Cincinnati, OH, United States
Cincinnati, OH, United States

The University of Cincinnati is a comprehensive public research university in Cincinnati, in the U.S. state of Ohio, and a part of the University System of Ohio.Founded in 1819 as Cincinnati College, it is the oldest institution of higher education in Cincinnati and has an annual enrollment of over 40,000 students, making it the second largest university in Ohio and one of the 50 largest universities in the United States. In the 2010 survey by Times Higher Education , the university was ranked in the top 100 universities in North America and as one of the top 200 in the world. Beginning with the 2011 edition of US News and World Report Best Colleges rankings, the University of Cincinnati has been ranked as a Tier One university, ranking as the 129th best overall university and 63rd best public university in the 2015 rankings. This includes being the number 3 ranked university in the nation in the "Up-and-Coming" National Universities section of the 2014 edition. In 2011-2012 academic year the Leiden University ranking put the University of Cincinnati at the 93rd place globally and at the 63rd place in North America by the proportion of top-cited publications. In 2014, US News and World Report ranked UC in the Top-200 of universities worldwide.The university garners nearly $500 million per annum in research funding, ranking 22nd among public universities in the US. Numerous programs across the university are nationally ranked, including: aerospace engineering, anthropology, architecture, classics, composition, conducting, cooperative education, criminal justice, design, environmental science, law, medicine, music, musical theater, neurology, opera, otolaryngology, paleontology, pediatrics, and pharmacy.The school offers over 100 bachelor degrees, over 300 degree granting programs, and over 600 total programs of study, ranging from certificates to doctoral and first professional education. With an economic impact of over $3.5 billion per year, it is the largest single employer in Greater Cincinnati. After extensive renovations through the implementation of the 1989 Master Plan, the university has been recognized by campus planners and architects as one of the most distinguished campus settings in the world. Wikipedia.


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News Article | November 1, 2016
Site: marketersmedia.com

Dean Edward Hines Co., LPA, a Dayton, Ohio, based law firm specializing in divorce, tax and family law, has launched its new website. The law firm serving clients in Dayton and Columbus has an AV Preeminent Rating from Martindale-Hubbell®, an attorney rating service established by peer reviews. More information on Dean Edward Hines Co., LPA, and their legal services in Dayton and Columbus, Ohio, is available on their website at: https://deanhineslawyer.com. For more than a century Martindale-Hubbell® Peer Review Ratings™ has been the gold standard in attorney ratings according to their website. These ratings are used to identify, evaluate and select appropriate lawyers for legal needs by attorneys looking to refer a client as well as individuals researching lawyers for their legal needs. A Peer Review Rating with Martindale-Hubbell®, self-reported professional credentials and other fact-based performance data contributes to the comprehensive view of a lawyer and, as the site reports, benefits the entire legal community. Dean Edward Hines Co., LPA, was founded in 1994 and have provided effective, aggressive, affordable and untraditional legal representation for their clients for more than 22 years. They have been AV Preeminent Peer Rated for Highest Level of Professional Excellence in 2016. Attorney Dean Edward Hines graduated from Eastern Michigan University in 1991 with a B.B.A. which includes a triple major in finance, real estate and accounting. He then graduated from the University of Cincinnati College of Law in 1993, completing his course of studies in 2 years and graduating in the top 10 percent of his class. The firm provides tax representation nationwide providing representation in regards to Family Law, Domestic Relations, Juvenile Court Matters, Federal taxation and State taxation, and numerous civil related business matters. Dean Edward Hines Co., LPA, is a member of the Ohio State Bar Association, American Bar Association, American Trial Lawyers Association (ALTA), Dayton Bar Association, Columbus Bar Association and Chicago Bar Association. It is a recipient of the American Jurisprudence Award in Estate Planning (tax emphasis) and AV Preeminent Nationally rated by Martindale Hubbell. More information on legal services in the Dayton office is available at: https://deanhineslawyer.com/lawyers-in-dayton-ohio. More information on legal services in the Columbus office is available at: https://deanhineslawyer.com/lawyers-in-columbus-ohio. More information on Dean Edward Hines Co., LPA, and their legal services can be found on the websites listed above. For more information, please visit https://deanhineslawyer.com


Patent
Ethicon Endo Surgery Inc. and University of Cincinnati | Date: 2016-10-20

Devices and methods are used to modify a metabolic pathway of a digestive system by creating a pathway within the intestinal tract through an anastomosis between a proximal location within the intestinal tract and a distal location within the intestinal tract. In some examples, the small intestine has a first initial length and the created pathway defines a second length of the intestinal tract that is approximately ten to seventy percent of the first initial length of the small intestine.


Patent
University of Cincinnati | Date: 2015-04-17

Disclosed are methods and compositions for treating Type I diabetes in a subject. Agents selected from a TLR4 agonist, a TLR4/MD-2 agonist, or a combination thereof may be used in the disclosed methods and compositions. Also disclosed are methods of restoring adaptive immune T cell tolerance, treating pernicious insulitis, improving immune tolerance, and treating autoimmune diseases using the disclosed methods and compositions.


Patent
University of Cincinnati | Date: 2015-03-03

A device (10) and method for analyzing blood coagulation in a blood sample. The device (10) includes a housing (12) having an analytical membrane (14) partially enclosed in a housing. The analytical membrane (14) includes a porous hydrophilic sample portion (34), a porous hydrophilic analytical portion (36), and a porous hydrophilic wicking portion (38). The porosity of the analytical portion (36) differs from the porosity of the sample portion (34). The method utilizes the device to analyze blood coagulation in a whole blood sample from the distance travelled by the red blood cell leading edge (50) in a predetermined period of time.


Patent
University of Cincinnati | Date: 2016-08-12

A method of electrolytic additive manufacturing provides 3-D parts. The method can be used to form parts from particulate material in an electrolytic bath. Metal is electrolytically deposited, binding the particles. Layers of the particles are built up to form the parts. The same process can be used to form parts without the particulate material. Layers of metal are electrolytically deposited in the electrolyte bath to form the parts.


PURPOSE:: To evaluate intravitreal aflibercept injection (IAI) in patients with presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome and choroidal neovascularization. METHODS:: Open-label randomized Phase I/II study of IAI in patients with presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome–related choroidal neovascularization. Thirty-nine eyes from 39 patients were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to 2 groups. The Sustained Group eyes (n = 19) underwent monthly IAI for 3 months, then mandatory IAI every 2 months for 12 months (with an option for monthly PRN dosing, if needed). The PRN Group eyes (n = 20) received 1 IAI at randomization, then monthly PRN IAI for 12 months. RESULTS:: Thirty-nine eyes (19 eyes Sustained Group and 20 eyes PRN Group) were randomized. Average age of participants was 50 years (19–75), with 16 men and 23 women. Ten, 12, and 17 eyes demonstrated extrafoveal, juxtafoveal, and subfoveal choroidal neovascularization, respectively. All eyes in both groups received IAI at baseline, with the Sustained and PRN groups receiving on an average 7.5 (5–11) and 4.6 (1–10) injections, respectively, over the 12 months. At baseline, overall average visual acuity was 68 letters (13–87 letters) with Snellen equivalent of 20/42 (20/20–20/160). At 12-month follow-up, Sustained Groupʼs average visual acuity was 84.9 letters (74–94) and Snellen equivalent was 20/21 (20/13–20/32), indicating an average improvement of 12 letters (6 letters loss to 36 letters gain) (P < 0.01). The PRN Groupʼs 12-month average visual acuity was 80.9 letters (60–94) and Snellen equivalent was 20/26 (20/13–20/63), indicating an average gain of 19 letters (4–75) (P < 0.01). Mean baseline central subfield thickness (CST) was 374 μm and mean 1-year CST was 260 μm (P < 0.01) among all study participants. The Sustained Groupʼs mean baseline CST was 383 μm and mean 12-month CST was 268 μm (P < 0.01). Mean baseline CST of the PRN Group was 360.8 μm, with the final mean CST of 260.5 μm (P < 0.01). No reported endophthalmitis, retinal tears, detachments, vitreous hemorrhage, nor adverse thrombotic events were reported. CONCLUSION:: Intravitreal aflibercept resulted in improved visual and anatomical outcomes with a favorable safety profile. PRN IAI dosing required less injections with similar visual and anatomical outcomes compared with sustained dosing. © 2017 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.


Korman P.,University of Cincinnati
Nonlinear Analysis: Real World Applications | Year: 2017

Using continuation methods and bifurcation theory, we study the exact multiplicity of periodic solutions, and the global solution structure, for three classes of periodically forced equations with singularities, including the equations arising in micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), the ones in condensed matter physics, as well as A.C. Lazer and S. Solimini's (Lazer and Solimini, 1987) problem. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd


Buchholz D.R.,University of Cincinnati
Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology | Year: 2017

A hormone-dependent developmental transition from aquatic to terrestrial existence occurs in all tetrapod vertebrates, such as birth, hatching, and metamorphosis. Thyroid hormones (TH) and their receptors (TRs) are key players in the tissue transformations comprising vertebrate developmental transitions. The African clawed frog, Xenopus, is a premier model for the role of TRs in developmental transitions because of the numerous and dramatic TH-dependent tissue transformations during metamorphosis and because of the endocrine, molecular, and genomic resources available. TRs are nuclear receptors that repress TH-response genes when plasma TH is minimal and that activate those same genes to induce tissue-specific gene regulation cascades when TH plasma levels increase. Tissue-specific TR expression levels help determine tissue sensitivity and responsivity to TH thereby regulating the initiation and rate of developmental change in TH-sensitive tissues which govern the tissue developmental asynchrony observed during metamorphosis. This review highlighting Xenopus presents the key experimental findings underpinning the roles TRs play in control of vertebrate developmental transitions. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.


Kritsky G.,University of Cincinnati
Annual Review of Entomology | Year: 2017

Beekeeping had its origins in honey hunting-the opportunistic stealing of honey from wild honey bee nests. True beekeeping began when humans started providing artificial cavities within which the bees could build comb for the queen to lay her eggs and the workers could process honey. By 2450 BCE, the Egyptians had developed sophisticated apiculture, and, within two millennia, beekeeping with horizontal hives had spread throughout the Mediterranean. During Europe's Middle Ages, honey and wax became important commodities for trade, and beekeeping in skep, log, box, and tree hives flourished to meet the demand. Other species of honey bees contributed to the development and spread of beekeeping in Asia beginning around 300 BCE. Meanwhile, beekeeping evolved independently in Mesoamerica with the stingless bee Melipona beecheii, as documented by archaeological finds and written accounts that survived Spanish conquest. © 2017 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Roland C.,University of Cincinnati
Journal of Perinatology | Year: 2017

Objective:Determine the impact of gestational age (GA) on vaginal delivery following induction of labor (IOL) for pre-eclampsia, and evaluate factors that influence successful induction.Study Design:Population-based retrospective cohort of 1 034 552 live births in Ohio (2006–2012). The rate of vaginal delivery in women with pre-eclampsia who underwent induction was calculated with 95% confidence intervals, stratified by week of GA at birth. Factors associated with the decision to undergo IOL, and success of IOL were evaluated, and multivariable logistic regression estimated the strength of association.Results:18 296 (71.3%) of the patients who underwent IOL had a vaginal delivery. The majority achieved vaginal delivery at both preterm (66% at 23–36 weeks) and term GAs (72%). Factors most strongly associated with vaginal delivery following IOL for pre-eclampsia included prior vaginal delivery and young maternal age.Conclusion:The majority of women with pre-eclampsia who undergo IOL achieve vaginal birth, even at early GAs.Journal of Perinatology advance online publication, 30 March 2017; doi:10.1038/jp.2017.31. © 2017 Nature America, Inc., part of Springer Nature.


Bernstein D.I.,University of Cincinnati
Clinical and Vaccine Immunology | Year: 2017

Despite the clear need, progress toward a vaccine for congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) has been slow. However, recent events have provided new interest, and several vaccine candidates are either in clinical trials or the trials are close to starting. In this issue of Clinical and Vaccine Immunology, Schleiss and colleagues show that a nonreplicating lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (rLCMV)-vectored vaccine expressing CMV glycoprotein B (gB) and/or pp65 induces B and T cells and improves pup survival in a Guinea pig model of congenital CMV infection (Clin Vaccine Immunol 24:e00300-16, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1128/CVI.00300-16). The combination vaccine appeared to be the most effective. © 2017 American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.


