data to the processes that occur directly before the spring cycle begins. The next step is to make similar measurements further away from Svalbard to validate their findings in the open ocean. "Being able to measure this transition depth gives us something to look at across seasons and across years that could have important implications for food web impacts in a rapidly changing Arctic," Cohen said.


News Article | November 20, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

An analysis of collegiate graduate and post-graduate programs by AffordableCollegesOnline.org has determined the best places to earn a Master’s and Doctorate Degree Online in the nation for 2016-2017. As a leader in online higher education resources, the site measured cost and quality data to determine the top online programs for each degree level, identifying Western New Mexico University, Fort Hays State University, University of Central Arkansas, Arkansas State University and Wilmington University as the top scoring schools for earning an online master’s degree and the University of Colorado Denver, University of Mississippi, Indiana State University, University of Arkansas and Texas A&M University as the top scoring schools for earning an online doctorate degree. "As of 2013, over 23 percent of master’s and doctoral level students were completing their degrees entirely online,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and Founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. "Our list pinpoints the schools around the nation who are providing students affordable, quality options when it comes to earning a post-baccalaureate degree, with the bonus of greater learning flexibility provided by online curriculum.” Schools must meet specific criteria to qualify for the Best Online Master’s Degree Programs & Best Online Doctorate Degree Programs lists. All institutions must be accredited, public or private not-for-profit entities and must offer in-state tuition and fees under $25,000 per year. Eligible institutions are further evaluated and scored based on a variety of data points, such as financial aid offerings, graduation rates and online program variety, to determine overall cost and quality rankings by school. Full rankings, as well as specific details on data and methodology used to determine school scores can be found at the following pages: All colleges highlighted for excellence in Online Master’s Programs for 2016-2017 are listed below: Adams State University Arkansas State University - Main Campus Ball State University Brenau University Chadron State College Columbus State University Concordia University-Saint Paul Delta State University East Carolina University Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University - Worldwide Emporia State University Fort Hays State University Graceland University - Lamoni Indiana State University Indiana Wesleyan University Liberty University Missouri State University - Springfield New Mexico State University - Main Campus North Carolina Central University North Carolina State University at Raleigh Northern Arizona University Northwestern State University of Louisiana Oklahoma State University - Main Campus Purdue University - Main Campus Saint Leo University Southeastern Oklahoma State University Southern Arkansas University Main Campus The University of Texas at Brownsville (University of Texas Rio Grande Valley) The University of Texas at Tyler Troy University University of Alabama at Birmingham University of Arkansas University of Arkansas at Little Rock University of Central Arkansas University of Central Missouri University of Colorado Denver University of Idaho University of Louisiana at Monroe University of Memphis University of Nebraska at Kearney University of North Carolina at Greensboro University of North Dakota University of Southern Mississippi University of West Alabama Wayland Baptist University Webster University Western Carolina University Western Kentucky University Western New Mexico University Wilmington University All colleges highlighted for excellence in Online Doctorate Programs for 2016-2017 are listed below: Allen College Amridge University Clemson University Colorado State University - Fort Collins Hampton University Harding University Indiana State University Kansas State University Keiser University - Fort Lauderdale Liberty University Mississippi State University Northern Arizona University Oregon State University Pennsylvania State University - Main Campus Rutgers University - New Brunswick Southern Illinois University - Edwardsville Stony Brook University Temple University Texas A & M University - College Station Texas A & M University - Commerce Texas Tech University The University of Alabama The University of Montana The University of Tennessee - Knoxville The University of Texas at Tyler The University of Texas Medical Branch Union Institute & University University at Buffalo University of Alabama in Huntsville University of Alaska Fairbanks University of Arizona University of Arkansas University of California - Berkeley University of Colorado Denver University of Delaware University of Florida University of Louisiana at Monroe University of Massachusetts - Amherst University of Michigan - Flint University of Minnesota - Twin Cities University of Mississippi University of Nebraska - Lincoln University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of North Carolina at Greensboro University of North Dakota University of Northern Colorado University of South Carolina - Columbia University of the Cumberlands Virginia Commonwealth University Wilmington University AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

LAUSANNE, Switzerland, Nov. 15, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- AC Immune SA (NASDAQ:ACIU), a Swiss-based, clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on neurodegenerative diseases, today announced that the shareholders of the company have elected Mr. Thomas Graney as a new member of the Board of Directors of the Company at its Annual General Meeting held at EPFL Innovation Park, Lausanne. Martin Velasco, Chairman of the Board of Directors of AC Immune, commented, "We are very pleased to welcome Tom Graney to our Board of Directors, the Compensation, Nomination and Corporate Governance Committee and the Finance and Audit Committee. His experience in corporate finance and international business and development will bring great expertise and experience to our Board. This comes at the right time as we transition AC Immune into a publicly traded company and continue to develop our strong pipeline of therapeutics and diagnostics targeting neurodegenerative disorders." The shareholders of the company also approved all other resolutions proposed. The detailed resolutions are available on the company's website.Furthermore, AC Immune confirms that Dr. Mathias Hothum has retired from the Board at the conclusion of the Annual General Meeting. About Mr. Tom Graney Mr. Graney serves as Chief Financial Officer and Senior Vice President of Finance & Corporate Strategy at Ironwood Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a post held since September 2014. Prior to Ironwood his professional career included 20 years with Johnson & Johnson and its affiliates, serving for four years as Worldwide Vice President of Finance and Chief Financial Officer of Ethicon, a Johnson & Johnson company. In addition, Mr. Graney has extensive global experience spanning corporate development, commercial strategy, portfolio management and supply chain management. Mr. Graney is a Chartered Financial Analyst charterholder and holds a B.S. in accounting from the University of Delaware and an M.B.A. in marketing, finance and international business from the Leonard N. Stern School of Business at New York University. About AC Immune AC Immune is a clinical stage Swiss-based biopharmaceutical company focused on neurodegenerative diseases with four product candidates in clinical trials. The Company designs, discovers and develops therapeutic and diagnostic products intended to prevent and modify diseases caused by misfolding proteins. AC Immune's two proprietary technology platforms create antibodies, small molecules and vaccines designed to address a broad spectrum of neurodegenerative indications, such as Alzheimer's disease. The Company's pipeline features seven therapeutic and three diagnostic product candidates. The most advanced of these is crenezumab, an anti-Abeta antibody in phase 3 clinical studies that is being advanced by the collaboration partner Genentech, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Roche. Other business partners include Biogen, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences and Piramal Imaging. Forward looking statements This press release may contain statements that constitute "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Forward-looking statements are statements other than historical fact and may include statements that address future operating, financial or business performance or AC Immune's strategies or expectations. In some cases, you can identify these statements by forward-looking words such as "may," "might," "will," "should," "expects," "plans," "anticipates," "believes," "estimates," "predicts," "projects," "potential," "outlook" or "continue," and other comparable terminology. Forward-looking statements are based on management's current expectations and beliefs and involve significant risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results, developments and business decisions to differ materially from those contemplated by these statements. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, the timing and conduct of clinical trials of AC Immune's product candidates, the clinical utility of AC Immune's product candidates, the timing or likelihood of regulatory filings and approvals, AC Immune's intellectual property position and AC Immune's financial position. These risks and uncertainties also include those described under the captions "Risk Factors" and "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" in AC Immune's Registration Statement on Form F-1 and other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.  Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date they are made, and AC Immune does not undertake any obligation to update them in light of new information, future developments or otherwise, except as may be required under applicable law. All forward-looking statements are qualified in their entirety by this cautionary statement. For further information please contact:


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

LAUSANNE, Switzerland, Nov. 15, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- AC Immune SA (NASDAQ:ACIU), a Swiss-based, clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on neurodegenerative diseases, today announced that the shareholders of the company have elected Mr. Thomas Graney as a new member of the Board of Directors of the Company at its Annual General Meeting held at EPFL Innovation Park, Lausanne. Martin Velasco, Chairman of the Board of Directors of AC Immune, commented, "We are very pleased to welcome Tom Graney to our Board of Directors, the Compensation, Nomination and Corporate Governance Committee and the Finance and Audit Committee. His experience in corporate finance and international business and development will bring great expertise and experience to our Board. This comes at the right time as we transition AC Immune into a publicly traded company and continue to develop our strong pipeline of therapeutics and diagnostics targeting neurodegenerative disorders." The shareholders of the company also approved all other resolutions proposed. The detailed resolutions are available on the company's website.Furthermore, AC Immune confirms that Dr. Mathias Hothum has retired from the Board at the conclusion of the Annual General Meeting. About Mr. Tom Graney Mr. Graney serves as Chief Financial Officer and Senior Vice President of Finance & Corporate Strategy at Ironwood Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a post held since September 2014. Prior to Ironwood his professional career included 20 years with Johnson & Johnson and its affiliates, serving for four years as Worldwide Vice President of Finance and Chief Financial Officer of Ethicon, a Johnson & Johnson company. In addition, Mr. Graney has extensive global experience spanning corporate development, commercial strategy, portfolio management and supply chain management. Mr. Graney is a Chartered Financial Analyst charterholder and holds a B.S. in accounting from the University of Delaware and an M.B.A. in marketing, finance and international business from the Leonard N. Stern School of Business at New York University. About AC Immune AC Immune is a clinical stage Swiss-based biopharmaceutical company focused on neurodegenerative diseases with four product candidates in clinical trials. The Company designs, discovers and develops therapeutic and diagnostic products intended to prevent and modify diseases caused by misfolding proteins. AC Immune's two proprietary technology platforms create antibodies, small molecules and vaccines designed to address a broad spectrum of neurodegenerative indications, such as Alzheimer's disease. The Company's pipeline features seven therapeutic and three diagnostic product candidates. The most advanced of these is crenezumab, an anti-Abeta antibody in phase 3 clinical studies that is being advanced by the collaboration partner Genentech, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Roche. Other business partners include Biogen, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences and Piramal Imaging. Forward looking statements This press release may contain statements that constitute "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Forward-looking statements are statements other than historical fact and may include statements that address future operating, financial or business performance or AC Immune's strategies or expectations. In some cases, you can identify these statements by forward-looking words such as "may," "might," "will," "should," "expects," "plans," "anticipates," "believes," "estimates," "predicts," "projects," "potential," "outlook" or "continue," and other comparable terminology. Forward-looking statements are based on management's current expectations and beliefs and involve significant risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results, developments and business decisions to differ materially from those contemplated by these statements. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, the timing and conduct of clinical trials of AC Immune's product candidates, the clinical utility of AC Immune's product candidates, the timing or likelihood of regulatory filings and approvals, AC Immune's intellectual property position and AC Immune's financial position. These risks and uncertainties also include those described under the captions "Risk Factors" and "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" in AC Immune's Registration Statement on Form F-1 and other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.  Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date they are made, and AC Immune does not undertake any obligation to update them in light of new information, future developments or otherwise, except as may be required under applicable law. All forward-looking statements are qualified in their entirety by this cautionary statement. For further information please contact:


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

LAUSANNE, Switzerland, Nov. 15, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- AC Immune SA (NASDAQ:ACIU), a Swiss-based, clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on neurodegenerative diseases, today announced that the shareholders of the company have elected Mr. Thomas Graney as a new member of the Board of Directors of the Company at its Annual General Meeting held at EPFL Innovation Park, Lausanne. Martin Velasco, Chairman of the Board of Directors of AC Immune, commented, "We are very pleased to welcome Tom Graney to our Board of Directors, the Compensation, Nomination and Corporate Governance Committee and the Finance and Audit Committee. His experience in corporate finance and international business and development will bring great expertise and experience to our Board. This comes at the right time as we transition AC Immune into a publicly traded company and continue to develop our strong pipeline of therapeutics and diagnostics targeting neurodegenerative disorders." The shareholders of the company also approved all other resolutions proposed. The detailed resolutions are available on the company's website.Furthermore, AC Immune confirms that Dr. Mathias Hothum has retired from the Board at the conclusion of the Annual General Meeting. About Mr. Tom Graney Mr. Graney serves as Chief Financial Officer and Senior Vice President of Finance & Corporate Strategy at Ironwood Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a post held since September 2014. Prior to Ironwood his professional career included 20 years with Johnson & Johnson and its affiliates, serving for four years as Worldwide Vice President of Finance and Chief Financial Officer of Ethicon, a Johnson & Johnson company. In addition, Mr. Graney has extensive global experience spanning corporate development, commercial strategy, portfolio management and supply chain management. Mr. Graney is a Chartered Financial Analyst charterholder and holds a B.S. in accounting from the University of Delaware and an M.B.A. in marketing, finance and international business from the Leonard N. Stern School of Business at New York University. About AC Immune AC Immune is a clinical stage Swiss-based biopharmaceutical company focused on neurodegenerative diseases with four product candidates in clinical trials. The Company designs, discovers and develops therapeutic and diagnostic products intended to prevent and modify diseases caused by misfolding proteins. AC Immune's two proprietary technology platforms create antibodies, small molecules and vaccines designed to address a broad spectrum of neurodegenerative indications, such as Alzheimer's disease. The Company's pipeline features seven therapeutic and three diagnostic product candidates. The most advanced of these is crenezumab, an anti-Abeta antibody in phase 3 clinical studies that is being advanced by the collaboration partner Genentech, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Roche. Other business partners include Biogen, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences and Piramal Imaging. Forward looking statements This press release may contain statements that constitute "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Forward-looking statements are statements other than historical fact and may include statements that address future operating, financial or business performance or AC Immune's strategies or expectations. In some cases, you can identify these statements by forward-looking words such as "may," "might," "will," "should," "expects," "plans," "anticipates," "believes," "estimates," "predicts," "projects," "potential," "outlook" or "continue," and other comparable terminology. Forward-looking statements are based on management's current expectations and beliefs and involve significant risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results, developments and business decisions to differ materially from those contemplated by these statements. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, the timing and conduct of clinical trials of AC Immune's product candidates, the clinical utility of AC Immune's product candidates, the timing or likelihood of regulatory filings and approvals, AC Immune's intellectual property position and AC Immune's financial position. These risks and uncertainties also include those described under the captions "Risk Factors" and "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" in AC Immune's Registration Statement on Form F-1 and other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.  Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date they are made, and AC Immune does not undertake any obligation to update them in light of new information, future developments or otherwise, except as may be required under applicable law. All forward-looking statements are qualified in their entirety by this cautionary statement. For further information please contact:


News Article | March 21, 2016
Site: www.cemag.us

An international group of physicists has discovered a phenomenon of large magnitude in an unexpected class of materials that can lead to a variety of devices used in optical systems. That phenomenon — the elasto-optic effect — characterizes the formation of a periodic variance of light refraction when an acoustic wave propagates in optical materials, says Yurong Yang, a research assistant professor at the University of Arkansas who led the research. “We found a significantly large elasto-optic effect in thin films made of materials called ferroelectrics,” Yang says, “which are usually considered for their changes in mechanical energy into electrical energy and vice versa, as well in multiferroelectric thin films, which are commonly investigated because of the possible control of their magnetic response by electric input, as well as of their electric response by magnetic input.” The research group published its findings in a paper in Physical Review Letters, the journal of the American Physical Society. A second paper describing the research was published in Nature Communications, an online journal published by the journal Nature. “Those discoveries of a large elasto-optic effect in ferroelectrics and multiferroelectrics therefore broaden the potential of these materials since they can now be put in use to also control their optical responses by elastic property,” says Laurent Bellaiche, Distinguished Professor of physics at the U of A, “which suggests exciting device opportunities arising from this overlooked coupling in these classes of materials.” Yang and Bellaiche, who holds the Twenty-First Century Endowed Professorship in Nanotechnology and Science Education, both conduct research in the Institute for Nanoscience and Engineering and physics department at the U of A. The researchers performed calculations on supercomputers at the Arkansas High Performance Computing Center and a U.S. Department of Defense supercomputing resource. The results published in Physical Review Letters were obtained through a collaborative effort with Zhigang Gui, a U of A physics graduate who is now a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Delaware; Lan Chen and X.K. Meng at Nanjing University in China, and Daniel Sando and Manuel Bibes at University of Paris-Sud in France. The results published in Nature Communications were obtained through a collaborative effort with Daniel Sando and Manuel Bibes and Cecile Carretero, Vincent Garcia, Stephane Fusil, and Agnes Barthelemy at the University of Paris-Sud; Eric Bousquet and Philippe Ghosez at the University of Liege in Belgium; and Daniel Dolfi of Thales Research and Technology in France. Source: University of Arkansas


News Article | November 23, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

SALT LAKE CITY--(BUSINESS WIRE)--SC16, the 28th annual international conference of high performance computing, networking, storage and analysis, celebrated the contributions of researchers and scientists - from those just starting their careers to those whose contributions have made lasting impacts. The conference drew more than 11,100 registered attendees and featured a technical program spanning six days. The exhibit hall featured 349 exhibitors from industry, academia and research organizations from around the world. “There has never been a more important time for high performance computing, networking and data analysis,” said SC16 General Chair John West from the Texas Advanced Computing Center. “But it is also an acute time for growing our workforce and expanding diversity in the industry. SC16 was the perfect blend of research, technological advancement, career recognition and improving the ways in which we attract and retain that next generation of scientists.” According to Trey Breckenridge, SC16 Exhibits Chair from Mississippi State University, the SC16 Exhibition was the largest in the history of the conference. The overall size of the exhibition was 150,000 net square feet (breaking the 2015 record of 141,430). The 349 industry and research-focused exhibits included 44 first-timers and 120 organizations from 25 countries outside the United States. During the conference, Salt Lake City also became the hub for the world’s fastest computer network: SCinet, SC16’s custom-built network which delivered 3.15 terabits per second in bandwidth. The network featured 56 miles of fiber deployed throughout the convention center and $32 million in loaned equipment. It was all made possible by 200 volunteers representing global organizations spanning academia, government and industry. For the third year, SC featured an opening “HPC Matters” plenary that this year focused on Precision Medicine, which examined what the future holds in this regard and how advances are only possible through the power of high performance computing and big data. Leading voices from the frontlines of clinical care, medical research, HPC system evolution, pharmaceutical R&D and public policy shared diverse perspectives on the future of precision medicine and how it will impact society. The Technical Program again offered the highest quality original HPC research. The SC workshops set a record with more than 2,500 attendees. There were 14 Best Paper Finalists and six Gordon Bell Finalists. These submissions represent the best of the best in a wide variety of research topics in HPC. “These awards are very important for the SC Conference Series. They celebrate the best and the brightest in high performance computing,” said Satoshi Matsuoka, SC16 Awards Chair from Tokyo Institute of Technology. “These awards are not just plaques or certificates. They define excellence. They set the bar for the years to come and are powerful inspiration for both early career and senior researchers.” Following is the list of Technical Program awards presented at SC16: SC16 received 442 paper submissions, of which 81 were accepted (18.3 percent acceptance rate). Of those, 13 were selected as finalists for the Best Paper (six) and Best Student Paper (seven) awards. The Best Paper Award went to “Daino: A High-Level Framework for Parallel and Efficient AMR on GPUs” by Mohamed Wahib Attia and Naoya Maruyama, RIKEN; and Takayuki Aoki, Tokyo Institute of Technology. The Best Student Paper Award went to “Flexfly: Enabling a Reconfigurable Dragonfly Through Silicon Photonics” by Ke Wen, Payman Samadi, Sebastien Rumley, Christine P. Chen, Yiwen Shen, Meisam Bahadori, and Karen Bergman, Columbia University and Jeremiah Wilke, Sandia National Laboratories. The ACM Gordon Bell Prize is awarded for outstanding team achievement in high performance computing and tracks the progress of parallel computing. This year, the prize was awarded to a 12-member Chinese team for their research project, “10M-Core Scalable Fully-Implicit Solver for Nonhydrostatic Atmospheric Dynamics.” The winning team presented a solver (method for calculating) atmospheric dynamics. In the abstract of their presentation, the winning team writes, “On the road to the seamless weather-climate prediction, a major obstacle is the difficulty of dealing with various spatial and temporal scales. The atmosphere contains time-dependent multi-scale dynamics that support a variety of wave motions.” To simulate the vast number of variables inherent in a weather system developing in the atmosphere, the winning group presents a highly scalable fully implicit solver for three-dimensional nonhydrostatic atmospheric simulations governed by fully compressible Euler equations. Euler equations are a set of equations frequently used to understand fluid dynamics (liquids and gasses in motion). Winning team members are Chao Yang, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Wei Xue, Weimin Zheng, Guangwen Yang, Ping Xu, and Haohuan Fu, Tsinghua University; Hongtao You, National Research Center of Parallel Computer Engineering and Technology; Xinliang Wang, Beijing Normal University; Yulong Ao and Fangfang Liu, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lin Gan, Tsinghua University; Lanning Wang, Beijing Normal University. This year, SC received 172 detailed poster submissions that went through a rigorous review process. In the end, 112 posters were accepted and five finalists were selected for the Best Poster Award. As part of its research poster activities, SC16 also hosted the ACM Student Research Competition for both undergraduate and graduate students. In all 63 submissions were received, 26 Student Research Competition posters were accepted – 14 in the graduate category and 12 in the undergraduate category. The Best Poster Award went to “A Fast Implicit Solver with Low Memory Footprint and High Scalability for Comprehensive Earthquake Simulation System” with Kohei Fujita from RIKEN as the lead author. First Place: “Touring Dataland? Automated Recommendations for the Big Data Traveler” by Willian Agnew and Michael Fischer, Advisors: Kyle Chard and Ian Foster. Second Place: “Analysis of Variable Selection Methods on Scientific Cluster Measurement Data” by Jonathan Wang, Advisors: Wucherl Yoo and Alex Sim. Third Place: “Discovering Energy Usage Patterns on Scientific Clusters” by Matthew Bae, Advisors: Wucherl Yoo, Alex Sim and Kesheng Wu. First Place: “Job Startup at Exascale: Challenges and Solutions” by Sourav Chakroborty, Advisor: Dhabaleswar K. Panda. Second Place: “Performance Modeling and Engineering with Kerncraft,” by Julian Hammer, Advisors: Georg Hager and Gerhard Wellein. Third Place: “Design and Evaluation of Topology-Aware Scatter and AllGather Algorithms for Dragonfly Networks” by Nathanael Cheriere, Advisor: Matthieu Dorier. The Scientific Visualization and Data Analytics Award featured six finalists. The award went to “Visualization and Analysis of Threats from Asteroid Ocean Impacts” with John Patchett as the lead author. The Student Cluster Competition returned for its 10th year. The competition which debuted at SC07 in Reno and has since been replicated in Europe, Asia and Africa, is a real-time, non-stop, 48-hour challenge in which teams of six undergraduates assemble a small cluster at SC16 and race to complete a real-world workload across a series of scientific applications, demonstrate knowledge of system architecture and application performance, and impress HPC industry judges. The students partner with vendors to design and build a cutting-edge cluster from commercially available components, not to exceed a 3120-watt power limit and work with application experts to tune and run the competition codes. For the first-time ever, the team that won top honors also won the award for achieving highest performance for the Linpack benchmark application. The team “SwanGeese” is from the University of Science and Technology of China. In traditional Chinese culture, the rare Swan Goose stands for teamwork, perseverance and bravery. This is the university’s third appearance in the competition. Also, an ACM SIGHPC Certificate of Appreciation is presented to the authors of a recent SC paper to be used for the SC16 Student Cluster Competition Reproducibility Initiative. The selected paper was “A Parallel Connectivity Algorithm for de Bruijn Graphs in Metagenomic Applications” by Patrick Flick, Chirag Jain, Tony Pan and Srinivas Aluru from Georgia Institute of Technology. The George Michael Memorial HPC Fellowship honors exceptional Ph.D. students. The first recipient is Johann Rudi from the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin for his project, “Extreme-Scale Implicit Solver for Nonlinear, Multiscale, and Heterogeneous Stokes Flow in the Earth’s Mantle.” The second recipient is Axel Huebl from Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf at the Technical University of Dresden for his project, “Scalable, Many-core Particle-in-cell Algorithms to Stimulate Next Generation Particle Accelerators and Corresponding Large-scale Data Analytics.” The SC Conference Series also serves as the venue for recognizing leaders in the HPC community for their contributions during their careers. Here are the career awards presented at SC16: The IEEE-CS Seymour Cray Computer Engineering Award recognizes innovative contributions to high performance computing systems that best exemplify the creative spirit demonstrated by Seymour Cray. The 2016 IEEE-CS Seymour Cray Computer Engineering Award was presented to William J. Camp of Los Alamos National Laboratory “for visionary leadership of the Red Storm project, and for decades of leadership of the HPC community.” Camp previously served as Intel’s Chief Supercomputing Architect and directed Intel’s Exascale R&D efforts. Established in memory of Ken Kennedy, the founder of Rice University's nationally ranked computer science program and one of the world's foremost experts on high-performance computing, the ACM/IEEE-CS Ken Kennedy Award recognizes outstanding contributions to programmability or productivity in high-performance computing together with significant community service or mentoring contributions. The 2016 Ken Kennedy Award was presented to William D. Gropp “for highly influential contributions to the programmability of high-performance parallel and distributed computers, and extraordinary service to the profession.” Gropp Is the Acting Director of the National Center for Supercomputing Applications and Director, Parallel Computing Institute, Thomas M. Siebel Chair in Computer Science at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. The IEEE-CS Sidney Fernbach Memorial Award is awarded for outstanding contributions in the application of high performance computers using innovative approaches. The 2016 IEEE-CS Sidney Fernbach Memorial Award was presented to Vipin Kumar “for foundational work on understanding scalability, and highly scalable algorithms for graph positioning, sparse linear systems and data mining.” Kumar is a Regents Professor at the University of Minnesota. The Supercomputing Conference Test of Time Award recognizes an outstanding paper that has appeared at the SC conference and has deeply influenced the HPC discipline. It is a mark of historical impact and recognition that the paper has changed HPC trends. The winning paper is “Automatically Tuned Linear Algebra Software” by Clint Whaley from University of Tennessee and Jack Dongarra from University of Tennessee and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. IEEE TCSC Award for Excellence in Scalable Computing for Early Career Researchers: The IEEE TCHPC Award for Excellence in Scalable Computing for Early Career Researchers recognizes individuals who have made outstanding and potentially long-lasting contributions to the field within five years of receiving their Ph.D. The 2016 awards were presented to Kyle Chard, Computation Institute , University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory; Sunita Chandrassekaran, University of Delaware; and Seyong Lee, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. SC17 will be held next November 12-17 in Denver, Colorado. For more details, go to http://sc17.supercomputing.org/. SC16, sponsored by the IEEE Computer Society and ACM (Association for Computing Machinery), offers a complete technical education program and exhibition to showcase the many ways high performance computing, networking, storage and analysis lead to advances in scientific discovery, research, education and commerce. This premier international conference includes a globally attended technical program, workshops, tutorials, a world-class exhibit area, demonstrations and opportunities for hands-on learning. For more information on SC16, visit: http://sc16.supercomputing.org.


