The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

University, Colorado, United States

The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

University, Colorado, United States

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News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

StartUp Health, which is organizing and supporting a global army of Health Transformers, announced today the inaugural Call for Innovations for StartUp Health Colorado. This Call for Innovations is a part of the unique collaboration between StartUp Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Children’s Hospital Colorado and UCHealth, to discover and support entrepreneurs and innovators seeking to transform health. This initial Call for Innovation seeks to find the most innovative entrepreneurs and innovators addressing the Children’s Health Moonshots and Access to Care Moonshots, two of StartUp Health’s 10 Health Moonshots that will impact the health of everyone in the world. Entrepreneurs building companies addressing the following themes within these two Moonshots should apply: Entrepreneurs selected for StartUp Health Colorado will receive co-development, clinical validation and pilot opportunities for their companies with Children’s Hospital Colorado and/or UCHealth, both nationally-recognized, top-ranked hospital systems. Entrepreneurs will have direct access to the researchers, faculty, clinicians, and leadership from these world-class institutions as they implement their solutions at the point of care. In addition to clinical validation and pilot opportunities, entrepreneurs accepted into StartUp Health Colorado companies will become a part of StartUp Health’s global Health Transformer community, receive lifetime access to the StartUp Health Academy to help grow their business and receive access to StartUp Health’s global network of over 30,000 industry leaders, investors, customers and world-class partners like AARP, GE, Janssen Research & Development, and others. “Our vision at Children’s Colorado is to reimagine the way we can improve child health in our region and beyond,” said Gil Peri, Senior Vice President and Chief Strategy Officer at Children’s Hospital Colorado. “Innovators from around the world are working on solutions to transform the way we interact with children and families—from prevention and early detection, to the experience they have at the hospital and long after they are recovering at home.” “By providing an opportunity to help develop and clinically validate impactful technologies designed to solve the toughest problems in health care today, we can revolutionize the way care is delivered to our patients,” said Dr. Richard Zane, UCHealth Chief Innovation Officer and Professor and Chair of Emergency Medicine at the CU School of Medicine. “Constantly improving outcomes and care delivery while driving virtual and telehealth solutions are keys to transforming the future of medicine.” “StartUp Health Colorado is giving entrepreneurs a unique opportunity to commercialize alongside these world class institutions and improve the quality of their solutions and products.” said Kim Muller, Director of CU Innovations, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. “We’re looking forward to supporting entrepreneurs from the Rocky Mountain region and around the world and inviting them to be part of our global army of Health Transformers” said Polina Hanin, Director of StartUp Health Academy. StartUp Health’s unique long-term platform for supporting entrepreneurs building digital health companies has resulted in the world’s largest digital health portfolio (more than 175 companies spanning 5 continents, 16 countries and 60+ cities), 10 acquisitions by companies including Intel, WebMD, Under Armour and Zimmer Biomet and its companies have raised over $620M of funding since 2012. StartUp Health’s diverse portfolio is currently comprised of 40% “doctorpreneurs”, 30% female founders and almost one-third serial entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurs can apply online for this inaugural Call for Innovation until December 9, 2016 at StartUpHealth.com/Colorado. Entrepreneurs currently in StartUp Health Academy, or that have previously applied to StartUp Health, will also be considered if they submit an application by the deadline. Entrepreneurs selected for this program will be announced in spring 2017. About StartUp Health In 2011, StartUp Health introduced a new model for transforming health by organizing