Stenson E.K.,University of Cincinnati
Current Opinion in Pediatrics | Year: 2017

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Herein, we review the current guidelines for the management of children with an acute asthma exacerbation. We focus on management in the emergency department, inpatient, and ICU settings. RECENT FINDINGS: The most recent statistics show that the prevalence of asthma during childhood has decreased in certain demographic subgroups and plateaued in other subgroups. However, acute asthma accounts for significant healthcare expenditures. Although there are few, if any, newer therapeutic agents available for management of acute asthma exacerbations, several reports leveraging quality improvement science have shown significant reductions in costs of care as well as improvements in outcome. SUMMARY: Asthma is one of the most common chronic conditions in children and the most common reason that children are admitted to the hospital. Nevertheless, the evidence to support specific agents in the management of acute asthma exacerbations is surprisingly limited. The management of acute exacerbations focuses on reversal of bronchospasm, correction of hypoxia, and prevention of relapse and recurrence. Second-tier and third-tier agents are infrequently used outside of the ICU setting. Reducing the variation in treatment is likely to lead to lower costs and better outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


Chidambaran V.,University of Cincinnati
Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology | Year: 2017

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Use of perioperative opioids for surgical pain management of children presents clinical challenges because of concerns of serious adverse effects including life-threatening respiratory depression. This is especially true for children with history of obstructive sleep apnea. This review will explore current knowledge of clinically relevant factors and genetic polymorphisms that affect opioid metabolism and postoperative outcomes in children. RECENT FINDINGS: Within the past several years, an increasing number of case reports have illustrated clinically important respiratory depression, anoxic brain injuries and even death among children receiving appropriate weight-based dosages of codeine and other opioids for analgesia at home setting particularly following tonsillectomy. Several national and international organizations have issued advisories on use of codeine in pediatrics, based on cytochrome P450 family 2 subfamily D type 6 (CYP2D6) pharmacogenetics. We have discussed the pros and cons of alternatives to codeine for pain management. SUMMARY: Although routine preoperative genotyping to identify children at risk and personalized opioid use for pediatric perioperative pain management is still a distant reality, current known implications of CYP2D6 pharmacogenetics on codeine use shows that pharmacogenetics has the potential to guide anesthesia providers on perioperative opioid selection and dosing to maximize efficacy and safety. Copyright © 2017 YEAR Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


Chang P.F.,University of Cincinnati
Patient Education and Counseling | Year: 2017

Objective: To understand the dynamic experiences of parents undergoing the decision-making process regarding cochlear implants for their child(ren). Methods: Thirty-three parents of d/Deaf children participated in semi-structured interviews. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed, and coded using iterative and thematic coding. Results: The results from this study reveal four salient topics related to parents' decision-making process regarding cochlear implantation: 1) factors parents considered when making the decision to get the cochlear implant for their child (e.g., desire to acculturate child into one community), 2) the extent to which parents' communities influence their decision-making (e.g., norms), 3) information sources parents seek and value when decision-making (e.g., parents value other parent's experiences the most compared to medical or online sources), and 4) personal experiences with stigma affecting their decision to not get the cochlear implant for their child. Conclusion: This study provides insights into values and perspectives that can be utilized to improve informed decision-making, when making risky medical decisions with long-term implications. Practical implications: With thorough information provisions, delineation of addressing parents' concerns and encompassing all aspects of the decision (i.e., medical, social and cultural), health professional teams could reduce the uncertainty and anxiety for parents in this decision-making process for cochlear implantation. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Smog from cars and trucks is an expected health hazard in big cities, but researchers from the University of Cincinnati found pollution from truck exhaust on one of the most remote mountain roads in the world. Brooke Crowley, an assistant professor of geology and anthropology, and UC graduate student Rajarshi Dasgupta examined soil pollution along India’s Manali-Leh Highway in the Himalaya Mountains. This tortuous 300-mile route, much of it gravel or dirt, winds its way over one of the highest navigable mountain passes in the world at 17,480 feet. That’s 4,000 feet higher in elevation than the top of Wyoming’s Grand Teton. The road’s very remoteness has made it an international tourist attraction, drawing cyclists and adventurers keen on treading where so few have. Even here in one of the most distant corners of the planet, a place of desolate valleys and austere beauty, the researchers in UC’s McMicken College of Arts and Sciences found evidence of pollution from diesel exhaust. “We measured incredibly high amounts of sulfur close to the highway. Some of those values are the highest ever reported in the literature and were likely connected to truck traffic,” Crowley said. The results were published in the journal Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology. The research was funded through grants by the UC Research Council, Sigma Xi and the Oak Ridge Associated Universities. For the study, Dasgupta took soil samples at four places along the highway and at six prescribed distances, starting with samples literally on the dirt road and extending out 150 meters. Soil samples were collected at 3, 9 and 15 centimeters in depth. Dasgupta said villagers in this area burn wood and cow dung for cooking and heating their homes. The resulting smoke often contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, a known carcinogen. They tested the soil for these hydrocarbons along with sulfur, total organic compound and 10 types of heavy metal. This wide net was necessary to capture the myriad potential pollutants caused by truck traffic, Dasgupta said. The study found low levels of heavy metals and no relationship between their concentrations and distance from the highway. But they found high concentrations of sulfur, a major pollutant in the exhaust of diesel-powered engines. “This area provided us with a rare opportunity to examine the effects of multiple contaminants in a remote, diesel-dominated, mountainous environment,” Dasgupta said. Comparative studies have found that India’s diesel contains an especially high sulfur content, the UC researchers said. Sulfur dioxide in the atmosphere contributes to acid rain. “At first glance, it’s easy to consider the region to be a pretty pristine place. But there are environmental impacts from humans,” Crowley said. Last year India ratified the Paris Agreement on climate change. The world’s second-largest nation by population produces nearly 5 percent of the world’s greenhouse gases. The agreement calls for participating countries to develop a plan to address temperature rise. India has a goal of producing 40 percent of its electricity with renewable energy by 2030. Diesel fuel is popular in India because it historically cost drivers less there than regular unleaded. Most of the buses and heavy trucks that traverse the Manali-Leh Highway burn diesel fuel. Completed in the 1970s, the road between Manali and Leh sees about 50,000 vehicles per year, mostly during the summer when the mountain passes are free of snow, according to government traffic counts. Himalaya means “abode of snow” in Sanskrit. UC researchers found the highest sulfur contents at the base of the narrow ridges that are most prone to rockslides. Trucks sometimes must wait to use a single lane while construction crews make repairs. “The road is terrible, and it’s almost always under construction. There can be lines of traffic idling waiting to go over the passes,” she said. “Our results suggest that a fair amount of emissions accumulate in the soil.” UC professor Lewis Owen, the geology department head, said Crowley’s findings are in keeping with other studies on pollution impacts in the region. “It’s not surprising at all if you’ve ever been to the Himalayas and seen all the diesel trucks that use the highways,” he said. Air pollution from Asian cities also ends up contaminating the remote region’s mountains and streams, he said. “There is no pristine environment left. You see black snow deposited on glaciers and snowfields in Tibet,” Owen said. “This study is adding to our data set about how we’re degrading the planet. Humans are the biggest geologic agents now. Some researchers are calling this geologic age ‘the Anthropocene’ after the human influence.” This study and others like it show the cumulative effect of fossil fuels on the environment, he said. “The biggest challenge is for the research to be disseminated to people who can do something about it,” he said. Dasgupta said countries can monitor pollution and its resulting health effects and invest in more renewable energy and other eco-friendly alternatives to reduce their carbon footprint. “There is no doubt that increasing economic development will put more stress on environments all over the world, remote or not,” Dasgupta said. UC’s Crowley has published studies on topics as diverse as plant defenses against species of now-extinct lemurs and the long-distance treks of extinct mammoths. The study marked Crowley’s second visit to the Himalaya region. But Crowley’s scientific interests have taken her around the world. She has made four trips to Madagascar to study lemurs and reconstruct the causes and consequences of extinctions on the island. She and her students have examined the effects of sea spray on vegetation in Trinidad and looked at ways the first humans in the Canary Islands changed its ecology. “I’m a paleoecologist. I’m interested in human-animal interactions. I haven’t conducted pollution research previously, and this study with Rajarshi has stretched me in a new direction,” she said. Dasgupta said the study proved to be a learning experience for him as well. “This study was the first of its kind for me, too,” Dasgupta said. “I am a geomorphologist. I study the evolution of the landforms around us. However, as a geographer, I have always been interested in the interactions of humans with the natural environment – the central theme of all geographic research. This study fits that theme perfectly.” In the Himalayas, the researchers found native wildlife such as ibex, herds of wild asses called kiang and condors, one of the largest birds on the planet. Adding to the bucolic scene, many of the villagers who live in the foothills tend goats. “It’s a beautiful landscape. The scale is hard to comprehend when you’re driving on a plain at 15,000 feet above sea level. That’s really high. It takes a while to acclimatize to the elevation,” Crowley said. The night skies were full of stars in that sparsely inhabited part of India, with little moisture in the atmosphere to obscure the view. The arid mountains have little vegetation and lots of exposed strata of rock. “It’s a geologist’s dream. UC professors in geology have been conducting research and teaching classes in this region for many years,” she said. “I am so grateful I was able to join them in the field.” But being in the field can be challenging. The researchers had to hire an experienced driver to take them over the mountains. They used a filtration system to provide clean drinking water. In some of the low-lying areas, they had to help push their truck out of the mud. “We’ve gotten a flat tire both times we’ve gone to India. You need nerves of steel to deal with the blind curves,” she said. Crowley said places on the extreme edges of habitability such as the Himalayas could be the first to feel the effects of dramatic climate change. These mountain ranges provide water and nutrients for rivers in India. “These are places that might have perennial glaciers that are important sources of water. If the glaciers disappear, that has major implications for people who rely on that water,” she said. The samples collected for this study provide baseline data if researchers decide to revisit the topic of roadside pollution in 10 or 20 years, she said. And given her track record of travel for UC, Crowley might be the one leading that expedition, too. “One of the joys of being a professor is you have some freedom in the kinds of research questions you can explore,” she said. “I have appreciated that opportunity here at UC.”


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

In an analysis of Medicare billing data submitted by more than 2,300 United States physicians, researchers have calculated the average number of surgical slices, or cuts, made during Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS), a procedure that progressively removes thin layers of cancerous skin tissue in a way that minimizes damage to healthy skin and the risks of leaving cancerous tissue behind. The study, the researchers say, serves as a first step towards identifying best practices for MMS, as well as identifying and informing physicians who may need re-training because their practice patterns deviate far from their peers. A report of the study, published in the journal JAMA Dermatology April 28, suggests that identifying and informing high outlier physicians of their extreme practice patterns can enable targeted re-training, potentially sparing patients from substandard care. The analysis is part of a medical quality improvement project called "Improving Wisely," funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and based at The Johns Hopkins University. The initiative focuses on developing and using individual physician-level measures to collect data and improve performance. The U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services provided broad access to their records for the study. "The project aims to work by consensus, encouraging outliers to seek educational and re-training tools offered by their professional society," says Martin Makary, M.D., M.P.H., professor of surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the paper's co-senior author. "That's the spirit of medicine's heritage of learning from the experience of other physicians." He estimates that the initiative could result in Medicare savings of millions of dollars. Ideally, says Makary, those who perform MMS make as few cuts or slices as possible to preserve as much normal tissue as possible while ensuring complete removal of cancers. As each layer of skin is removed, it is examined under a microscope for the presence of cancer cells. However, there can be wide variation in the average number of cuts made by a physician. Measuring a surgeon's average number of cuts was recently endorsed by the American College of Mohs Surgery (ACMS) as a clinical quality metric used to assess its members. "Outlier practice patterns in health care, and specifically Mohs surgery, can represent a burden on patients and the medical system," says John Albertini, M.D., immediate past president of the American College of Mohs Surgery and the paper's other senior author. "By studying the issue of variation in practice patterns, the Mohs College hopes to improve the quality and value of care we provide our patients." Taking their cue from that support, Makary and his research team analyzed Medicare Part B claims data from January 2012 to December 2014 for all physicians who received Medicare payments for MMS procedures on the head, neck, genitalia, hands and feet. These regions of the body account for more than 85 percent of all MMS procedures reimbursed by Medicare during those years. A total of 2,305 physicians who performed MMS were included in the analysis. The researchers also gathered the following data for each physician: sex, years in practice, whether the physician worked in a solo or group practice, whether the physician was a member of ACMS, whether the physician practiced at an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education site for MMS, volume of MMS operations, and whether the physician practiced in an urban or rural setting. Physicians had to perform at least 10 MMS procedures each year to be included in the analysis. The researchers found that the average number of cuts among all physicians was 1.74. The median was 1.69 and the range was 1.09 to 4.11 average cuts per case. Of the 2,305 physicians who performed MMS during each of the three years studied, 137 were considered extremely high outliers during at least one of those years. An extremely high outlier was defined as having a personal average of greater than two standard deviations, or 2.41 cuts per case, above all physicians in the study. Forty-nine physicians were persistently high outliers during all three years. Physicians in solo practice were 2.35 times more likely to be a persistent high outlier than those in a group practice; 4.5 percent of solo practitioners were persistent high outliers compared to 2.1 percent of high outlier physicians who performed MMS in a group practice. Volume of cases per year, practice experience and geographic location were not associated with being a high outlier. Low extreme outliers, defined as having an average per case in the bottom 2.5 percent of the group distribution, also were identified. Of all physicians in the study, 92 were low outliers in at least one year and 20 were persistently low during all three years. Potential explanations for high outliers include financial incentive, because the current payment model for MMS pays physicians who do more cuts more money, Makary says. These charges are ultimately passed on to Medicare Part B patients, who are expected to pay 20 percent of their health care bill. Low outliers may be explained by incorrect coding, overly aggressive initial cuts, or choice of tumors for which MMS is not necessary, he says. Although the study was limited by lack of information about each patient's medical history, or the diameter or depth of each cut, Makary says it's a meaningful step toward identifying and mitigating physician outliers. "Developing standards based on physicians' actual experience and practices is the home-grown approach needed now to improve health care and lower costs of care," says Makary. Other authors on this paper include Aravind Krishnan, Tim Xu, Susan Hutfless and Angela Park of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; Thomas Stasko of the University of Oklahoma; Allison T. Vidimos of the Cleveland Clinic; Barry Leshin of The Skin Surgery Center; Brett M. Coldiron of the University of Cincinnati Hospital; Richard G. Bennett of Bennett Surgery Center in Santa Monica, California; and Victor J. Marks and Rebecca Brandt of the American College of Mohs Surgery. Funding for this study was provided by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (grant No. 73417) and the American College of Mohs Surgery.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