News Article | November 24, 2016
Site: www.cnet.com

After designing a Civil War computer game for an eighth-grade project, Sonia Uppal was intrigued by programming. But her school material was just too dry and boring for a kid to endure. "It was awful," so she gave up computer science, she says. At a technology fair the next year, though, a chance encounter with a $35 computer called the Raspberry Pi reignited her interest. The palm-size machine is a proudly naked circuit board brazenly showing all its chips and electronic connectors. "It was magical to me," she says. "I picked one up and started tinkering with it. You could do so much with this little thing." For openers, Uppal, 17, taught herself Python, one of today's hottest programming languages. Next, she raised $600 for a project called Pi à la Code, buying 10 of the little computers while at home in Los Altos Hills, California, and taking them to the hill town of Kasauli in northwestern India. There, she taught programming to 25 kids while still a high school sophomore and junior. Now she's headed to the University of California, Berkeley, eager to study computer science. Her story is exactly why Raspberry Pis may be coming to a school near you. The computers burst onto the scene in 2012, six years after a team of computer scientists at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory realized fewer and fewer students had any real understanding of computers. Together, they designed a deliberately bare-bones computer they hoped would encourage a new generation of hobbyist programmers, just like the old PCs from Commodore, Tandy and BBC Micro did in the 1980s. The result was the Raspberry Pi, a credit card-size circuit board exposing students to computer fundamentals. "These are the USB ports where you plug in a keyboard -- this is input," says Matt Richardson, evangelist for the Raspberry Pi Foundation charity organization that designs the computer and, through its trading operation, oversees sales. "This is where you plug in the monitor -- that's an output. That's a computer lesson right there." The little computer is a commercial success, selling in 114 countries and shipping 8 million units over four years. "When we first launched Raspberry Pi, we thought we'd ship 10,000 units a year," says Claire Doyle, head of the Raspberry Pi division for Element14, which makes and distributes the computer. Instead, the explosive growth of the Raspberry Pi took the company by surprise as schools and tinkerers built a movement around it. Because the Raspberry Pi Foundation is a charity, it funnels all profits back into R&D and things like providing free teacher training and resource materials. It also plays a role in some interesting projects, such as working with the Zoological Society of London and the Kenya Wildlife Service, which have put up camera traps to spot illegal rhino and elephant poaching. The computing industry doesn't want us to dirty our hands with chores like formatting hard drives, administering network privileges and updating antivirus software. We don't even have to type if we don't want to; we now tell our gadgets what to do just by speaking to them. Sure, making gadgets easier to use means more people can use them. But somebody has to know what makes these things tick. "The 'it just works' ethos from tech companies is phenomenal. It's changed people's lives for the better," says Raspberry Pi Foundation Chief Executive Philip Colligan. "But it's also robbed us of a sense of agency over the computer," he says. "I don't think we're going to get much innovation from people who don't understand how computing really works." That's where the Raspberry Pi comes in. Because you can plug lots of widgets into a Raspberry Pi -- cameras, thermometers, motors and blinking lights, for example -- it's a great foundation for all kinds of projects. "Are you interested in nature? Here's a bird box project," says Richardson. "Music? Here's how to make a synthesizer. Robots? Here's how to use Raspberry Pi as its brains." That's why it appeals to Melissa Jurist, who designs school programs for children in her job directing K-12 outreach at the University of Delaware's College of Engineering. Jurist especially likes it when kids tackle Pi projects that are "slightly subversive, something that could yield something gross or funny, or something parents probably don't know how to do. "Allowing kids to catapult, shoot or hurl disgusting stuff at each other using a Pi is also at the top of my list," says Jurist. "Cool kids may have iPhones, but cooler kids know how to manipulate and create with their devices." But the Raspberry Pi can be used for more than child's play. Computer engineering students at the Rochester Institute of Technology often use a Raspberry Pi as the brains for their senior projects. These range from devices to monitor home security and control home electronics, to operating a weather station that posts reports on Twitter. "Having a board with all the capabilities built in lets them focus on the application they're trying to get working," vaulting over low-level electronics work that otherwise would fritter away most of the year, says Roy Melton, a lecturer and engineer who teaches the students. And graduate students at Worcester Polytechnic Institute's Aerospace Engineering program put Pis on drones to help them navigate. "We need a fairly powerful computer that can fly," says Professor Raghvendra Cowlagi. "You can't find something under $50 that's so powerful. If you burn one, you just get another." The Raspberry Pi can do more than just raise the next generation of engineers, although that's plenty. With technology pervading every part of our lives, modern society needs a technically literate population, says Laura Blankenship, chair of computer science at the Baldwin School in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, and member of the Computer Science Teachers Association. Knowing how computers work can help Baldwin's middle-school classes wrestle with social issues -- like the conflicting needs of national security and individual privacy. Informed students also can question the tech giants whose products and services reach deep into their lives, says Blankenship. "Once they build something that's similar to a mobile phone, they can ask, 'Why is there software installed on a phone that I can't take off?'" There's a lot riding on the tiny computer. Who knew it could achieve so much? This story appears in the fall 2016 edition of CNET Magazine. For other magazine stories, click here.


DENVER, CO--(Marketwired - October 21, 2016) - MediaNews Group, Inc. ("MNG"), the largest shareholder of Monster Worldwide, Inc. ( : MWW) ("Monster" or the "Company"), with an ownership interest of 11.5% of Monster's outstanding shares, announced it has released an open letter to Monster shareholders along with its definitive consent solicitation materials filed today with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC") and announced that it (through an affiliate) intends to make a cash tender offer for up to 8,925,815 shares of common stock of Monster at a price of $3.70 per share. The offer price of $3.70 per share represents a 9.8% premium to the closing price of the Monster common stock reported on the NYSE on October 20, 2016, the last full trading day before we announced the tender offer and a 33.6% premium to the closing price of the Monster common stock reported on the NYSE on August 8, 2016, the last full trading day before announcement of the Randstad merger agreement. The number of shares MNG intends to offer to purchase in the tender offer represents approximately 10% of the outstanding shares of Monster common stock. The tender offer will be open to all Monster shareholders. After giving effect to the tender offer, assuming the purchase of 100% of the Monster common stock sought in the tender offer, MNG is expected to own 19,225,815 shares of Monster common stock or 21.5% of the Company. MNG is not able to purchase more than 25% of the outstanding Monster common stock without causing a "Change of Control" under the Monster credit agreement. MNG'S offer will not be subject to a financing condition, however, it will be subject to certain other conditions, including the termination of both the Randstad tender offer and merger agreement. Once the tender offer is commenced, offering materials will be mailed to Monster shareholders and filed with the SEC. Monster shareholders should read the offering materials when they become available, because they will contain important information. The tender offer will be held open for at least 20 business days following its commencement, and tenders of shares must be made prior to the expiration of the tender offer period. Additionally, MNG has released an extensive shareholder presentation outlining 1) its strategic plan to revitalize Monster and 2) its director candidates' substantial qualifications to replace the current Board of Directors. The presentation and other information related to MNG's campaign can be found at www.revitalizemonster.com. MNG's nominees for the Monster Board of Directors are: The full text of MNG's letter is included below: MediaNews Group, Inc. ("MNG"), currently has an ownership interest of approximately 11.5% of the outstanding shares of Monster Worldwide, Inc. ("Monster" or the "Company"), making us the Company's largest shareholder. We have nominated seven highly qualified candidates to replace the current Board of Directors at Monster, as this Board has proven time and again its inability to make the right strategic and operational decisions to maximize shareholder value at the Company. The current deal with Randstad at $3.40 per share and the "process" that resulted in this offer is just one example in a long line of poor decision-making by the current Board. In addition to entering into the Randstad deal, this Board oversaw a decline in revenue of over 24% since 2012 and approved a stock repurchase program that had the Company buying back stock in December of 2015 at an average price of $5.99, only to advise shareholders to accept $3.40 per share from Randstad months later. Our director candidates are significantly more qualified and more experienced than the existing Board and one of our candidates, Daniel Dienst, is prepared to serve as interim CEO so that the turnaround at Monster can begin immediately after our directors are seated. Why Are We Here? A Better Path Forward For All Monster Shareholders MNG initially established a position in Monster in July of 2016 because we believed the stock was tremendously undervalued relative to its long-term prospects. We continue to strongly believe this is the case and that the deal with Randstad at $3.40 per share significantly undervalues the Company. Our nominees are dedicated to executing a plan to maximize shareholder value for all investors and while MNG would make a profit if the Randstad deal closes, we believe there is SIGNIFICANTLY more upside for everyone if the Company is managed properly over the long-term. MNG has a significant and deep understanding of the pressures facing Monster and the changes going on in the recruitment advertising industry. This, in part, is based on the following: We are confident that with the right talent and plan, Monster can reduce its revenue declines and increase profitability, despite the numerous headwinds facing the Company. We believe the main issues facing Monster are its lack of competent management, its poor strategy to address the shift in the business, and its completely inadequate oversight by a Board that doesn't have the experience, skills or desire to turn the business around. Our current plan for change focuses on three key areas -- 1) returning to growth, 2) optimizing the cost structure and 3) monetizing/restructuring non-core assets -- and would specifically involve the following initiatives: Our strategy for Monster is well thought out and the result of an exhaustive study of the business and industry, combined with our Board's relevant experience executing these types of initiatives, both at MNG and a host of other businesses. MNG has experience, both at our newspapers and our job board business, making significant expense reductions while minimizing impacts to revenue, and our strategy is greatly informed by these experiences. At MNG, we have reduced total operating expenses significantly over the last few years and our revenue performance has been as good or better than similar large newspaper companies in the industry over that same time period. Additionally, at our Jobs in the US business, we've been able to significantly reduce expense while actually growing revenue over the last few years. With the right execution and strategy, focused around the key initiatives listed above, we believe Monster has the ability to deliver long-overdue value to shareholders and can achieve a stock price of $6 - $8 per share over the next 18 months. Recent Restructuring Actions at the Company Have Not Gone Nearly Far Enough Monster claims that they have "already taken" actions to address challenges by cutting expenses over $100 million during the past several years, cutting capital expenditures by 50% and divesting non-core or underperforming assets. To be clear, the Company has not gone nearly far enough in terms of what it could or should do to rein in expenses, reduce capital spending and divest, restructure or shutdown under-performing assets. With regards to operating expenses, Monster still has close to 3,700 employees, with over 1,000 in salesi and over 61 offices in 23 countriesii. We simply do not accept the notion that the Company has done everything it can to reduce operating expense. Monster spends more on capital expenditures as a percentage of its revenue than its competitors and this management team/Board has a terrible track record when it comes to generating a return on capital invested -- return on capital has ranged annually from 0.4% to 4.4% since 2013iii. We are confident that significant improvements can be made to the product even with a reduced capital expenditures budget and what is clear is that the money being spent now is generating minimal returns for shareholders. The Company also contends that all non-core or underperforming assets have been divested. It's disingenuous for the Company to say it has done everything it can here when the international business alone has been unprofitable for the last 3 years. Clearly there is more to do to either restructure, sell or shutdown pieces of the international business. Moreover, our suspicion is that there are other parts of Monster's business, when analyzed with the necessary level of scrutiny, that would fall into the same category. MNG is NOT Trying to Take Control of Monster Monster claims we are trying to take control of the Company without paying a control premium. Comparing a campaign to remove and replace the Board of an underperforming company with an offer to acquire the whole business is akin to comparing apples and oranges. We are offering shareholders a credible and preferable alternative to the sub-optimal Randstad deal. Additionally, since we are shareholders in the Company and intend to continue being shareholders once our nominees are elected to the Board, we are completely aligned with all shareholders in our desire to maximize the value of the Company. MNG has a long-term view on its Monster investment and strong conviction around the well thought out plan we've put together and the experienced slate we've assembled. We are confident the opportunity exists to create significantly more shareholder value if the right Board and leadership team is put in place and the business is operated properly. Collectively, our Board has experience working on 27 turnaround situations and seventeen years of experience working within the recruitment advertising industry. The strategy we are proposing for Monster is absolutely realistic and our Board has the experience and know-how to execute it effectively. Questionable Strategic and Operational Decisions by the Incumbent Board The Company's financial performance under the current Board has been terrible, with revenue declining by over 24% since 2012 and stock performance suffering as a result. The incumbent Board has a long history of poor decision-making that has negatively impacted shareholder value. This is the Board that: Given this history of poor decision making, why should shareholders now believe the Board when it says that the Randstad deal is the best option to deliver value? An outright sale of the Company was not -- and is not -- the only option. The incumbent Board took the easy way out via a "fire-sale" since they have little skin in the game, as the incumbent non-employee directors collectively own a measly 0.3% of the stockviii. It is clear to us that the Randstad deal was entered into by the Board out of desperation to avoid responsibility for yet another quarterly miss by the Company. The Company did not negotiate a go-shop provision with Randstad, even though they did not run a formal auction process. While other potential buyers are able to technically submit bids, practically speaking, the rushed nature of the process would make it hard for any public company, private company with a sophisticated Board, or traditional private equity firm to participate. These types of potential buyers are used to more formal processes with structured bidding rounds, reasonable deadlines and a level playing field for all participants. We have talked to multiple companies who have stated that they would have participated in a formal process had the Company run one. Moreover, now that the deal with Randstad has been executed, potentially going "hostile" and submitting a competing bid with no access to diligence is not something most public companies, large private companies or traditional private equity funds are comfortable with, thereby severely limiting potential bid activity post the execution of the merger agreement. Aside from the rushed, flawed nature of the "process" the Company ran, we take issue with the fact that the Company was exploring a sale without evaluating all other alternatives for restructuring the business. As we've stated before, we don't believe now is the right time to sell the Company, especially without an exhaustive evaluation of other options to improve the business, and there is no evidence the Company went through this type of evaluation. Potential short-term price movements SHOULD NOT be a motivating factor for a Board and management team and it's clear that this, at least in part, was driving the Company's motivation to get a deal done so quickly with Randstad. Board Has Enabled Tim Yates to Potentially Make Over $4.9 Million if Randstad Deal Closes Monster CEO Tim Yates automatically gets paid over $1.7 millionix if the Randstad deal closes -- even if he keeps his job -- because the Board foolishly awarded equity awards with single-trigger change in control provisions to executives prior to March of 2016 and allowed him to negotiate the deal. Mr. Yates stands to make over $4.9 millionx if the Randstad deal is successful and he is terminated "without cause" or terminates "for "good reason." Mr. Yates owns less than 1%xi of the Company and has very little "skin in the game." Given the fact that the Company's stock has declined by over 92% since he first became involved in the business in 2007, and over 55% the last 12 monthsxii, it seems wholly unfair to shareholders that he stands to make such a financial windfall for "selling at the bottom." Despite Mr. Yates' obvious conflicts resulting from his golden parachutes and lack of substantial ownership of the Company, Monster's Board still allowed Mr. Yates to run the Company's haphazard sales "process" and completely relied on him for negotiations and updates. A SIGNFICANT Upgrade to the Board - Introduction to MNG's Nominees Our nominees have a very relevant and diverse set of skills across areas such as finance, sales management, corporate governance, restructuring, technology, recruitment advertising, and operations. Collectively, they have: Mr. Dienst served as a director and the Chief Executive Officer of Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia Inc., a media and merchandising company, from 2013-2015, where he led the turnaround of the famous brand and orchestrated its successful sale in 2015 to Sequential Brands, Inc. for $353 million. Prior to his service at Martha Stewart Living, Mr. Dienst had a distinguished career in the steel and metals industry, having served as the Group Chief Executive Officer of Sims Metal Management, Ltd. from 2008-2013, the world's largest publicly listed metal and electronics recycler, processing and trading in excess of 15 million tons of metal annually from 270 facilities on five continents. He had previously sold Metal Management, Inc., a company that he founded and served in the capacity of Chief Executive Officer from 2004-2008, to Sims for $1.7 billion in 2008. Mr. Dienst also served as Chairman of the Board and Acting Chief Executive Officer of Metals USA, Inc., one of the nation's largest steel processors, after its reorganization and until its going private sale to an affiliate of Apollo Management, L.P. in 2004. Mr. Dienst is also experienced in the financial markets, having served as a Managing Director of Corporate and Leveraged Finance at CIBC World Markets Corp., a diversified global financial services firm, from 2000-2004. From 1998-2000, he held various positions within CIBC, including Executive Director of the High Yield and Financial Restructuring Group. Previous to his time at CIBC, he served in various capacities with Jefferies & Company, Inc., a global investment banking firm. Mr. Dienst also recently served from 2014-2015 as a Director of 1st Dibs, Inc., a venture-backed e-commerce business owned by Benchmark Capital, Spark Capital, Index Ventures and Insight Venture Partners. Mr. Dienst holds a B.A. from Washington University in St. Louis. and a J.D. from Brooklyn Law School. Mr. Dienst's qualifications as a director include his executive experience as a CEO and director of 4 public companies, his expertise in turnarounds, special situations and corporate transactions and his experience in the media sector. Mr. Anto is currently a Senior Vice President at MediaNews Group, Inc. (d/b/a Digital First Media), the second largest newspaper company in the U.S. by circulation, where he has served since 2013. From 2014-2015, he was Vice President of Business Development for MediaNews Group and also CEO at Jobs in the US, a subsidiary of MediaNews with regionally focused job board sites in New England. From 2013-2014 he was Managing Director at Digital First Ventures, the strategic investing division of MediaNews Group. In 2009 he co-founded RumbaTime, LLC, a fashion brand focused on timepieces and accessories and served as the Company's CEO until 2012. From 2006-2009 Mr. Anto was a Senior Analyst and Director of Investments at Harbinger Capital Partners, a multi-strategy investment firm, where he managed one of the largest merchant power investment portfolios in the sector, accounting for approximately 30% of the Fund's assets and completed M&A and debt financing transactions totaling over $4 billion in value. Prior to his time at Harbinger, Mr. Anto was an associate at ABS Capital Partners, a later-stage venture capital firm, and an analyst at First Union Securities in their technology investment banking group. He is currently on the board at CIPS Marketing Group, Inc. and he has previously served on the boards of Kelson Energy Inc., Kelson Canada and Rumbatime. He has a BBA from Emory University and an MBA from Columbia University. Mr. Anto's qualifications as a director include his expertise as a previous CEO of a job board business, his executive experience, particularly in the media industry, and his expertise in turnarounds and corporate transactions. Mr. Bloomfield is currently the CEO of vitalfew, inc, a consulting and advisory business which he founded in 2015. He also serves on the Board of governors for TaTech, a leading industry association which enables the interaction of companies in the recruitment technology space. He has been a member since 2006 and on the board of governors since the first board was elected by the membership. In 2016, he co-founded and is also the current CRO of ConversationDriver, a company that utilizes software to help organizations improve efficiencies in sales outreach. From 2012-2015, he served as the Senior Vice President of Sales and Business Development at recruitment technology company, ZipRecruiter, which he joined in 2012 as the 20th employee and the first in sales. In his role at ZipRecruiter he developed the entire sales organization, which he grew from concept to over 120 reps when he left the company. Previously he was Vice President of Business Development at JobTarget, a company that provides technology to organizations that want to offer their own web-based job boards to their members. While at JobTarget, he was instrumental in launching innovative new products and also led the acquisition of two companies. Mr. Bloomfield holds a B.A. from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Mr. Bloomfield's qualifications as a director include his expertise in recruitment technologies, developed over a career spanning more than twelve years in the space. He is widely recognized as a thought leader in the sector and, in addition to advising or having advised almost thirty companies in the industry, he is a frequent speaker at industry conferences and events. Mr. Freeman is the President, a Founding Member, and Director of Alden Global Capital, LLC, a New York-based investment firm focused on deep value, catalyst driven investing. He has been with the firm since its founding in 2007, and has been its President since 2014. Mr. Freeman currently serves as Vice Chairman of MediaNews Group, Inc. (d/b/a Digital First Media), the second largest newspaper business in the United States by circulation with over $1 billion of annual revenue, owning newspapers such as The Denver Post, San Jose Mercury News and Orange County Register. He also serves on the compensation committee and leads the strategic review committee for MNG and has served on its board since 2011. Mr. Freeman is a co-founder and serves on the board of SLT Group, Inc. (d/b/a SLT) a private fitness business based out of New York and started in 2011, which recently took in a large growth investment from North Castle Partners, a private equity firm focused on the health and wellness space. Mr. Freeman also co-founded City of Saints Coffee Roasters in 2013, a third wave coffee roaster, wholesaler and retailer based out of Brooklyn, NY. Prior to Alden, from 2006 - 2007, Mr. Freeman worked as an Investment Analyst at New York-based Smith Management, a private investment firm. Prior to that, from 2003 - 2006, Mr. Freeman was an investment banking analyst at Peter J. Solomon Company, a boutique investment bank, working on mergers and acquisitions, restructurings and refinancing assignments. He has previously served on the boards at The Philadelphia Media Network and The Journal Register Company, among others. Currently, Mr. Freeman also serves as Chairman of the Advisory Board for Jewish Life at Duke University's Freeman Center and he also graduated with a BA from Duke University. Mr. Freeman's qualifications as a director include his experience as an investor, investment banker and board member of multiple companies with expertise in finance, compensation, turnarounds, corporate transactions and significantly improving value at underperforming companies. Mr. Gregson has served as the Americas Leader for the Insurance Industry for Willis Towers Watson plc since 2013. Prior to his role at Willis Towers Watson, Mr. Gregson was a Managing Director at Alvarez and Marsal Holdings, LLC, a financial advisory services company focused primarily on the financial services industry, from 2010-2013. Mr. Gregson has over thirty years of experience in developing and implementing business solutions for global organizations. Prior to joining Alvarez and Marsal, Mr. Gregson served as founder and president of Bridge Pointe, LLC, a Bermuda-based insurance and reinsurance company and advisory services firm that provides innovative insurance solutions for insurers and corporate sponsors. Previously, he was a co-founder and principal of the Gregson Group, a business advisory firm helping companies align business strategies with organizational and human capital strategies. He is currently a director at Fidelity & Guaranty Life, a provider of life insurance and annuity products, where he serves on the audit, compensation and related party transactions committee. Mr. Gregson holds a B.A. from the University of Delaware and has attended the Executive Finance Program at the University of Michigan. Mr. Gregson's qualifications as a director include his experience advising companies on complex business and financial issues for thirty years, and his expertise in corporate governance, strategy, and financial/operational performance improvement. Mr. Robinson is a highly regarded financial and operating executive with thirty years of senior-level strategic, financial, governance, turnaround and M&A experience. He has also been on seven public company boards, and has experience serving as Chairman of the board as well as Chairman of audit and compensation committees. From 2006-2009, Mr. Robinson was Chief Financial Officer and Chief Operating Officer for Miva, Inc., a digital marketing company, and was instrumental in Miva's turnaround and subsequent sale. He was previously Senior Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of HotJobs.com, an online job board, where he was responsible for all finance and administrative functions at the company. After bringing the company to profitability a year ahead of expectation, HotJobs was sold to Yahoo! for $500 million, representing a 75% premium to market. Prior to joining HotJobs, Mr. Robinson was Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer for PRT Group, a software and IT services company, where he raised $62 million in its initial public offering. In 1994, Mr. Robinson was recruited by the CEO and Warburg Pincus to serve as the Chief Financial Officer of Valassis Communications, Inc. (f/k/a Advo, Inc.), a Fortune 500 company and the largest direct marketing company on the New York Stock Exchange with $2 billion in revenues. Over a three-year period, shareholder value increased 300% due to operational initiatives which he led, in addition to paying out a one-time $10 special dividend. Previously, Mr. Robinson held senior financial positions with Citigroup, Mars, Inc. and Kraft Foods Group, Inc. He is currently on the board at EVINE Live Inc., and has previously served on the board of The Jones Group, Inc., where he chaired the audit and compensation committees, in addition to having served on the boards of five other public companies over the course of his career. Mr. Robinson holds a B.A. from The University of Wisconsin and an M.B.A. in finance from Harvard Business School. Mr. Robinson's qualifications as a director include his C-level executive experience at multiple companies, his experience serving on the boards of seven public companies and his expertise in finance, corporate governance, turnarounds and corporate transactions. The Hon. Gregory Slayton has served as the Managing Director of Slayton Capital, an international venture capital firm that has been an early investor in some of the most successful companies in Silicon Valley history, since 2002. He was an early investor in Google and Salesforce.com and served on the advisory boards of both companies. From 2005-2009, Mr. Slayton was the United States Chief of Mission (defacto Ambassador) to Bermuda, serving under both the Bush and Obama Administrations. From 2000-2002, he served as Chief Executive Officer of ClickAction Inc., an email marketing services company that was acquired by InfoUSA Inc., and prior to this, he was Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of MySoftware, which merged with ClickAction in 2000. He has also served as Distinguished Visiting Professor at Peking University and as a visiting professor at UIBE Business School, Beijing & Szechuan University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University and the Stanford Graduate School of Business. Mr. Slayton has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, Time and three Harvard Business School case studies. He has lived and worked extensively in Asia, Africa, Europe and Latin America, and was a Fulbright Scholar at the University of the Philippines, where he completed a Masters in Asian Studies with honors. Mr. Slayton holds a B.A. from Dartmouth College and an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School, having graduated from both institutions with honors. Mr. Slayton's qualifications as a director include his experience as an investor in technology companies, his executive experience as CEO of multiple companies, his experience serving on the boards of four public companies and his expertise in technology, operations and international markets. As shareholders, we don't have to settle for the "fire-sale" Randstad deal that was brought to us by the current Board or the poor performance of the Company that has taken place under its watch. Simply put, we expect more from the board members we entrust with creating value at the companies we invest in and we think other shareholders should expect more as well. There is a better path forward for Monster and we are confident that the plan we've laid out and the board candidates we are presenting represent the best possible alternative to deliver substantial value to shareholders. We encourage all shareholders to visit our website, revitalizemonster.com, to learn more about our nominees and our strategic plan to revitalize the Company. If you have any questions, please contact Okapi Partners LLC at info@okapipartners.com or 212-297-0720. MediaNews Group, Inc. (d/b/a Digital First Media) is a leader in local, multiplatform news and information, distinguished by its original content and high quality, diversified portfolio of local media assets. Digital First Media is the second largest newspaper company in the United States by circulation, serving an audience of over 40 million readers on a monthly basis. The Company's portfolio of products includes 67 daily newspapers and 180 non-daily publications. Digital First Media has a leading local news audience share in each of its primary markets and its content monetization platforms serve clients on both a national and local scale. MediaNews Group, Inc., Joseph Anto, Ethan Bloomfield, Daniel Dienst, Heath Freeman, Kevin Gregson, Lowell Robinson and Gregory Slayton (collectively, the "Participants") have filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC") a definitive consent statement and accompanying form of consent card to be used in connection with the solicitation of consents from the stockholders of Monster Worldwide, Inc. (the "Company"). All stockholders of the Company are advised to read the definitive consent statement and other documents related to the solicitation of consents by the Participants as they contain important information, including additional information related to the Participants. The consent statement and an accompanying consent card will be furnished to some or all of the Company's stockholders and will be, along with other relevant documents, available at no charge on the SEC website at http://www.sec.gov/ or from Okapi Partners at (855) 305-0856 or info@okapipartners.com. Information about the Participants and a description of their direct or indirect interests by security holdings is contained in the definitive consent statement on Schedule 14A filed by the Participants with the SEC on October 20, 2016. This document is available free of charge from the sources indicated above. The tender offer referenced in this press release has not yet commenced. This announcement is for informational purposes only and is not an offer to purchase or a solicitation of an offer to sell securities, nor is it a substitute for the tender offer materials that will be filed with the SEC. The solicitation and offer to buy shares of common stock of Monster will only be made pursuant to an Offer to Purchase and related tender offer materials that will be filed by MNG (through an affiliate) with the SEC. THE TENDER OFFER MATERIALS OF MNG ON SCHEDULE TO (INCLUDING AN OFFER TO PURCHASE, A RELATED LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL AND CERTAIN OTHER TENDER OFFER DOCUMENTS) WILL CONTAIN IMPORTANT INFORMATION. MONSTER SHAREHOLDERS SHOULD READ THESE DOCUMENTS CAREFULLY WHEN THEY BECOME AVAILABLE BECAUSE THEY WILL CONTAIN IMPORTANT INFORMATION THAT MONSTER SHAREHOLDERS SHOULD CONSIDER BEFORE MAKING ANY DECISION REGARDING TENDERING THEIR SECURITIES. Copies of these documents, when filed with the SEC, will be available free of charge by contacting Okapi Partners LLC, the information agent for the tender offer, at (855) 305-0856. These documents, when filed with the SEC, will also be available for free at the SEC's website at www.sec.gov. THIS PRESS RELEASE CONTAINS FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS. FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS CAN BE IDENTIFIED BY USE OF WORDS SUCH AS "OUTLOOK", "BELIEVE", "INTEND", "EXPECT", "POTENTIAL", "WILL", "MAY", "SHOULD", "ESTIMATE", "ANTICIPATE", AND DERIVATIVES OR NEGATIVES OF SUCH WORDS OR SIMILAR WORDS. FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS IN THIS PRESS RELEASE ARE BASED UPON PRESENT BELIEFS OR EXPECTATIONS. HOWEVER, FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS ARE NOT GUARANTEED TO OCCUR AND MAY NOT OCCUR AS A RESULT OF VARIOUS RISKS, REASONS AND UNCERTAINTIES, INCLUDING UNCERTAINTY AS TO WHETHER THE CONDITIONS TO THE TENDER OFFER WILL BE SATISFIED, THE NUMBER OF SHARES OF MONSTER COMMON STOCK THAT WILL BE TENDERED AND WHETHER THE TENDER OFFER WILL BE COMMENCED OR CONSUMMATED. EXCEPT AS REQUIRED BY LAW, MNG AND ITS OWNERS AND RELATED PERSONS UNDERTAKE NO OBLIGATION TO UPDATE ANY FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENT, WHETHER AS A RESULT OF NEW INFORMATION, FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS OR OTHERWISE. Note: unless cited below, Monster historical financials and data points referenced in this letter are from the Company's SEC filings and press releases i According to previous conversations with Monster Investor Relations. Based on our understanding, this includes inside sales, outside sales, management and sales/customer support ii http://www.monster.com/about/our-locations iii S&P Capital IQ iv 2016 Proxy Peer Group includes: IAC/InterActiveCorp; LinkedIn Corporation; Earthlink Holdings Corp.; VeriSign, Inc.; Shutterfly, Inc.; Pandora Media, Inc.; j2 Global, Inc.; Pegasystems Inc.; Blucora, Inc.; WebMD Health Corp.; NetSuite, Inc.; Web.com Group, Inc.; and DHI Group, Inc. Excludes three companies that are no longer standalone public companies since they have been acquired; Calculation of Cumulative Total Shareholder Return assumes dividends are reinvested v Company's Consent Revocation Statement, filed on Schedule 14A on October 18, 2016 vi Based on stock price of $44.72 on June 8, 2007 vii For instance, Monster made statements in a press release filed on Schedule 14D-9/A on September 30, 2016, claiming, "Monster's Board recognized that enhancing Monster's competitive position in the current environment will require continued investment, and the Company will likely operate in a low growth environment with substantial margin pressure for several years." Several days later, Monster wrote in a shareholder presentation filed on Schedule 14A on October 4, 2016 (the "October 4 DEFA14A), "If the Randstad transaction does not close, Monster's stock price could trade down to or below the pre-announcement price." viii S&P Capital IQ ix Company's Solicitation/Recommendation Statement, filed on Schedule 14D-9 on September 6, 2016 x Company's Solicitation/Recommendation Statement, filed on Schedule 14D-9 on September 6, 2016 xi Company's Consent Revocation Statement, filed on Schedule 14A on October 18, 2016 xii Based on Monster stock price on October 15, 2015 of $7.60


