Dayton, OH, United States

University of Dayton

www.udayton.edu
Dayton, OH, United States

The University of Dayton is an American private Roman Catholic national research university in Ohio's sixth-largest city, Dayton. Founded in 1850 by the Society of Mary , it is one of three Marianist universities in the nation and the largest private university in Ohio. The university's campus is located in the city's southern portion and spans 388 acres on both sides of the Great Miami River. The campus is noted for the Immaculate Conception Chapel and the University of Dayton Arena. The University also operates, in China's Suzhou Industrial Park, the University of Dayton China Institute.The University has about 8,000 undergraduate and 3,000 post-graduate students from a variety of religious, ethnic and geographic backgrounds, drawn from across the United States and more than 40 countries. It offers more than 70 academic programs in arts and science, business administration, education and health science, engineering, law and, in 1988, was first in the country to offer an undergraduate degree program in human rights.The University's notable alumni include humorist Erma Bombeck; engineer David Bradley ; architect Bruce Graham; Super Bowl-winning coaches Jon Gruden and Chuck Noll; first female Premier of New South Wales Kristina Keneally; sportscaster Dan Patrick and Nobel Prize winner Charles J. Pedersen. Wikipedia.

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Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 124.99K | Year: 2016

While much attention is necessarily focused on the evaluation and certification of the materials and processes involved in adhesive bonding, development is still needed in decreasing the cost, time, and complexity of the current repair concepts. A material and processing system is needed that allows the design, infusion, and cure of composite repairs without the current roadblocks imposed by ovens, autoclaves, and expensive tooling. VARTM processing of custom repairs allows freedom in design and minimizes the specialized tooling required for patches and straps that are prefabricated apart from the structures needing repair. CRG's no-oven, no-autoclave (NONA) composite processing technology enables the fabrication of high-performance composite parts without the limitations imposed by autoclaves and ovens. NASA originally funded CRG to develop the materials and processes for the manufacture of large, single-piece space launch structures. Building on that activity, CRG proposes NONA repair of composite structures. In this concept, NONA resin is introduced to a scarfed surface and dry fiber via VARTM processing and undergoes complete cure without additional heat input. NONA offers the opportunity to repair PMC structures on-site without the use of large capital equipment. The University of Dayton Research Institute will conduct the scarfing and evaluation of test materials. The resin consists of common aerospace epoxy components, but it is formulated to achieve complete cure in a matter of hours without additional heat input. The two-part epoxy system uses its own chemical energy to propel itself through a complete cure. It provides good strength, chemical resistance, and thermal performance up to 350 deg. F. CRG envisions a mobile fleet of NONA composite technicians that can perform repair activities at manufacturing sites around the world, restoring functionality to damaged structures and tools, minimizing impact on plant operations and production.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.91K | Year: 2015

Optonicus, in collaboration with the University of Dayton has demonstrated the feasibility of a new Scalable Adaptive Fiber-Array Elements (SAFARE) phased fiber-array beam director architecture in Phase I to address the DoD need for HEL directed energy systems. The SAFARE system integrates a new high fill factor fiber-array architecture with novel imaging, sensing, and control capabilities that enable power scaling and phase control to come together in one system overcoming the obstacles currently preventing the fielding HEL directed energy technology in airborne platforms. In phase II prototypes of the low SWaP SAFARE fiber-array laser heads will be developed and demonstrated in realistic atmospheric conditions. These scalable laser heads can be used as general building blocks for future directed energy systems. In Phase III Optonicus will commercialize the technology for dual DoD directed energy applications and civilian commercial uses.


A rechargeable lithium battery includes a lithium anode, a cathode, and a separator interposed between the lithium anode and the cathode. The separator includes a porous polymer soaked with a liquid electrolyte. The lithium battery further includes an artificial solid electrolyte interphase membrane interposed between the lithium anode and the separator. The artificial solid electrolyte interphase membrane may be a composite of a carbonaceous material, a high shear modulus conducting polymer, and a conductive additive.