and supporting a global army of entrepreneurs called Health Transformers. StartUp Health is investing in 10 Health Moonshots with the long-term goal of improving the health and wellbeing of everyone in the world. With the world’s largest digital health portfolio (more than 175 companies spanning 5 continents, 16 countries and 60+ cities), StartUp Health’s long-term platform for entrepreneurs includes the StartUp Health Academy, StartUp Health Network, StartUp Health Media and StartUp Health Ventures. StartUp Health was founded by Steven Krein and Unity Stoakes and is chaired by former Time Warner CEO, Jerry Levin. StartUp Health’s notable strategic partners and investors include AARP, Aurora Health Care, California Health Care Foundation, Children’s Hospital Colorado, University of Colorado, UCHealth, Steve Case, Mark Cuban, Esther Dyson, Brad Feld, Genentech, GE Ventures, Janssen Research & Development, LLC., Kaiser Permanente Ventures, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and SeventySix Capital. Learn more at http://www.startuphealth.com. About Children's Hospital Colorado Children’s Hospital Colorado (Children’s Colorado) has defined and delivered pediatric health care excellence for more than 100 years. Founded in 1908, Children’s Colorado is a leading pediatric network entirely devoted to the health and well-being of children. Continually acknowledged as one of the nation’s outstanding pediatric hospitals by U.S. News & World Report and ranked on its Best Children’s Hospitals 2016-17 Honor Roll, Children’s Colorado is known for both its nationally and internationally recognized medical, research, education and advocacy programs, as well as comprehensive everyday care for kids throughout Colorado and surrounding states. Children’s Colorado is the winner of the 2015 American Hospital Association-McKesson Quest for Quality Prize, and is a 2013-2016 Most Wired hospital according to Hospitals & Health Networks magazine. Children’s Colorado also is recognized for excellence in nursing from the American Nurses Credentialing Centers and has been designated a Magnet® hospital since 2005. The hospital’s family-centered, collaborative approach combines the nation’s top pediatric doctors, nurses and researchers to pioneer new approaches to pediatric medicine. With urgent, emergency and specialty care locations throughout Metro Denver and Southern Colorado, including its campus on the Anschutz Medical Campus, Children’s Colorado provides a full spectrum of pediatric specialties. For more information, visit http://www.childrenscolorado.org and connect with Children’s Colorado on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest. Children’s Hospital Colorado complies with applicable Federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex. ATENCIÓN: si habla español, tiene a su disposición servicios gratuitos de asistencia lingüística. Llame al 1-720-777-9800. CHÚ Ý: Nếu bạn nói Tiếng Việt, có các dịch vụ hỗ trợ ngôn ngữ miễn phí dành cho bạn. Gọi số 1-720-777-9800 http://www.hhs.gov/civil-rights/for-individuals/section-1557 About University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus (CU Anschutz) is the largest academic health center in the Rocky Mountain region. The campus combines interdisciplinary teaching, research and clinical facilities to prepare the region’s future health care professionals, provide the best available health care at two nationally recognized hospitals and be a national leader in life sciences research. Annually, CU Anschutz medical professionals educate 4,000 degree-seeking future health professionals, provide 1.5 million patient visits, and are awarded approximately $400 million in research grants. For more information about CU Anschutz, and to access campus resources, go to http://www.ucdenver.edu/anschutz. About UCHealth UCHealth is a Front Range health system that delivers the highest quality patient care with the highest quality patient experience. UCHealth combines Memorial Hospital, Poudre Valley Hospital, Medical Center of the Rockies, Colorado Health Medical Group, and University of Colorado Hospital into an organization dedicated to health and providing unmatched patient care in the Rocky Mountain West. Separately, these institutions can continue providing superior care to patients and service to the communities they serve. Together, they push the boundaries of medicine, attracting more research funding, hosting more clinical trials and improving health through innovation.