Miller G.A.,University of Delaware | Miller G.A.,University of Konstanz | Miller G.A.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | Rockstroh B.,University of Konstanz
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology | Year: 2013

Endophenotypes for psychopathology have been conceived as latent, unobserved, but measureable manifestations of phenomena that causally connect genetic liability to clinical disorder. Several decades of research have led to refinement of the construct and identification of some candidate endophenotypes, but rather limited progress on finding the genes involved or the mechanisms by which endophenotypes are driven by genetic and environmental factors and in turn drive psychopathology. Currently promising avenues for research involve development of transdiagnostic concepts not limited to traditional diagnostic categories, measures of endophenotypic and manifest psychopathology that have higher validity than those categories, and methods for modeling complex relationships among diverse contributors to etiology. With more grounding in animal neuroscience and other aspects of basic biological and psychological science, exemplified in the Research Domain Criteria initiative, there is every reason to anticipate that the endophenotype concept will grow more central in the psychopathology literature. Copyright © 2013 by Annual Reviews.


Colby D.W.,University of California at San Francisco | Colby D.W.,University of Delaware | Prusiner S.B.,University of California at San Francisco
Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Biology | Year: 2011

The discovery of infectious proteins, denoted prions, was unexpected. After much debate over the chemical basis of heredity, resolution of this issue began with the discovery that DNA, not protein, from pneumococcus was capable of genetically transforming bacteria (Avery et al. 1944). Four decades later, the discovery that a protein could mimic viral and bacterial pathogens with respect to the transmission of some nervous system diseases (Prusiner 1982) met with great resistance. Overwhelming evidence nowshows that Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and related disorders are caused by prions. The prion diseases are characterized by neurodegeneration and lethality. In mammals, prions reproduce by recruiting the normal, cellular isoform of the prion protein (PrPC) and stimulating its conversion into the disease-causing isoform (PrPSc). PrPC and PrPSc have distinct conformations: PrPC is rich in a-helical content and has little b-sheet structure, whereas PrPSc has less a-helical content and is rich in b-sheet structure (Pan et al. 1993). The conformational conversion of PrPC to PrPSc is the fundamental event underlying prion diseases. In this article, we provide an introduction to prions and the diseases they cause. © 2011 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.


Yu W.,University of Delaware | Porosoff M.D.,University of Delaware | Chen J.G.,University of Delaware | Chen J.G.,Columbia University | Chen J.G.,Brookhaven National Laboratory
Chemical Reviews | Year: 2012

The field of heterogeneous catalysis, specifically catalysis on bimetallic alloys, has seen many advances over the past few decades. Bimetallic catalysts, which often show electronic and chemical properties that are distinct from those of their parent metals, offer the opportunity to obtain new catalysts with enhanced selectivity, activity, and stability. There are two critical factors that contribute to the modification of the electronic and chemical properties of a metal in a bimetallic surface. First, the formation of hetero atom bonds changes the electronic environment of the metal surface, giving rise to modifications of its electronic structure through the ligand effect. Second, the geometry of the bimetallic structure is typically different from that of the parent metals. The primary objective of the current review is to provide correlations between model surfaces and supported catalysts for several types of catalytic reactions.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2012

The overall objective of the proposed effort is to develop an improved ultrasonic consolidation process for metal matrix composites (MMCs). This will be done through the development and validation of multiscale models of the bonding process and the laminated structures produced. These models will facilitate the optimization of the in-coming material, the structural performance of the processed material, and the production costs. Touchstone Research Laboratory (Touchstone) will team with the University of Delaware"s Center for Composite Materials (UD-CCM) to accomplish the objective. The approach will be to evaluate every aspect of the process to achieve the desired process improvements. Touchstone will use its materials and process knowledge to supply input to the modeling effort and will provide the MMC prepreg tape material for process validation trials. UD-CCM will support Touchstone by modeling the ultrasonic process and using the models to optimize the process and the materials.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.99K | Year: 2013

As infrared (IR) electo-optical sensors improve in both availability and quality a strong need exists to have comparable improvements in the performance of military obscurants within the IR band. Conventional approaches for creating effective IR obscurants have relied primarily on shaped metal particles with high aspect ratios (e.g. rods, flakes). While efficient it is difficult to create very wideband or spectrally complex responses when using surface plasmon based metal particles. In this effort we will take a completely different approach towards the design of IR based obscurants. Instead of using metal particles we intend to explore the development of all dielectric obscurants that exploit the properties of photonic crystals with integrated nanocavities. We believe this approach can create highly reflective obscurant particles within an entire IR band. Moreover, by introducing defect modes we will show that it is possible to create single or multiple transparent windows within a wideband obscurant band. The all dielectric approach is also amenable to current nanofabrication methods as well as scalable nano-imprinting techniques that can be used to fabricate large quantities of obscurant at a reasonable cost.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 750.00K | Year: 2014

The overall objective of the proposed effort is to develop an improved ultrasonic consolidation (UC) process for metal matrix composites (MMCs). The Phase I effort demonstrated the feasibility of using a fiber-matrix unit cell finite element analysis to study the thermal and acoustic softening that occurs during UC. The analyses completed in Phase I highlighted the need for uniform prepreg material and appropriate anvil knurl patterns in order to optimize the UC process. These factors will become the focus of the Phase II effort with production of relevant test articles and laminated structures to be carried out once the tape uniformity and UC process have been optimized. Touchstone Research Laboratory (Touchstone) will team with the University of Delawares Center for Composite Materials (UD-CCM) again during the Phase II effort. Touchstone will be the producer of the improved MetPreg prepreg tape and will perform testing and characterization of the feedstock material and finished components. UD-CCM will continue its modeling work and will also produce the bonded specimens and structures using its UC equipment.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP.2011.2.2-4 | Award Amount: 5.19M | Year: 2012

This proposal aims at developing a new generation of novel materials for high performance permanent magnets (PM) with energy product 60 kJ/m3 <(BH)max < 160 kJ/m3, which do not contain any rare-earths or platinum. To achieve this objective two strategies will be used: a) exploitation of shape anisotropy of high magnetic moment materials produced in the form of high-aspect-ratio (>5) nanostructures by environmentally friendly synthesis methods and b) using high-throughput (HT) thin film synthesis and characterization techniques to identify new PM candidate phases. The first strategy, through the control of the nanostructure will lead to a factor of 4 increase of the coercivity (over conventional Alnico) . The second strategy will use (HT) methods to screen hundreds of possible compositions and synthesis conditions. Investigations will focus on promising candidate materials of the type {Fe-Co}-X-Y (X = other 3d or 4d metals and Y= B,C,P or N) and Heusler alloys of the type X2YZ (where X is usually Fe, Co, Ni, Cu; Y other transition metals, most often Mn; and Z a group-B element (Al, Ga, Ge, Sn...). High Ms materials that can be stabilized in tetragonal or hexagonal structures by epitaxial growth on selected substrates are the goal with magnetic anisotropies in excess of 107 ergs/cm3.This range covers a wide field of applications and represents a sizeable market fraction of over 100 M. All research will be performed taking into consideration the critical issues of toxicology and sustainability of the full life cycle of the materials from production to recycling. The consortium will generate breakthroughs to re-establish the EU as a leader in the science, technology and commercialization of this very important class of materials with a wide range of applications, helping to decrease our dependence on raw materials from abroad providing a positive socioeconomic impact and increased employability of young European scientists.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY, PA, February 21, 2017-- Jo Anne Norris has been recognized for showing dedication, leadership and excellence in counseling.Worldwide Branding, the world's leading source for professional networking and branding, is proud to name Ms. Norris a Lifetime Achiever. An accomplished member, Ms. Norris celebrates many years' experience in her professional network, and has been noted for achievements, leadership qualities, and the credentials and successes she has accrued in her field.In her most recent role, Ms. Norris served as a school counselor at the Columbia Borough School District.To prepare for her career, Ms. Norris undertook a robust education that includes a master's degree in school counseling from the University of Delaware and a bachelor's degree in communicative disorders (speech and language therapy) from West Chester University. She is presently working on her dissertation for her Ed.D. in Pupil Servicers Leadership, which she is pursuing through Widener University. Additionally, she has been honored as a Top Female Executive by Worldwide Branding in 2016.In recognition of outstanding contributions to her profession and the Worldwide Branding community, Ms. Norris has been featured on the Who's Who Lifetime Achievement website. Please visit https://wwlifetimeachievement.com/2017/02/03/jo-anne-norris/ to view this distinguished honor.About Worldwide BrandingFor more than 15 years, Worldwide Branding has been the leading, one-stop-shop, personal branding company, in the United States and abroad. From writing professional biographies and press releases, to creating and driving Internet traffic to personal websites, our team of branding experts tailor each product specifically for our clients' needs. From health care to finance to education and law, our constituents represent every major industry and occupation, at all career levels.For more information, please visit http://www.worldwidebranding.com


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Students from Delaware, Florida, Minnesota, New York, South Carolina and Texas have been elected by delegates from throughout the United States to serve on the 2016-17 National FFA Officer team. David Townsend, an agricultural and natural resources and plant science major at the University of Delaware, was elected president. This is the first time the state of Delaware has had a national FFA president. Victoria Harris, a biology major at the University of Florida, will serve as secretary. DeShawn Blanding, a biological engineering (natural resources engineering) major at North Carolina A&T State University, was elected southern region vice president and Trey Elizondo, a science and agricultural communications major at Texas A&M, will serve as western region vice president. Ashley Willits, an agricultural education major at Tarleton State University, was elected eastern region vice president and Valerie Earley, an agricultural communications major at the University of Minnesota, will serve as central region vice president. Each year at the National FFA Convention & Expo, six students are elected by delegates to represent the organization as national officers. Delegates elect a president, secretary, and vice presidents representing the central, southern, eastern and western regions of the country. National officers commit to a year of service to the National FFA Organization. Each officer travels more than 100,000 national and international miles to interact with business and industry leaders, thousands of FFA members and teachers, corporate sponsors, government and education officials, state FFA leaders, the general public, and more. The team will lead personal growth and leadership training conferences for FFA members throughout the country and help set policies that will guide the future of FFA and promote agricultural literacy. The National FFA Organization provides leadership, personal growth and career success training through agricultural education to 649,355 student members who belong to one of 7,859 local FFA chapters throughout the U.S., Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. About National FFA Organization The National FFA Organization is a national youth organization of 649,355 student members as part of 7,859 local FFA chapters in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The FFA mission is to make a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. The National FFA Organization operates under a federal charter granted by the 81st United States Congress and it is an integral part of public instruction in agriculture. The U.S. Department of Education provides leadership and helps set direction for FFA as a service to state and local agricultural education programs. For more, visit the National FFA Organization online at FFA.org and on Facebook, Twitter and the official National FFA Organization blog. About National FFA Foundation The National FFA Foundation builds partnerships with industry, education, government, other foundations and individuals to secure financial resources that recognize FFA member achievements, develop student leaders and support the future of agricultural education. Governed by a 19-member board of trustees comprised of educators, business leaders, individual donors and FFA Alumni, the foundation is a separately registered nonprofit organization. About 82 percent of every dollar received by the foundation supports FFA members and agricultural education opportunities. For more, visit FFA.org/Give.


News Article | December 12, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The pathway to zero-emission vehicles has taken two forks, one toward battery electric cars like the Tesla and the other toward fuel-cell-powered automobiles like the Toyota Mirai. The University of Delaware's Yushan Yan believes that fuel-cell vehicles are the way to go, because they best preserve the advantages of gasoline automobiles: low upfront cost, long driving range and fast refueling. But he also believes that a new fuel-cell technology may be necessary. For Yan, that approach is a new twist on traditional fuel cells, known as proton exchange membrane fuel cells, or PEMFCs, which rely on costly platinum-based catalysts. Yan and his research team are pursuing an alternative technology, the hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cell (HEMFC), because of its inherent cost advantages. He sees the rationale for this proposed switch as a matter of very simple arithmetic. "To make fuel-cell cars a reality, the DOE (Department of Energy) has set a system cost target of $30 per kilowatt, which translates into about $2,400 per car," he says. "Right now, the cost for PEMFCs is $52 per kilowatt, which is a big improvement over where the technology started." "But the catalyst accounts for only about $12 of that total, leaving $40 worth of other components. So even if we throw in some magic, we can't get the rest of the way down to the target of $30 with PEMFCs." Yan is co-author on a new paper published in the online version of Nature Nanotechnology that he views as a roadmap to a unified strategy for HEMFC zero-emission cars based on three arguments. "First, to become a commercial reality, fuel-cell engines have to be at cost parity with their gasoline counterparts," he says, "and moving from an acid platform with the PEMFC to a base system with the HEMFC will enable a collateral benefit in bringing down all of the associated costs. "Then, if we agree that this is the best approach, we need to get everyone in the HEMFC research community on board. If we want to succeed, we have to work together." Finally, Yan warns that it is insufficient just to have a lower cost. "It doesn't work to compare our results today with those from yesterday or the day before," he says. "To succeed commercially with HEMFCs, we have to match or beat the performance of PEMFCs. It's that simple -- we can't succeed without achieving performance parity." The paper, "Activity Targets for Nanostructured Platinum Group Metal-Free Catalysts in Hydroxide Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells," was co-authored by Brian P. Setzler, Zhongbin Zhuang, Jarrid A. Wittkopf, and Yushan Yan. Yan is Distinguished Engineering Professor in UD's Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Setzler is a postdoctoral researcher in Yan's group, and Wittkopf is a doctoral student advised by Yan. Zhuang is a professor at Beijing University of Chemical Technology and a former postdoctoral researcher in Yan's group.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The University of Pittsburgh is the newest academic participant in the University City Science Center’s Phase 1 Ventures program. To launch their partnership, the Science Center and the University of Pittsburgh Innovation Institute are collaborating to commercialize a Pitt-developed technology for accurately aligning lower-limb prostheses. Phase 1 Ventures (P1V) is a startup accelerator for launching companies around “long horizon” technologies that typically require significant development and/or regulatory approvals, such as healthcare, materials, or energy. Entrepreneurs are either matched to a technology at one of P1V’s participating universities or enrolled as part of a previously formed company that has not yet raised financing. Since it was launched in 2015, P1V has committed a total of over $1.3 million to participants, typically as the first investment. These participants have raised a total of over $1.6 million in non-dilutive funding and $250,000 in follow-on investment to date. “I am delighted by the strong cross-Commonwealth cooperation in our agreement with the University City Science Center,” said Marc Malandro, Founding Director of the University of Pittsburgh Innovation Institute and Chairman of Life Sciences PA (formerly Pennsylvania Bio), the state’s trade association for the life sciences industry. “Pennsylvania has two of the top five NIH funded universities in the United States in the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Pennsylvania, along with many other institutions with strong life sciences programs. Through increased collaboration, we can ensure that Pennsylvania continues to grow its life sciences economy, providing good paying jobs, while also benefitting all of society with impactful innovations that improve and prolong lives.” The first Pitt project being supported by P1V is a technology that facilitates extremely accurate prostheses fittings, thereby reducing physical discomfort and wear and tear, as well as the need for recurring re-fitting visits. The technology was developed by Goeran Fiedler, assistant professor in the School of Rehabilitation Science, and former Pitt faculty member Jonathan Akins, now at Widener University. P1V has helped to form a startup company and work with the Pitt team to develop a commercialization plan, and has provided assistance in applying for a federal STTR grant to further develop the technology. If the company is successful in obtaining grants, the Science Center could choose to make its own investment, or seek other investors or industry funding for the company. “Phase 1 Ventures is making the geographic gap between Philadelphia and Pittsburgh just a little bit less of a divide for commercialization in Pennsylvania,” says Science Center President & CEO Stephen S. Tang, Ph.D., MBA. “Partnerships like the one that the Science Center and Pitt are forging through Phase 1 Ventures mean that inventors and entrepreneurs can access the resources they need to create great new companies – regardless of where they are.” Launched in 2015, P1V’s portfolio currently includes 19 newly-formed companies representing intellectual property from twelve institutions, including The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia; Drexel University; Lehigh University; Penn State University; Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey; Temple University; Thomas Jefferson University; University of Delaware; University of Iowa; University of Pennsylvania; University of Pittsburgh; and University of the Sciences. About the University of Pittsburgh Innovation Institute Established in 2013, the University of Pittsburgh Innovation Institute is the University’s hub for innovation and entrepreneurship. The Innovation Institute provides a comprehensive suite of services for Pitt Innovators, from protecting intellectual property to the commercialization of new discoveries. The Institute also provides a wealth of educational programming, mentoring and networking for Pitt faculty, students and regional small businesses. About the Science Center Located in the heart of uCity Square, the Science Center is a mission-driven nonprofit organization that catalyzes and connects innovation to entrepreneurship and technology commercialization. For 50+ years, the Science Center has supported startups, research, and economic development in the life sciences, healthcare, physical sciences, and emerging technology sectors. As a result, graduate firms and current residents of the Science Center’s incubator support one out of every 100 jobs in the Greater Philadelphia region and drive $13 billion in economic activity in the region annually. By providing resources and programming for any stage of a business’s lifecycle, the Science Center helps scientists, entrepreneurs and innovators take their concepts from idea to IPO – and beyond. For more information about the Science Center, go to http://www.sciencecenter.org