UC interdisciplinary researchers and global collaborators dig into the past to inspire modern water management strategies that can save time and money and may avoid negative effects on our climate Tucked away in a laboratory in University of Cincinnati's Braunstein Hall are tubes of rock and dirt that quietly tell a story -- a story that looks back on ancient society's early water conservation. UC researchers hope the story will aid in the future preservation of our planet's most precious resource. In an effort to help manage the world's water supply more efficiently, an interdisciplinary team of University of Cincinnati researchers from the departments of anthropology, geography and geology have climbed through rainforests, dug deep under arid deserts and collaborated with scientists around the world to look at how ancient humans manipulated their environment to manage water. "We begin by asking, 'What is water to humans, how do we engage with it and how does the environment engage us?" asks Vernon Scarborough, professor and department head in UC's Department of Anthropology. "When we look at the trajectory of our changing climate, we realize that the issue is not just climate change but also water change. Climate and water work synergistically and can affect one another in critical ways. "Given the current climate patterns, in this and the next century, we will likely face further rising sea levels, less potable water and a compromised availability of freshwater as a result of drought in many areas and unusually heavy rains and runoff in others. "So we are looking at how the past can inform the present," adds Scarborough. To face future sustainability and water management issues, UC's interdisciplinary team of real-world "Indiana Jones" employ modern technology to peek inside ancient irrigation communities in obscure places around the globe like the arid American Southwest and humid rainforests in Central America and Southeast Asia. "The point of these projects is to help, in part, create effective modern water policy," says Scarborough, who also works closely with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). "Exploring all these unique points on the globe is the only way we're going to get at it, and it's our teamwork, communication and cooperation that will make this project so successful." As a result of their collaboration, several members of UC's research team will be presenting the outcome of their field work at one or both of two upcoming prestigious scientific annual meetings: the 77th annual Society for Applied Science meeting in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and the 82nd annual Society for American Archaeology meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Both are meeting this week. For more than two decades, the researchers worked intricately together in remote areas that are known for their seasonal water and environmental challenges. One core investigation lies deep in the ancestral Puebloan community in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico -- the ancestors of modern Puebloans that thrived for more than 300 years in a dry desert in the middle of the American Southwest. Scientists have long debated whether this area was truly a sustainable thriving community based on local resource access or an occasional gathering spot for ceremonial rituals dependent on importing food and related supplies. To create a comprehensive snapshot for how ancestral Native American Puebloans managed water and survived in the ancient desert, UC's research team used aerial surface imaging technology, mass spectrometry and geochemical soil sampling, as well as anthropological behavioral and DNA studies and soil excavations around ancient structures to help shed significant light on that mystery. Nicholas Dunning and Christopher Carr, both UC professors of geography, looked broadly at the geographic area documenting and sampling the stratified layers of rock and sediment, while Lewis Owen, also a UC professor of geology, used optical-stimulated luminescence, a unique technique to accurately determine the age of core sand and soil samples. "We found geochemical evidence for corn grown in the area during this time, which is a very water-intensive crop, as well as sophisticated irrigation and water-management techniques," says Kenneth Tankersley, UC associate professor of anthropology and geology. To get a 3-D look at the surface of the canyon, Carr used sophisticated LIDAR technology, or light, imaging, detection and ranging technology, to measure the surface elevation of the ground from an airplane. "This technology uses a laser beam to measure the morphology of the surface and is totally revolutionizing archaeology," says Carr. "The key thing LIDAR gives us is elevation so we know how the water flows off the mesa tops into the drainage ditches and into the valley floors. "LIDAR ultimately tells the archaeologists where to excavate and look for evidence of agriculture, canals and water control gates beneath the surface." To uncover the thousand-year-old secrets for survival held in the geochemical deep core soil samples, Tankersley, along with Owen and Warren Huff, UC professor of geology, employed laboratory sampling techniques to reveal that the high level of salt in the soil -- once thought by scientists to be harmful -- was in fact a form of a calcium sulfate mineralization that may have functioned to enhance the soil for the maize (corn) grown in that area. "The surrounding mesas provided water in their springs after the snow melted," says Tankersley. "During the rainy season when floodwaters hit, the Puebloans would capture runoff water from small canyons known as the rincons and local periodic streams such as Chaco Wash and Escavada Wash." The researchers consider this strategy a reflection of risk aversion. "When it rained in one spot over here the Ancestral Puebloans took advantage of it, and when it rained over there they took advantage of that," Scarborough says. Under this expeditious use of landscape, two key members of the Chaco water management project, Stephen Plog, professor of archaeology from the University of Virginia, and Adam Watson at the American Museum of Natural History were also part of the collaborative team that utilized DNA sampling techniques on human remains to reveal a remarkable matrilineal family line connected through the female lineage. "To effectively manage water requires flexibility and creativity as rainfall is unpredictable in the Southwest," says Samantha Fladd, an advanced doctoral student from the University of Arizona, also working on the Chaco project here at UC. "The presence of a hierarchical matriline helps to explain how Chaco residents coordinated these activities in order to practice successful water management and agriculture." In contrast to Chaco Canyon's desert aridity many of the researchers also spent a significant amount of time in the Guatemalan rainforests around Tikal -- a Central American site that coexisted at about the same time as Chaco Canyon more than a thousand years ago. While the two environments couldn't be more opposite in climate the researchers found Tikal's water issues just as challenging. David Lentz, UC professor of biology, with the assistance of Scarborough, Huff, Tankersley, Carr, Owen and NSF-funded Dunning, discovered how the Maya civilization survived in Tikal after suffering several droughts. "Similar to Chaco Canyon, we found geochemical evidence for corn fields situated in specific environmental niches at Tikal," says Dunning. Scarborough speculates the Maya channeled runoff during the rainy season and created elaborate water storage systems, allowing their civilization to thrive for more than three centuries. Eventually the Maya not only suffered from a changing climate, but they had added to their own demise, say the researchers. "Essentially, they may have affected a change in their own climate," says Scarborough. "After several years of deforestation -- clearing out trees and forests to make room for crops -- the Maya unintentionally, but perhaps dramatically upset their annual rainfall, which precipitated degrees of drought that ultimately forced them to abandon the once fertile environment. Sound familiar?" With recent funding by the National Science Foundation, Dunning, along with Scarborough and other researchers, will spend a fifth season this summer as a co-principal investigator on the Yaxnohcah project along with Carr and four UC students. The focus of this study looks at the development of ancient urbanism in relation to water, land and forest management in the Maya lowlands and will be a presentation topic by Dunning and by Carr at the upcoming annual Society for American Archaeology meeting in Vancouver. "Our collaborative research as a team is critical -- each one of us is an important cog in this investigation," says Scarborough. "It takes each one of us and our individual expertise to effectively measure how well these early urban and rural communities adapted to climate change and managed their water resources." "We still have to deal with those same issues in our environment today. From an archaeological perspective, our changing climate is immediate, but it may be several years before the damage is fully apparent at a truly global scale," Scarborough adds. "We will begin to see sea levels rise by a good meter. Because over two-thirds of the largest cities on the planet occupy coastal margins, with estimates suggesting that an anticipated 80 percent of human population will gravitate toward urban settings in the near term, we really are approaching a truly 'perfect storm.'" While the researchers look at future water management as the direction of this research, they also focus on the constant changes to the landscape and the creatures that occupy these environments. Scarborough adds that If we are not careful, we will instigate even further change to a wide array of plant and animal species all over the world. "If you don't design for that appropriately, you can be building management networks and ways to capture and control water that will wind up getting buried like the build-up behind modern dams, or plans can get abandoned altogether as a river changes," say Scarborough and Jon-Paul McCool, UC doctoral student under Dunning's mentorship. "How past populations dealt with variable precipitation like that identified at Tikal, Chaco Wash or drainage patterns overall has been very dynamic. Such investments in building massive dam projects today is a costly expenditure of money and time that might well benefit from views of the past. "We don't want to waste that money on high-priced water infrastructure if we can engage in smaller scale, lower investment strategies like our ancestors did."


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

NEW YORK, April 26, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. DonnaMaria E. Cortezzo, Attending Neonatologist and Pediatric Palliative Care Provider at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and Assistant Professor at the University of Cincinnati - Department of Pediatrics and Anesthesia has been selected to join the Physician Board at the American Health Council. She will be sharing her knowledge and expertise on Neonatology, Neonatal - Perinatal Palliative Care. and Neonatal Pain/ Sedation Management. Board Certified through the American Board of Pediatrics in Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Pediatrics, and Neonatal - Perinatal Medicine, Dr. Cortezzo utilizes her nine years of expertise in the field of Neonatology in her role as an Attending Neonatologist and Pediatric Palliative Care Provider at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and Assistant Professor at the University of Cincinnati - Department of Pediatrics and Anesthesia. In her current capacity, Dr. Cortezzo’s day-to-day responsibilities include clinical care in neonatology and pediatric palliative care and conducting research in neonatal and palliative pain care and neonatal pain management. Following graduation with a medical degree from the University of Connecticut in 2008, Dr. Cortezzo completed her residency in Pediatrics at the University of Connecticut in 2011 and her fellowship in Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine in 2014. In 2015, Dr. Cortezzo completed a fellowship in Hospice and Palliative Medicine at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. Dr. Cortezzo’s scope of clinical practice includes neonatology, perinatal palliative care, neonatal palliative care, neonatal pain management, and congenital anomalies. She has authored several peer-reviewed publications on bacillus subtilis, germination, DNA damaging chemicals, antisense ribosome inhibition of gene expression, barriers and facilitators to palliative care in the NICU, and experiences with end-of-life care in the NICU. Among her many accolades, Dr. Cortezzo is proud to have been published in bio-chem journals during her residency at the University of Connecticut and in pediatric journals addressing palliative care.  A recent published article titled, “End of Life Care” draws a comparison between family and provider attitudes in pediatric palliative care. She has spoken at national conferences on neonatal-perinatal palliative care and recently spoke at an ethics conference regarding ethical challenges in conducting invasive research involving the maternal-fetal dyad. Looking back, Dr. Cortezzo pursued the field of Neonatology after being drawn to the acuity, pathophysiology, procedures, and the ability to connect with families of her patients in neonatology. Seeing the need for palliative medicine in neonatology prompted her to seek out additional training and broaden her career focus. To further develop her professional development, Dr. Cortezzo maintains a membership with The American Academy of Pediatrics, The American Medical Association, and The American Board of Pediatrics. Considering the future, Dr. Cortezzo hopes to focus on further integrating palliative care in to fetal and neonatal care, improving the approach to pain and sedation management in neonates, and utilizing simulation to teach health care professionals communication skills around difficult conversations. In her free time, Dr. Cortezzo enjoys working out, listening to music, cooking, outdoor activities, and non-traditional art.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

Clinical-stage biotech company Capricor Therapeutics Inc., has announced positive six-month results from a randomized 12-month Phase 1/2 trial in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which was designed to analyze safety and exploratory efficacy. DMD is a rare, genetic disorder that often occurs in boys.  It involves progressive muscular weakness and patients often experience frequent falls, have trouble getting up, or performing daily tasks such as eating, as well as learning disabilities, and treatment options are limited. Cardiac disease is the most common cause of death among those with DMD, who often don’t survive past their twenties, and early results from the trial showed statistically significant improvements in measures of cardiac and upper limb function in patients treated with the cell-based therapy called CAP-1002. CAP-1002 is comprised of allogeneic cardiosphere-derived cells, or CDCs, which are a type of progenitor cell. The HOPE trial, involved 25 patients, aged 12 years an older, with DMD who had cardiomyopathy, or heart disease secondary to DMD.  Thirteen patients were randomized to receive a single dose of CAP-1002, while 12 received usual care. The cell therapy was infused into the three main coronary arties, with a total dose of 75 million cells. MRI assessments showed that those receiving the cell-therapy showed significant improvements in systolic thickening of the inferior wall of the heart. “The observed signal in global cardiac scar reduction and the increase in the thickening of the left ventricle during contraction are very encouraging,” Joao A. C. Lima, M.D., professor of medicine and Director of the magnetic Resonance Imaging Core Lab at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said in a prepared statement. “The population treated in HOPE had very advanced cardiac involvement, and to see such positive results following just a single-dose of CAP-1002 is remarkable.” There were also statistically significant improvements in upper limb function, which was assessed using a test designed specifically for use in a DMD setting, called the Performance of the Upper Limb test (PUL). The test simulates common daily activities that patients with DMD often have trouble performing, such as tearing paper or removing a container lid. The treatment was generally safe and well-tolerated no patients experienced a major adverse cardiac event. “In HOPE, we saw potential effects in both the heart and skeletal muscle that appear quite compelling in an exploratory trial,” principal investigator of the trial, John L. Jefferies, M.D., professor of pediatric cardiology and adult cardiovascular diseases at the University of Cincinnati said in a prepared statement. “These results clearly support the conduct of a confirmatory clinical trial in DMD to further evaluate the potential of CAP-1002. We look forward to an effective medication becoming available for people with this progressive and fatal disease, one that is poorly met by current options.” Capricor plans to request Breakthrough Therapy or Regenerative Medicine Advanced Technology designations for the therapy from the Food and Drug Administration. The company said it anticipates releasing top-line 12-month data results from the trial during the fourth quarter of 2017.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