News Article | November 7, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

AURORA, Colo. (Nov. 7, 2016) - Scientists at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have discovered the neurological reasons why those with anorexia and bulimia nervosa are able to override the urge to eat. In a study published last week in the journal Translational Psychiatry, the researchers showed that normal patterns of appetite stimulation in the brain are effectively reversed in those with eating disorders. Rather than the hypothalamus, a brain region that regulates appetite, driving motivation to eat, signals from other parts of the brain can override the hypothalamus in eating disorders. "In the clinical world we call this `mind over matter,''' said Guido Frank, MD, lead author of the study and associate professor of psychiatry and neuroscience at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. "Now we have physiological evidence to back up that idea." Dr. Frank, an expert on eating disorders, set out to discover the hierarchies of the brain that govern appetite and food intake. He wanted to understand the neurological reasons behind why some people eat when they were hungry and others don't. Using brain scans, the researchers examined how 26 healthy women and 26 women with anorexia or bulimia nervosa reacted to tasting a sugary solution. They discovered that those with eating disorders had widespread alterations in the structure of brain pathways governing taste-reward and appetite regulation. The alterations were found in the white matter, which coordinates communication between different parts of the brain. There were also major differences in the role the hypothalamus played in each group. Among those without an eating disorder, brain regions that drive eating took their cues from the hypothalamus. In the groups with an eating disorder, the pathways to the hypothalamus were significantly weaker and the direction of information went in the opposite direction. As a result, their brain may be able to override the hypothalamus and fend off the signals to eat. "The appetite region of the brain should drive you off your chair to get something to eat," said Frank. "But in patients with anorexia or bulimia nervosa that is not the case." According to the study, humans are programmed at birth to like sweet tastes. But those with eating disorders begin to avoid eating sweets for fear of gaining weight. "One could see such avoidance as a form of learned behavior and more specifically operant conditioning, with weight gain as the feared `punishment,''' the study said. This behavior could eventually alter the brain circuits governing appetite and food intake. Researchers now suggest that being afraid to eat certain foods could impact the taste-reward processing mechanisms in the brain which could then reduce the influence of the hypothalamus. "We now understand better on the biological level how those with an eating disorder may be able to override the drive to eat," said Frank. "Next we need to begin looking at children to see when all of this starts to come into play." Frank is the author of a new book entitled "WHAT CAUSES EATING DISORDERS - AND WHAT DO THEY CAUSE?" available on Amazon and other outlets. The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus is the only comprehensive academic health sciences center in Colorado, the largest academic health center in the Rocky Mountain region and one of the newest education, research and patient care facilities in the world. Home to 21,000 employees, more than 4,000 degree-seeking students and two nationally recognized hospitals that handle 1.7 million patient visits each year, CU Anschutz trains the health sciences workforce of the future and fuels the economy. CU Anschutz features schools of medicine, pharmacy, dental medicine and public health, a college of nursing and a graduate school. All interconnected, these organizations collaboratively improve the quality of patient care they deliver, research they conduct, and health professionals they train.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