News Article | December 27, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

MINNEAPOLIS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The National Institute for Pharmaceutical Technology and Education, Inc. (NIPTE) is part of the newly created public-private partnership called National Institute for Innovation of Manufacturing Biopharmaceuticals (NIIMBL). Its formation was announced by U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker on December 16, 2016. NIIMBL is led by the University of Delaware and includes some 150 private companies, academic institutions, and non-profit organizations across the nation. It is supported by a $70 million grant from U.S. Department of Commerce and an initial investment of $129 million from participating organizations. Its goal is to accelerate biopharmaceutical manufacturing innovation and educate and train a world-leading biopharmaceutical manufacturing workforce, fundamentally advancing U.S. competitiveness in this industry. The participating NIPTE team, currently comprised of six member institutions (Universities of Connecticut, Kentucky, Kansas, Texas, Iowa, and Wisconsin), is a Tier 1 partner in NIIMBL. It will hold a seat on the Institute’s Governance Board and will play a major role in its initiatives primarily focusing on biopharmaceutical formulations and product development, and FDA regulatory science. The team will work in close collaboration with three other NIPTE member institutions, Purdue University, University of Maryland, and the University of Minnesota, which are Tier 1 partners alongside NIPTE. “We are extremely pleased that advanced pharmaceutical manufacturing is now part of the Manufacturing USA network,” said Dr. Vadim J. Gurvich, executive director of NIPTE and research associate professor at the University of Minnesota. “NIIMBL’s leadership has put together a very impressive partnership that will make a significant impact on biopharmaceutical manufacturing in this nation. As a key member, we will contribute to both research and education. For example, our Center of Excellence in Pharmaceutical Formulations will be a natural partner in NIIMBL.” NIPTE is a 501(c)(3) non-profit academic organization with the mission to improve human health through multi-university collaborative research advancing quality, safety, affordability, and speed to market of medicines. It is comprised of 15 top schools of pharmacy, chemical and pharmaceutical engineering, and one medical school. Current members are Duquesne University, Illinois Institute of Technology, Long Island University, Purdue University, Rutgers University, University of Connecticut, University of Iowa, University of Kansas, University of Kentucky, University of Maryland, University of Michigan, University of Minnesota, University of Puerto Rico, University of Rochester Medical Center, University of Texas, and University of Wisconsin.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Ocean acidification (OA) is spreading rapidly in the western Arctic Ocean in both area and depth, according to new interdisciplinary research reported in Nature Climate Change by a team of international collaborators, including University of Delaware professor Wei-Jun Cai. The research shows that, between the 1990s and 2010, acidified waters expanded northward approximately 300 nautical miles from the Chukchi slope off the coast of northwestern Alaska to just below the North Pole. Also, the depth of acidified waters was found to have increased, from approximately 325 feet to over 800 feet (or from 100 to 250 meters). "The Arctic Ocean is the first ocean where we see such a rapid and large-scale increase in acidification, at least twice as fast as that observed in the Pacific or Atlantic oceans," said Cai, the U.S. lead principal investigator on the project and Mary A.S. Lighthipe Professor of Earth, Ocean, and Environment at UD. "The rapid spread of ocean acidification in the western Arctic has implications for marine life, particularly clams, mussels and tiny sea snails that may have difficulty building or maintaining their shells in increasingly acidified waters," said Richard Feely, NOAA senior scientist and a co-author of the research. Sea snails called pteropods are part of the Arctic food web and important to the diet of salmon and herring. Their decline could affect the larger marine ecosystem. Among the Arctic species potentially at risk from ocean acidification are subsistence fisheries of shrimp and varieties of salmon and crab. Other collaborators on the international project include Liqi Chen, the Chinese lead principal investigator and scientist with the Third Institute of Oceanography of State Oceanic Administration of China; and scientists at Xiamen University, China and the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, among other institutions. The researchers studied water samples taken during cruises by Chinese ice breaker XueLong (meaning "snow dragon") in summer 2008 and 2010 from the upper ocean of the Arctic's marginal seas to the basins as far north as 88 degrees latitude, just below the North Pole, as well as data from three other cruises. Scientists measured dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity which allows them to calculate pH and the saturation state for aragonite, a carbonate mineral that marine organisms need to build their shells. Data collected by ship and model simulations suggest that increased Pacific Winter Water (PWW), driven by circulation patterns and retreating sea ice in the summer season, is primarily responsible for this OA expansion, according to Di Qi, the paper's lead author and a doctoral student of Chen. "This work will help increase our understanding of climate change, carbon cycling, and ocean acidification in the Arctic, particularly as it affects marine and fishery science and technology," said Chen. PWW comes from the Pacific Ocean through the Bering Strait and shelf of the Chukchi Sea and into the Arctic basin. In recent years, melting sea ice has allowed more of the Pacific water to flow through the Bering Strait into the Arctic Ocean. Pacific Ocean water is already high in carbon dioxide and has higher acidity. As the ocean mass moves north, it absorbs additional carbon dioxide from decomposing organic matter in the water and sediments, increasing acidity. The melting and retreating of Arctic sea ice in the summer months also has allowed PWW to move further north than in the past when currents pushed it westward toward the Canadian archipelago. Arctic ocean ice melt in the summer, once found only in shallow waters of depths less than 650 feet or 200 meters, now spreads further into the Arctic Ocean. "It's like a melting pond floating on the Arctic Ocean. It's a thin water mass that exchanges carbon dioxide rapidly with the atmosphere above, causing carbon dioxide and acidity to increase in the meltwater on top of the seawater," said Cai. "When the ice forms in winter, acidified waters below the ice become dense and sink down into the water column, spreading into deeper waters."


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Injecting large amounts of offshore wind power into the U.S. electrical grid is manageable, will cut electricity costs, and will reduce pollution compared to current fossil fuel sources, according to researchers from the University of Delaware and Princeton University who have completed a first-of-its-kind simulation with the electric power industry. The researchers consulted with PJM Interconnection -- a grid operator supplying electricity to more than 60 million people in 14 states -- to develop a computer model that simulates how the electric grid would respond to injections of wind power from offshore wind farms along the East Coast at five build-out levels, between 7 and 70 gigawatts of installed capacity. The two-part study is published in the journal Renewable Energy. One hurdle grid operators face is how to integrate increasing amounts of naturally fluctuating offshore wind into a network that has to deliver reliable power to customers, 24-7. The UD and Princeton team showed conservatively that, with some upgrades to transmission lines but without any need for added storage, the PJM grid can handle over 35 gigawatts of offshore wind--that's 35 billion watts--enough to power an estimated 10 million homes. They also found that the PJM grid could in the future handle twice that amount, up to 70 gigawatts, as wind forecasting improves, allowing the power operator to better predict and harness more wind. "Our goal was to replicate this very human-made energy system under all kinds of scenarios," said Cristina Archer, associate professor of physical ocean science and engineering at the University of Delaware. "What would you do as a grid operator if you thought it was going to be windy today and it isn't, or if the wind storm arrives earlier than expected? We simulated the entire PJM grid, with each power plant and each wind farm in it, old and new, every five minutes. As far as we know, this is the first model that does this." From her office in UD's Harker Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Laboratory, Archer led the team's efforts to generate realistic offshore wind forecasts based on real wind farm data from land-based systems, which colleagues at Princeton then incorporated into their model of the PJM electric power system. The team used stochastic modeling, running hundreds of forecasts with various tweaks in conditions, to realistically represent the fluctuating and sometimes unpredictable behavior of wind. The model of PJM, called Smart-ISO, created at Princeton, is designed to handle both the variability and uncertainty of growing inputs of offshore wind energy, simulating what happens over an extensive power grid with more than 60,000 miles of transmission lines. "The uncertainty of wind will require that we develop strategies to minimize the need for spinning reserve," said Warren Powell, professor and lead researcher at Princeton in charge of the SMART-ISO model, referring to electric generators that need to keep "spinning" and be ready for any electricity shortage. "Although we found that reserves were needed -- 21 percent of the 70 gigawatt wind capacity -- there are a number of strategies that could be investigated to better handle the variability as wind grows in the future." The first U.S. offshore wind farm, consisting of five wind turbines at Block Island, Rhode Island, with a generating capacity of 30 megawatts, had not been built yet when the researchers began their study five years ago. The 70 gigawatts offshore modeled in this study would be almost equal to the total U.S. wind power capacity installed on land through the end of 2016. Archer says that adding more offshore wind farms would lower consumers' electricity costs and reduce pollution by replacing coal and natural gas power plants. "We saw up to a 50 percent reduction in carbon and sulfur dioxide and up to a 40 percent reduction in nitrogen oxides emissions at the highest build-out level, a 70-gigawatt set of wind farms. Plus, the costs of electricity would go down every month except in July when air conditioning is at a peak," Archer said. "Wind power is a very good idea -- for people's health and their wallets." The research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The two-part study is published in Renewable Energy. Part I, "The Challenge of Integrating Offshore Wind Power in the U.S. Electric Grid: Wind Forecast Error," was written by Cristina Archer, H. P. Simao, Willett Kempton, Warren Powell and M. J. Dvorak. Part II, "The Challenge of Integrating Offshore Wind Power in the U.S. Electric Grid: Simulation of Electricity Market Operations," was written by H.P. Simao, Warren Powell, Cristina Archer and Willett Kempton.


WASHINGTON -- People with knee osteoarthritis (OA) often have difficulty with physical function, such as getting out of a chair and walking, which limits the ability to be physically active. According to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington, most people with knee OA actually already have the physical function necessary to walk at least 6,000 steps a day, the minimum amount needed to improve their arthritis and prevent disability. Osteoarthritis, or OA, is the most common joint disease affecting middle-age and older people. It is characterized by progressive damage to the joint cartilage--the cushioning material at the end of long bones--and causes changes in the structures around the joint. People with knee OA need to adopt a physically active lifestyle, or at least a goal of 6,000 steps a day, to get major health benefits. Yet most people with this condition are sedentary and struggle to engage in physical functions like stair climbing and walking. Researchers at the University of Delaware's Department of Physical Therapy analyzed publicly available data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative to measure physical activity and physical function among OA patients. "We were interested in understanding what minimal level of functional ability was necessary to be physically active," said Daniel K. White, PT, ScD, MSc, Assistant Professor and the study's lead author. "For instance, how far does one need to be able to walk in order to be active in the community?" Establishing minimum physical function thresholds a day helps clinicians prioritize when to prescribe interventions like physical therapy. Physical function was measured according to timed, five-repetition sit-to-stand (STS) tests, timed 400-meter walks, and walking speed on a 20-meter walk. To establish a minimum threshold for both physical function and activity, they calculated cut points at 80 percent and 95 percent specificity for walking 6,000 steps per day. There were 1,790 participants who wore their monitors for three or more days and moved 6,319 ± 2,920 steps a day, with 47 percent walking more than 6,000 steps a day. The mean STS test results for these participants was 10.2 ± 3.2 seconds, and their 400-meter walk speed was 305.3 ± 51.4 seconds. Their walking speed was 1.3 ± 0.2 meters per second. Physical function at or below these thresholds may be a barrier to people with OA getting the minimum level of physical activity they need, said White. The good news is that most people with knee OA already meet these physical function thresholds. For those patients who are below these thresholds, interventions that target improvement of physical function may help them achieve the target of 6,000 steps a day, he said. "Our findings are important to both patients and providers. They are important to patients to realize that most people with knee OA are able to live a physically active lifestyle. They are important to providers to understand when someone may need help with their functional ability to become physically active, such as receiving a referral for physical therapy," he said. In the future, White hopes to utilize this research and conduct even more studies to promote physical activity to people with knee OA. "Now that we have an idea of how much ability is necessary to be active, we can better develop intervention strategies that are personalized to patients' individualized needs so we can get them to be more active," he said. This research was supported by funding from the Rheumatology Research Foundation. About the American College of Rheumatology Headquartered in Atlanta, Ga., the American College of Rheumatology is an international medical society representing over 9,400 rheumatologists and rheumatology health professionals with a mission to Advance Rheumatology! In doing so, the ACR offers education, research, advocacy and practice management support to help its members continue their innovative work and provide quality patient care. Rheumatologists are experts in the diagnosis, management and treatment of more than 100 different types of arthritis and rheumatic diseases. For more information, visit http://www. . The ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting is the premier meeting in rheumatology. With more than 450 sessions and thousands of abstracts, it offers a superior combination of basic science, clinical science, tech-med courses, career enhancement education and interactive discussions on improving patient care. For more information about the meeting, visit http://www. , or join the conversation on Twitter by following the official #ACR16 hashtag.


News Article | April 12, 2016
Site: www.rdmag.com

University of Delaware researchers have identified two novel molecular players necessary to regulate plasmodesmata — communication channels in plants that bridge individual cells with their neighboring cells for distribution and exchange of nutrients, minerals and cellular signals -- under both biotic and abiotic stress conditions, shining light on what is considered one of the mysteries of plant biology and a fundamental structure essential for plant survival and body formation. "Plants do not have cells that move freely like humans do because plant cells are kind of glued together. So they have to have a different way to communicate and that's these channels," said Weier Cui, a postdoctoral researcher in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources' Department of Plant and Soil Sciences who used the study for her Ph.D. thesis. The research, published recently in the journal Nature Plants, was conducted by Cui and Jung-Youn Lee, professor of plant and soil sciences and biological sciences. The work was funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The paper is the result of three years of research and Lee said that without Cui's level of commitment, hard work and perseverance, they never would have been able to get their results. Lee also said that it is very rare for a paper of this magnitude to have only two authors. According to Lee, not much is known about plasmodesmata due to the technical challenges associated with its study. "Our lab has been studying how plant cells regulate plasmodesmal gating to either facilitate or block intercellular movement in response to environmental challenges. Our previous finding made the connection for the first time that plasmodesmata are closed when plants are attacked by microbial pathogens as an innate immune response," said Lee. "It is almost as if plants are guarding the intercellular passageways limiting food supply or distribution, which would deter the invading pathogenic bacteria, for example, to proliferate." This latest research shows that in addition to closing the pathways due to immune response, the pathways are also closed in response to mechanical wounding. Through targeted mutant screening of Arabidopsis plants, Cui identified two genes encoding enzymes that catalyze the production of cell wall polymers called callose, which is not a structural constituent of the plant cell wall and functions as transitional wall materials formed at the cell division sites or wounding sites. "Our job is to find molecules that may be the door keepers of the channels, sometimes restrict them and sometimes open them. Callose is one of the most important physical constraints of plasmodesmata," said Cui. Lee said that callose has been found as a kind of structural element near the plasmodesmata channel and "people have seen that sometimes the level will go up and sometimes it will go down, and when it's less, it seems to correlate with when plasmodesmata permeability has increased. There were strong correlations." In other words, when signals or nutrients need to be extensively moved between cells, the callose levels drop and allow the plant cells to enhance communication with one another and when molecular movement needs to be blocked, callose levels rise and block molecular movement through plasmodesmata. Lee further explained that because the callose is a biopolymer -- polymers produced by a living organism -- it has to be synthesized by enzymes. "It has also been known that callose itself is synthesized by callose synthase enzymes, and there are gene families known, but no one knew which callose synthase member is specifically devoted to produce callose at the plasmodesmata." This research shows that two enzymes are devoted to altering callose levels at the plasmodesmata, with one working particularly when the plant has been infected by a pathogen and one functioning specifically in situations where plants are stressed by an abiotic mechanism. "If you wound the plant leaves, they deposit a large quantity of callose at the wounding site, which is controlled by one of the known callose synthase members. When plant tissues are damaged, the plant has to clot the wounded sites -- that's the wound callose. At the same time, they also deposit a finite amount of callose at around the channels between intact cells nearby the damaged, dying cells. Here, different members of the enzyme, which we newly identified, seems to function to close channels because isolating the healthy cells is perhaps necessary to protect them," Cui said. Now that the "molecular players" critical for changing plasmodesmata permeability have been identified, researchers can use the molecular and genetic information to find even more components of the plasmodesmata regulatory pathway or mechanism and will be able to link the significance or the functional importance of plasmodesmata in development, physiology and in interaction with its environment. "Our finding really opens up many avenues in the whole field," Lee said. "The reason that plasmodesmata have remained a mystery of plant biology is because we have not known much about how they are formed or the molecules or the genes that are involved in the formation or regulation. These two genes that we identified are novel regulators of the plasmodesmal permeability, which allows us and others to use as new molecular tools for further exploration."


News Article | September 28, 2016
Site: www.rdmag.com

Within a few years, the U.S. Department of Energy wants plug-in electric vehicles to be just as affordable and convenient as the internal-combustion machines most of us drive today. But we’re not there yet. When President Obama and the Department of Energy (DOE) launched the EV (plug-in electric vehicles) Everywhere initiative in 2012, the DOE said electric vehicles need to be 30 percent lighter, battery costs have to drop from $500 per kilowatt hour to $125 per kilowatt hour and electric drive systems must drop from $30 per kilowatt down to $8 per kilowatt. “Typically, in the engineering world, when you have a problem like this, you look at the system, for example the motor design,” said Jun Cui, an Iowa State University associate professor of materials science and engineering and a senior scientist with the DOE’s Ames Laboratory. But electric motors have been around since the 1830s. The easy system solutions were found long ago. “The hard stuff is material-related,” Cui said. “It’s the demand for better materials.” A research team led by Cui is working to meet the demand for better materials and performance in electric motors. To support their work, they’ve just won a three-year, $3.8 million grant from the DOE’s Vehicle Technologies Program. Of that, $2.8 million will support research at Iowa State. The project also includes research partners from the United Technologies Research Center in East Hartford, Connecticut; and the University of Delaware in Newark. Cui said the project was made possible by combining the research expertise and facilities of Iowa State and the Ames Laboratory. Local collaborators include Scott Chumbley, a professor of materials science and engineering and scientist for the Ames Laboratory; Peter Collins, the Alan and Julie Renken associate professor of materials science and engineering and an associate scientist of the Ames Laboratory; Iver Anderson, a senior metallurgist for the Ames Laboratory and an adjunct professor of materials science and engineering; Valery Levitas, a Schafer 2050 Challenge Professor of aerospace engineering and an associate scientist of the Ames Laboratory; Frank Peters, an associate professor and associate chair of operations in industrial and manufacturing systems engineering; and Matthew Kramer, director of the Ames Laboratory’s Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering and an adjunct professor of materials science and engineering. Cui said the project’s modeling and basic experimental efforts will be based at Iowa State and the large-scale casting and part molding will be based at the Ames Laboratory. Cui said the grant would not have been possible without his prior steel research at the DOE’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington. “This is truly a collaboration,” Cui said. “It’s not all Ames Laboratory or Iowa State, but people from both joining together to make this project happen.” The grant is part of a $59.2 million federal investment in 35 research projects aimed at reducing the cost and improving the efficiency of electric, alternative-fuel and conventional vehicles, according to a DOE announcement. Cui’s research team is working to develop motors with the stator core (a non-rotating, magnetic part) manufactured with thin layers, or laminations, of a new “electrical steel.” The new steel will be an iron alloy containing 6.5 percent silicon, twice the amount used in electric motors today. Cui said the extra silicon increases the electrical resistivity of the material by about 50 percent. And that reduces eddy currents, heat and power loss in the motor. That’s very important as researchers work to develop the next generation of electric motors. Cui said he sees those motors running at much higher frequencies – jumping from today’s 60 hertz all the way to 400 hertz. That produces a much higher motor power density, Cui said. And that means motors can be smaller, lighter, more powerful and more cost effective. Running at higher frequencies also lowers motor efficiency. Cui said the new electrical steel his team is developing can reduce those efficiency losses. But there’s a problem: Steel with extra silicon is brittle and expensive to manufacture. “It will crack if you drop it,” Cui said. The Iowa State-Ames Laboratory researchers will study and characterize different processes for making electrical steel so it’s more ductile and cheaper to make. Cui said the researchers are also committed to developing materials and motors that don’t depend on magnets made with rare-earth materials. That saves the motor industry from the rising costs of rare-earth materials. “The fundamental drive for this project is that we want more cost-effective and efficient electric motors,” Cui said. “In about 10 years, if we’re lucky, we should see a real impact of this work. We should see these motors on the road.”


News Article | September 28, 2016
Site: www.rdmag.com

Within a few years, the U.S. Department of Energy wants plug-in electric vehicles to be just as affordable and convenient as the internal-combustion machines most of us drive today. But we’re not there yet. When President Obama and the Department of Energy (DOE) launched the EV (plug-in electric vehicles) Everywhere initiative in 2012, the DOE said electric vehicles need to be 30 percent lighter, battery costs have to drop from $500 per kilowatt hour to $125 per kilowatt hour and electric drive systems must drop from $30 per kilowatt down to $8 per kilowatt. “Typically, in the engineering world, when you have a problem like this, you look at the system, for example the motor design,” said Jun Cui, an Iowa State University associate professor of materials science and engineering and a senior scientist with the DOE’s Ames Laboratory. But electric motors have been around since the 1830s. The easy system solutions were found long ago. “The hard stuff is material-related,” Cui said. “It’s the demand for better materials.” A research team led by Cui is working to meet the demand for better materials and performance in electric motors. To support their work, they’ve just won a three-year, $3.8 million grant from the DOE’s Vehicle Technologies Program. Of that, $2.8 million will support research at Iowa State. The project also includes research partners from the United Technologies Research Center in East Hartford, Connecticut; and the University of Delaware in Newark. Cui said the project was made possible by combining the research expertise and facilities of Iowa State and the Ames Laboratory. Local collaborators include Scott Chumbley, a professor of materials science and engineering and scientist for the Ames Laboratory; Peter Collins, the Alan and Julie Renken associate professor of materials science and engineering and an associate scientist of the Ames Laboratory; Iver Anderson, a senior metallurgist for the Ames Laboratory and an adjunct professor of materials science and engineering; Valery Levitas, a Schafer 2050 Challenge Professor of aerospace engineering and an associate scientist of the Ames Laboratory; Frank Peters, an associate professor and associate chair of operations in industrial and manufacturing systems engineering; and Matthew Kramer, director of the Ames Laboratory’s Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering and an adjunct professor of materials science and engineering. Cui said the project’s modeling and basic experimental efforts will be based at Iowa State and the large-scale casting and part molding will be based at the Ames Laboratory. Cui said the grant would not have been possible without his prior steel research at the DOE’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington. “This is truly a collaboration,” Cui said. “It’s not all Ames Laboratory or Iowa State, but people from both joining together to make this project happen.” The grant is part of a $59.2 million federal investment in 35 research projects aimed at reducing the cost and improving the efficiency of electric, alternative-fuel and conventional vehicles, according to a DOE announcement. Cui’s research team is working to develop motors with the stator core (a non-rotating, magnetic part) manufactured with thin layers, or laminations, of a new “electrical steel.” The new steel will be an iron alloy containing 6.5 percent silicon, twice the amount used in electric motors today. Cui said the extra silicon increases the electrical resistivity of the material by about 50 percent. And that reduces eddy currents, heat and power loss in the motor. That’s very important as researchers work to develop the next generation of electric motors. Cui said he sees those motors running at much higher frequencies – jumping from today’s 60 hertz all the way to 400 hertz. That produces a much higher motor power density, Cui said. And that means motors can be smaller, lighter, more powerful and more cost effective. Running at higher frequencies also lowers motor efficiency. Cui said the new electrical steel his team is developing can reduce those efficiency losses. But there’s a problem: Steel with extra silicon is brittle and expensive to manufacture. “It will crack if you drop it,” Cui said. The Iowa State-Ames Laboratory researchers will study and characterize different processes for making electrical steel so it’s more ductile and cheaper to make. Cui said the researchers are also committed to developing materials and motors that don’t depend on magnets made with rare-earth materials. That saves the motor industry from the rising costs of rare-earth materials. “The fundamental drive for this project is that we want more cost-effective and efficient electric motors,” Cui said. “In about 10 years, if we’re lucky, we should see a real impact of this work. We should see these motors on the road.”


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Worcester Polytechnic Institute will hold its second annual Advanced Biomanufacturing Symposium, a two-day, in-depth event that will focus on the technology and processes of continuous biomanufacturing and the challenges of making novel cell and regenerative tissue therapies that are approaching the clinic. The symposium, which was over-subscribed last year, is set for March 27–28, 2017. Organized by WPI life sciences and bioengineering faculty members and the university’s Biomanufacturing Education and Training Center (BETC), the symposium will bring together industry professionals and academic researchers working with new technologies, processes, and business practices that will have a significant impact on biomanufacturing in the near term. “2017 is shaping up to be an important year for biological products, with increasing public awareness of the industry and advances across the biomanufacturing spectrum that will demand our attention,” said Kamal Rashid, PhD, director of the BETC and research professor at WPI. “Evolving platforms and expression systems, progress towards end-to-end continuous biomanufacturing, the challenges of cell and tissue therapies—all of these topics will be explored in detail at our symposium.” This year’s keynote presenters include Manon Cox, PhD, president and chief executive officer of Protein Sciences Corp.; Jerome Ritz, MD, professor at Harvard Medical School and executive director of the Connell and O'Reilly Cell Manipulation and Gene Transfer Laboratory at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; and Gail Naughton, PhD, chief executive officer of Histogen Inc. Of note, Kelvin Lee, PhD, Gore Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Delaware, who led the team that organized the recently funded National Institute for Innovation in Manufacturing Biopharmaceuticals(NIIMBL), will also speak at the symposium. WPI is a member of NIIMBL. The symposium will feature session talks by subject matter experts from Biogen, Eppendorf, GE Healthcare, MilliporeSigma, Organovo, Pall Life Sciences, Sartorius Stedim Biotech, and Unum Therapeutics, as well as faculty members from Tufts University and WPI. “The talks will be presented in a single-track so participants will have access to all the content, and not have to choose between concurrent sessions,” Rashid said. “This worked very well last year. It helps maximize interaction and information exchange.” (Click here for photos from last year’s symposium. ) The symposium will take place in the Rubin Campus Center on WPI’s campus in Worcester, Mass. Registration is required and space is limited. (Click here for more event information and registration.) Funded in part by a grant from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, the BETC is a multi-faceted resource for the biologics industry, providing a range of hands-on customized programs. The BETC works with biomanufacturers to help them train, and retrain, their employees at a state-of-the-art center removed from their own production facilities. The center also provides research collaboration opportunities and consulting services to help companies manage challenges, explore new technologies, or scale up new processes. Founded in 1865 in Worcester, Mass., WPI is one of the nation’s first engineering and technology universities. Its 14 academic departments offer more than 50 undergraduate and graduate degree programs in science, engineering, technology, business, the social sciences, and the humanities and arts, leading to bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees. WPI’s talented faculty work with students on interdisciplinary research that seeks solutions to important and socially relevant problems in fields as diverse as the life sciences and bioengineering, energy, information security, materials processing, and robotics. Students also have the opportunity to make a difference to communities and organizations around the world through the university’s innovative Global Projects Program. There are more than 45 WPI project centers throughout the Americas, Africa, Asia-Pacific, and Europe.


