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Denver, CO, United States

The University of Colorado Denver is a public research university in the U.S. state of Colorado. It is part of the University of Colorado system. The university has two campuses — one in downtown Denver at the Auraria Campus, and the other at the Anschutz Medical Campus located in neighboring Aurora. The single university is the result of the 2004 consolidation of the University of Colorado at Denver and the University of Colorado Health science Center.The University of Colorado Denver is located on Auraria Campus in Downtown Denver, Colorado while the University of Colorado Hospital is located on the Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora, Colorado nearly 10 miles away. UCH is also affiliated with the neighboring Children's Hospital, and with the National Jewish Medical and Research Center and Denver Health Medical Center in Denver. There are currently more than 27,000 students at the school's two physical campuses in downtown Denver and in Aurora. The school also offers classes via CU Online.The University of Colorado Denver is the largest research institution in Colorado, attracting more than $375 million in research grants annually, and granting more graduate degrees than any other institution in the state. CU Denver, along with University of Colorado Hospital and University Physicians, Inc., employs more than 12,200 Coloradans, making it one of the metro Denver area's top employers. The university serves more than 500,000 patients a year through its hospital and clinical services. Wikipedia.


Hawkins J.L.,University of Colorado at Denver
New England Journal of Medicine | Year: 2010

A 30-year-old nulliparous woman at 39 weeks' gestation is undergoing induction of labor because of premature rupture of membranes. She is currently receiving an oxytocin infusion, and her cervical dilatation is 1 cm. Her obstetrician has ordered intermittent intravenous administration of fentanyl for pain relief, but she feels nauseated, has been unable to rest, and describes her pain as 9 on a scale of 10. The patient strongly prefers a vaginal delivery to cesarean delivery and is concerned that epidural analgesia may alter the progress of labor. The anesthesiologist is consulted to discuss the use of epidural analgesia during labor and delivery. Copyright © 2010 Massachusetts Medical Society. All rights reserved.


Schedin P.,University of Colorado at Denver
Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in biology | Year: 2011

Cells of the mammary gland are in intimate contact with other cells and with the extracellular matrix (ECM), both of which provide not only a biochemical context, but a mechanical context as well. Cell-mediated contraction allows cells to sense the stiffness of their microenvironment, and respond with appropriate mechanosignaling events that regulate gene expression and differentiation. ECM composition and organization are tightly regulated throughout development of the mammary gland, resulting in corresponding regulation of the mechanical environment and proper tissue architecture. Mechanical regulation is also at play during breast carcinoma progression, as changes in ECM deposition, composition, and organization accompany breast carcinoma. These changes result in stiffer matrices that activate mechanosignaling pathways and thereby induce cell proliferation, facilitate local tumor cell invasion, and promote progression. Thus, understanding the role of forces in the mammary gland is crucial to understanding both normal developmental and pathological processes.


Hassell K.L.,University of Colorado at Denver
American Journal of Preventive Medicine | Year: 2010

Background: The number of individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD) in the U.S. is unknown. Determination of burden of disease, healthcare issues, and policies is best served by representative estimations of the SCD population. Purpose: To update SCD population estimates by using recent U.S. Census and birth-cohort SCD prevalence for at-risk populations as available through the centralized reporting of universal newborn screening for hemoglobinopathies, with an effort to demonstrate the potential effect of early mortality. Methods: National and state SCD populations were estimated based on the 2008 U.S. Census, using total, African-American, and Hispanic birth-cohort disease prevalence derived from the National Newborn Screening Information System. Estimates were corrected for early mortality for sickle cell anemia using data from the CDC's Compressed Mortality Report and published patient-cohort survival information. Results: National SCD population estimates ranged from 104,000 to 138,900, based on birth-cohort disease prevalence, but from 72,000 to 98,000 when corrected for early mortality. Several limitations were noted in the available data, particularly for SCD mortality in adults. Conclusions: The number of individuals with SCD in the U.S. may approach 100,000, even when accounting for the effect of early mortality on estimations. A paucity of high-quality data limits appropriate estimation. State-to-state variability may preclude application of state-specific information to other states or to the nation as a whole. Standardized collection and centralized reporting, a surveillance system, will be necessary to assess the size and composition of the U.S. SCD population. © 2010 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.


Levin M.J.,University of Colorado at Denver
Current Opinion in Immunology | Year: 2012

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) T-cell-mediated immunity (VZV-CMI) in older persons prevents latent VZV in sensory neurons from reactivating to cause herpes zoster. VZV-CMI declines greatly with aging, but can be restored by the licensed zoster vaccine. However, the vaccine-induced boost in VZV-CMI (which determines the efficacy of the vaccine) is a function of the age of the vaccinee, and the duration of this boost wanes with time. Both factors influence the value of this vaccine. To understand these aging effects, limited information about the phenotypic and functional differences in VZV-CMI in old and young persons are reviewed, as well as the reversal of these differences by vaccination. Based on information from these studies some potential approaches to improving prevention of herpes zoster are discussed. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Berman B.D.,University of Colorado at Denver
Brain : a journal of neurology | Year: 2013

Writer's cramp is a task-specific focal hand dystonia characterized by involuntary excessive muscle contractions during writing. Although abnormal striatal dopamine receptor binding has been implicated in the pathophysiology of writer's cramp and other primary dystonias, endogenous dopamine release during task performance has not been previously investigated in writer's cramp. Using positron emission tomography imaging with the D2/D3 antagonist 11C-raclopride, we analysed striatal D2/D3 availability at rest and endogenous dopamine release during sequential finger tapping and speech production tasks in 15 patients with writer's cramp and 15 matched healthy control subjects. Compared with control subjects, patients had reduced 11C-raclopride binding to D2/D3 receptors at rest in the bilateral striatum, consistent with findings in previous studies. During the tapping task, patients had decreased dopamine release in the left striatum as assessed by reduced change in 11C-raclopride binding compared with control subjects. One cluster of reduced dopamine release in the left putamen during tapping overlapped with a region of reduced 11C-raclopride binding to D2/D3 receptors at rest. During the sentence production task, patients showed increased dopamine release in the left striatum. No overlap between altered dopamine release during speech production and reduced 11C-raclopride binding to D2/D3 receptors at rest was seen. Striatal regions where D2/D3 availability at rest positively correlated with disease duration were lateral and non-overlapping with striatal regions showing reduced D2/D3 receptor availability, except for a cluster in the left nucleus accumbens, which showed a negative correlation with disease duration and overlapped with striatal regions showing reduced D2/D3 availability. Our findings suggest that patients with writer's cramp may have divergent responses in striatal dopamine release during an asymptomatic motor task involving the dystonic hand and an unrelated asymptomatic task, sentence production. Our voxel-based results also suggest that writer's cramp may be associated with reduced striatal dopamine release occuring in the setting of reduced D2/D3 receptor availability and raise the possibility that basal ganglia circuits associated with premotor cortices and those associated with primary motor cortex are differentially affected in primary focal dystonias.

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