IMAGE:  Trucks line up for their turn to climb a mountain pass on India's Manali-Leh Highway. view more Smog from cars and trucks is an expected health hazard in big cities, but researchers from the University of Cincinnati found pollution from truck exhaust on one of the most remote mountain roads in the world. Brooke Crowley, an assistant professor of geology and anthropology, and UC graduate student Rajarshi Dasgupta examined soil pollution along India's Manali-Leh Highway in the Himalaya Mountains. This tortuous 300-mile route, much of it gravel or dirt, winds its way over one of the highest navigable mountain passes in the world at 17,480 feet. That's 4,000 feet higher in elevation than the top of Wyoming's Grand Teton. The road's very remoteness has made it an international tourist attraction, drawing cyclists and adventurers keen on treading where so few have. Even here in one of the most distant corners of the planet, a place of desolate valleys and austere beauty, the researchers in UC's McMicken College of Arts and Sciences found evidence of pollution from diesel exhaust. "We measured incredibly high amounts of sulfur close to the highway. Some of those values are the highest ever reported in the literature and were likely connected to truck traffic," Crowley said. The results were published in the journal Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology. The research was funded through grants by the UC Research Council, Sigma Xi and the Oak Ridge Associated Universities. For the study, Dasgupta took soil samples at four places along the highway and at six prescribed distances, starting with samples literally on the dirt road and extending out 150 meters. Soil samples were collected at 3, 9 and 15 centimeters in depth. Dasgupta said villagers in this area burn wood and cow dung to cook food and heat their homes. The resulting smoke often contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, a known carcinogen. They tested the soil for these hydrocarbons along with sulfur, total organic compound and 10 types of heavy metal. This wide net was necessary to capture the myriad potential pollutants caused by truck traffic, Dasgupta said. The study found low levels of heavy metals and no relationship between their concentrations and the distance from the highway. But they found high concentrations of sulfur, a major pollutant in the exhaust of diesel-powered engines. "This area provided us with a rare opportunity to examine the effects of multiple contaminants in a remote, diesel-dominated, mountainous environment," Dasgupta said. Comparative studies have found that India's diesel contains an especially high sulfur content, the UC researchers said. Sulfur dioxide in the atmosphere contributes to acid rain. "At first glance, it's easy to consider the region to be a pretty pristine place. But there are environmental impacts from humans," Crowley said. Last year India ratified the Paris Agreement on climate change. The world's second-largest nation by population produces nearly 5 percent of the world's greenhouse gases. The agreement calls for participating countries to develop a plan to address temperature rise. India has a goal of producing 40 percent of its electricity with renewable energy by 2030. Diesel fuel is popular in India because it historically cost drivers less there than regular unleaded. Most of the buses and heavy trucks that traverse the Manali-Leh Highway burn diesel fuel. Completed in the 1970s, the road between Manali and Leh sees about 50,000 vehicles per year, mostly during the summer when the mountain passes are free of snow, according to government traffic counts. Himalaya means "abode of snow" in Sanskrit. UC researchers found the highest sulfur contents at the base of the narrow ridges that are most prone to rockslides. Trucks sometimes must wait to use a single lane while construction crews make repairs. "The road is terrible, and it's almost always under construction. There can be lines of traffic idling waiting to go over the passes," she said. "Our results suggest that a fair amount of emissions accumulate in the soil." UC professor Lewis Owen, the geology department head, said Crowley's findings are in keeping with other studies on pollution impacts in the region. "It's not surprising at all if you've ever been to the Himalayas and seen all the diesel trucks that use the highways," he said. Air pollution from Asian cities also ends up contaminating the remote region's mountains and streams, he said. "There is no pristine environment left. You see black snow deposited on glaciers and snowfields in Tibet," Owen said. "This study is adding to our data set about how we're degrading the planet. Humans are the biggest geologic agents now. Some researchers are calling this geologic age 'the Anthropocene' after the human influence." This study and others like it show the cumulative effect of fossil fuels on the environment, he said. "The biggest challenge is for the research to be disseminated to people who can do something about it," Owen said. Dasgupta said countries can monitor pollution and its resulting health effects and invest in more renewable energy and other eco-friendly alternatives to reduce their carbon footprint. "There is no doubt that increasing economic development will put more stress on environments all over the world, remote or not," Dasgupta said. UC's Crowley has published studies on topics as diverse as plant defenses against species of now-extinct lemurs and the long-distance treks of extinct mammoths. The study marked Crowley's second visit to the Himalaya region. But Crowley's scientific interests have taken her around the world. She has made four trips to Madagascar to study lemurs and reconstruct the causes and consequences of extinctions on the island. She and her students have examined the effects of sea spray on vegetation in Trinidad and looked at ways the first humans in the Canary Islands changed its ecology. "I'm a paleoecologist. I'm interested in human-animal interactions. I haven't conducted pollution research previously, and this study with Dasgupta has stretched me in a new direction," she said. Dasgupta said the study proved to be a learning experience for him as well. "This study was the first of its kind for me, too," Dasgupta said. "I am a geomorphologist. I study the evolution of the landforms around us. However, as a geographer, I have always been interested in the interactions of humans with the natural environment - the central theme of all geographic research. This study fits that theme perfectly." In the Himalayas, the researchers found native wildlife such as ibex, herds of wild asses called kiang and condors, one of the largest birds on the planet. Adding to the bucolic scene, many of the villagers who live in the foothills tend goats. "It's a beautiful landscape. The scale is hard to comprehend when you're driving on a plain at 15,000 feet above sea level. That's really high. It takes a while to acclimatize to the elevation," Crowley said. The night skies were full of stars in that sparsely inhabited part of India, with little moisture in the atmosphere to obscure the view. The arid mountains have little vegetation and lots of exposed strata of rock. "It's a geologist's dream. UC professors in geology have been conducting research and teaching classes in this region for many years," she said. "I am so grateful I was able to join them in the field." But being in the field can be challenging. The researchers had to hire an experienced driver to take them over the mountains. They used a filtration system to provide clean drinking water. In some of the low-lying areas, they had to help push their truck out of the mud. "We've gotten a flat tire both times we've gone to India. You need nerves of steel to deal with the blind curves," she said. Crowley said places on the extreme edges of habitability such as the Himalayas could be the first to feel the effects of dramatic climate change. These mountain ranges provide water and nutrients for rivers in India. "These are places that might have perennial glaciers that are important sources of water. If the glaciers disappear, that has major implications for people who rely on that water," she said. The samples collected for this study provide baseline data if researchers decide to revisit the topic of roadside pollution in 10 or 20 years, she said. And given her track record of travel for UC, Crowley might be the one leading that expedition, too. "One of the joys of being a professor is you have some freedom in the kinds of research questions you can explore," she said. "I have appreciated that opportunity here at UC."


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.treehugger.com

Let's think, for a moment, about cephalopods and e-readers. That's right: Let's compare an octopus to a Kindle. One is soft, smart, and lives under water. The other is hard, square, land-loving, and though it's memory is impressive, not particularly intelligent. But that's the boring, obvious, stuff. What's interesting is all the two have in common. READ MORE: Nature Blows My Mind! The Amazing Shapeshifting Mimic Octopus Cephalopods and e-readers, it turns out, share a lot in terms of how they change colors and patterns. One, obviously, is doing this on skin as a means of camouflage and communication while the other is displaying information inorder to entertain humans. The process, according to University of Cincinnati researchers, is surprisingly similar. A new study titled "Biological vs. Electronic Adaptive Coloration: How Can One Inform the Other?" explains how cephalopods use subtle changes in their skin's pigment to absorb or reflect available light and in doing so, achieve a wide range of colors and patterns. Devices that utilize e-Paper, like the Kindle, use electrical fields in much the same way to move pigments and generate "emissive" light. Across many dimensions, millions of years of evolution outscore human research and development dramatically. In terms of energy consumption, scalability, and texture, cephalopod biology is far more advanced than current e-Paper technology. The human tech does have a few advantages, however. Pigment changes on e-Paper are faster, for example, and can achieve a more pure "black." Though the use of pigment was surprisingly similar between biological and technological systems, the findings indicate that there are a great many ways to achieve the same—or a very similar—end result. The task now, as the study's title suggests, is to learn a few tricks from nature to improve the performance and efficiency of e-Reader technology.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Leading higher education information and resource provider AffordableCollegesOnline.org has announced its list of the best online colleges for veterans and military personnel for 2017. The ranking names the top 59 two- and four-year schools and the top 50 four-year schools in the nation based on service member-friendly benefits, affordability and program quality. The four-year schools with the best scores were University of Southern Mississippi, Webster University, Saint Leo University, University of Idaho and Murray State University. The top five two-year schools include Central Texas College, St. Philip’s College, Mount Wachusett Community College, Wake Technical Community College and Del Mar College. "Veterans and current members of the military face some unique challenges when it comes to earning a certificate or degree,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. “These schools have demonstrated a commitment to providing outstanding benefits and resources to service members who choose to pursue an online education, while also maintaining affordability and quality standards.” To qualify for a spot on AffordableCollegesOnline.org’s rankings, schools must meet several minimum requirements. Each college cited is institutionally accredited and holds public or private not-for-profit standing. Each is also scored based on a comparison of more than a dozen metrics including the availability and amount of financial aid, military tuition discounts, ROTC programs, veteran support services and graduation rates by school. AffordableCollegesOnline.org enforces strict affordability standards, requiring schools to offer in-state tuition rates below $20,000 per year for four-year schools, and below $5,000 per year for two-year schools. All eligible school scores are compared to determine the final “Best” list. For complete details on the data and methodology used to score each school and a full list of ranking colleges, visit: Top Four-Year Schools in the U.S. with Military-Friendly Online Programs for 2017: Arkansas State University-Main Campus Azusa Pacific University Ball State University Columbia College Dallas Baptist University Duquesne University East Carolina University Eastern Kentucky University Hampton University Hawaii Pacific University Iowa State University Kansas State University Lawrence Technological University Lewis University Mercy College Mississippi State University Missouri State University-Springfield Montana State University-Billings Murray State University New England College Niagara University Northern Arizona University Northern Kentucky University Norwich University Oklahoma State University-Main Campus Oral Roberts University Point Park University Regis University Saint Leo University Texas A & M University-College Station The College of Saint Scholastica The University of Alabama The University of Montana Tiffin University Troy University University of Arizona University of Cincinnati-Main Campus University of Idaho University of Mississippi University of Nebraska at Omaha University of North Carolina at Greensboro University of Oklahoma-Norman Campus University of South Florida-Main Campus University of Southern Mississippi University of the Incarnate Word University of Toledo Viterbo University Washington State University Webster University Western Kentucky University Top Two-Year Schools in the U.S. with Military-Friendly Online Programs for 2017: ### AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