News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Research suggest that large submarine landslides off Great Bahama Bank in the past were large enough to generate tsunamis MIAMI -- While the Caribbean is not thought to be at risk for tsunamis, a new study by researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science indicates that large submarine landslides on the slopes of the Great Bahama Bank have generated tsunamis in the past and could potentially again in the future. "Our study calls attention to the possibility that submarine landslides can trigger tsunami waves," said UM Rosenstiel School Ph.D. student Jara Schnyder, the lead author of the study. "The short distance from the slope failures to the coastlines of Florida and Cuba makes potential tsunamis low-probability but high-impact events that could be dangerous." The team identified margin collapses and submarine landslides along the slopes of the western Great Bahama Bank--the largest of the carbonate platforms that make up the Bahamas archipelago--using multibeam bathymetry and seismic reflection data. These landslides are several kilometers long and their landslide mass can slide up to 20 kilometers (12 miles) into the basin. An incipient failure scar of nearly 100 kilometers (70 miles) length was identified as a potential future landslide, which could be triggered by an earthquake that occasionally occur off the coast of Cuba. Using the mathematical models commonly used to evaluate tsunami potential in the U.S., the researchers then simulated the tsunami waves for multiple scenarios of submarine landslides originating off the Great Bahama Bank to find that submarine landslides and margin collapses in the region could generate dangerous ocean currents and possibly hazardous tsunami waves several meters high along the east coast of Florida and northern Cuba. "Residents in these areas should be aware that tsunamis do not necessarily have to be created by large earthquakes, but can also be generated by submarine landslides that can be triggered by smaller earthquakes," said UM Rosenstiel School Professor of Marine Geosciences Gregor Eberli, senior author of the study. The study, titled "Tsunamis caused by submarine slope failures along western Great Bahama Bank," was published in the Nov. 4 issue of the journal Scientific Reports. The paper's co-authors include: Jara S.D. Schnyder, Gregor P. Eberli of the CSL-Miami, James T. Kirby, Fengyan Shi, and Babak Tehranirad of the University of Delaware, Thierry Mulder and Emmanuelle Ducassou of the Université de Bordeaux in France, and Dierk Hebbeln and Paul Wintersteller of the University of Bremen in Germany. Funding was provided by the industrial associates of the CSL-Center for Carbonate Research at the University of Miami. About the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School The University of Miami is one of the largest private research institutions in the southeastern United States. The University's mission is to provide quality education, attract and retain outstanding students, support the faculty and their research, and build an endowment for University initiatives. Founded in the 1940's, the Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science has grown into one of the world's premier marine and atmospheric research institutions. Offering dynamic interdisciplinary academics, the Rosenstiel School is dedicated to helping communities to better understand the planet, participating in the establishment of environmental policies, and aiding in the improvement of society and quality of life. For more information, visit: http://www. .


A team of researchers at the University of Delaware recently received a grant from the National Institutes of Health to explore the use of the 22-inch robot in a new approach to pediatric rehabilitation based on social interaction between robots and humans. The team—robotics expert Herbert Tanner, mobility researcher Cole Galloway, and computational linguist Jeffrey Heinz—will collaborate with researchers at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Imaging Science on the project, which is known as GEAR (Grounded Early Adaptive Rehabilitation). "Our hope is that the robot will act as a magnet for very young children with disabilities, along with their typically developing peers, engaging them in dynamic group activities—controlled chaos full of fun, friends and fitness," says Galloway. "Pediatric rehabilitation equipment and training currently do not meet the needs of kids with motor disabilities," he adds. "Young children's overall knowledge depends on their ability to be mobile with peers—once they start moving, they begin to learn about the world in fundamentally different ways." Like a toy, more than a toy It's no accident that NAO resembles a toy more than a research tool, but he's a very sophisticated "toy." "NAO will interact socially with children and engage with them," says Tanner. "But, even more importantly, the robot will be programmed to react to the behaviors of individual children and deliver personalized interventions." Heinz, whose expertise lies in machine learning, will work with Tanner on the programming by developing new algorithms that will enable the robot to devise plans on its own based on its environment. "Amazingly, we can use insights from how children learn language to design robots that can likewise learn from their experience," says Heinz. This capability is what will enable NAO not only to lead kids through a prescribed sequence of steps in a choreographed training routine but also to know when enough is enough. If a child's attention wanders, NAO will redirect her attention to an activity likely to reengage her. If a child shows signs of fatigue, NAO will offer him a more restful activity. "We all know that babies' behavior is highly dynamic," says Galloway. "NAO and our entire research team will have to be equally dynamic, which should result in both significant and innovative gains for pediatrics and robotics." NAO will be used in conjunction with a portable harness system that partially supports the weight of special-needs kids and allows them to move freely in an 80-square-foot space, as well as with a network of cameras, sensors, and accelerometers that record the subjects' motion and type of activity. Experts at Johns Hopkins will contribute by developing activity recognition algorithms so that NAO can discern fine distinctions in the types of movements the children make. The data collected will enable the researchers to evaluate the effectiveness of the robotic intervention. Once the system has proven its efficacy through clinical testing in the Pediatric Mobility Lab and Design Studio at UD's Science, Technology and Advanced Research (STAR) Campus, the door will be open to develop versions of the setup for use in community homes as well as area schools, such as the classrooms and gym at UD's Early Learning Center. Tanner, who has already worked with Heinz in applying lessons from child learning to robot training, is happy to be involved in a project focused on kids with special needs. "This work has the potential to have a clear and immediate effects on people's lives," he says. Explore further: Cooperative robots that learn = less work for human handlers (w/ video)


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Quilt today announced two key hires to help spearhead the digital insurance revolution. As the senior vice president of product and customer, veteran startup executive Nichole Mace will head Quilt’s efforts to change how people buy and use insurance, while Tytana Yap will lead customer acquisition efforts as the director of marketing. Mace comes to Quilt most recently from Zipcar, where she served as the vice president of product and member experience. As a member of the executive team, Mace headed Zipcar’s global product strategy, overseeing the creation of Zipcar 2.0, which offers the company’s one million users new services and a completely new user experience to better match changing needs. It was Quilt’s commitment to customers as people, rather than numbers, that convinced Mace to join the team. “Quilt has started with the customer and built a business around their needs. That philosophy has guided my career and is the primary reason I decided to come here,” said Mace. “Changing a well-established industry will be challenging, but the stars are aligned and now is the time to make a great leap in what insurance is.” Mace will be responsible for bringing Quilt’s vision of simple, streamlined digital insurance to life. Joining the Quilt team represents a full circle for Mace, who began her career as the product manager of Quicken’s first online insurance venture before leaving to join Constant Contact as the director of product management. Mace was one of Constant Contact’s first 20 employees, guiding the email marketing company’s product department from inception through its 2007 IPO. Mace sees removing the friction and anxiety from insurance as the key to similar success for Quilt, taking the insurance buying process from time-consuming ordeal to a joyful customer experience on par with Apple, REI, and Trader Joe’s. “Quilt understands that it’s about solving the problem of loss in a world of changing customer expectations,” said Mace. “At Zipcar and through my YouTube work, I learned how expectations - especially for people in their 20s and 30s - have changed. Instant and digital are key to today’s customers, and that’s what separates Quilt from the pack.” Quilt co-founder and CEO Blair Baldwin agrees. “Bringing Nichole onto the team was a natural extension of Quilt’s mission to build a customer-centric experience. Throughout her career, she’s been tremendously successful at finding elegant solutions to complex problems. We’re thrilled to have such a high-caliber executive here to make the Quilt vision a reality.” Getting the attention of customers will be the job of Tytana Yap, Quilt’s new director of marketing. She joins the team most recently from TripAdvisor, where she was the manager of global traffic acquisition, and Vistaprint, where she oversaw the company’s customer acquisition in Australia, New Zealand, and Singapore. Yap was convinced of the need for Quilt after a particularly bad insurance experience. “Getting life insurance was a nightmare. It took six months. I’d like others to have a much better experience.” Baldwin says Yap is the perfect person to take Quilt’s message of a better way to do insurance to the world. “Tytana has both a wealth of digital experience and an authentic voice. We’re elated to have her on the team.” Quilt’s new marketing director has learned in her career that even with all the advances in marketing technology, it’s still the message that matters. “Marketing has changed so much, so fast. It’s become more technical and more programmatic, but the creative and messaging continues to be powerful and can’t be ignored,” said Yap. “I’m glad I was exposed to the best of both worlds.” Mace holds undergraduate degrees in business and art history from the University of Delaware, and an MBA from the Franklin W. Olin School of Business at Babson College. Yap has an MBA from the Australian Graduate School of Management in Sydney. About Quilt Quilt offers a family of mobile-first, digital insurance products that make it easier than ever to cover the things that matter. Quilt takes the hassle out of insurance with an intuitive buying experience and simple, easy-to-use policies designed for people who live online.


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: www.techrepublic.com

Government, academic, and private-sector officials are collaborating on new ways to prevent and mitigate distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks, based on research years in the making but kicked into high gear by the massive takedown this month of domain name system provider Dyn. SEE: Aerohive's new IoT security solution could have blocked Dyn DDoS attacks, company claims (TechRepublic) The largest attacks in summer 2015 were about 400 gigabits per second, but September 2016 saw an attack on security blogger Brian Krebs of more than 600Gbps, while Dyn said its own attack may have exceeded 1.2 terabits per second. Government-led research is focusing on the 1-terabit range but with systems that can scale higher, which is already needed due to the proliferation of vulnerable Internet of Things devices too easily commandeered by malicious hackers. But it means there's a ton of job security for Dan Massey, a computer science Ph.D. serving as program manager for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Advanced Research Projects Agency Cyber Security Division. Massey in August 2015 began evaluating and funding new anti-DDoS efforts at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), private companies, and universities, which share the goal of getting innovative techniques into commercially feasible pilot projects no later than summer 2018. Some are already underway, Massey and others said. SEE: New World Hackers group claims responsibility for internet disruption (CBS News) Funded projects include attack information sharing methods from the University of Southern California, University of California-Los Angeles, and University of Oregon. The latter implements a unique peer-to-peer method of letting networks share information about traffic patterns, as does Portland, Ore.-based research contractor Galois. Colorado State University is making a way to distribute the task of packet filtering and intelligence gathering; the University of Delaware and others including IBM are focusing on identifying new kinds of attacks; and the University of Houston is looking at on-demand network capacity for handling attacks when they hit. In addition, Waterford, Va.-based Waverley Labs and the Cloud Security Alliance are working on whitelisting methods to make a network only accept approved traffic. NIST is collaborating with the University of California-San Diego to determine whether the software for stopping DDoS attacks would hurt network performance. Other anti-DDoS measures are already common for large companies, such as load balancing so that different parts of a network can pick up the slack if others go down, having multiple DNS providers for the same reason, and educating end users on safe internet usage, security experts at Akamai, Radware, and certification specialist (ISC)2 said. It's unclear why the Dyn network seemingly did not balance itself, although mainstream websites such as The New York Times were able to quickly handle the problem by switching to different DNS servers. Perhaps the longest-standing way to combat DDoS attacks is by using the Internet Engineering Task Force's Best Current Practice #38—BCP-38, in networking parlance—which emerged in 2000. Implementing this standard prevents a network from sending packets with forged IP addresses. However, there's no way for internet authorities to enforce the use of such standards, especially outside of the United States, officials at the UCSD's Center for Applied Internet Data Analysis (CAIDA) said. CAIDA operates the Spoofer Project, which is software based on 2005 research from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) that lets users see if their network allows forged packets. CAIDA currently reports that 75% of 435 million tested IP addresses are unspoofable, although that's a hard-to-imagine percentage of the internet's 3.4 undecillion (34x1038) possible IP addresses, CAIDA manager of scientific projects Josh Polterock noted. Nor is there any need to update the 16-year-old BCP-38 standard, because it works fine if people would just use it, explained security expert Jay Ashworth who manages the BCP-38 Wiki. Paul Mockapetris, famous in networking circles as the father of DNS, is also thinking outside the box. "Rather than a handful of addresses for contacting [companies such as] Dyn, we need to think about creating multiple paths for getting DNS information between the creator and consumers of that information. This won't be popular with the business models of DNS providers... but we need to make attacks on the naming infrastructure per se several orders of magnitude harder, so we can depend on DNS services to aid in the defense," he stated. Charging for packets is one preventative possibility, said Mockapetris, now chief scientist of Carlsbad, Calif.-based ThreatSTOP. "We certainly need more dreams and innovation if the internet is to succeed." Mockapetris agreed that reputation systems and carrier-level filtering, as already in use by some of the world's largest networking companies, could be useful. He added that he'd love to see more use of virtualization so applications such as banking could be walled off from common web surfing. Either way, he concluded, "We certainly need more dreams and innovation if the internet is to succeed."


News Article | November 22, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A new multi-institutional study of the so-called global warming "hiatus" phenomenon -- the possible temporary slowdown of the global mean surface temperature (GMST) trend said to have occurred from 1998 to 2013 -- concludes the hiatus simply represents a redistribution of energy within the Earth system, which includes the land, atmosphere and the ocean. In a paper published today in Earth's Future, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, lead author Xiao-Hai Yan of the University of Delaware, Newark; along with leading scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and University of Washington, discuss new understandings of the global warming "hiatus" phenomenon. In particular, the researcher's point to the prominent role played by the global ocean in absorbing the extra heat from the atmosphere by acting as a "heat sink" as an explanation for the observed decrease in GMST, which is considered a key indicator of climate change. "The hiatus period gives scientists an opportunity to understand uncertainties in how climate systems are measured, as well as to fill in the gap in what scientists know," explained Yan, Mary A.S. Lighthipe Chaired Professor in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment and director of UD's Center for Remote Sensing. "Individually, each of us carries some research into this topic and many of my co-authors are leading scientists who have studied this topic from various and often diverse angles." "The hiatus in the rise of global surface temperature is over, but understanding the processes involved helps us with future predictions" continued co-author Kevin Trenberth of National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The paper grew out of a special US CLIVAR panel session at the 2015 AGU fall meeting and includes the following distinguished co-authors: Where is the missing heat? While Yan said it is difficult to reach complete consensus on such a complex topic, after a thorough review of the literature and much discussion and debate, there are a number of key points on which these leading scientists concur: Earth's energy budget is a complex calculation of how much solar energy enters our climate system from the sun and what happens to it: how much is stored by land, in the ocean or in the atmosphere. "To better monitor the Earth's energy budget, and its consequences, the ocean is most important to consider because the amount of heat it can store is extremely large when compared to the land or atmospheric capacity," said Yan. According to the paper, arguably, the most appropriate single variable in the Earth's system that can be used to monitor global warming is ocean heat content integrated from the surface to different layers and to the bottom of the ocean. In the near term, the scientists hope this paper will lay the foundation for future research in the global change field. To begin, they suggest the climate community replace the term "global warming hiatus" with "global surface warming slowdown" to eliminate confusion. "This terminology more accurately describes the pause in the increase of the ocean's global mean surface temperature in the late 20th century," Yan said. The scientists also called for continued support of current and future technologies for ocean monitoring as a means to reduce observation errors in sea surface temperature and ocean heat content. This includes maintaining Argo, the main system for monitoring ocean heat content, and the development of Deep Argo to monitor the lower half of the ocean; the use of ship-based subsurface ocean temperature monitoring programs; advancements in the use of robotic technologies such as autonomous underwater vehicles to monitor marginal seas and shelf and coastal regions; and further development of real- or near-real-time deep ocean remote sensing methods. Yan's research group reported in a 2015 paper that some coastal oceans' (e.g. U.S. East Coast, China Coast) response to the recent global surface warming slowdown are three times larger than what is found in the open ocean. "Although these regions represent only a fraction of the ocean volume, the changing rate of ocean heat content is faster here and real time data and more research are needed to quantify and understand what is happening," Yan said. Variability and heat sequestration over specific regions (i.e. Pacific, Atlantic, Indian, Southern Oceans, etc.) was also discussed and requires further investigation. However, there is broad agreement among the scientists and in the literature that the slowdown of GMST increase from 1998-2013 was the "result of increase uptake of heat energy by the global ocean during those years." This work was supported through various funding sources including the National Science Foundation, NASA, NOAA and NASA-JPL.


News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Birds prefer to migrate at night--so much so that if day breaks while they're over water, they'll turn back toward the nearest shore rather than pressing on. That's the key finding of a new study in The Auk: Ornithological Advances, which used weather radar to examine the behavior of birds crossing the Great Lakes. Kevin Archibald and Jeff Buler of the University of Delaware and their colleagues turned the U.S.'s powerful network of weather surveillance radar stations on birds heading north across the Great Lakes during their spring migration. As dawn approaches, their data show, birds caught over water increase their elevation and often turn back. This leads to a pileup of birds in near-shore stopover habitat--the density of birds taking off from the southern shores of the Great Lakes on subsequent spring evenings was 48% higher than on the northern shores. Birds presumably increase their altitude at dawn to try to see how much farther they have to go; if they decide it's too far, they go back to try again the next night, leading to higher concentrations of migrants on near shores. When birds are migrating south in the fall, these pile-ups would happen on the north side of the lakes rather than the south. "Our study justifies the high value of shoreline habitats for conservation of migratory bird populations in the Great Lakes region," says Buler. "It also emphasizes that the extent of stopover use in shoreline habitats is context-dependent. We hope professionals charged with managing stopover habitats recognize that shoreline areas can receive high migrant use by virtue of the proximity to a lake and how many migrants are aloft at dawn from day to day, rather than [just] by the presence of abundant food sources in these habitats." The data used in the study came from radar stations in Cleveland, Ohio; Grand Rapids, Michigan; and Green Bay, Wisconsin, collected in spring 2010-2013. Cleveland was the only station that did not observe birds increasing their elevation at dawn, possibly because Lake Erie is narrow enough for them to see across without an increase in altitude. "Nearshore areas of the Great Lakes are important to migrating landbirds. Archibald, Buler, and their colleagues further investigate this distributional pattern by analyzing the interaction between spring migratory flight behavior and the migrant exodus at nearshore stopover sites using NEXRAD radar," according to The Nature Conservancy's Dave Ewert. "Their research supports earlier work that migrants concentrate near Great Lakes shorelines, but with new perspectives." "Migrating birds reorient toward land at dawn over the Great Lakes, USA" will be available December 7, 2016, at http://americanornithologypubs. (issue URL http://americanornithologypubs. ). About the journal: The Auk: Ornithological Advances is a peer-reviewed, international journal of ornithology that began in 1884 as the official publication of the American Ornithologists' Union, which merged with the Cooper Ornithological Society in 2016 to become the American Ornithological Society. In 2009, The Auk was honored as one of the 100 most influential journals of biology and medicine over the past 100 years.


NORWALK, Conn.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Board of Trustees of the Financial Accounting Foundation (FAF) today reappointed veteran governmental auditor James E. Brown to a second term on the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB), the FAF announced. The Trustees also appointed Kristopher E. Knight, Delaware’s deputy secretary of state and director of the state’s Division of Corporations, to a five-year term on the GASB. The GASB is the independent, private-sector organization that sets accounting standards for state and local governments in the United States. The FAF oversees the activities of the GASB and its sister accounting standard setter, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB). Messrs. Brown and Knight’s terms become effective July 1, 2017, and extend through June 30, 2022. Mr. Knight will succeed outgoing Board member Jan I. Sylvis, whose term concludes on June 30, 2017. Ms. Sylvis, who was appointed to the Board in 2007, has served as its vice chair since January 2015. “The Board of Trustees is pleased to have Jim serve another term on the GASB,” said FAF Chairman Charles H. Noski. “His insight and perspective will continue to be valuable resources to the Board.” “Jan Sylvis’s service on the Board and contributions in the area of stakeholder outreach allowed the GASB to forge stronger, more productive bonds with the financial statement preparer, auditor, and user communities during her tenure,” Mr. Noski added. Regarding Mr. Knight’s appointment, Mr. Noski said, “We welcome Kristopher to the GASB. The wealth and variety of experience in governmental accounting he brings will be substantial assets to the GASB.” GASB Chairman David A. Vaudt said, “Jim’s deep experience as an auditor and accounting educator promoted vigorous Board discussion during his first term. His ability to understand and appreciate the viewpoints of preparers and users will continue to be of great value to the Board going forward. Kristopher’s energy, expertise, and ability to carefully evaluate all points of view will serve the Board well as we continue our work on the reexamination of the Financial Reporting Model, Revenue and Expense Recognition, and in other project areas.” “Jan’s ten years of service on the GASB, including in the role of vice chair for the past two years, are marked by her singular dedication to working to improve accounting and financial reporting for the Board’s diverse range of stakeholders and that is something for which we are all very grateful,” Mr. Vaudt said. “She will truly be missed.” Prior to joining the GASB in 2012, Mr. Brown served for more than 25 years as a partner at BKD, LLP, a large regional public accounting firm headquartered in Springfield, Missouri. At BKD, he was responsible for quality control and training for the firm’s government and not-for-profit practice from 1984 until 2011, and acted as the firm’s principal contact with the GASB. Before joining BKD, Mr. Brown was a partner in a local public accounting firm in Joplin, Missouri. He previously taught accounting and auditing at Missouri Southern State University in Joplin and presently serves as a continuing education instructor for the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA). A past member of the AICPA’s Auditing Standards Board and Board of Examiners, Mr. Brown is a certified public accountant and a certified government financial manager. Mr. Knight is Delaware’s deputy secretary of state and director of the state’s Division of Corporations. In his role, he oversees the state’s $1 billion corporate franchise and servicing of the 1.2 million business entities that make their legal home in Delaware. Mr. Knight also supervises several other divisions of the Delaware Department of State, including the Office of the State Banking Commissioner, the state’s Corporate and International Development office, and Delaware’s abandoned property Voluntary Disclosure Agreement program. Since 2012, he has also served as treasurer of the Delaware Sustainable Energy Utility’s Board of Directors. There, Mr. Knight led a comprehensive overhaul of the utility’s financial policies and practices. Previously, Mr. Knight served as the director of Delaware’s Division of Accounting. In that role, he administered policy related to the state’s procurement card program, which has an $80 million annual budget. Prior to his career in public service, Mr. Knight served in positions of increasing responsibility at KPMG LLP for more than a decade. As senior audit manager, he managed all aspects of governmental client audits, including those for the University of Delaware, the state of Delaware, and Philadelphia Gas Works. Mr. Knight holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration—accounting from Loyola University. He is a certified public accountant and a member of the AICPA. About the Financial Accounting Foundation Established in 1972, the Financial Accounting Foundation (FAF) is the independent, private-sector, not-for-profit organization based in Norwalk, Connecticut responsible for the oversight, administration, financing, and appointment of the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) and the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB). The FASB and GASB establish and improve financial accounting and reporting standards – known as Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, or GAAP – for public and private companies, not-for-profit organizations, and state and local governments in the United States. For more information, visit www.accountingfoundation.org. Established in 1984, the GASB is the independent, private-sector organization based in Norwalk, Connecticut, that establishes accounting and financial reporting standards for U.S. state and local governments that follow Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). These standards are recognized as authoritative by state and local governments, state Boards of Accountancy, and the American Institute of CPAs (AICPA). The GASB develops and issues accounting standards through a transparent and inclusive process intended to promote financial reporting that provides useful information to taxpayers, public officials, investors, and others who use financial reports. The Financial Accounting Foundation (FAF) supports and oversees the GASB. For more information, visit www.gasb.org.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