Patent
University of Dayton | Date: 2016-03-28

An analog neuromorphic circuit is disclosed, having input voltages applied to a plurality of inputs of the analog neuromorphic circuit. The circuit also includes a plurality of resistive memories that provide a resistance to each input voltage applied to each of the inputs so that each input voltage is multiplied in parallel by the corresponding resistance of each corresponding resistive memory to generate a corresponding current for each input voltage and each corresponding current is added in parallel. The circuit also includes at least one output signal that is generated from each of the input voltages multiplied in parallel with each of the corresponding currents for each of the input voltages added in parallel. The multiplying of each input voltage with each corresponding resistance is executed simultaneously with adding each corresponding current for each input voltage.


Patent
University of Dayton | Date: 2016-07-06

An analog neuromorphic circuit is disclosed having resistive memories that provide a resistance to an input voltage signal as the input voltage signal propagates through the resistive memories generating a first output voltage signal and to provide a resistance to a first error signal that propagates through the resistive memories generating a second output voltage signal. A comparator generates the first error signal that is representative of a difference between the first output voltage signal and the desired output signal and generates the first error signal so that the first error signal propagates back through the plurality of resistive memories. A resistance adjuster adjusts a resistance value associated with each resistive memory based on the first error signal and the second output voltage signal to decrease the difference between the first output voltage signal and the desired output signal.


Patent
University of Dayton | Date: 2016-04-11

A persistent color change liquid indicator includes a backing layer, a penetration layer, and a reaction layer. The backing layer has an indication color. The penetration layer includes a liquid structure to allow a liquid to travel through the penetration layer to the reaction layer. The penetration layer is opaque when dry and translucent when exposed to the liquid is to allow the indication color to be visible. The reaction layer reacts to the presence of the liquid such that the visibility of the indication color persists after exposure to the liquid ceases.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: Materials Eng. & Processing | Award Amount: 237.98K | Year: 2016

Nanoscale materials are found in many consumer products to serve as particle reinforcement in a polymer matrix; the material system is called a polymer nanocomposite. One such example is the use of nanoscale silica particles in tires to improve fuel economy. Choices of material combinations are often determined through trial and error experiments. This research grant will enable the design of polymer nanocomposites via an informed approach using computational modeling and experiments, resulting in a simple tool to predict compatibility as a function of material types and processing conditions. Potential applications for polymer nanocomposites include solar cells, sports equipment, medical devices and aerospace structures. The project will involve several female undergraduate students through a program at the University of Cincinnati as well as high school students through the University of Dayton Summer Honors Institute and the Minority Engineering & Technology Enrichment Camp. Long-standing relationships with Ethiopian universities will be leveraged via grants through the NSF Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research (PEER) program.

Multicomponent polymer mixtures such as nanocomposites are among the most commonly used polymeric materials, but there is a significant gap in the understanding of how hierarchical structure develops in such systems. This research tests the hypothesis that it is possible to accurately determine a parameter controlling filler dispersion in a polymer matrix, and to employ this parameter in a toolbox to predict optimized structure and performance. The approach couples a pseudo-thermodynamic analysis of binary mixtures to obtain a pseudo-second order virial coefficient which quantifies binary enthalpic interactions, and which relates to a coarse-grained potential. This parameter will be employed in mesoscale simulations to predict optimal compositions, processing conditions, dispersion and/or segregation of components in complex blends, correlation functions and correlation lengths for fillers. These features can also be experimentally determined in separate x-ray and neutron scattering measurements. Therefore, the researched work involves three novel components: 1) tabulation of pseudo-second order virial coefficients using scattering and determination of potential functions for simulation; 2) dissipative particle dynamics simulations of binary, ternary, quaternary mixtures using potentials from part 1; 3) x-ray and neutron scattering, microscopy, dynamic mechanical and rheological measurements to verify simulation results. The outcome of our approach is a practical solution to compounding issues, based on a mutually validating experimental and simulation methodology.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: SPECIAL STUDIES AND ANALYSES | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2016