CINCINNATI--Changes in female hormones may trigger headaches in adolescent girls, but their effect may depend on age and their stage of pubertal development, according to a new study from researchers at University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. The study, "Ovarian Hormones, Age and Pubertal Development and their Association with Days of Headache Onset in Girls with Migraine: An Observational Cohort Study" is currently available in the online edition of Cephalalgia, the scholarly journal of the International Headache Society. The study found that higher levels of the sex hormone progesterone were associated with fewer headaches in older teenagers, while lower levels resulted in more headache in that group. In younger girls, the opposite appears to be true. "Ours is the first study to show that migraine headaches might also be influenced by female hormones in girls with migraine," says Vincent Martin, MD, professor in the UC Division of General Internal Medicine and co-director of the Headache and Facial Pain Center at the UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute. "While low and declining estrogen levels are thought to precipitate migraine in adult women we found that progesterone to be the most important trigger factor in these young girls. However, this effect seemed to differ depending on the age of the girls and their pubertal development." Nationally, about 10 percent of school age children suffer from migraine, according to the Migraine Research Foundation (MRF). As adolescence approaches, the incidence of migraine increases rapidly in girls and by age 17 about 8 percent of boys and 23 percent of girls have experienced migraine, the MRF reports. Past studies have shown that female hormones are an important contributor for migraine in adult women, explains Martin, also a UC Health physician. Two thirds of adult women will develop migraine attacks of that occur shortly before or during menstrual bleeding. These attacks have been called "menstrual migraine." Low and declining levels of estrogen are thought to trigger attacks of menstrual migraine. Prior to this study the contribution of female hormones on migraine was unknown in girls and at what age this might occur, says Martin. "There is a dramatic change in the way that female hormones affect migraine that occurs during puberty," says Martin. "Prior to puberty progesterone has little effect on migraine, but after puberty high progesterone levels are associated with fewer headaches and low progesterone levels have more headache." Researchers as part of a 13-month study examined 34 girls experiencing migraine distributed across three age strata, ages 8 to 11, 12 to 15 and 16 to 17. Daily urine samples were collected and the occurrence and severity of headaches was recorded in diary for a 90-day period. The urine samples were evaluated for metabolites of the sex hormones estrogen and progesterone to determine if their presence was associated with days of headache onset or severity. All participants were patients of Cincinnati Children's Headache Center. The adolescents were offered a nominal stipend to encourage study compliance. Higher levels of progesterone appeared to be associated with reduced frequency of headaches in older teens. In the 16 to 17 age group there was a 42 percent chance of having a headache when levels of progesterone were low in urine samples, while when levels of the hormone was higher the chance of headache dropped to 24 percent, says Martin. In the 8 to 11 age group, there was 15 percent chance of suffering from migraine or headache when levels of progesterone were low, but a 20 percent chance of migraine or headache when high levels of progesterone were found in the urine, explains Martin. "The shifting contribution of female hormones to migraine occurrence from pre-pubertal girls through puberty into adulthood suggests a very dynamic process," says Andrew Hershey, MD, PhD, endowed chair and director of neurology at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. "As the brain is developing in these girls there may be differences in the brain receptors sensitivity and their roles in migraine occurrence. The role of these receptors appear to shift from progesterone to estrogen as these girls progress through puberty. As the brain matures it could respond differently to hormones than a non-maturated brain." Girls may first start entering puberty between age 8-10 years old, although their first period may not be until age 12 or later. As they progress through this pubertal development, there may be cyclic hormonal fluctuations and irregular menstrual periods, explains Hershey. "We have previously demonstrated that a monthly headache pattern can begin during these early stages. As they age, their menstrual periods become more regular as do hormone fluctuations and by age 17, most girls are demonstrating adult hormone patterns," says Hershey. "But just having fluctuations in hormones or regular menstrual periods isn't enough to account for the differences in headache severity and onset displayed by younger girls compared to older teens." Martin says the research team was able to account for cyclic changes of hormones and that they were not found to be predictive of headache onset. "What I can say with the urine progesterone levels is that they were preventive in the older teens and that was more of an adult response; it is what you would expect to see in older women." "Our study suggests that female hormones play an important role in triggering headaches in young girls and that their response to hormones seems to change at the time of puberty," says Martin. "Since migraine commonly begins during puberty in girls one might ask whether a change in response to hormones might represent the initiating factor for migraine in some girls- kind of like the "big bang" theory of migraine." Martin and Hershey teamed with Scott W. Powers, PhD, professor of pediatrics at UC and co-director of the Cincinnati Children's Headache Center; Marielle Kabbouche, MD, professor of pediatrics at UC and director of the Acute and Inpatient Headache Program at Cincinnati Children's; Hope O'Brien, MD, associate professor of pediatrics at UC and program director of Headache Medicine Education at Cincinnati Children's; and Joanne Kacperski, MD, assistant professor of pediatrics at UC and director of the Post Headache Concussion Program at Cincinnati Children's. Team members also included Cincinnati Children's researchers, Janelle Allen, Susan LeCates, Polly Vaughan and Shannon White and Timothy Houle, PhD, Harvard University. The study received financial support from the National Headache Foundation and the Driskill Foundation. Martin is president of the National Headache Foundation. He is a speaker for Teva Pharmaceutical Industries, Allergan Plc., Avanir Pharmaceuticals and Depomed, Inc. Martin is also a consultant for NeuroScion, Avanir Pharmaceuticals, Depomed, Inc., Eli Lilly and Company, Amgen Inc., and Alder Biopharmaceuticals. Hershey is a consultant for Allergan Plc., Amgen Inc., Curelator Headache, Depomed, Inc. and Eli Lilly and Company.


(PR NewsChannel) / May 5, 2017 / Charlotte, North Carolina Dino Kanelos, MD, Family Medicine Physician within Carolina Family Healthcare has been named a 2017 Top Doctor in Charlotte, North Carolina. Top Doctor Awards is dedicated to selecting and honoring those healthcare practitioners who have demonstrated clinical excellence while delivering the highest standards of patient care. Dr. Dino Kanelos is an experienced and respected family practice physician, who has been in practice for more than 17 years as an independent practitioner. His career in medicine started in 1997, when he graduated from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine in Ohio. He then completed an internship at the Carolinas Medical Center, followed by a residency at CMC Union Regional Medical Center. Dr. Kanelos is certified by the American Board of Family Medicine, and he diagnoses and treats a wide range of conditions for patients across the age spectrum. He is dedicated to the patient well being by using an integrated approach of medical and preventive care.  Conditions treated by him range from managing acute and chronic medical conditions such as diabetes, hypertension and asthma, as well as everyday medical needs such as the common cold, flu, and minor surgery. In addition, he has the ability to diagnosis and treat a wide range of patients through his on-site allergy clinic, sleep clinic and weight loss clinic. Dr. Kanelos has become renowned for his patient centric focus, taking his time to talk to his patients about their concerns, as well as discussing their conditions and possible treatments. This laudable philosophy makes Dr. Dino Kanelos a very worthy winner of a 2017 Top Doctor Award. About Top Doctor Awards Top Doctor Awards specializes in recognizing and commemorating the achievements of today’s most influential and respected doctors in medicine. Our selection process considers education, research contributions, patient reviews, and other quality measures to identify top doctors.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Smog from cars and trucks is an expected health hazard in big cities, but researchers from the University of Cincinnati found pollution from truck exhaust on one of the most remote mountain roads in the world. Brooke Crowley, an assistant professor of geology and anthropology, and UC graduate student Rajarshi Dasgupta examined soil pollution along India’s Manali-Leh Highway in the Himalaya Mountains. This tortuous 300-mile route, much of it gravel or dirt, winds its way over one of the highest navigable mountain passes in the world at 17,480 feet. That’s 4,000 feet higher in elevation than the top of Wyoming’s Grand Teton. The road’s very remoteness has made it an international tourist attraction, drawing cyclists and adventurers keen on treading where so few have. Even here in one of the most distant corners of the planet, a place of desolate valleys and austere beauty, the researchers in UC’s McMicken College of Arts and Sciences found evidence of pollution from diesel exhaust. “We measured incredibly high amounts of sulfur close to the highway. Some of those values are the highest ever reported in the literature and were likely connected to truck traffic,” Crowley said. The results were published in the journal Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology. The research was funded through grants by the UC Research Council, Sigma Xi and the Oak Ridge Associated Universities. For the study, Dasgupta took soil samples at four places along the highway and at six prescribed distances, starting with samples literally on the dirt road and extending out 150 meters. Soil samples were collected at 3, 9 and 15 centimeters in depth. Dasgupta said villagers in this area burn wood and cow dung for cooking and heating their homes. The resulting smoke often contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, a known carcinogen. They tested the soil for these hydrocarbons along with sulfur, total organic compound and 10 types of heavy metal. This wide net was necessary to capture the myriad potential pollutants caused by truck traffic, Dasgupta said. The study found low levels of heavy metals and no relationship between their concentrations and distance from the highway. But they found high concentrations of sulfur, a major pollutant in the exhaust of diesel-powered engines. “This area provided us with a rare opportunity to examine the effects of multiple contaminants in a remote, diesel-dominated, mountainous environment,” Dasgupta said. Comparative studies have found that India’s diesel contains an especially high sulfur content, the UC researchers said. Sulfur dioxide in the atmosphere contributes to acid rain. “At first glance, it’s easy to consider the region to be a pretty pristine place. But there are environmental impacts from humans,” Crowley said. Last year India ratified the Paris Agreement on climate change. The world’s second-largest nation by population produces nearly 5 percent of the world’s greenhouse gases. The agreement calls for participating countries to develop a plan to address temperature rise. India has a goal of producing 40 percent of its electricity with renewable energy by 2030. Diesel fuel is popular in India because it historically cost drivers less there than regular unleaded. Most of the buses and heavy trucks that traverse the Manali-Leh Highway burn diesel fuel. Completed in the 1970s, the road between Manali and Leh sees about 50,000 vehicles per year, mostly during the summer when the mountain passes are free of snow, according to government traffic counts. Himalaya means “abode of snow” in Sanskrit. UC researchers found the highest sulfur contents at the base of the narrow ridges that are most prone to rockslides. Trucks sometimes must wait to use a single lane while construction crews make repairs. “The road is terrible, and it’s almost always under construction. There can be lines of traffic idling waiting to go over the passes,” she said. “Our results suggest that a fair amount of emissions accumulate in the soil.” UC professor Lewis Owen, the geology department head, said Crowley’s findings are in keeping with other studies on pollution impacts in the region. “It’s not surprising at all if you’ve ever been to the Himalayas and seen all the diesel trucks that use the highways,” he said. Air pollution from Asian cities also ends up contaminating the remote region’s mountains and streams, he said. “There is no pristine environment left. You see black snow deposited on glaciers and snowfields in Tibet,” Owen said. “This study is adding to our data set about how we’re degrading the planet. Humans are the biggest geologic agents now. Some researchers are calling this geologic age ‘the Anthropocene’ after the human influence.” This study and others like it show the cumulative effect of fossil fuels on the environment, he said. “The biggest challenge is for the research to be disseminated to people who can do something about it,” he said. Dasgupta said countries can monitor pollution and its resulting health effects and invest in more renewable energy and other eco-friendly alternatives to reduce their carbon footprint. “There is no doubt that increasing economic development will put more stress on environments all over the world, remote or not,” Dasgupta said. UC’s Crowley has published studies on topics as diverse as plant defenses against species of now-extinct lemurs and the long-distance treks of extinct mammoths. The study marked Crowley’s second visit to the Himalaya region. But Crowley’s scientific interests have taken her around the world. She has made four trips to Madagascar to study lemurs and reconstruct the causes and consequences of extinctions on the island. She and her students have examined the effects of sea spray on vegetation in Trinidad and looked at ways the first humans in the Canary Islands changed its ecology. “I’m a paleoecologist. I’m interested in human-animal interactions. I haven’t conducted pollution research previously, and this study with Rajarshi has stretched me in a new direction,” she said. Dasgupta said the study proved to be a learning experience for him as well. “This study was the first of its kind for me, too,” Dasgupta said. “I am a geomorphologist. I study the evolution of the landforms around us. However, as a geographer, I have always been interested in the interactions of humans with the natural environment – the central theme of all geographic research. This study fits that theme perfectly.” In the Himalayas, the researchers found native wildlife such as ibex, herds of wild asses called kiang and condors, one of the largest birds on the planet. Adding to the bucolic scene, many of the villagers who live in the foothills tend goats. “It’s a beautiful landscape. The scale is hard to comprehend when you’re driving on a plain at 15,000 feet above sea level. That’s really high. It takes a while to acclimatize to the elevation,” Crowley said. The night skies were full of stars in that sparsely inhabited part of India, with little moisture in the atmosphere to obscure the view. The arid mountains have little vegetation and lots of exposed strata of rock. “It’s a geologist’s dream. UC professors in geology have been conducting research and teaching classes in this region for many years,” she said. “I am so grateful I was able to join them in the field.” But being in the field can be challenging. The researchers had to hire an experienced driver to take them over the mountains. They used a filtration system to provide clean drinking water. In some of the low-lying areas, they had to help push their truck out of the mud. “We’ve gotten a flat tire both times we’ve gone to India. You need nerves of steel to deal with the blind curves,” she said. Crowley said places on the extreme edges of habitability such as the Himalayas could be the first to feel the effects of dramatic climate change. These mountain ranges provide water and nutrients for rivers in India. “These are places that might have perennial glaciers that are important sources of water. If the glaciers disappear, that has major implications for people who rely on that water,” she said. The samples collected for this study provide baseline data if researchers decide to revisit the topic of roadside pollution in 10 or 20 years, she said. And given her track record of travel for UC, Crowley might be the one leading that expedition, too. “One of the joys of being a professor is you have some freedom in the kinds of research questions you can explore,” she said. “I have appreciated that opportunity here at UC.”