STAMFORD, Conn.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Land & Buildings Investment Management, LLC (together with its affiliates, "Land and Buildings") today issued the following letter to shareholders of Taubman Centers, Inc. (NYSE: TCO) (“Taubman,” “Taubman Centers” or the "Company”) announcing the nomination of two highly-qualified director candidates for election at Taubman’s 2017 Annual Meeting. The full text of the letter follows: At Land and Buildings, we are focused on long-term solutions that maximize value for all shareholders. In 1992, I attended the Taubman IPO roadshow at the Plaza Hotel in New York, and my prior firm acquired shares at the IPO. For 14 years I published investment opinions on Taubman, oftentimes documenting the numerous missteps of this management team. For the past eight years, since I founded Land and Buildings, we have continued to meet with management and analyze the investment opportunity at Taubman. Since the first half of 2016 and as recently as last week, we have had an active engagement with Taubman Chairman, President and CEO Bobby Taubman, and implored him to take action to address the deplorable state we find the Company in today. Unfortunately, Bobby Taubman has made it clear to us that he prefers to dig in his heels against shareholders rather than reach an amicable resolution that addresses the level of change that we believe is necessary at the Company. As such, Land and Buildings has nominated two highly-qualified director candidates for election to the Taubman Centers Board of Directors (the “Board”) at the 2017 Annual Meeting: We believe the crux of the matter is this: Bobby Taubman, the Chairman, President and CEO of Taubman Centers, runs Taubman Centers as if he is the only shareholder – despite having what we view as a de minimis economic interest in the Company – and has a demonstrated history of running roughshod over the Taubman Centers independent Board members and common shareholders. Bobby Taubman’s history of disenfranchising Taubman Centers’ common shareholders is well documented and includes (among other transgressions): Unfortunately, the independent Board members have not held Bobby Taubman accountable, which has resulted in horrible total returns when compared to peers. The poor track record of the independent directors includes: Changes by the Company since our initial engagement have solely been cosmetic and have only occurred to preserve the status quo, in our view: We estimate about 50% upside in the shares to close the gap to our and other analysts’ net asset value estimates of approximately $106 per share. We believe Taubman’s malls are insulated from many of the broader issues facing brick and mortar retail as its malls are highly sought after by retailers, resulting in strong sales and rent growth. Our highly-qualified nominees, Charles Elson and Jonathan Litt, have the right mix of governance expertise and sector experience to address the numerous issues that have persistently plagued the Company and unlock significant long-term shareholder value, in our view. Common shareholders have suffered under the leadership of Bobby Taubman as poor capital allocation, bloated G&A, inferior operating margins and abysmal corporate governance have caused sub-par returns. Over the past 1, 3, and 5 years, Taubman has underperformed its high-quality class A mall REIT peers by 4%, 29%, and 57%, respectively.8 Troublingly, despite having highlighted many of these issues in recent months, the status quo has continued: 2016 was another year of inferior net operating income and EBITDA margins with bloated G&A costs compared to its high-quality peers. Poor capital allocation decisions continue to plague the Company and development/re-development spending is expected to rise further in 2017 to $400 million. Figure 1: Taubman Inferior Total Returns Stem From Numerous Issues Plaguing the Company, in Our View Note: Reflects total returns for the trailing 1, 3 and 5 year periods through October 14, 2016. Class A mall peers utilized throughout letter are General Growth Properties (NYSE: GGP), The Macerich Company (NYSE: MAC) and Simon Property Group (NYSE: SPG). Figure 2: Taubman’s Inferior Margins Demonstrate Nearly Total Disregard for Cost Control, in Our View Note: Figures reflect pro rata ownership of assets; Land and Buildings estimates used where the Company does not disclose each metric. Charles Elson is the Edgar S. Woolard, Jr., Chair in Corporate Governance and the Director of the John L. Weinberg Center for Corporate Governance at the University of Delaware. He is also a “Consultant” to the law firm Holland & Knight. He formerly served as a Professor of Law at Stetson University College of Law in St. Petersburg, Florida from 1990 until 2001. His fields of expertise include corporations, securities regulation and corporate governance. He is a graduate of Harvard College and the University of Virginia Law School, and has served as a law clerk to Judges J. Harvie Wilkinson III and Elbert P. Tuttle of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth and Eleventh Circuits. He has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Illinois College Of Law, the Cornell Law School, and the University of Maryland School of Law, and was a Salvatori Fellow at the Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C. and is a member of the American Law Institute. Professor Elson has written extensively on the subject of boards of directors. He is a frequent contributor on corporate governance issues to various scholarly and popular publications. He served on the National Association of Corporate Directors' Commissions on Director Compensation, Director Professionalism, CEO Succession, Audit Committees, Strategic Planning, Director Evaluation, Risk Governance, Effective Lead Director, and Board Diversity and was a member of its Best Practices Council on Coping With Fraud and Other Illegal Activity. He also served on the National Association of Corporate Directors’ Advisory Council. He is Vice Chairman of the ABA Business Law Section’s Committee on Corporate Governance and was a member of its Committee on Corporate Laws. He is presently a member of the Board of Directors of HealthSouth Corporation, a healthcare services provider and Bob Evans Farms Inc., a restaurant and food products company. Jonathan Litt has over 24 years of experience as a global real estate strategist and an investor in both public real estate securities and direct property. Mr. Litt founded Land and Buildings in the summer of 2008 to take advantage of the opportunities uncovered by the global property bubble. Previously, Mr. Litt was Managing Director and Senior Global Real Estate Analyst at Citigroup where he was responsible for Global Property Investment Strategy, coordinating a 44-person team of research analysts located across 16 countries. Mr. Litt was recognized as a leading analyst since 1995, achieving the prestigious Institutional Investor Magazine #1 ranking for 8 years and top five ranking throughout the period. Mr. Litt also achieved a top ranking from Greenwich Associates since 1995. Before moving to the sell-side in 1994, Mr. Litt worked on the buy-side investing in public real estate securities and buying real property during his tenure at European Investors and BrookHill Properties, where his career began in 1988. Mr. Litt served on the Board of Directors at Mack-Cali from March 2014 to August 2016. Mr. Litt graduated from Columbia University in 1987 with a BA in Economics and NYU's Stern School of Business in 1990 with an MBA in Finance. Mr. Litt can often be seen on CNBC or quoted in the Wall Street Journal and other industry publications. He is also the director of a not-for-profit, the Children with Dyslexia Scholarship Fund, which provides children with scholarships to secondary schools that specialize in dyslexia. CERTAIN INFORMATION CONCERNING THE PARTICIPANTS Land & Buildings Investment Management, LLC together with the other participants named herein (collectively, "Land & Buildings "), intends to file a preliminary proxy statement and accompanying proxy card with the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") to be used to solicit votes for the election of its slate of highly-qualified director nominees at the 2017 annual meeting of stockholders of Taubman Centers, Inc., a Michigan corporation (“TCO” or, the “Company”). LAND & BUILDINGS STRONGLY ADVISES ALL STOCKHOLDERS OF THE COMPANY TO READ THE PROXY STATEMENT AND OTHER PROXY MATERIALS AS THEY BECOME AVAILABLE BECAUSE THEY WILL CONTAIN IMPORTANT INFORMATION. SUCH PROXY MATERIALS WILL BE AVAILABLE AT NO CHARGE ON THE SEC'S WEB SITE AT HTTP://WWW.SEC.GOV. IN ADDITION, THE PARTICIPANTS IN THIS PROXY SOLICITATION WILL PROVIDE COPIES OF THE PROXY STATEMENT WITHOUT CHARGE, WHEN AVAILABLE, UPON REQUEST. REQUESTS FOR COPIES SHOULD BE DIRECTED TO THE PARTICIPANTS' PROXY SOLICITOR. The participants in the proxy solicitation are anticipated to be Land & Buildings Capital Growth Fund, LP, a Delaware limited partnership (“L&B Capital” ), L & B Real Estate Opportunity Fund, LP, a Delaware limited partnership (“L&B Opportunity”), Land & Buildings GP LP, a Delaware limited partnership (“L&B GP”), Land & Buildings Investment Management, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company (“L&B Management”), Jonathan Litt and Charles Elson. As of the date hereof, L&B Capital directly owns 185,600 shares of Common Stock, $0.01 par value, of the Company (the "Shares”). As of the date hereof, L&B Opportunity directly owns 97,600 Shares. As of the date hereof, 435,247 Shares were held in certain accounts managed by L&B Management (the “Managed Accounts”). L&B GP, as the general partner of each of L&B Capital and L&B Opportunity, may be deemed the beneficial owner of the (i) 185,600 Shares owned by L&B Capital and (ii) 97,600 Shares owned by L&B Opportunity. L&B Management, as the investment manager of each of L&B Capital and L&B Opportunity, and as the investment advisor of the Managed Accounts, may be deemed the beneficial owner of the (i) 185,600 Shares owned by L&B Capital, (ii) 97,600 Shares owned by L&B Opportunity, and (iii) 435,247 Shares held in the Managed Accounts. Mr. Litt, as the managing principal of L&B Management, may be deemed the beneficial owner of the (i) 185,600 Shares owned by L&B Capital, (ii) 97,600 Shares owned by L&B Opportunity, and (iii) 435,247 Shares held in the Managed Accounts. In addition, as of the date hereof, Mr. Litt directly owns 436 shares of the Company’s 6.5% Series J Cumulative Redeemable Preferred Stock, no par value. As of the date hereof, Mr. Elson does not own any Shares.


News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Plate tectonics, the idea that the surface of the Earth is made up of plates that move apart and come back together, has been used to explain the locations of volcanoes and earthquakes since the 1960s. One well-known example of this is the Pacific Ring of Fire, a 25,000-mile stretch of the Pacific Ocean known for its string of underwater volcanoes (nearly 450 of them) and earthquake sites, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). On the Pacific Coast, this area sits along the subduction zone known as the Cascadia plate, which runs down the west coast of Canada to the west coast of the United States. Most earthquakes are said to occur at subduction zones or along faults in tectonic plates. What actually defines a tectonic plate and how thick plates are, however, has remained a hotly debated topic. This is because while scientists know that the top of the plate is the surface of the Earth, defining the plate's bottom boundary has been challenging. A recent study by the University of Delaware's Jessica Warren and colleagues at the University of Oxford and the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, provides a new data set that scientists can use to understand this problem. "Understanding the thickness of the plate is important to understanding how plates move around, both when they form at mid-ocean ridges and later on when the material goes back down into the Earth through subduction zones such as those in Cascadia, the Andes, Japan and Indonesia," said Warren, assistant professor in the Department of Geological Sciences in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment. "It also can help scientists model and predict future earthquake and volcanic hazards, where they might occur and how deep the devastation might be depending on what the models show." To understand what's happening inside the Earth, scientists must be creative because studying the interior of the Earth in situ is impossible. Instead, scientists study how seismic waves pass through the Earth and then invert the signal that is received to reverse engineer what's happening. They also model the thermal properties of the rock, including where temperature changes occur, because they know that the interior of the Earth is hotter than the surface crust. "Science has been telling us that what we predict for temperature changes within the Earth should agree with what the seismic waves are telling us. The problem has been that these two models don't agree," said Warren, a petrology expert who studies the origin of rocks and how they formed. One longstanding argument has been whether the Gutenberg discontinuity -- the identification of a change in seismic properties -- represents the bottom of the plate. To investigate this problem, Warren and her colleagues performed laboratory experiments on olivine, the main mineral found in the Earth's mantle (the upper ~250 miles of the planet). Olivine also is the main mineral in peridotite rock, which is considered to be a robust model of the interior of the Earth's composition. The researchers took olivine and added melt (also known as basalt) to mimic how a new plate is created at a mid-ocean ridge. The team then twisted the olivine-melt mixture under high temperatures and high pressure to determine the influence of melt on the alignment of olivine crystals. They then used these experiments to predict the seismic signature of this rock and compared it to the seismic signature associated with the Gutenberg discontinuity. The team's results showed that the Gutenberg discontinuity does not define the bottom of the plate, but instead is caused by the presence of olivine-melt mixtures within tectonic plates. "I've spent over a decade studying how olivine minerals are oriented in peridotite rocks because the flow patterns provide a historical record of how these rocks from the mantle have changed and deformed over time," says Warren. The research team's results suggest the best way to model the plate thickness is based on the thermal profile and the conductive cooling that occurs as a plate ages. "We think that the bottom of the plate is below where you have a cooling in the temperature profile. It is a layer that is associated with melt being trapped or frozen in the rock and changing the seismic properties in the rock that subsequently produced the layer that we're imaging," she said. "By our estimates, this would mean that the tectonic plates in the ocean are approximately 100 kilometers or about 62 miles thick. " The team's data also offers an explanation for the Guttenberg discontinuity, Warren continued, saying that it corresponds to melt that was trapped or frozen in the rock after melting at mid-ocean ridges, which produced a change in how the seismic waves pass through the rock. This study was recently reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. It was supported through funding from the National Environment Research Council, National Science Foundation and John Fell Fund. Co-authors on the work include UD's Warren; Lars Hansen, University of Oxford Department of Earth Sciences; and Chao Qi, University of Minnesota Twin Cities Department of Earth Sciences.


Szczesny S.E.,University of Pennsylvania | Elliott D.M.,University of Delaware
Acta Biomaterialia | Year: 2014

Despite the critical role tendons play in transmitting loads throughout the musculoskeletal system, little is known about the microstructural mechanisms underlying their mechanical function. Of particular interest is whether collagen fibrils in tendon fascicles bear load independently or if load is transferred between fibrils through interfibrillar shear forces. We conducted multiscale experimental testing and developed a microstructural shear lag model to explicitly test whether interfibrillar shear load transfer is indeed the fibrillar loading mechanism in tendon. Experimental correlations between fascicle macroscale mechanics and microscale interfibrillar sliding suggest that fibrils are discontinuous and share load. Moreover, for the first time, we demonstrate that a shear lag model can replicate the fascicle macroscale mechanics as well as predict the microscale fibrillar deformations. Since interfibrillar shear stress is the fundamental loading mechanism assumed in the model, this result provides strong evidence that load is transferred between fibrils in tendon and possibly other aligned collagenous tissues. Conclusively establishing this fibrillar loading mechanism and identifying the involved structural components should help develop repair strategies for tissue degeneration and guide the design of tissue engineered replacements. © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


McCormick K.P.,University of Delaware | Willmann M.R.,University of Pennsylvania | Meyers B.C.,University of Delaware
Silence | Year: 2011

Prior to the advent of new, deep sequencing methods, small RNA (sRNA) discovery was dependent on Sanger sequencing, which was time-consuming and limited knowledge to only the most abundant sRNA. The innovation of large-scale, next-generation sequencing has exponentially increased knowledge of the biology, diversity and abundance of sRNA populations. In this review, we discuss issues involved in the design of sRNA sequencing experiments, including choosing a sequencing platform, inherent biases that affect sRNA measurements and replication. We outline the steps involved in preprocessing sRNA sequencing data and review both the principles behind and the current options for normalization. Finally, we discuss differential expression analysis in the absence and presence of biological replicates. While our focus is on sRNA sequencing experiments, many of the principles discussed are applicable to the sequencing of other RNA populations. © 2011 McCormick et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Saha K.K.,University of Delaware | Drndic M.,University of Pennsylvania | Nikolic B.K.,University of Delaware
Nano Letters | Year: 2012

We study two-terminal devices for DNA sequencing that consist of a metallic graphene nanoribbon with zigzag edges (ZGNR) and a nanopore in its interior through which the DNA molecule is translocated. Using the nonequilibrium Green functions combined with density functional theory, we demonstrate that each of the four DNA nucleobases inserted into the nanopore, whose edge carbon atoms are passivated by either hydrogen or nitrogen, will lead to a unique change in the device conductance. Unlike other recent biosensors based on transverse electronic transport through translocated DNA, which utilize small (of the order of pA) tunneling current across a nanogap or a nanopore yielding a poor signal-to-noise ratio, our device concept relies on the fact that in ZGNRs local current density is peaked around the edges so that drilling a nanopore away from the edges will not diminish the conductance. Inserting a nucleobase into the nanopore affects the charge density in the surrounding area, thereby modulating edge conduction currents whose magnitude is of the order of microampere at bias voltage 0.1 V. The proposed biosensors are not limited to ZGNRs and they could be realized with other nanowires supporting transverse edge currents, such as chiral GNRs or wires made of two-dimensional topological insulators. © 2011 American Chemical Society.


Trueswell J.C.,University of Pennsylvania | Papafragou A.,University of Delaware
Journal of Memory and Language | Year: 2010

What role does language play during attention allocation in perceiving and remembering events? We recorded adults' eye movements as they studied animated motion events for a later recognition task. We compared native speakers of two languages that use different means of expressing motion (Greek and English). In Experiment 1, eye movements revealed that, when event encoding was made difficult by requiring a concurrent task that did not involve language (tapping), participants spent extra time studying what their language treats as the details of the event. This 'linguistic encoding' effect was eliminated both when event encoding was made easier (no concurrent task) and when the concurrent task required the use of language (counting aloud). In Experiment 2, under conditions of a delayed concurrent task of counting aloud, participants used language covertly just prior to engaging in the additional task. Together, the results indicate that language can be optionally recruited for encoding events, especially under conditions of high cognitive load. Yet, these effects are malleable and flexible and do not appear to shape core biases in event perception and memory. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.72K | Year: 2010

Physical Sciences Inc. and the University of Delaware propose a novel self-healing, damage-sensing, reinforced polymer composite concept for use in degradation-resistant structural applications. In Phase I we investigated the feasibility of a microcapsule-based self-healing system and a damage-sensing functionality. The objective of Phase II is to develop a reinforced composite material that incorporates the self-healing and damage-sensing capabilities developed in Phase I. Toward this end, we will investigate the self-healing efficiency of the multifunctional composite and characterize the mechanical and damage-sensing properties of the material. We will design a scalable fabrication process for production of the multifunctional material. The implementation of this method and transition of the developed technology to structural applications are planned for Phase III.


Patent
University of Delaware and University of Pennsylvania | Date: 2012-12-05

Disclosed are devices that feature nanopores formed in graphene sheets, such as graphene ribbons. The graphene sheets include an edge irregularity, such as a zig-zag configuration, a chiral edge, or an armchair-configuration edge, which edges confer on the devices the ability to discriminate between different subunits of a macromolecule translocated through the nanpore. The disclosed devices and methods have application to DNA sequencing and analysis, among other applications.


News Article | December 26, 2016
Site: www.bbc.co.uk

On 9 January 2007, one of the most influential entrepreneurs on the planet announced something new - a product that was to become the most profitable in history. It was, of course, the iPhone. There are many ways in which the iPhone has defined the modern economy. There is the sheer profitability of the thing, of course: there are only two or three companies in the world that make as much money as Apple does from the iPhone alone. There is the fact that it created a new product category: the smartphone. The iPhone and its imitators represent a product that did not exist 10 years ago but now is an object of desire for most of humanity. There's the way the iPhone transformed other markets - software, music, and advertising. But those are just the obvious facts about the iPhone. And when you delve more deeply, the tale is a surprising one. We give credit to Steve Jobs and other leading figures in Apple - his early partner Steve Wozniak, his successor Tim Cook, his visionary designer Sir Jony Ive - but some of the most important actors in this story have been forgotten. 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy highlights the inventions, ideas and innovations which have helped create the economic world we live in. It is broadcast on the BBC World Service. You can find more information about the programme's sources and listen online or subscribe to the programme podcast. Ask yourself: what actually makes an iPhone an iPhone? It's partly the cool design, the user interface, the attention to detail in the way the software works and the hardware feels. But underneath the charming surface of the iPhone are some critical elements that made it, and all the other smartphones, possible. The economist Mariana Mazzucato has made a list of 12 key technologies that make smartphones work: 1) tiny microprocessors, 2) memory chips, 3) solid state hard drives, 4) liquid crystal displays and 5) lithium-based batteries. That's the hardware. Then there are the networks and the software. So 6) Fast-Fourier-Transform algorithms - clever bits of maths that make it possible to swiftly turn analogue signals such as sound, visible light and radio waves into digital signals that a computer can handle. At 7) - and you might have heard of this one - the internet. A smartphone isn't a smartphone without the internet. At 8) HTTP and HTML, the languages and protocols that turned the hard-to-use internet into the easy-to-access World Wide Web. 9) Cellular networks. Otherwise your smartphone not only isn't smart, it's not even a phone. 10) Global Positioning Systems or GPS. 11) The touchscreen. 12) Siri, the voice-activated artificial intelligence agent. All of these technologies are important components of what makes an iPhone, or any smartphone, actually work. Some of them are not just important, but indispensable. But when Mariana Mazzucato assembled this list of technologies, and reviewed their history, she found something striking. The foundational figure in the development of the iPhone wasn't Steve Jobs. It was Uncle Sam. Every single one of these 12 key technologies was supported in significant ways by governments - often the American government. A few of these cases are famous. Many people know, for example, that the World Wide Web owes its existence to the work of Sir Tim Berners-Lee. He was a software engineer employed at Cern, the particle physics research centre in Geneva that is funded by governments across Europe. And the internet itself started as Arpanet - an unprecedented network of computers funded by the US Department of Defense in the early 1960s. GPS, of course, was a pure military technology, developed during the Cold War and opened up to civilian use only in the 1980s. Other examples are less famous, though scarcely less important. The Fast-Fourier-Transform is a family of algorithms that have made it possible to move from a world where the telephone, the television and the gramophone worked on analogue signals, to a world where everything is digitised and can therefore be dealt with by computers such as the iPhone. The most common such algorithm was developed from a flash of insight from the great American mathematician John Tukey. What was Tukey working on at the time? You've guessed it: a military application. Specifically, he was on President Kennedy's Scientific Advisory committee in 1963, trying to figure out how to detect when the Soviet Union was testing nuclear weapons. Smartphones wouldn't be smartphones without their touchscreens - but the inventor of the touchscreen was an engineer named EA Johnson, whose initial research was carried out while Johnson was employed by the Royal Radar Establishment, a stuffily-named agency of the British government. The work was further developed at Cern - those guys again. Eventually multi-touch technology was commercialised by researchers at the University of Delaware in the United States - Wayne Westerman and John Elias, who sold their company to Apple itself. Yet even at that late stage in the game, governments played their part: Wayne Westerman's research fellowship was funded by the US National Science Foundation and the CIA. Then there's the girl with the silicon voice, Siri. Back in the year 2000, seven years before the first iPhone, the US Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency, Darpa, commissioned the Stanford Research Institute to develop a kind of proto-Siri, a virtual office assistant that might help military personnel to do their jobs. Twenty universities were brought into the project, furiously working on all the different technologies necessary to make a voice-activated virtual assistant a reality. Seven years later, the research was commercialised as a start-up, Siri Incorporated- and it was only in 2010 that Apple stepped in to acquire the results for an undisclosed sum. As for hard drives, lithium-ion batteries, liquid crystal displays and semiconductors themselves - there are similar stories to be told. In each case, there was scientific brilliance and plenty of private sector entrepreneurship. But there were also wads of cash thrown at the problem by government agencies - usually US government agencies, and for that matter, usually some arm of the US military. Silicon Valley itself owes a great debt to Fairchild Semiconductor - the company that developed the first commercially practical integrated circuits. And Fairchild Semiconductor, in its early days, depended on military procurement. Of course, the US military didn't make the iPhone. Cern did not create Facebook or Google. These technologies, that so many people rely on today, were honed and commercialised by the private sector. But it was government funding and government risk-taking that made all these things possible. That's a thought to hold on to as we ponder the technological challenges ahead in fields such energy and biotechnology. Steve Jobs was a genius, there's no denying that. One of his remarkable side projects was the animation studio Pixar - which changed the world of film when it released the digitally animated film, Toy Story. Even without the touchscreen and the internet and the Fast-Fourier-Transform, Steve Jobs might well have created something wonderful. But it would not have been a world-shaking technology like the iPhone. More likely it would, like Woody and Buzz, have been an utterly charming toy. Tim Harford is the FT's Undercover Economist. 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy was broadcast on the BBC World Service. You can find more information about the programme's sources and listen online or subscribe to the programme podcast.


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The University of Delaware's Eric Furst is leading one of five projects recently selected to conduct fluid dynamics investigations in the International Space Station's U.S. National Laboratory. The program is jointly administered by the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the National Science Foundation (NSF). NSF will award $1.5 million total in funding for the selected projects to advance fundamental science and engineering knowledge through microgravity inquiry. Furst's project, "Kinetics of Nanoparticle Self-Assembly in Directing Fields," will use facilities onboard the space station (ISS) to study the assembly of ellipsoidal magnetic particles in the presence of a controlled magnetic field. A professor in UD's Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Furst is particularly interested in colloidal materials -- mixtures in which small particles called colloids are uniformly distributed throughout another substance. These materials range from common household items like mayonnaise, jelly and paint to high-tech applications in medicine, photovoltaics and communications. "The number of functional materials manufactured by assembly of colloidal particles is growing," says Furst. "With this work, we will be controlling assembly by applying external fields that affect the motion of the particles and their organization." "Functional materials are fascinating because their mission is to perform in a certain way while basically remaining invisible," he says. "The cool part for me as a scientist and engineer is revealing that magic to people, but the science behind it can be hard to explain." Furst says that some of the simplest "smart materials" are those that flow on demand. "These materials have what's known as yield stress," he says. "It's what keeps toothpaste on our toothbrushes and ketchup on our fries." "Yield stress is a commonly engineered property in colloidal systems," he adds. "We're seeking to use more complex colloidal building blocks to engineer more sophisticated properties, while also enabling new routes to manufacturing those materials by self-assembly." The colloidal materials examined in this project could serve as building blocks for phononic bandgap materials that control the propagation of sound and heat, ultra-low thermal conductivity coatings, and photonic crystals with rich structural color. In announcing the awards, NSF's Grace Wang said, "In the microgravity environment of space, NSF grantees will be able to investigate fluid dynamics phenomena and processes not observable on Earth to further our scientific understanding that will lead to advances to benefit all Americans." Furst's initial ISS research, performed starting in 2009, has appeared in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and Physical Review Letters, for which he was awarded the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal in 2014. Through the new grant, Furst plans to engage the public by producing segments for a variety of media outlets, especially those that concentrate on space-based research. CASIS and NSF solicited proposals to assess fluid flow phenomena such as capillary flow, diffusion, interfacial behavior, multiphase flow, separation and surface tension. Other institutions that received awards through the program were Rensselaer Polytech Institute, Cornell University, and the University of California-Santa Barbara. CASIS was selected by NASA in July 2011 to maximize use of the International Space Station (ISS) U.S. National Laboratory through 2020. CASIS is dedicated to supporting and accelerating innovations and new discoveries that will enhance the health and wellbeing of people and our planet. In 2005, Congress designated the U.S. portion of the International Space Station as the nation's newest national laboratory to maximize its use for improving life on Earth, promoting collaboration among diverse users, and advancing STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education. This unique laboratory environment is available for use by other U.S. government agencies and by academic and private institutions, providing access to the permanent microgravity setting, vantage point in low Earth orbit, and varied environments of space.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Tipton Communications, a fast-growing, full-service employee communications, public relations and marketing agency serving corporations and hospitals nationwide, announced today that Natalie Hines has been promoted to Account Executive. Hines will continue to support the planning, development and coordination of internal communications, projects and programs for clients nationwide at Tipton Communications. In this newly defined position, she will manage, strengthen and grow client relationships by developing and implementing effective, creative strategies. “Natalie has the leadership skills and talent to develop this new position for us,” said Dan Tipton, President and CEO of Tipton Communications. “I am confident she will successfully represent Tipton with our clients and demonstrate an absolute commitment to providing the very best products backed by top-quality service.” Natalie began working at Tipton Communications in 2014 as a public relations intern while studying at the University of Delaware. She joined the team full-time in 2015 as a communications specialist after earning her bachelor’s degree in mass communication, with minors in advertising and organizational community leadership. Recently, Hines was appointed to serve as secretary of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) Delaware Chapter Board.