More research needed to learn why there are more childhood leukemia diagnoses in people living in areas of high-density oil and gas development Young Coloradans diagnosed with acute lymphocytic leukemia are more likely to live in areas of high-density oil and gas development compared to young Coloradans diagnosed with other types of cancer, according to researchers at the Colorado School of Public Health at CU Anschutz. The researchers observed no association between non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and high-density oil and gas development. "Over 378,000 Coloradans and millions of Americans currently live within a mile of at least one oil and gas well, and petroleum development continues to expand into residential areas," said lead investigator Dr. Lisa McKenzie, assistant research professor at the Colorado School of Public Health. "The findings from our registry-based case control study indicate that young Coloradans diagnosed with one type of childhood leukemia are more likely to live in the densest areas of oil and gas sites. More comprehensive research that can address our study's limitations is needed to understand and explain these results." Funded by the CU Cancer Center and published today in the journal PLOS ONE, the study shows children and young adults between the ages of 5 and 24 with acute lymphocytic leukemia were 4.3 times more likely to live in the densest area of active oil and gas wells than those with other cancers. The study focused on rural areas and towns in 57 Colorado counties and excluded urban areas of more than 50,000 people. According to the report, US oil and gas development has grown rapidly over the past 15 years and this industrial activity has the potential to emit toxic substances into air and water, including carcinogens like benzene. According to current research, over 15 million Americans now live within 1.6 kilometers (1 mile) of oil and gas development. There are hundreds of oil and gas wells within one mile of a home in Colorado's most intensive areas of oil and gas development. The study indicates that people living in areas of oil and gas development may be at an increased risk for health effects, including cancers, resultant from such industrial exposures. The report concludes that future research should incorporate information on oil and gas development activities and production levels, as well as levels of specific pollutants of interest like benzene, near homes, schools and day care centers. It recommends such research consider specific ages and residential histories, compare cases to controls without cancer and address other potential confounders and environmental stressors. Data for the study was obtained from the Colorado Central Cancer Registry and the Colorado Oil and Gas Information System. The study included 743 young Coloradans aged 0-24 years living in rural Colorado and diagnosed with cancer between 2001 and 2013. Researchers used information from the Colorado Oil and Gas Information System to build a geocoded dataset with coordinates of all oil and gas wells in rural Colorado and determined dates for when each well was active. Geocoded residential addresses of cancer patients at the time of diagnosis were linked to active well locations in the year of diagnosis and active well locations in each of the 10 years preceding the cancer diagnosis. They then took the inverse of each distance and summed the inverse distances to calculate inverse distance weighted oil and gas well counts within a 16.1 km radius of each participant's residence at cancer diagnosis for each of the 10 years prior to the date of the cancer diagnosis. The inverse distance weighted well count method gives greater weight to the wells nearer the home. Age, race, gender, income, elevation of residence and year of cancer diagnosis all were considered in the analysis. The study was limited by the low occurrence of leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in rural Colorado, lack of specific age at cancer diagnosis and the fact that all study participants had been diagnosed with cancer. The study also was limited by the lack of information on specific activities at the well sites, place of residence before cancer diagnosis, other sources of pollution around the residence and individual characteristics such as common infections and family history of cancer. The other study authors are William Allshouse, Tim Byers, Berrin Serdar and John Adgate of the Colorado School of Public Health at CU Anschutz and Edward Bedrick of the College of Public Health at the University of Arizona. The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus is the only comprehensive academic health sciences center in Colorado, the largest academic health center in the Rocky Mountain region and one of the newest education, research and patient care facilities in the world. Home to 21,000 employees, more than 4,000 degree-seeking students and two nationally recognized hospitals that handle 1.7 million patient visits each year, CU Anschutz trains the health sciences workforce of the future and fuels the economy. CU Anschutz features schools of medicine, pharmacy, dental medicine and public health, a college of nursing and a graduate school. All interconnected, these organizations collaboratively improve the quality of patient care they deliver, research they conduct, and health professionals they train.


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus announced today that it is a Grand Challenges Explorations winner, an initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Kathryn Colborn, PhD, assistant research professor at the CU School of Medicine and senior investigator with the Center for Global Health at the Colorado School of Public Health, will pursue an innovative global health and development research project titled "Development of an automated early warning system for malaria transmission using machine learning." Grand Challenges Explorations (GCE) supports innovative thinkers worldwide to explore ideas that can break the mold in how we solve persistent global health and development challenges. Colborn's project is one of more than 55 Grand Challenges Explorations Round 17 grants announced today by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. To receive funding, Colborn and other Grand Challenges Explorations winners demonstrated in a two-page online application a bold idea in one of six critical global heath and development topic areas. The foundation will be accepting applications for the next GCE round in February 2017. Using data from Mozambique, Colborn, in collaboration with her husband, James, seeks to show how novel statistical models and online tools can change the way people are surveying, predicting and responding to areas of high malaria transmission. It focuses on innovations in malaria elimination analytics, specifically the training of algorithms using supervised learning, an advanced computing task, on demographic health surveys and satellite data. The methods will be disseminated through GitHub, a code repository and version control system, and can be made available for free to anyone in the world. "Ideally, the malaria analytics tools we develop would be used by Mozambique's Ministry of Health to predict future monthly case rates and to help in their prevention planning," Colborn said. At CU Anschutz, scientists engage in high-profile studies that contribute new information about the nature and treatment of disease to the rest of the world. Grand Challenges Explorations is a US$100 million initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Launched in 2008, over 1228 projects in more than 65 countries have received Grand Challenges Explorations grants. The grant program is open to anyone from any discipline and from any organization. The initiative uses an agile, accelerated grant-making process with short two-page online applications and no preliminary data required. Initial grants of US$100,000 are awarded two times a year. Successful projects have the opportunity to receive a follow-on grant of up to US$1 million. The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus is the only comprehensive academic health sciences center in Colorado, the largest academic health center in the Rocky Mountain region and one of the newest education, research and patient care facilities in the world. Home to 21,000 employees, more than 4,000 degree-seeking students and two nationally recognized hospitals that handle 1.7 million patient visits each year, CU Anschutz trains the health sciences workforce of the future and fuels the economy. CU Anschutz features schools of medicine, pharmacy, dental medicine and public health, a college of nursing and a graduate school. All interconnected, these organizations collaboratively improve the quality of patient care they deliver, research they conduct, and health professionals they train.