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Loyola Medicine radiation oncologist Edward Melian, MD, has received the Chicago Radiological Society's 2017 Distinguished Service Award, the highest honor the society bestows on members. The award, also known as the Gold Medal, recognizes Dr. Melian's outstanding leadership and his many years of service to radiation oncology and radiology. Dr. Melian received the Gold Medal during the society's April 20, 2017 meeting. Dr. Melian's clinical expertise includes brain tumors, pediatric cancer, spinal tumors, HDR/LDR brachytherapy, radiosurgery, sarcomas, stereotactic body radiation therapy and trigeminal neuralgia. He has served as co-director of the lung cancer evaluation center and member of the neuro-oncology clinic at Loyola's Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center. Dr. Melian twice has been named Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine Teacher of the Year in radiation oncology. The Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology named Dr. Melian 2014 Educator of the Year. Dr. Melian is past president of the Chicago Radiological Society and has served on the society's executive committee since 1998. He has served on the Illinois Radiological Society's executive committee since 2002 and has been a councilor of the American College of Radiology for eight years. He also serves on the American College of Radiology's executive council. Dr. Melian is a long-standing member of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology, Radiological Society of North America, Gilbert H. Fletcher Society and North American Skull Base Society. He is an author of dozens of papers in peer-reviewed journals and co-author of eight book chapters on radiation oncology and neurological sciences. Dr. Melian earned his medical degree from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. He completed a residency in radiation oncology at Loyola University Medical Center and a fellowship in radiation oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Dr. Melian is an associate professor in the departments of radiation oncology and neurological surgery at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. Dr. Melian and his wife, Jan, live in Burr Ridge, Illinois. They have four children and seven grandchildren. He is an avid rower and competed in multiple National Rowing Championships between 1980 and 1995. The Chicago Radiological Society is dedicated to disseminating knowledge in the radiological sciences by hosting multiple educational meetings each year. Members also advocate for the profession at local, state and national levels. The society, founded in 1913, is the oldest, continuously active radiological society in the United States.


Air pollution from internal combustion engine vehicle use is altering the environment notably, even along the remote Manali-Leh Highway in the Himalaya Mountains in India, new research from the University of Cincinnati has found. To be more specific, the researchers examined the soil along the 300-mile route to check for the presence of common exhaust pollutants (heavy metals, sulfur, etc.). The route, which is along mostly dirt and gravel roads, passes through one of the highest mountain passes the world that can accommodate vehicles — at roughly 17,480 feet. It’s this quality that’s responsible for the highway’s status as a tourist destination (of sorts). The road, which is traversed by around 50,000 vehicles a year (mostly diesel trucks and buses), was completed in the 1970s. Commenting on the findings, an assistant professor of geology and anthropology at UC by the name of Brooke Crowley stated: “We measured incredibly high amounts of sulfur close to the highway. Some of those values are the highest ever reported in the literature and were likely connected to truck traffic.” Along with Crowley, UC graduate student Rajarshi Dasgupta was closely involved with the fieldwork involving the gathering of soil samples along the highway. The press release provides more: “For the study, Dasgupta took soil samples at 4 places along the highway and at 6 prescribed distances, starting with samples literally on the dirt road and extending out 150 meters. Soil samples were collected at 3, 9, and 15 centimeters in depth. “Dasgupta said villagers in this area burn wood and cow dung for cooking and heating their homes. The resulting smoke often contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, a known carcinogen. They tested the soil for these hydrocarbons along with sulfur, total organic compound and 10 types of heavy metal. This wide net was necessary to capture the myriad potential pollutants caused by truck traffic, Dasgupta said. “The study found low levels of heavy metals and no relationship between their concentrations and distance from the highway. But they found high concentrations of sulfur, a major pollutant in the exhaust of diesel-powered engines.” The relatively cheap diesel fuel used in most of India is, of course, particularly high in sulfur (hence the low price) — as is the case in many other poor parts of the world. “At first glance, it’s easy to consider the region to be a pretty pristine place. But there are environmental impacts from humans,” Crowley noted. That isn’t surprising, since even the deepest parts of the ocean are now home to high levels of human-created chemical pollution. Discussing the fact that the highest concentrations of soil sulfur were found towards the bases of narrow ridges where trucks often have to idle while waiting to use a single lane during repair work, Crowley stated: “The road is terrible, and it’s almost always under construction. There can be lines of traffic idling waiting to go over the passes. Our results suggest that a fair amount of emissions accumulate in the soil.” With regard to implications for the future, Dasgupta noted: “There is no doubt that increasing economic development will put more stress on environments all over the world, remote or not.” The new findings are detailed in a paper published in the journal Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology. Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech daily newsletter or weekly newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.


Learning Tech Experts to Team-Up at Webinar Clarifying Benefits of Highly Flexible LMS Platforms Talented Learning Lead Analyst John Leh will join Paradiso CEO Sach Chaudhari on May 12th to help B2B and B2C commercial training providers understand the advantages of a "best of breed" learning platform strategy. Bloomsburg, PA, April 29, 2017 --( "Building a Best-of-Breed Learning Machine: Insights for Commercial Training Companies" will be hosted by Talented Learning CEO and Lead Analyst, John Leh, along with Paradiso Solutions Founder and CEO Sach Chaudhari. This free online event is scheduled for Friday, May 12, 2017, from 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time. "Choosing the right LMS for your training business is often complex, costly and time-consuming," John Leh explained. "But in a world where technology never stands still, the critical question is how can you make the most of your investment, now and in the future? The answer is adaptability." Webinar Agenda This webinar will look at how a highly flexible infrastructure provides the kind of adaptability commercial training organizations need in a dynamic market. Specifically, John and Sach will explain how API-based logic makes it easy to modify learning platform functionality as business requirements change. Participants will learn what it takes to build their own “best-of-breed” learning solution, including: - How APIs work, and why they're integral to this approach - What the most popular LMS integrations are today (and why) - What to consider when choosing a portfolio of third-party integrations - How to identify functionality that will add value (not overhead) - What to know about managing and modifying multiple integrations over time - Costs of a best-of-breed LMS, compared to a pre-configured solution. How To Attend This Webinar Individuals can learn more and reserve a seat through the event registration page: http://bit.ly/LMSAPIsWebinar. (All registrants will receive a link to the webinar recording, even if they are unable to attend the live session.) About the Presenters Sach Chaudhari is a Silicon Valley-based expert in the field of elearning platform development. He is the CEO of Paradiso Solutions, which focuses on developing eLearning platforms. Sach studied business at Harvard Business School and computer science at the University of Cincinnati. He holds multiple patents in software engineering. Prior to founding Paradiso, Sach worked at several Silicon Valley start-ups and Fortune 500 companies. John Leh is CEO and Lead Analyst at Talented Learning. Named one of the Top 20 Global Elearning Movers and Shakers of 2017, John is a fiercely independent LMS selection consultant and blogger who helps organizations develop and implement learning technology strategies – primarily for the extended enterprise. John’s advice is based on 20 years of industry experience, serving as a trusted LMS selection and sales adviser to more than 100 learning organizations with a total technology spend of more than $65 million. About Paradiso Solutions Paradiso Solutions is a learning technology company with the DNA of Silicon Valley and a massive global presence. Founded in 2007 on the premise that elearning should be fun and engaging, Paradiso offers LMS implementation, consulting, support, hosting, training and course creation. The company’s most successful solution, Paradiso LMS, integrates gamification and social learning capabilities to create engaging experiences that help people learn better and faster. About Talented Learning Talented Learning is an independent research and consulting firm devoted to helping organizations of all sizes choose and use modern LMS solutions and related technologies for their unique business needs. Insights from Talented Learning help organizations at every stage of the learning technology implementation lifecycle, from business case development and requirements definition, to vendor evaluation and selection. The firm’s analysts also serve as trusted advisors to modern LMS vendors who must manage product positioning and roadmaps in today’s dynamic elearning landscape. To learn more visit TalentedLearning.com. Bloomsburg, PA, April 29, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Independent LMS research and consulting firm, Talented Learning today announced that it will partner with learning technology developer Paradiso Solutions at a live webinar designed to help commercial training providers understand the business benefits of using a highly flexible learning platform."Building a Best-of-Breed Learning Machine: Insights for Commercial Training Companies" will be hosted by Talented Learning CEO and Lead Analyst, John Leh, along with Paradiso Solutions Founder and CEO Sach Chaudhari. This free online event is scheduled for Friday, May 12, 2017, from 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time."Choosing the right LMS for your training business is often complex, costly and time-consuming," John Leh explained. "But in a world where technology never stands still, the critical question is how can you make the most of your investment, now and in the future? The answer is adaptability."Webinar AgendaThis webinar will look at how a highly flexible infrastructure provides the kind of adaptability commercial training organizations need in a dynamic market. Specifically, John and Sach will explain how API-based logic makes it easy to modify learning platform functionality as business requirements change.Participants will learn what it takes to build their own “best-of-breed” learning solution, including:- How APIs work, and why they're integral to this approach- What the most popular LMS integrations are today (and why)- What to consider when choosing a portfolio of third-party integrations- How to identify functionality that will add value (not overhead)- What to know about managing and modifying multiple integrations over time- Costs of a best-of-breed LMS, compared to a pre-configured solution.How To Attend This WebinarIndividuals can learn more and reserve a seat through the event registration page: http://bit.ly/LMSAPIsWebinar. (All registrants will receive a link to the webinar recording, even if they are unable to attend the live session.)About the PresentersSach Chaudhari is a Silicon Valley-based expert in the field of elearning platform development. He is the CEO of Paradiso Solutions, which focuses on developing eLearning platforms. Sach studied business at Harvard Business School and computer science at the University of Cincinnati. He holds multiple patents in software engineering. Prior to founding Paradiso, Sach worked at several Silicon Valley start-ups and Fortune 500 companies.John Leh is CEO and Lead Analyst at Talented Learning. Named one of the Top 20 Global Elearning Movers and Shakers of 2017, John is a fiercely independent LMS selection consultant and blogger who helps organizations develop and implement learning technology strategies – primarily for the extended enterprise. John’s advice is based on 20 years of industry experience, serving as a trusted LMS selection and sales adviser to more than 100 learning organizations with a total technology spend of more than $65 million.About Paradiso SolutionsParadiso Solutions is a learning technology company with the DNA of Silicon Valley and a massive global presence. Founded in 2007 on the premise that elearning should be fun and engaging, Paradiso offers LMS implementation, consulting, support, hosting, training and course creation. The company’s most successful solution, Paradiso LMS, integrates gamification and social learning capabilities to create engaging experiences that help people learn better and faster.About Talented LearningTalented Learning is an independent research and consulting firm devoted to helping organizations of all sizes choose and use modern LMS solutions and related technologies for their unique business needs. Insights from Talented Learning help organizations at every stage of the learning technology implementation lifecycle, from business case development and requirements definition, to vendor evaluation and selection. The firm’s analysts also serve as trusted advisors to modern LMS vendors who must manage product positioning and roadmaps in today’s dynamic elearning landscape. To learn more visit TalentedLearning.com. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Talented Learning, LLC


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

ASHLAND, OH, May 08, 2017-- Larisa Elt has been named director of publisher services at Bookmasters , one of the largest providers of customized book publishing services in the United States.Elt will lead efforts to service and sell Bookmasters and Baker & Taylor supply chain services with an emphasis on print-on-demand (POD) and third party distribution services She will specifically be responsible for working with existing and prospective academic, professional, university, and scholarly press publishers, as well as contribute to Bookmasters' collaborative sales strategy for its suite of publisher services, which also includes fulfillment and warehousing eBook distribution and sales , and editorial and design services Elt formerly held senior sales and marketing positions with McGraw-Hill Education, Jessica Kingsley Publishers, Oxford University Press, and Bloomsbury Continuum.She will officially begin her new role at Bookmasters on May 15, filling the position formerly held by Elizabeth Scarpelli, now the director of the new University of Cincinnati Press."Larisa is a consummate professional with a proven track record in business development, at building customer partnerships, and as a team player who delivers results," said Ken Fultz, general manager at Bookmasters. "We're extremely happy to have Larisa as a member of our sales leadership team."About BookmastersBookmasters, based in Ashland, Ohio, is one of the largest providers of customized publisher services in the United States. For more than 40 years, Bookmasters has offered services to publishers and authors such as book manufacturing, print sales and distribution, warehousing and fulfillment, eBook sales and distribution, and editorial and design services. To learn more, visit www.bookmasters.com Bookmasters is owned by Follett Corporation and is a strategic partner with Baker & Taylor , premier worldwide distributor of books, digital content, and entertainment products.