PHILADELPHIA--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Axalta Coating Systems (NYSE: AXTA), a leading global manufacturer of liquid and powder coatings, and a Founding Partner of Daytona International Speedway (DIS), will help kick off a weekend of exciting festivities for the 59th annual DAYTONA 500 while it celebrates the new Axalta Center Injector. Beginning with a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for children with cognitive or physical disabilities, Axalta and the other DIS Founding Partners will custom-fit cars so that the children can “race” in the famed motorsports stadium in their own sit-in cars. Axalta is making this event possible in partnership with GoBabyGo!, a national program from the University of Delaware that empowers children with disabilities to become independently mobile through the use of custom-fitted motorized vehicles. Employees from Axalta and other Founding Partner organizations of Daytona International Speedway will work meticulously in Axalta’s new Center Injector to retrofit motorized toy cars for 12 toddlers aged 5 and younger who have challenges freely moving on their own. With assistance from Florida Hospital, GoBabyGo! has selected children from the Daytona Beach, FL region to participate in this event. This event will provide a very heartwarming and memorable sequence of life-changing moments for the children and their families. Prior to the vehicle build, children and their families will participate in an exclusive meet-and-greet with Jeff Gordon, four-time Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series champion and three-time DAYTONA 500 champion. Once the vehicles are completed and decorated by the injector teams, the children will “drive” their custom vehicles for the first time as they ride along the Axalta red carpet to the finish line. Every child will be presented with a Teddy Bear in a NASCAR-styled fire suit at the completion of the race. “We are humbled and honored to celebrate the opening of the Axalta Center Injector at the Daytona International Speedway by offering children and their families this unforgettable experience,” said Joe McDougall, Axalta Senior Vice President. “To watch the children navigate their new, custom rides in a renowned location on race weekend in our new Center Injector, will truly create an incredible memory for all of us.” In May 2016, International Speedway Corporation and Axalta announced a multi-year partnership that made Axalta the fifth Founding Partner at Daytona International Speedway’s new motorsports stadium. The agreement provides Axalta with naming rights for the Center Injector and other branding rights within specific areas of the stadium. This partnership allows for increased engagement opportunities and ways to give back to the community. Axalta is committed to corporate social responsibility initiatives with a special focus on STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education. Through this program, Axalta is proud to encourage its employees and those of the other Founding Partner organizations to apply their STEM skills to help those most in need. Media who are interested in covering the event require event credentials from Daytona International Speedway no later than two business days prior to the event. Please visit this link or call (386) 681-6745 for more information and to apply for media credentials. Media without credentials will not be permitted to cover this event. GoBabyGo! is an international nonprofit committed to building and providing motorized cars for toddlers with disabilities who may otherwise be immobile in their early, formative years. Over the past decade, GoBabyGo! has been able to place many of their custom, re-built toy cars on the “roads” — well, mostly gym floors and homes —of families in need! To learn more about GoBabyGo! visit www.udel.edu/gobabygo. Axalta is a leading global company focused solely on coatings and providing customers with innovative, colorful, beautiful and sustainable solutions. From light OEM vehicles, commercial vehicles and refinish applications to electric motors, buildings and pipelines, our coatings are designed to prevent corrosion, increase productivity and enable the materials we coat to last longer. With more than 150 years of experience in the coatings industry, the 12,800 people of Axalta continue to find ways to serve our 100,000+ customers in 130 countries better every day with the finest coatings, application systems and technology. For more information visit axalta.com and follow us @Axalta on Twitter and on LinkedIn.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) is launching operations this month of one of the world's most powerful and energy-efficient supercomputers, providing the nation with a major new tool to advance understanding of the atmospheric and related Earth system sciences. Named "Cheyenne," the 5.34-petaflop system is capable of more than triple the amount of scientific computing performed by the previous NCAR supercomputer, Yellowstone. It also is three times more energy efficient. Scientists across the country will use Cheyenne to study phenomena ranging from wildfires and seismic activity to gusts that generate power at wind farms. Their findings will lay the groundwork for better protecting society from natural disasters, lead to more detailed projections of seasonal and longer-term weather and climate variability and change, and improve weather and water forecasts that are needed by economic sectors from agriculture and energy to transportation and tourism. "Cheyenne will help us advance the knowledge needed for saving lives, protecting property, and enabling U.S. businesses to better compete in the global marketplace," said Antonio J. Busalacchi, president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. "This system is turbocharging our science." UCAR manages NCAR on behalf of the National Science Foundation (NSF). Cheyenne currently ranks as the 20th fastest supercomputer in the world and the fastest in the Mountain West, although such rankings change as new and more powerful machines begin operations. It is funded by NSF as well as by the state of Wyoming through an appropriation to the University of Wyoming. Cheyenne is housed in the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center (NWSC), one of the nation's premier supercomputing facilities for research. Since the NWSC opened in 2012, more than 2,200 scientists from more than 300 universities and federal labs have used its resources. "Through our work at the NWSC, we have a better understanding of such important processes as surface and subsurface hydrology, physics of flow in reservoir rock, and weather modification and precipitation stimulation," said William Gern, vice president of research and economic development at the University of Wyoming. "Importantly, we are also introducing Wyoming’s school-age students to the significance and power of computing." The NWSC is located in Cheyenne, and the name of the new system was chosen to honor the support the center has received from the people of that city. The name also commemorates the upcoming 150th anniversary of the city, which was founded in 1867 and named for the American Indian Cheyenne Nation. Cheyenne was built by Silicon Graphics International, or SGI (now part of Hewlett Packard Enterprise Co.), with DataDirect Networks (DDN) providing centralized file system and data storage components. Cheyenne is capable of 5.34 quadrillion calculations per second (5.34 petaflops, or floating point operations per second). The new system has a peak computation rate of more than 3 billion calculations per second for every watt of energy consumed. That is three times more energy efficient than the Yellowstone supercomputer, which is also highly efficient. The data storage system for Cheyenne provides an initial capacity of 20 petabytes, expandable to 40 petabytes with the addition of extra drives.  The new DDN system also transfers data at the rate of 220 gigabytes per second, which is more than twice as fast as the previous file system’s rate of 90 gigabytes per second. Cheyenne is the latest in a long and successful history of supercomputers supported by the NSF and NCAR to advance the atmospheric and related sciences. “We’re excited to provide the research community with more supercomputing power,” said Anke Kamrath, interim director of NCAR’s Computational and Information Systems Laboratory, which oversees operations at the NWSC. “Scientists have access to increasingly large amounts of data about our planet. The enhanced capabilities of the NWSC will enable them to tackle problems that used to be out of reach and obtain results at far greater speeds than ever.” High-performance computers such as Cheyenne allow researchers to run increasingly detailed models that simulate complex events and predict how they might unfold in the future. With more supercomputing power, scientists can capture additional processes, run their models at a higher resolution, and conduct an ensemble of modeling runs that provide a fuller picture of the same time period. "Providing next-generation supercomputing is vital to better understanding the Earth system that affects us all, " said NCAR Director James W. Hurrell. "We're delighted that this powerful resource is now available to the nation's scientists, and we're looking forward to new discoveries in climate, weather, space weather, renewable energy, and other critical areas of research." Some of the initial projects on Cheyenne include: Long-range, seasonal to decadal forecasting: Several studies led by George Mason University, the University of Miami, and NCAR aim to improve prediction of weather patterns months to years in advance. Researchers will use Cheyenne's capabilities to generate more comprehensive simulations of finer-scale processes in the ocean, atmosphere, and sea ice. This research will help scientists refine computer models for improved long-term predictions, including how year-to-year changes in Arctic sea ice extent may affect the likelihood of extreme weather events thousands of miles away. Wind energy: Projecting electricity output at a wind farm is extraordinarily challenging as it involves predicting variable gusts and complex wind eddies at the height of turbines, which are hundreds of feet above the sensors used for weather forecasting. University of Wyoming researchers will use Cheyenne to simulate wind conditions on different scales, from across the continent down to the tiny space near a wind turbine blade, as well as the vibrations within an individual turbine itself. In addition, an NCAR-led project will create high-resolution, 3-D simulations of vertical and horizontal drafts to provide more information about winds over complex terrain. This type of research is critical as utilities seek to make wind farms as efficient as possible. Space weather: Scientists are working to better understand solar disturbances that buffet Earth's atmosphere and threaten the operation of satellites, communications, and power grids. New projects led by the University of Delaware and NCAR are using Cheyenne to gain more insight into how solar activity leads to damaging geomagnetic storms. The scientists plan to develop detailed simulations of the emergence of the magnetic field from the subsurface of the Sun into its atmosphere, as well as gain a three-dimensional view of plasma turbulence and magnetic reconnection in space that lead to plasma heating. Extreme weather: One of the leading questions about climate change is how it could affect the frequency and severity of major storms and other types of severe weather. An NCAR-led project will explore how climate interacts with the land surface and hydrology over the United States, and how extreme weather events can be expected to change in the future. It will use advanced modeling approaches at high resolution (down to just a few miles) in ways that can help scientists configure future climate models to better simulate extreme events. Climate engineering: To counter the effects of heat-trapping greenhouse gases, some experts have proposed artificially cooling the planet by injecting sulfates into the stratosphere, which would mimic the effects of a major volcanic eruption. But if society ever tried to engage in such climate engineering, or geoengineering, the results could alter the world's climate in unintended ways. An NCAR-led project is using Cheyenne's computing power to run an ensemble of climate engineering simulations to show how hypothetical sulfate injections could affect regional temperatures and precipitation. Smoke and global climate: A study led by the University of Wyoming will look into emissions from wildfires and how they affect stratocumulus clouds over the southeastern Atlantic Ocean. This research is needed for a better understanding of the global climate system, as stratocumulus clouds, which cover 23 percent of Earth's surface, play a key role in reflecting sunlight back into space. The work will help reveal the extent to which particles emitted during biomass burning influence cloud processes in ways that affect global temperatures.


News Article | April 6, 2016
Site: www.nature.com

Henry “Hoby” Wedler caught the chemistry bug as a high-school student in Sonoma County, California. He loved to think about atoms and how they fit together to make molecules. Although he wanted to enrol in his school's advanced chemistry course, he faced a frustrating problem: he has been completely blind since birth, and his teacher thought that he might find it too hard. The field was too visual, she told him. Nonsense, Wedler thought. “I said, 'No one can see atoms; it's completely cerebral.'” Now 28, he is studying for a PhD in organic chemistry at the University of California, Davis, and is considering teaching offers. His once-doubting school instructor has become one of his greatest allies. It's not an easy road, but early-career scientists who face physical challenges such as blindness, deafness or paralysis are building varied and rewarding careers. They work in academic, government and industrial research as teachers, consultants and other occupations. Success requires desire, grit and ingenuity. Researchers who have trouble seeing, hearing or with mobility need creative workarounds in the lab and field. They may have to design their own equipment. They need a crew of friends, peers and mentors who can provide support. And they must seek work that capitalizes on their strengths, accepting that some assignments may be beyond their reach — at least for now. “You have to really want to be a scientist a lot, or it won't happen,” says Richard Mankin, a research entomologist for the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) in Gainesville, Florida, who wears braces on his legs and relies on crutches to walk. Despite a patchwork quilt of policies and guidelines that are meant to broaden employment opportunities, disabled people still have trouble finding work. A 2014 analysis by the Campaign for Science and Engineering, which promotes science in the United Kingdom, reported1 that fewer than half of the nation's 5.2 million people of working age with disabilities had jobs between 2010 and 2011. They were more than twice as likely as peers without disabilities to report working part-time, and about half as likely to have jobs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Similarly, in 2015, the US National Science Foundation reported2 that about one in nine scientists aged 75 or younger in the United States had a disability. They, too, were more than twice as likely to be out of the labour force than their peers without disabilities. As Wedler found, accessibility issues crop up long before a scientist enters the workforce. German-born climatologist Imke Durre, blind since early childhood, says that her father, a computer scientist, created a Braille word-processing program in the early 1980s to help her to do school work. Such technology is widespread today, says Durre, who works for the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. But she says that there are still practical hurdles to using assistive tools, particularly for students. Even when Braille versions of textbooks are available, teachers may not know about them or be able to order them in time for a class. Figures, tables and graphs typically aren't translated into Braille, so a student with a visual impairment often needs to collaborate with a sighted colleague to interpret visual data — a process that may not go smoothly, says Durre. On occasion, she says with a laugh, she has shown up to a meeting carrying blank pages instead of the hard copies of graphs and tables that she thought she had prepared. Mundane tasks pose barriers, too. James McNutt, who uses a wheelchair and studies the history of science at Queen's University in Kingston, Canada, set out last year to record some of the difficulties that he faces as he travels around the university (see go.nature.com/oaablb). With a video camera attached to his wheelchair, he attempted to open doors, operate lifts and visit washrooms. Buttons, switches and knobs were often out of reach. Doors wouldn't open. Passageways were too narrow or too winding to accommodate a wheelchair easily. “Quite often, the planning people don't have an idea of what is and is not accessible,” says McNutt, who has cerebral palsy. “They don't know how big the wheelchair is. They don't have any idea what it's like.” Audrey Kobayashi, a geographer at Queen's University and a member of the school's committee on campus accessibility, says that the situation has improved greatly over the past two decades. There are now clear lines of responsibility to ensure that students with disabilities get any help they need, and the movement is garnering attention (see 'A worldwide wave of awareness'). But Kobayashi, who uses a wheelchair at work because of a neurological disorder called transverse myelitis, says that a lot of challenges remain. “We're trying to make a barrier-free campus, but it's slow,” she says. The difficulties don't end after receiving a degree. Researchers who have a disability and want to work in a scientific field must first ensure that physical adjustments are made to labs and other workplaces to facilitate access. These can include redesigning lab sinks to accommodate a wheelchair, posting emergency instructions in Braille and checking that doorways to halls with lifts or ramps don't lock automatically and block exits. In the United States, the Americans with Disabilities Act, enacted in 1990, requires accommodations in public spaces. The UK Disability Discrimination Act (1995) and Canada's Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (2005) impose similar requirements for their regions. But the laws often do not require retrofitting, and thus many labs that were built before the legislation took effect remain difficult or impossible to navigate for scientists who have mobility issues: aisles are too narrow, tables are too tall and eyewash stations are tucked into inconvenient corners. Some scientists are attacking the problems on their own. Neuroscientist Bradley Duerstock, who has been quadriplegic for more than 25 years, developed a disability-friendly lab space at Purdue University's Center for Paralysis Research in West Lafayette, Indiana, where he researches assistive technologies. With grants from the US National Institutes of Health and other sources, he adapted the 'kitchen work triangle' — a home-design layout concept that imagines the stove, sink and refrigerator as the shape's corners — into a 'wet-laboratory work triangle' defined by the lab sink, lab bench and fume hood. Years ago, he designed a microscope that lets the user control illumination, focus and exposure through a computer interface, rather than tricky-to-operate knobs (now, such microscopes are commercially available). Scientists with disabilities are also installing light switches that are positioned at an accessible height and that are labelled for people who rely on Braille, and they use adjustable-height lab benches and other accommodations. Back in California, Wedler gives credit to his adviser, chemist Dean Tantillo, for hiring him as an undergraduate and for making the lab an easier place to work. With the help of US$30,000 in supplemental funding attached to his US National Science Foundation graduate fellowship, Wedler and other members of Tantillo's team developed a 3D-printing solution that produces tactile models of molecular structures. Different shapes and textures in the models represent different atoms and bonds, and Braille notations describe bond angles and bond lengths. It takes a couple of days to generate each printed model, but Wedler doesn't mind: the homegrown technology allows him to 'feel' the outcomes of his calculations so that he can verify his work on his own. When Duerstock and Susan Mendrysa, then a colleague at Purdue's Institute for Accessible Science, polled coworkers to learn what qualities make a lab most accommodating, they found that working with an established, well-funded principal investigator was key: such scientists were more likely to give staff with disabilities the extra time they might need to complete their studies or to publish papers. Colleagues can also help on a smaller scale. Born with muscles missing in his legs and arms, Mankin has conducted field research internationally since the 1970s, walking with crutches or crawling along the ground to study the sounds and vibrations that insects make in various locations. He seldom works in the field alone, and he keeps his trips short. He asks those who accompany him to manage tasks that he cannot perform, such as carrying equipment and climbing trees. Physical barriers are not the only obstacles: bias can also be an issue. Jae-Hyeon Parq, a postdoctoral researcher at Seoul National University, who has used a wheelchair since sustaining a spinal injury as an undergraduate, worries that his disability will make it hard for him to find a job. Trained as a physicist, Parq now works in the lab of marine geologist Sang-Mook Lee, who has been trying to improve conditions for scientists with disabilities since 2006, when he was paralysed in a car accident. “Most people, especially in Korea, don't understand the diversity of disabled people,” Parq says. “They judge what I can and what I can't do from my appearance.” If Parq can't get a permanent job, he says, he will continue to work for Lee. Those whose disabilities aren't as immediately obvious face a different, yet related problem: whether to tell potential employers. “One of the most common questions I get is, should I say on my CV that I'm deaf?” says biochemist Annemarie Ross of the Rochester Institute of Technology's National Technical Institute for the Deaf in New York. Ross, who is hearing-impaired, tells students that it is their choice — there is no clear advantage for applicants who do or don't reveal a disability. But it's a challenge that must be resolved, she says. “A big barrier in general for our students are the employers. They think, 'If a worker can't hear a fire alarm, how do we make sure they're safe? If they stay behind in a burning lab, we could be liable.'” Often, job candidates must persuade employers to reframe their assumptions in interviews, Ross says. Those with hearing disorders, for example, can see the strobe lights on many modern fire-alarm systems. By the same token, scientists in a lab don't spend much time doing physical tasks. “I was always having to persuade people I could do things from a wheelchair,” says Karl Booksh, an analytical chemist at the University of Delaware in Newark who experienced a spinal cord injury in university. “The way I convinced most of them was pointing out that the most successful faculty members didn't know where the pipettes were to begin with — that the key to success was writing papers and proposals.” Some scientists with disabilities have reframed their impairment as a positive attribute: they say that coping with the challenges of everyday life has helped them to develop unusual skills and expertise. Wedler, for instance, says that navigating town trained his brain to make spot-on mental maps. A similar sort of spatial thinking helps him with organic chemistry. “I was thinking in terms of feet and miles, but there's no reason you can't shrink that down to ångströms,” he says. “In terms of doing the problems, I might have an advantage over my sighted peers.” Mankin is dubious that the stigma against those with disabilities will ever fade completely. He is president of the Foundation for Science and Disability, which sponsors a grant programme that supports the research of graduate students with disabilities. But, he says, he doesn't think of himself as disabled. He is an enthusiast whose voice crackles with excitement when he talks about his work. He is studying psyllids, insects that cause a tree-damaging disease that threatens Florida's $10-billion citrus industry, and he has been developing systems that use vibrations to lure and trap male psyllids to prevent them from mating with females nearby. The approach could offer an alternative to pesticides, and has attracted the attention of federal legislators. “Being a scientist has been lots of fun,” Mankin says. “I've done things that I hope have benefitted humanity. This is what I always wanted to do.”


The International Nurses Association is pleased to welcome MaryAnn D’Arrigo, MSN, APN-C to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare. MaryAnn D’Arrigo is an Advanced Practice Nurse with 30 years of experience in her field and an extensive expertise in all facets of nursing, especially obstetrics, gynecology, inpatient, and women’s health. MaryAnn is currently serving patients within Cherry Hill OB/GYN in Cherry Hill, New Jersey. MaryAnn attended Cumberland County Community College, graduating with her Associate Degree. An advocate for continuing education, MaryAnn went on to earn her Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing Cum Laude from the University of Delaware, before completing her Master of Science Degree in Nursing from Rutgers State University of New Jersey. She then earned her Advanced Practice Nurse in Women’s Health through the National Certification Corporation. MaryAnn holds additional certification in Neonatal Advanced Life Support, Advanced Cardiac Life Support, and is a Certified Registered Nurse in Inpatient Obstetrics. To keep up to date with the latest advances and developments in her field, she maintains a professional membership with the Association of Women’s Health Organization and Neonatal Nursing and the National Association of Nurse Practitioners in Women’s Health. She attributes her success to her caring personality and taking the time to teach her patients. When she is not working, MaryAnn enjoys cooking, hiking, spending time with her family, and participating in the Susan G. Komen Race. Learn more about MaryAnn here: http://inanurse.org/network/index.php?do=/4135088/info/ and http://cherryhillobgyn.com/about-us/maryann-darrigo-msn-apn-c/ and be sure to read her upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) is launching operations this month of one of the world's most powerful and energy-efficient supercomputers, providing the nation with a major new tool to advance understanding of the atmospheric and related Earth system sciences. Named "Cheyenne," the 5.34-petaflop system is capable of more than triple the amount of scientific computing performed by the previous NCAR supercomputer, Yellowstone. It also is three times more energy efficient. Scientists across the country will use Cheyenne to study phenomena ranging from wildfires and seismic activity to gusts that generate power at wind farms. Their findings will lay the groundwork for better protecting society from natural disasters, lead to more detailed projections of seasonal and longer-term weather and climate variability and change, and improve weather and water forecasts that are needed by economic sectors from agriculture and energy to transportation and tourism. "Cheyenne will help us advance the knowledge needed for saving lives, protecting property, and enabling U.S. businesses to better compete in the global marketplace," said Antonio J. Busalacchi, president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. "This system is turbocharging our science." UCAR manages NCAR on behalf of the National Science Foundation (NSF). Cheyenne currently ranks as the 20th fastest supercomputer in the world and the fastest in the Mountain West, although such rankings change as new and more powerful machines begin operations. It is funded by NSF as well as by the state of Wyoming through an appropriation to the University of Wyoming. Cheyenne is housed in the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center (NWSC), one of the nation's premier supercomputing facilities for research. Since the NWSC opened in 2012, more than 2,200 scientists from more than 300 universities and federal labs have used its resources. "Through our work at the NWSC, we have a better understanding of such important processes as surface and subsurface hydrology, physics of flow in reservoir rock, and weather modification and precipitation stimulation," said William Gern, vice president of research and economic development at the University of Wyoming. "Importantly, we are also introducing Wyoming’s school-age students to the significance and power of computing." The NWSC is located in Cheyenne, and the name of the new system was chosen to honor the support the center has received from the people of that city. The name also commemorates the upcoming 150th anniversary of the city, which was founded in 1867 and named for the American Indian Cheyenne Nation. Cheyenne was built by Silicon Graphics International, or SGI (now part of Hewlett Packard Enterprise Co.), with DataDirect Networks (DDN) providing centralized file system and data storage components. Cheyenne is capable of 5.34 quadrillion calculations per second (5.34 petaflops, or floating point operations per second). The new system has a peak computation rate of more than 3 billion calculations per second for every watt of energy consumed. That is three times more energy efficient than the Yellowstone supercomputer, which is also highly efficient. The data storage system for Cheyenne provides an initial capacity of 20 petabytes, expandable to 40 petabytes with the addition of extra drives.  The new DDN system also transfers data at the rate of 220 gigabytes per second, which is more than twice as fast as the previous file system’s rate of 90 gigabytes per second. Cheyenne is the latest in a long and successful history of supercomputers supported by the NSF and NCAR to advance the atmospheric and related sciences. “We’re excited to provide the research community with more supercomputing power,” said Anke Kamrath, interim director of NCAR’s Computational and Information Systems Laboratory, which oversees operations at the NWSC. “Scientists have access to increasingly large amounts of data about our planet. The enhanced capabilities of the NWSC will enable them to tackle problems that used to be out of reach and obtain results at far greater speeds than ever.” High-performance computers such as Cheyenne allow researchers to run increasingly detailed models that simulate complex events and predict how they might unfold in the future. With more supercomputing power, scientists can capture additional processes, run their models at a higher resolution, and conduct an ensemble of modeling runs that provide a fuller picture of the same time period. "Providing next-generation supercomputing is vital to better understanding the Earth system that affects us all, " said NCAR Director James W. Hurrell. "We're delighted that this powerful resource is now available to the nation's scientists, and we're looking forward to new discoveries in climate, weather, space weather, renewable energy, and other critical areas of research." Some of the initial projects on Cheyenne include: Long-range, seasonal to decadal forecasting: Several studies led by George Mason University, the University of Miami, and NCAR aim to improve prediction of weather patterns months to years in advance. Researchers will use Cheyenne's capabilities to generate more comprehensive simulations of finer-scale processes in the ocean, atmosphere, and sea ice. This research will help scientists refine computer models for improved long-term predictions, including how year-to-year changes in Arctic sea ice extent may affect the likelihood of extreme weather events thousands of miles away. Wind energy: Projecting electricity output at a wind farm is extraordinarily challenging as it involves predicting variable gusts and complex wind eddies at the height of turbines, which are hundreds of feet above the sensors used for weather forecasting. University of Wyoming researchers will use Cheyenne to simulate wind conditions on different scales, from across the continent down to the tiny space near a wind turbine blade, as well as the vibrations within an individual turbine itself. In addition, an NCAR-led project will create high-resolution, 3-D simulations of vertical and horizontal drafts to provide more information about winds over complex terrain. This type of research is critical as utilities seek to make wind farms as efficient as possible. Space weather: Scientists are working to better understand solar disturbances that buffet Earth's atmosphere and threaten the operation of satellites, communications, and power grids. New projects led by the University of Delaware and NCAR are using Cheyenne to gain more insight into how solar activity leads to damaging geomagnetic storms. The scientists plan to develop detailed simulations of the emergence of the magnetic field from the subsurface of the Sun into its atmosphere, as well as gain a three-dimensional view of plasma turbulence and magnetic reconnection in space that lead to plasma heating. Extreme weather: One of the leading questions about climate change is how it could affect the frequency and severity of major storms and other types of severe weather. An NCAR-led project will explore how climate interacts with the land surface and hydrology over the United States, and how extreme weather events can be expected to change in the future. It will use advanced modeling approaches at high resolution (down to just a few miles) in ways that can help scientists configure future climate models to better simulate extreme events. Climate engineering: To counter the effects of heat-trapping greenhouse gases, some experts have proposed artificially cooling the planet by injecting sulfates into the stratosphere, which would mimic the effects of a major volcanic eruption. But if society ever tried to engage in such climate engineering, or geoengineering, the results could alter the world's climate in unintended ways. An NCAR-led project is using Cheyenne's computing power to run an ensemble of climate engineering simulations to show how hypothetical sulfate injections could affect regional temperatures and precipitation. Smoke and global climate: A study led by the University of Wyoming will look into emissions from wildfires and how they affect stratocumulus clouds over the southeastern Atlantic Ocean. This research is needed for a better understanding of the global climate system, as stratocumulus clouds, which cover 23 percent of Earth's surface, play a key role in reflecting sunlight back into space. The work will help reveal the extent to which particles emitted during biomass burning influence cloud processes in ways that affect global temperatures.