The semiconductor industry is undergoing a shift towards creation of value-added products and services, rather than simply focusing on advancing the state-of-the-art in integrated circuit technology, with Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) expected to play an increasingly important role in the new era. The design and development of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems entails sophisticated Computer-Aided-Design tools, elaborate microfabrication facilities, and extensive packaging infrastructures. Such technological barriers limit the abilities of innovators and entrepreneurs to access and use MEMS technologies. This award supports research to enable a novel, cloud-based MEMS design, development and manufacturing platform that is web-accessible, low cost, expansible and interactive. If successful, this research will foster cybermanufacturing innovation by enabling a new manufacturing service infrastructure that allows a wide range of customers and entrepreneurs to prototype their Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems efficiently and at low cost, thereby directly benefitting the U.S. economy and society. This research also will lead to new curriculum in the rapidly emerging areas of cloud computing, electronics, microfabrication, and sensors. Educational, training, and outreach activities envisioned by this research will entail development of hands-on instructional material for minority and underrepresented high school students.

The CloudMEMS platform will establish a novel Design Anywhere, Manufacture Anywhere approach in the design and development of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems via standardized processes and materials selections from leading semiconductor foundries easily made available to clients, designers, and entrepreneurs. The multi-university research team will systematically investigate process constraints in the Design-for-Manufacturing of next-generation Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems toward enabling component design and fabrication using standard semiconductor foundry processes. The team will investigate sophisticated mathematical models and scaling laws capable of handling Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems designs based on different structural materials and processes. Pertinent multi-pronged approaches for aiding Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems design will be explored by (1) Fusing commercial Computer-Aided-Design packages into a cloud server and (2) Studying Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems scaling laws for cost effective re-engineering of pre-simulated and pre-decomposed devices. The project will foster distinct design cycles for expert users and non-expert users who lack process knowledge. The CloudMEMS platform will be made accessible via Internet to bridge the cyber and manufacturing domains, thereby promoting leadership of the U.S. in cyber-driven microsystems and manufacturing.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: Enviro Health & Safety of Nano | Award Amount: 549.49K | Year: 2017

CBET - 1650960
PI: Kristen K. Comfort

Nanomaterials (NMs) hold tremendous potential to improve quality of life through applications spanning everyday consumer products to biomedical therapeutics. This surge in NM utilization has resulted in significant degrees of NM waste and increased rates of human exposure, generating the need to ensure the safety of NM-based applications. As NM behavior is dependent upon local environmental factors, this creates a challenge for standard cell-based assessment to produce reliable data, as they lack physiological accuracy. This work strives to overcome these limitations by transforming a standard cellular model into one more representative of a human system, thereby developing an environment more representative of real world exposure scenarios. Through utilization of this enhanced model for NM safety assessments, we will be able to accurately characterize NM behavior and resultant bioresponses accurately and efficiently.

The objective of this CAREER research project is to design, create, and validate an enhanced microenvironment model (EMM) for biologically accurate evaluation of nanomaterial behavior and impact. To accomplish this, the PI proposes to construct and implement the EMM which has the advantages of cell-based systems, while incorporating the key physiological elements. These elements include: 1) a multiple cellular compartment model; 2) dynamic flow connecting all cellular compartments; 3) a inclusion of a circulating immune line; and 4) a scaffold to promote 3D cellular growth. The EMM will be spiked with silver NMs (AgNMs) followed by evaluation and characterization of nanomaterial behavior, pharmacokinetic profiles, inflammatory and mutagenic responses and cellular stress. Analyses of these endpoints will enable validation of the EMM.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 750.00K | Year: 2016

To address the urgent need for 3D flash-lidar technology for landing on solar system bodies and for spacecraft rendezvous and docking with satellites, an effort is proposed to fabricate, characterize, and test a versatile, high-sensitivity InGaAs APD 3D flash lidar and to advance the technology-readiness level (TRL) of lidar technologies suitable for NASA mission requirements. Leveraging an existing InGaAs APD focal-plane array (FPA) technology, improvements will be made to increase its reliability and performance. The high-gain, low-excess-noise APD FPAs will be characterized and integrated with miniature camera electronics, along with a medium-pulse-energy, high-repetition-rate, ultra-compact, pulsed diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) laser. The lidar sensor will be shown to meet NASA needs in terms of sensitivity and 5-cm range resolutions. Using these results, a large-format (e.g. 1024 x 1024, or larger) FPA will be designed for qualification for space missions.

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