TORONTO, ONTARIO--(Marketwired - May 4, 2017) - Arch Biopartners, Inc., (Arch or the Company) (TSX VENTURE:ARCH)(OTCBB:ACHFF) a portfolio-based biotechnology company, today announced Dalton Pharma Services (Dalton) has launched the good manufacturing practice (GMP) campaign for AB569, the Company's inhalation drug candidate for treating antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections in the lungs. Dalton will be responsible for the GMP preparation and filling of AB569 into glass vials. These vials will then form part of the clinical kits required to support the phase I safety trial for AB569 at the Cincinnati Veterans Affairs Medical Center (CVAMC) later this year. Catalent Inhalation, a division of Catalent Pharma Solutions, (Catalent) previously completed the initial stability and formulation studies for AB569, which were both important production milestones in preparing a GMP pharmaceutical product for human trials and eventual drug approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and other health authorities. Catalent will continue to be involved in the final testing of the GMP supply of AB569 once the vial filling is completed by Dalton to enable the release of the final drug product. As these tasks near completion, Arch management expects to provide updates regarding the expected delivery time of the drug product to CVAMC to enable the start of the phase I safety trial. About AB569 and Anti-biotic resistant airway infections in COPD and CF patients AB569 was invented by Dr. Daniel Hassett, Professor at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, to treat antibiotic resistant bacterial lung infections, which is a significant problem for patients with either CF or COPD. AB569 is also a candidate treatment for antibiotic resistant urinary tract infections, skin infections and as a catheter lock solution. The University of Cincinnati has exclusively licensed AB569 to Arch. AB569, as a bactericidal compound, constitutes an innovative potential treatment for dealing with pulmonary bacterial infections, some of which are resistant to all 26 approved antibiotics in the United State alone. In pre-clinical studies, AB569 has demonstrated significant ability to kill many types of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Arch has received orphan drug designation for AB569 from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of CF patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. Arch has also received an orphan medicinal product designation from the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of CF patients. CF patients are predisposed to bacterial lung infections due to abnormal mucus production in the lungs and airways. In particular, Pseudomonas aeruginosa infects 40% of CF patients between the ages of 6 and 10 years of age. By the age of 17, the frequency of infection increases to 60% and reaches approximately 75% of all CF patients between the ages of 25 and 34. The mucoid form of P. aeruginosa is a very challenging infection to treat due to its high resistance to both antibiotics and phagocyte-mediated killing. Once patients present with the mucoid form of P. aeruginosa, their overall lung function precipitously declines, resulting in a poor overall clinical prognosis. Like CF patients, people with COPD have compromised innate immune systems and respiratory conditions that are vulnerable to chronic bacterial infections that are often refractory to conventional antibiotic regimens. COPD is a major health problem worldwide and its prevalence is increasing (over 325,000,000 patients world-wide), ranked by the World Health Organization as the third leading cause of death. COPD is a general term to describe progressive lung diseases which includes chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and non-reversible asthma. Most cases are caused by inhaling pollutants, predominantly from smoking or exposure to lung pollutants in highly polluted cities around the world as well as the workplace. Dalton Chemical Laboratories Inc. o/a Dalton Pharma Services is a Health Canada approved and FDA registered cGMP contract service provider of integrated chemistry, drug development and manufacturing services to the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. Dalton brings 30 years of experience to their client's projects and emphasize quality, speed and flexibility. Dalton can accelerate a drug development program by integrating process development, cGMP API manufacturing and sterile or solid finished dose manufacturing all at a single location. For Dalton's full range of in-house services including cGMP sterile fill/finish services please visit www.dalton.com. CMO 2016 and 2017 Leadership Awards in the categories of Quality, Reliability, Capabilities, Expertise, Compatibility and Development from Life Science Leader reflects Dalton's ongoing commitment to their clients, peers and the business community. In 2016 Dalton was certified as "A Great Place to Work." Arch Biopartners Inc. is focused on the development of innovative technologies that have the potential to make a significant medical or commercial impact. Arch works closely with the scientific community, universities and research institutions to advance and build the value of select preclinical technologies, develop the most promising intellectual property, and create value for its investors. Arch has established a diverse portfolio that includes AB569, a potential new treatment for antibiotic resistant bacterial infections; Metablok, a potential treatment for inflammation, sepsis and cancer metastasis; MetaMx, which targets elusive brain tumor initiating cells; and, 'Borg' peptide coatings that increase corrosion resistance and decrease biofilm on various medical grade metals and plastics. For more information on Arch Biopartners, other public documents Arch has filed on SEDAR and its technologies including, please visit www.archbiopartners.com. All statements, other than statements of historical fact, in this news release are forward looking statements that involve various risks and uncertainties, including, without limitation, statements regarding the future plans and objectives of the Company. There can be no assurance that such statements will prove to be accurate. Actual results and future events could differ materially from those anticipated in such statements. These and all subsequent written and oral forward-looking statements are based on the estimates and opinions of management on the dates they are made and are expressly qualified in their entirety by this notice. The Company assumes no obligation to update forward-looking statements should circumstances or management's estimates or opinions change. Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.


This year's David Martin Carter Mentor Award was presented to Dr. Richard Edelson, Chair and Professor, Department of Dermatology, Yale School of Medicine. For over four decades Dr. Richard Edelson has influenced the field of dermatology as a distinguished dermatologist, researcher, educator and esteemed mentor. He is a notable author and editor, having worked on hundreds of scholarly articles, other writings, and six books. Dr. Edelson is the past president of the Dermatology Foundation, and has held leadership positions with the National Cancer Institute and Association of Professors of Dermatology. "We were proud to honor Dr. Richard Edelson with the 2017 David Martin Carter Mentor Award," commented Dr. Steven R. Cohen, Chair of the Mentor Award Committee. "A world-renowned dermatologist and researcher, Dr. Edelson is the 25th honoree to receive this prestigious award. He has been a devoted mentor and educator, and is truly laudable in the field of dermatology." Recent recipients of the David Martin Carter Mentor Award include Dr. Jouni Uitto (2013) of Jefferson Medical College, Dr. Gerald Lazarus (2014) of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and Dr. Howard Baden of Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital (2015), and Dr. Barbara A. Gilchrest of Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital (2016). The Research Achievement Awards were instituted in 1989 to identify established scientists in investigative dermatology and cutaneous biology. This year they recognize those who have greatly advanced work related to autoimmune and inflammatory skin diseases, melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer, vitiligo, and pigment cell disorders. "This year's Research Achievement Award winners are truly an exceptional group, all of whom have made great strides in their respective fields," said Dr. David Norris. "ASA is proud to celebrate their outstanding achievements." Research Achievement Award in Vitiligo & Pigment Cell Biology Zalfa Abdel-Malek, PhD of University of Cincinnati Cancer Institute Research Achievement Award in Melanoma & Skin Cancer Ruth Halaban, PhD of Yale School of Medicine Research Achievement Award in Psoriasis James G. Krueger, MD, PhD of The Rockefeller University Research Achievement Award in Autoimmune & Inflammatory Skin Disorders Robert E. Tigelaar, MD of Yale School of Medicine "On behalf of the Board of Directors of American Skin Association, I would like to commend all of this year's award recipients," said Howard P. Milstein, Chairman of ASA. "Their work in the field of investigative dermatology is vital to the search for a cure for melanoma, skin cancer and other skin diseases. We are pleased to support these outstanding researchers." ABOUT AMERICAN SKIN ASSOCIATION A unique collaboration of patients, families, advocates, physicians and scientists, ASA has evolved over thirty years as a leading force in efforts to defeat melanoma, skin cancer, and other skin diseases. Established to serve the now more than 100 million Americans – one third of the U.S. population – afflicted with skin disorders, the organization's mission remains to: advance research, champion skin health - particularly among children, and drive public awareness about skin disease. For more information, visit americanskin.org. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/american-skin-association-asa-honors-outstanding-researchers-during-annual-meeting-of-the-society-for-investigative-dermatology-300447174.html


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

LAS VEGAS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--UNLV President Len Jessup announced today that Desiree Reed-Francois has agreed to terms and will become the university’s athletics director, effective June 1. An introductory news conference is scheduled for 2 p.m. April 18 at UNLV. Reed-Francois, current deputy athletics director at Virginia Tech, has more than two decades of leadership experience as an athlete, attorney and athletics administrator, and is considered one of the industry’s rising stars. At UNLV, she will oversee all aspects of the athletics program, including general operations, fiscal affairs, facilities, strategic planning and external relations. She will become the first Hispanic female athletics director at the FBS level. “There’s a great sense of enthusiasm and momentum in the community and at UNLV, and I’m honored to join this university and work with our coaches, staff and student-athletes to build on the solid foundation in place,” said Reed-Francois. “College athletics have the unique ability to educate, unite and inspire. Together, we will do all of that at UNLV and build a championship culture that leads academically and athletically.” Reed-Francois served as second-in-command to the athletics director at Virginia Tech since 2014, and was responsible for external relations and day-to-day operations for 22 sports, more than 600 student-athletes and 14 facilities. An administrator with an eye toward balancing the complex external and internal facets of a Power Five athletics department, she partnered on budget development for all athletics units at Virginia Tech, prepared the department’s facilities master plan, redesigned fundraising strategy and revitalized the university’s student-athlete success program. Under her leadership, overall ticket, marketing and licensing revenue rose by more than 20 percent the past two years, and the institution secured the largest corporate development gifts in program history. This included a season ticket sellout for football and marked attendance increases in men’s and women’s basketball, baseball, soccer and softball. She was one of just four women in the nation responsible for day-to-day operations of a Power Five football program, and helped orchestrate the most-attended football game in history in 2016 when Virginia Tech and Tennessee met in front of more than 156,000 fans at Bristol Motor Speedway. Working closely with Virginia Tech athletics director Whit Babcock, Reed-Francois was instrumental in the recruitment and hiring of current Hokies head football coach Justin Fuente (the reigning ACC Coach of the Year) and coaches for women’s basketball and lacrosse – all of which recently enjoyed or are in the midst of stellar seasons. She also led the search for recently hired first-year volleyball coach Jill Lytle Wilson. “Desiree has tremendous depth of experience at the highest levels of college athletics and a clear vision for the future of Rebel athletics, and I couldn’t be more pleased to welcome her to UNLV,” said Jessup. “She has shown the ability to manage the complex internal demands of a large Power Five athletics department, while simultaneously energizing fans and supporters in all sports, and I’m confident she’ll successfully move UNLV athletics forward.” Prior to Virginia Tech, Reed-Francois spent two years at the University of Cincinnati as senior associate athletics director and senior woman administrator. There, she was a member of the executive staff whose duties included external affairs, sport oversight, and negotiation of the university’s contract with the Cincinnati Bengals for use of Paul Brown Stadium during a campus stadium renovation. For several months in 2014, she also served as interim athletics director. “Desiree has a great way about her,” said John Swofford, commissioner of the Atlantic Coast Conference. “She's kind and considerate, balanced by a strength of conviction. She's a great communicator, and her prior experiences provide solid preparation for her position as an athletics director." A former student-athlete at UCLA (rowing), Reed-Francois is a strong advocate for student-athletes, and understands the importance of leadership development and mentorship in ensuring their future success. “Leadership development is at the core of college athletics, and it’s important that we create an environment leading to opportunities to positively impact lives and develop leaders in our student-athletes, our coaches and our staff,” said Reed-Francois. She has worked at the University of Tennessee – where she was the first female in SEC history to oversee men’s basketball – Fresno State, Santa Clara, San Jose State, the University of California-Berkeley and the University of San Francisco. Prior to that, she was a practicing lawyer, and also spent time as a legal associate for the Oakland Raiders and the NFL’s Management Council. Reed-Francois earned a bachelor’s degree from UCLA and a juris doctorate from the University of Arizona College of Law. She is heavily involved in athletics administration at the national level, participating in the Division 1 Athletics Directors Leadership Institute and Fellows Program, the Women Leaders in College Sports’ Executive Institute and as a member of the College Football Playoff Committee’s operations committee. In 2016, she was named one of 12 senior athletics administrators as “NEXT UP” by College AD’s panel of respected athletics directors. Reed-Francois and her husband Joshua have a son, Jackson.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