News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: www.theguardian.com

Last week, Donald Trump’s space policy advisor Bob Walker made headlines by suggesting that the incoming administration might slash Nasa’s climate and earth science research to focus the agency on deep space exploration. This caused great concern in the scientific community, because Nasa does some of the best climate research in the world, and its Earth science program does much more. Walker suggested the earth science research could be shifted to other agencies, but climate scientist Michael Mann explained what would result: Walker’s comments set off alarm bells for another reason. Were it simply a matter of transferring Nasa’s climate and earth science programs to other agencies, what would be the point? Such a transfer would be logistically difficult, and if the research funding weren’t cut, it wouldn’t save any taxpayer money. And it’s not as though the branches doing Nasa’s climate research are distracting other branches of the agency from conducting deep space exploration. The suggestion does however look a lot like a Trojan horse whose true purpose is to cut government-funded climate research, perhaps transferring some of Nasa’s programs and budget to other agencies and simply scrapping the rest. In an interview with The Guardian, Walker accused Nasa of “politically correct environmental monitoring” and “politicized science.” Carol Off from CBC’s program As It Happens conducted a follow-up interview with Walker and asked for examples to support his accusations. Walker cited the example of Nasa’s announcement that 2014 was the hottest year on record, claiming: The reason Walker knew that Nasa estimates gave 2014 a 38% (not 39%) chance of being the hottest year on record (Noaa put its odds at 48%) is that Nasa and Noaa included this information in their announcement. There is uncertainty in every scientific measurement. That’s why scientific theories and conclusions aren’t proven; they’re only supported or disproved by the available evidence. Nasa and Noaa concluded that 2014 was about twice as likely to be the hottest year on record than the second-most likely year (2010). Thus they decided that they could announce that 2014 was likely the hottest year on record, but they also included the uncertainty in that conclusion, as good scientists do. For that, Walker wrongly accused them of “politicizing science.” Coincidentally, 2015 broke the 2014 record, and 2016 is about to shatter the record for hottest year once again. In the CBC interview, Walker also claimed: “the models that the scientists have used on global warming have been extremely flawed.” In reality, as documented in my book, climate models have been incredibly accurate at predicting global warming. But Walker’s most glaring red flags were raised when he was asked about the 97% expert consensus on human-caused global warming, to which he replied: Walker followed up to the interview with three sources he claimed supported his rejection of the 97% expert climate consensus. In this answer, Walker checked off three of the five characteristics of science denial. First, he engaged in conspiratorial thinking by accusing the climate science community of blocking contrarian research. In reality, the 3% of climate scientists who dispute the expert consensus on human-caused global warming are able to publish their work in scientific journals. It’s just that the contrarian research tends to be flawed and falls apart under scientific scrutiny, so it doesn’t get much attention outside of certain biased media outlets. Second, in denying the 97% expert consensus, Walker instead appealed to fake experts. He cited three sources to dispute the consensus, one of which was the National Association of Scholars; but digging deeper, the source was actually a 2011 interview the association did with Fred Singer. Singer is a tobacco and fossil fuel industry-funded scientist, who claimed in the interview: In short, one of the sources Walker cited to dispute the 97% expert consensus on human-caused global warming is the unsubstantiated guess of a fossil fuel-funded fake expert. Walker also referenced the Open Source Systems, Science, and Solutions Foundation (OSS), which says: On the same page OSS does mention that 31,000 scientists signed the Oregon Petition disputing the consensus, but only to debunk this particular myth. Strike two for Walker. His third source was “The Center for Climate Research,” which most likely refers to a paper published by David Legates, who used to head the University of Delaware’s so-named center. While Legates’ paper was published in a scientific journal, it badly misrepresented the expert consensus on climate change by focusing on the papers that didn’t explicitly quantify how much global warming humans are responsible for. By that logic, there’s no expert consensus on evolution, or the Earth not being flat, or on any scientific question, because in every scientific field most papers don’t focus on answering the most basic, settled questions. The problem is that Walker is getting his climate information from inaccurate, biased sources, and he’s an advisor to the president-elect. It’s possible that the incoming administration won’t follow his dangerous, biased advice. The issue will predominantly be in the hands of Congress in any case, but Republicans in Congress have been trying to slash Nasa’s earth science budget for years. Now they have an ally in the White House. Additionally, Trump has surrounded himself with advisors and cabinet members who likely don’t view climate research favorably. The head of his EPA transition team denies climate science and opposes efforts to cut carbon pollution. For EPA head, he’s considering Scott Pruitt and Kathleen Hartnett White. Pruitt is among the attorneys general attacking the Clean Power Plan in court, and his arguments have been delivered directly by the oil industry. Hartnett White has worked for several fossil fuel-funded think tanks and has compared expert scientific conclusions to religious dogma. Trump will likely select an Interior Secretary in favor of opening public lands to oil drilling. While Trump himself has claimed to have an open mind about climate change, he’s also displayed a lack of basic knowledge about the subject, to put it mildly. Trump will be forced to rely on his advisors, but he’s surrounded himself with Big Oil cronies, and his chief of staff has said that Trump’s default position on climate science is that “most of it is a bunch of bunk.” It’s very possible that Congress will send Trump a budget that slashes Nasa climate research, and it’s also possible that his oil-allied team will advise him to sign it. Doing so would be a terrible mistake that would cripple the scientific community’s ability to monitor how rapidly we’re changing the Earth’s climate. We can’t simply bury our heads in the sand and hope the problem goes away. If our political leaders try to kneecap our climate monitoring, citizens must make them aware that this is an unacceptably irresponsible action that will not be tolerated.


News Article | April 22, 2016
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

No one is telling you what time to go to bed with this, but researchers are making a strong case that the duration and timing of your sleep are closely associated with whether your behavior is heart-healthy. Night owls should take special note of a new study by University of Delaware researcher Freda Patterson and collaborators at the University of Pennsylvania, Drexel University and the University of Arizona College of Medicine, who found that the early-to-bed, early-to-rise approach aligns much better with cardiovascular health. Sleep deficits and poor-quality sleep have been linked to obesity and a myriad of health problems, but this study shows that when it comes to promoting healthy hearts, it's not a matter of getting more sleep. It's a matter of getting adequate sleep at optimal times. Doing that seems to reduce the kind of behaviors - smoking, sedentary lifestyles and poor dietary choices - that put hearts in harm's way. "There are some who believe that sleep as a physiological function is upstream to these heart-health behaviors," said Patterson, assistant professor of behavioral health and nutrition in the University's College of Health Sciences. "If that is true, the implication would be that if we can modify sleep as a central risk factor, we might be in much better position to leverage or modify some of our most stubborn cardiovascular risk behaviors such as tobacco use." The study, published in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine, examined the duration and approximate timing of sleep to see what patterns might be linked to the three prime suspects of cardiovascular trouble - smoking, poor diet and sedentary habits. Those three behaviors have been blamed for about 40 percent of cardiovascular deaths in the United States and the United Kingdom. The study had an enormous pool of data with which to work, drawing from the United Kingdom's Biobank Resource and a sample of 439,933 adults, between the ages of 40-69. They found several strong connections, but first, a few notes about definitions and methods. The study defined short sleep as less than six hours, adequate sleep as seven to eight hours, and long sleep as nine hours or more. Respondents were categorized by their self-reported sleep-timing or "chronotype" - whether they considered themselves a morning person, more morning than evening, more evening than morning, or an evening person. Participants were asked about their physical activity, how much time they spent using a computer or watching TV on an average day, how many servings of fruits and vegetables they had each day and how many cigarettes they typically smoked in an average day. And the bottom line was this - those whose sleep was either short or long and the night owls who went to bed later were more likely than adequate sleepers and those who went to bed earlier to smoke, remain sedentary and eat fewer fruits and vegetables. "These data suggest that it's not just sleep deprivation that relates to cardiovascular risk behaviors, but too much sleep can relate as well," Patterson said. "Oftentimes, health messages say we need to get more sleep, but this may be too simplistic. Going to bed earlier and getting adequate sleep was associated with better heart health behaviors." The American Health Association reports that only 5-10 percent of adults meet ideal standards in diet, physical activity and tobacco use. The rest of us have work to do. "We know that people who are active tend to have better sleep patterns, and we also know that people who do not get their sleep are less likely to be active," Patterson said. "A pressing question for practitioners and researchers is how do you leverage one to improve the other?" Data on the population studied were derived from the United Kingdom Biobank Resource, which draws on the UK's national health service. Subjects were between 40-69 years old during the four-year data collection period, which went from 2006-10. Despite the enormous sample size, the data had some limitations, Patterson said. Population diversity was limited, for example. Ninety-five percent of respondents were white. And the data were largely based on self-report. Further study is required to determine whether promoting adequate sleep and earlier-to-bed patterns would improve heart health.


News Article | November 22, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

WASHINGTON, DC -- A new study of the temporary slowdown in the global average surface temperature warming trend observed between 1998 and 2013 concludes the phenomenon represented a redistribution of energy within the Earth system, with Earth's ocean absorbing the extra heat. The phenomenon was referred to by some as the "global warming hiatus." Global average surface temperature, measured by satellites and direct observations, is considered a key indicator of climate change. In a study published today in Earth's Future, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, lead author Xiao-Hai Yan of the University of Delaware, Newark, along with scientists from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, and several other institutions discuss new understanding of the phenomenon. The paper grew out of a special U.S. Climate Variability and Predictability Program (CLIVAR) panel session at the 2015 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting. "The hiatus period gives scientists an opportunity to understand uncertainties in how climate systems are measured, as well as to fill in the gap in what scientists know," Yan said. "NASA's examination of ocean observations has provided its own unique contribution to our knowledge of decadal climate trends and global warming," said Veronica Nieves, a researcher at JPL and the University of California, Los Angeles and co-author of the new study. "Scientists have more confidence now that Earth's ocean has continued to warm continuously through time. But the rate of global surface warming can fluctuate due to natural variations in the climate system over periods of a decade or so." While Yan said it's difficult to reach complete consensus on such a complex topic, a thorough review of the literature and much discussion and debate revealed a number of key points on which these leading scientists concur: "To better monitor Earth's energy budget and its consequences, the ocean is most important to consider because the amount of heat it can store is extremely large when compared to the land or atmospheric capacity," said Yan. According to the paper, "arguably, ocean heat content--from the surface to the seafloor--might be a more appropriate measure of how much our planet is warming." In the near term, the researchers hope this paper will lay the foundation for future research in the global change field. To begin, they suggest the climate community replace the term "global warming hiatus" with "global surface warming slowdown" to eliminate confusion. "This terminology more accurately describes the slowdown in global mean surface temperature rise in the late 20th century," Yan said. The scientists also called for continued support of current and future technologies for ocean monitoring to reduce observation errors in sea surface temperature and ocean heat content. This includes maintaining Argo, the main system for monitoring ocean heat content, and the development of Deep Argo to monitor the lower half of the ocean; the use of ship-based subsurface ocean temperature monitoring programs; advancements in robotic technologies such as autonomous underwater vehicles to monitor waters adjacent to land (like islands or coastal regions); and further development of real- or near-real-time deep ocean remote sensing methods. Yan's research group reported in a 2015 paper that some coastal oceans (e.g., U.S. East Coast, China Coast) responded faster to the recent global surface warming rate change than the global ocean. "Although these regions represent only a fraction of the ocean volume, the changing rate of ocean heat content is faster here, and real-time data and more research are needed to quantify and understand what is happening," Yan said. Variability and heat sequestration over specific regions (e.g., Pacific, Atlantic, Indian, Southern Oceans, etc.) require further investigation, the authors conclude. However, there is broad agreement among the scientists and in the literature that the slowdown in the global mean surface temperature increase from 1998 to 2013 was due to increased uptake of heat energy by the global ocean. The American Geophysical Union is dedicated to advancing the Earth and space sciences for the benefit of humanity through its scholarly publications, conferences, and outreach programs. AGU is a not-for-profit, professional, scientific organization representing more than 60,000 members in 139 countries. Join the conversation on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and our other social media channels. This research article is open access. A PDF copy of the article can be downloaded at the following link: http://onlinelibrary. . Journalists and PIOs may also order a copy of the final paper by emailing a request to Lauren Lipuma at llipuma@agu.org. Please provide your name, the name of your publication, and your phone number. Neither the paper nor this press release is under embargo. Xiao-Hai Yan: Joint Institute of CRM, University of Delaware and Xiamen University, Newark, Delaware, U.S.A. and Xiamen, Fujian, China;


News Article | November 21, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Aegis Living, a leader in the senior assisted living industry, announces that Sharon McCarthy has been named Chief Marketing Officer. McCarthy brings more than twenty years of consumer marketing and senior management experience with Kraft Foods, Taco Bell, Picture People and The Discovery Channel. Sharon McCarthy replaces Judy Meleliat who was promoted to President of Aegis Living in 2014. Meleliat says, “Sharon will be an exceptional addition to our team. Sharon’s experience demonstrates creativity, insight, and problem solving skills.” Meleliat adds, “Leaders like Sharon McCarthy are rare because they’ve excelled at managing many brands in different business categories, and as such, bring deep expertise in developing and implementing comprehensive marketing strategies. We’re excited about how she’ll be able to help us tell our story here at Aegis Living.” McCarthy will oversee Aegis Living’s sales, marketing and life enrichment programs. She says, “I’m inspired by the caliber and compassion of the team I met at Aegis Living. I’m moved by their mission to serve and bring moments of joy to our residents.” Sharon McCarthy brings a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration from The University of Delaware and an MBA in Entrepreneurial Management from The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. About Aegis Living Aegis Living is a national leader in assisted living and memory care operating 29 communities across the west coast. Founded in 1997 and headquartered in Redmond, Washington, privately held Aegis Living serves residents in Washington, California and Nevada with seven new developments in the Puget Sound region. Aegis Living has 2,000 employees and has been honored as time and again as a “Best Place to Work” by KING5 and other media entities. The company also ranks as America’s #1 rated senior living company on the employee review site Glassdoor.com. Follow us on Twitter @aegisliving and Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AegisLiving


News Article | November 28, 2016
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« Volkswagen Group and SOVAC to produce vehicles in Algeria | Main | GLM launches EV brand and shows two models in Hong Kong » A team from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the University of Minnesota, the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Delaware has developed a new chemical process to make p-xylene, an important ingredient of common plastics. The new method has a 97% yield and uses biomass as the feedstock. P-xylene is currently produced from petroleum. The research is featured in the current issue of the journal ChemCatChem. Xylene chemicals are used to produce a plastic called PET (polyethylene terephthalate), which is currently used in many products including soda bottles, food packaging, synthetic fibers for clothing and automotive parts. Global market forecasts estimate that the market for plastic products using this chemical will grow by about 5% annually. The key to the new process, which builds on previous work by the research team, is a new zeolite catalyst that directs the liquid chemical reaction to produce p-xylene and discourages the production of other byproducts. Previous efforts to make p-xylene in this manner have not achieved a yield higher than 75%. The new zeolite was synthesized to contain phosphorous which helps create a much more selective chemical reaction that almost exclusively yields p-xylene. The phosphorous containing zeolite catalysts exhibit high surface area and well dispersed phosphorous active sites. Different from conventional acid catalysts, the phosphorous containing zeolite catalysts is highly selective for p-xylene production. The selectivity is unique and has not been observed in the past. It can be easily used for many other important catalytic reactions. The research team is part of the Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation that seeks to find breakthrough technologies for producing biofuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. The center is funded by the US Department of Energy as part of the Energy Frontiers Research Center (EFRC) program, which involves more than 20 faculty members with complementary skills to collaborate on solving the world’s most pressing energy challenges.


Buyuksahin B.,International Energy Agency | Harris J.H.,University of Delaware
Energy Journal | Year: 2011

The coincident rise in crude oil prices and increased number of financial participants in the crude oil futures market from 2000-2008 has led to allegations that "speculators" drive crude oil prices. As crude oil futures peaked at $ 147/bbl in July 2008, the role of speculators came under heated debate. In this paper, we employ unique data from the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) to test the relation between crude oil prices and the trading positions of various types of traders in the crude oil futures market. We employ Granger Causality tests to analyze lead and lag relations between price and position data at daily and multiple day intervals. We find little evidence that hedge funds and other non-commercial (speculator) position changes Granger-cause price changes; the results instead suggest that price changes precede their position changes. Copyright © 2011 by the IAEE. All rights reserved.


Han Y.,Tsinghua University | Davidson R.A.,University of Delaware
Earthquake Engineering and Structural Dynamics | Year: 2012

Two key issues distinguish probabilistic seismic risk analysis of a lifeline or portfolio of structures from that of a single structure. Regional analysis must consider the correlation among lifeline components or structures in the portfolio, and the larger scope makes it much more computationally demanding. In this paper, we systematically identify and compare alternative methods for regional hazard analysis that can be used as the first part of a computationally efficient regional probabilistic seismic risk analysis that properly considers spatial correlation. Specifically, each method results in a set of probabilistic ground motion maps with associated hazard-consistent annual occurrence probabilities that together represent the regional hazard. The methods are compared according to how replicable and computationally tractable they are and the extent to which the resulting maps are physically realistic, consistent with the regional hazard and regional spatial correlation, and few in number. On the basis of a conceptual comparison and an empirical comparison for Los Angeles, we recommend a combination of simulation and optimization approaches: (i) Monte Carlo simulation with importance sampling of the earthquake magnitudes to generate a set of probabilistic earthquake scenarios (defined by source and magnitude); (ii) the optimization-based probabilistic scenario method, a mixed-integer linear program, to reduce the size of that set; (iii) Monte Carlo simulation to generate a set of probabilistic ground motion maps, varying the number of maps sampled from each earthquake scenario so as to minimize the sampling variance; and (iv) the optimization-based probabilistic scenario again to reduce the set of probabilistic ground motion maps. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Nagarajan V.K.,University of Delaware | Smith A.P.,Louisiana State University
Plant and Cell Physiology | Year: 2012

Phosphate (Pi) is a common limiter of plant growth due to its low availability in most soils. Plants have evolved elaborate mechanisms for sensing Pi deficiency and for initiating adaptive responses to low Pi conditions. Pi signaling pathways are modulated by both local and long-distance, or systemic, sensing mechanisms. Local sensing of low Pi initiates major root developmental changes aimed at enhancing Pi acquisition, whereas systemic sensing governs pathways that modulate expression of numerous genes encoding factors involved in Pi transport and distribution. The gaseous phytohormone ethylene has been shown to play an integral role in regulating local, root developmental responses to Pi deficiency. Comparatively, a role for ethylene in systemic Pi signaling has been more circumstantial. However, recent studies have revealed that ethylene acts to modulate a number of systemically controlled Pi starvation responses. Herein we highlight the findings from these studies and offer a model for how ethylene biosynthesis and responsiveness are integrated into both local and systemic Pi signaling pathways. © 2011 The Author.


Aysal T.C.,Cornell University | Barner K.E.,University of Delaware
IEEE Transactions on Information Theory | Year: 2010

We consider consensus algorithms in their most general setting and provide conditions under which such algorithms are guaranteed to converge, almost surely, to a consensus. Let {A(t), B(t)} ∈ RN × N be (possibly) stochastic, nonstationary matrices and {x(t), m(t)} ∈ R N × 1 be state and perturbation vectors, respectively. For any consensus algorithm of the form x(t+1) = A(t)x(t) + B(t)m(t), we provide conditions under which consensus is achieved almost surely, i.e., Pr{lim t→∞x(t) = c1} = 1 for some c ∈ R. Moreover, we show that this general result subsumes recently reported results for specific consensus algorithms classes, including sum-preserving, nonsum-preserving, quantized, and noisy gossip algorithms. Also provided are the ε-converging time for any such converging iterative algorithm, i.e., the earliest time at which the vector x(t) is ε close to consensus, and sufficient conditions for convergence in expectation to the average of the initial node measurements. Finally, mean square error bounds of any consensus algorithm of the form discussed above are presented. © 2006 IEEE.


Roth T.L.,University of Alabama at Birmingham | Sweatt J.D.,University of Delaware
Hormones and Behavior | Year: 2011

Studies over the past half-century have made it clear that environmental influences in development, particularly stress and traumatic experiences, can remain pervasive across the lifespan. Though it has been hypothesized for some time that the long-term consequences of early-life adversity represent epigenetic influences, it has not been until recently that studies have begun to provide empirical support of experience-driven epigenetic modifications to the genome. Here we focus on this theme, and review current knowledge pertaining to the epigenetics of behavioral development. At the center of our discussion is the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene, as abnormal BDNF gene activity is a leading etiological hypothesis by which early-life adverse experiences persistently modify brain and behavioral plasticity. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.


Miles F.L.,University of California at Los Angeles | Miles F.L.,University of Delaware | Sikes R.A.,University of Delaware
Molecular Cancer Research | Year: 2014

Reciprocal interactions between tumor and stromal cells propel cancer progression and metastasis. A complete understanding of the complex contributions of the tumor stroma to cancer progression necessitates a careful examination of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is largely synthesized and modulated by cancer-associated fibroblasts. This structurally supportive meshwork serves as a signaling scaffold for a myriad of biologic processes and responses favoring tumor progression. The ECM is a repository for growth factors and cytokines that promote tumor growth, proliferation, and metastasis through diverse interactions with soluble and insoluble ECM components. Growth factors activated by proteases are involved in the initiation of cell signaling pathways essential to invasion and survival. Various transmembrane proteins produced by the cancer stroma bind the collagen and fibronectin-rich matrix to induce proliferation, adhesion, and migration of cancer cells, as well as protease activation. Integrins are critical liaisons between tumor cells and the surrounding stroma, and with their mechano-sensing ability, induce cell signaling pathways associated with contractility and migration. Proteoglycans also bind and interact with various matrix proteins in the tumor microenvironment to promote cancer progression. Together, these components function to mediate cross-talk between tumor cells and fibroblasts ultimately to promote tumor survival and metastasis. These stromal factors, which may be expressed differentially according to cancer stage, have prognostic utility and potential. This review examines changes in the ECM of cancer-associated fibroblasts induced through carcinogenesis, and the impact of these changes on cancer progression. The implication is that cancer progression, even in epithelial cancers, may be based in large part on changes in signaling from cancer-associated stromal cells. These changes may provide early prognostic indicators to further stratify patients during treatment or alter the timing of their follow-up visits and observations. ©2014 AACR.


Patent
Rice University and University of Delaware | Date: 2014-06-16

Implantable modular hydrogels to aid in salivary gland restoration and associated methods are provided. In one embodiment, the present disclosure provides for a hydrogel network comprising: a hyaluronic acid macromer crosslinked with a multiblock copolymer.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 484.74K | Year: 2010

New material systems are required as a result of advanced performance criteria for the next generation destroyer program and other Navy ships. As a part of these requirements there is high demand for high strength structural composites. The objective of the STTR Phase II project is to develop high strength and light weight structural composites utilizing functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as a nanoscale reinforcement. We propose to significantly increase the out-of-plane mechanical properties of the carbon fiber/epoxy composites by the introduction of SWNTs; SWNTs are considered to be the ideal reinforcing agent for advanced polymer composites because of their tremendous mechanical strength, exceptional electronic and thermal properties, nanometer scale diameter, high aspect ratio and light weight. Our approach is to apply chemistry to modify the SWNTs and engineer the interfacial interaction with the resins, because the formation of a strong interface is a critical step in the efficient translation of the excellent mechanical properties of SWNTs into the composite materials. In Phase I of this STTR project we demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing chemically modified SWNTs for the VARTM fabrication of carbon fiber/epoxy composites and showed that the incorporation of SWNTs improved shear strength and preserved in-plane mechanical properties.

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