Coors M.E.,The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus | Raymond K.M.,The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus | Hopfer C.J.,The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus | Sakai J.,The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus | And 3 more authors.
Drug and Alcohol Dependence | Year: 2016

Objective: This study assessed whether a customized disclosure form increases understanding for adolescents with substance use disorder (SUD) when compared to a standard disclosure for genomic addiction research. Method: We gathered empirical data from adolescents with SUD, family members, former patients followed since adolescence, and community counterparts. The study was conducted in four stages. Stage 1: national experts (n= 32) identified current, future, speculative risks of broadly shared biobanks. Stage 2 assessed participants' (n= 181) understanding of current risks as a prerequisite for rating saliency of risks via a Visual Analog Scale. Salient risks were incorporated into a customized disclosure form. Stage 3 compared the understanding of customized disclosure by participants (n= 165) at baseline; all groups scored comparably. Stage 4 conducted a direct comparison of the standard disclosure to standard disclosure plus customized disclosure (n= 195). Independent t-tests compared understanding in those receiving the standard disclosure to standard disclosure plus customized disclosure within 6 groups. Results: The customized disclosure significantly improved understanding in adolescent patients (p= 0.002) and parents of patients (p= 0.006) to the level of their counterparts. The customized disclosure also significantly improved understanding in siblings of former patients (p= 0.034). Understanding of standard disclosure in patients versus controls was significantly different (p= 0.005). The groups receiving the customized disclosure scored significantly higher. Understanding of the standard disclosure plus customized disclosure in patients versus controls was not significantly different. Conclusion: Adolescents with addictions understand the risks of participating in genomic addiction research as well as their community counterparts when information provided is salient to them. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


PubMed | The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
Type: | Journal: Drug and alcohol dependence | Year: 2016

This study assessed whether a customized disclosure form increases understanding for adolescents with substance use disorder (SUD) when compared to a standard disclosure for genomic addiction research.We gathered empirical data from adolescents with SUD, family members, former patients followed since adolescence, and community counterparts. The study was conducted in four stages. Stage 1: national experts (n=32) identified current, future, speculative risks of broadly shared biobanks. Stage 2 assessed participants (n=181) understanding of current risks as a prerequisite for rating saliency of risks via a Visual Analog Scale. Salient risks were incorporated into a customized disclosure form. Stage 3 compared the understanding of customized disclosure by participants (n=165) at baseline; all groups scored comparably. Stage 4 conducted a direct comparison of the standard disclosure to standard disclosure plus customized disclosure (n=195). Independent t-tests compared understanding in those receiving the standard disclosure to standard disclosure plus customized disclosure within 6 groups.The customized disclosure significantly improved understanding in adolescent patients (p=0.002) and parents of patients (p=0.006) to the level of their counterparts. The customized disclosure also significantly improved understanding in siblings of former patients (p=0.034). Understanding of standard disclosure in patients versus controls was significantly different (p=0.005). The groups receiving the customized disclosure scored significantly higher. Understanding of the standard disclosure plus customized disclosure in patients versus controls was not significantly different.Adolescents with addictions understand the risks of participating in genomic addiction research as well as their community counterparts when information provided is salient to them.

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