DELRAY BEACH, Fla.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Progeny Genetics LLC (Progeny), a leading risk modeling pedigree software for clinicians, announced today that Jamie L’Heureux, MS, CGC has been appointed to the role of Chief Executive Officer. For 20 years, Progeny has assisted healthcare providers with patient screening, risk analysis, order processing, clinical review, and letter generation. Ms. L’Heureux brings over 12 years of experience in both research and clinical genetics as a Board Certified genetic counselor. She received her Master’s degree in Medical Genetics from the University of Cincinnati’s Genetic Counseling Training Program and began her career at the University of Iowa as a Research Coordinator for several international research projects. Ms. L’Heureux’s strong background in software development includes implementing new laboratory information management systems and designing patient-facing Family History Questionnaires. For the past three years, Ms. L’Heureux served as Software Product Manager at Progeny, and was integral to development of Progeny’s letter generation feature and integrated risk models. “I am excited to be able to use my past experience as a Progeny user, both in the research and clinical genetic counseling settings, to help build upon the strong foundation that Progeny already has established, and make it even more user-friendly for our healthcare provider customers and their patients,” said Ms. L’Heureux. “We have some exciting improvements coming up that are focused on saving clinicians’ time and simplifying their workflow.” As a prominent member of the Progeny leadership team, Ms. L’Heureux helps guide the future of the company by leveraging her extensive experience as a genetic counselor. In addition, her software development knowledge provides a solid foundation for Ms. L’Heureux to harness the needs of Progeny’s healthcare provider clientele. Progeny’s software is available in over 2,400 unique sites in 80 countries worldwide. Progeny has played a prominent role in advancing science by bringing family history to the forefront of genetic healthcare, with the intention that the information provided to healthcare providers will assist them with early detection and intervention to patients with genetic predispositions. Progeny became a subsidiary of Ambry Genetics (Ambry), a genetic testing company based in Aliso Viejo, California, in April 2015. Progeny’s software helps healthcare providers analyze hereditary family history data so clinicians can effectively identify genetic risk factors in patients and their families. For more information about Progeny’s services and support, visit here. Progeny is a subsidiary of Ambry Genetics, providing customizable family history, pedigree, sample, and genetic data management software solutions to healthcare providers worldwide. Using Progeny’s sophisticated technology, healthcare providers can collect family history from patients, review and edit pedigrees, run integrated risk models, order and review genetic testing, and integrate into the electronic medical record, allowing healthcare providers to embrace personalized healthcare like never before. For more information about Progeny, visit www.progenygenetics.com. Ambry Genetics is both College of American Pathologists (CAP)-accredited and Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified. Ambry leads in clinical genetic diagnostics and genetics software solutions, combining both to offer the most comprehensive testing menu in the industry. Ambry has established a reputation for sharing data while safeguarding patient privacy, unparalleled service, and responsibly applying new technologies to the clinical molecular diagnostics market. For more information about Ambry Genetics, visit www.ambrygen.com.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Kentucky Symphony Orchestra closes its 25th Season Saturday, May 13 at 7:30 p.m. with Sondheim vs. Webber: The Battle of Broadway. Composers Stephen Sondheim and Andrew Lloyd Webber (who coincidently have the same birthday — March 22) ruled the boards on Broadway and the West End for most of the 1970s-80s, compiling hit song after hit song in a string of award winning musicals. Home-grown bonafide Broadway stars Pamela Myers and Jessica Hendy will be featured, singing the hit tunes of these living legends. In his early teens Stephen Sondheim became a protege of renowned lyricist Oscar Hammerstein II. Sondheim’s big break came when he was asked to write the lyrics for the Leonard Bernstein and Jerome Robbins' project that became West Side Story. From there Gypsy, and his own musical A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum followed, before he penned a string of hit musicals including: Company, Follies, A Little Night Music, Sweeney Todd and Into the Woods. Sondheim won an Oscar and multiple Tony and Grammy Awards, plus a Pulitzer Prize. Sir Andrew Lloyd Webber was born into a musical family in Britain. His early efforts in musical theatre were influenced by the works of Richard Rodgers and Frederick Lowe. Webber teamed up with lyricist Tim Rice for his first shows — Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, Jesus Christ Superstar and Evita. In the 80s Cats, Starlight Express and Phantom of the Opera more than paid this impresario /composer’s bills. Webber also won his share of Academy, Tony, Grammy and other awards. Pamela Myers, fresh out of the University of Cincinnati’s College Conservatory of Music, landed in New York and in the cast of Sondheim’s musical Company in 1970. Mesmerized by the pace of the big city, Pam’s description of her encounters on the subway was immortalized in the song written for her by Sondheim and placed in the show (“Another Hundred People”). Years later Jessica Hendy’s portrayal of Grizabella on the National Tour of Webber’s Cats brought her to Broadway in 2000 to close the longest running musical of all time (since eclipsed by Phantom and Chicago). She is currently back in the show’s Broadway revival. CCM students, soprano, Paulina Villarreal and baritone, Sola Fadiran, and Danny McDowell from the Cincinnati Boy Choir will be on hand to add range and variety to the 15 hit musicals included (complete playlist attached). Let mom decide the winner. Join the KSO with Pamela Myers, Jessica Hendy and cast for an evening featuring hits by two of musical theater’s titans, 7:30 p.m., Saturday, May 13, 2017 at Greaves Concert Hall, on the campus of NKU in Highland Heights, KY. Reserved seating tickets are $19, $27, $35 (children ages 6-18 are 50% off), and are available online at kyso.org, or by phone (859) 431-6216. About the KSO: For 25 years The Kentucky Symphony Orchestra has taken the “phony” out of symphony via live thematic concerts that culturally enrich, educate and entertain the residents of Northern Kentucky and Greater Cincinnati. The KSO performs throughout Northern Kentucky with three series of concerts.


Fu F.,Guangdong University of Technology | Dionysiou D.D.,University of Cincinnati | Liu H.,CAS Chongqing Institute of Green and Intelligent Technology
Journal of Hazardous Materials | Year: 2014

Recent industrial and urban activities have led to elevated concentrations of a wide range of contaminants in groundwater and wastewater, which affect the health of millions of people worldwide. In recent years, the use of zero-valent iron (ZVI) for the treatment of toxic contaminants in groundwater and wastewater has received wide attention and encouraging treatment efficiencies have been documented. This paper gives an overview of the recent advances of ZVI and progress obtained during the groundwater remediation and wastewater treatment utilizing ZVI (including nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI)) for the removal of: (a) chlorinated organic compounds, (b) nitroaromatic compounds, (c) arsenic, (d) heavy metals, (e) nitrate, (f) dyes, and (g) phenol. Reaction mechanisms and removal efficiencies were studied and evaluated. It was found that ZVI materials with wide availability have appreciable removal efficiency for several types of contaminants. Concerning ZVI for future research, some suggestions are proposed and conclusions have been drawn. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Despa S.,University of California at Davis | Lingrel J.B.,University of Cincinnati | Bers D.M.,University of California at Davis
Cardiovascular Research | Year: 2012

Aims Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) is essential in regulating [Na+]i, and thus cardiac myocyte Ca2+ and contractility via Na+/Ca2+ exchange. Different NKA-α subunit isoforms are present in the heart and may differ functionally, depending on specific membrane localization. In smooth muscle and astrocytes, NKA-α2 is located at the junctions with the endo(sarco)plasmic reticulum, where they could regulate local [Na+], and indirectly junctional cleft [Ca 2+]. Whether this model holds for cardiac myocytes is unclear. Methods and resultsThe ouabain-resistant NKA-α1 cannot be selectively blocked to assess its effect. To overcome this, we used mice in which NKA-α1 is ouabain sensitive and NKA-α2 is ouabain resistant (SWAP mice). We measured the effect of ouabain at low concentration on [Na +]i, Ca2+ transients, and the fractional sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release in cardiac myocytes from wild-type (WT; NKA-α2 inhibition) and SWAP mice (selective NKA-α1 block). At baseline, Na+ and Ca2+ regulations are similar in WT and SWAP mice. For equal levels of total NKA inhibition (∼25%), ouabain significantly increased Ca2+ transients (from ΔF/F0 1.5 ± 0.1 to 1.8 ± 0.1), and fractional SR Ca2+ release (from 24 ± 3 to 29 ± 3) in WT (NKA-α2 block) but not in SWAP myocytes (NKA-α1 block). This occurred despite a similar and modest increase in [Na+]i (∼2 mM) in both groups. The effect in WT mice was mediated specifically by NKA-α2 inhibition because at a similar concentration ouabain had no effect in transgenic mice where both NKA-α1 and NKA-α2 are ouabain resistant. ConclusionNKA-α2 has a more prominent role (vs. NKA-α1) in modulating cardiac myocyte SR Ca 2+ release. © 2012 The Author.


Background: Worsening renal function (WRF) is an ominous complication in patients with acute heart failure syndrome (AHFS). Few data are available with regard to the clinical implications of transient versus persistent WRF in this setting. Methods and Results: We studied 467 patients with AHFS and creatinine measurements at baseline and on days 2, 5, 14, and 30. WRF (≥0.5 mg/dL increase in serum creatinine above baseline at any time point) was defined as persistent when serum creatinine remained ≥0.5 mg/dL above baseline throughout day 30, and transient when creatinine levels subsequently decreased to <0.5 mg/dL above baseline. WRF occurred in 115 patients, and was transient in 39 patients (33.9%). The 6-month mortality rates were 17.3%, 20.5%, and 46.1% in patients without WRF, transient WRF, and persistent WRF, respectively. In a multivariable Cox model, compared with patients with stable renal function, the adjusted hazard ratio for mortality was 0.8 (95% CI 0.4-1.7; P = .58) in patients with transient WRF and 3.2 (95% CI 2.1-5.0; P < .0001) in patients with persistent WRF. Conclusion: Transient WRF is frequent among patients with AHFS. Whereas persistent WRF portends increased mortality, transient WRF appears to be associated with a better outcome as compared with persistent renal failure. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Wiczer B.M.,University of Cincinnati | Thomas G.,University of Cincinnati
Science Signaling | Year: 2012

Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) plays a central role in translating nutrient abundance into cell growth and proliferation. Although specifi c proteins have been described as mediators of this nutrient input, their mechanistic linkage remains incomplete. Two studies have added phospholipase D (PLD) as a mediator of nutrients to mTORC1. Furthermore, these studies link PLD and its product phosphatidic acid to previously identifi ed activators of mTORC1 signaling, including the class III phosphoinositide-3 kinase, and provide evidence of the existence of two parallel nutrient-regulated pathways that converge on mTORC1 at late endosomes and/or lysosomes.


Kupfer D.J.,University of Pittsburgh | Wulsin L.,University of Cincinnati
Annual Review of Medicine | Year: 2013

Mental disorders represent a significant global burden whose effects are exacerbated by gaps in diagnosis and service provision. A substantial number of individuals seek services not through specialty psychiatric clinics but through primary care. Thus, the interface between psychiatry and the rest of medicine represents an appropriate area of focus in which to improve the detection and treatment of mental disorders. Development of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) can play a key role in this process. DSM-5 is expected to include specific revisions in diagnostic criteria, chapter organization, text structure, and classification approach that are designed to improve use of DSM by nonpsychiatrist physicians. Furthermore, revisions to DSM-5 will inform development of the primary care version of DSM-5. The goal is to publish a manual that enhances clinical utility in a manner that is concise and more amenable to use in primary care. Copyright © 2013 by Annual Reviews.


Teng T.,University of Cincinnati | Thomas G.,University of Cincinnati | Mercer C.A.,University of Cincinnati
Current Opinion in Genetics and Development | Year: 2013

Ribosome biogenesis and protein synthesis are two of the most energy consuming processes in a growing cell. Moreover, defects in their molecular components can alter the pattern of gene expression [. 1,2]. Thus it is understandable that cells have developed a surveillance system to monitor the status of the translational machinery. Recent discoveries of causative mutations and deletions in genes linked to ribosome biogenesis have defined a group of similar pathologies termed ribosomopathies. Over the past decade, much has been learned regarding the relationship between growth control and ribosome biogenesis. The discovery of extra-ribosomal functions of several ribosome proteins and their regulation of p53 levels has provided a link from ribosome impairment to cell cycle regulation. Yet, evidence suggesting p53 and/or Hdm2 independent pathways also exists. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding the mechanisms underlying the pathologies of ribosomopathies and discuss the relationship between ribosome production and tumorigenesis. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Patent
University of Cincinnati and Shriners Hospitals For Childrens | Date: 2010-06-18

A device, and method of making the device, capable of therapeutic treatment and/or for in vitro testing of human skin. The device may be used on skin wounds for burned, injured, or diseased skin, and provides structures and functions as in normal uninjured skin, such as barrier function, which is a definitive property of normal skin. The device contains cultured dermal and epidermal cells on a biocompatible, biodegradable reticulated matrix. All or part of the cells may be autologous, from the recipient of the cultured skin device, which advantageously eliminates concerns of tissue compatibility. The cells may also be modified genetically to provide one or more factors to facilitate healing of the engrafted skin replacement, such as an angiogenic factor to stimulate growth of blood vessels. The inventive device is easy to handle and manipulate for surgical transplant, can be made into large sheets to minimize the number of grafts required to cover a large surface area to be treated, and can be produced within the time frame to treat a burned individual requiring a skin graft.


Patent
University of Cincinnati and ECOSIL Technologies LLC | Date: 2010-07-27

Compositions and methods for treating metal substrates and/or bonding metal substrates to polymeric materials, such as rubber, are provided. The compositions include at least one substantially hydrolyzed amino silane and at least one substantially hydrolyzed sulfur-containing silane Optionally, the compositions include a nano-size particulate material. The compositions provide coatings on metal substrates for protecting the metal from corrosion and for adhering rubber-like polymeric compositions to the metal with polymer-to-metal vulcanization conditions less dependent on the coating thickness, and with use of less coating materials.


Patent
University of Cincinnati | Date: 2010-03-01

A method of treating a reactive airway disease in a subject comprising administering at least one peroxidase inhibitor in association with administration of at least one -agonist.


Patent
Cincinnati Nde Ltd. and University of Cincinnati | Date: 2014-01-30

Systems, methods and computer storage mediums accurately measure wall thickness in a region of interest included in complex curved structures. Embodiments of the present disclosure relate to generating a wall thickness loss distribution map of a region of interest that provides an accurate representation of wall thickness for the region of interest included in a complex curved structure. The wall thickness loss distribution map is generated from a two-dimensional model of the wall thickness loss distribution of the region of interest. The two-dimensional model is converted from a three-dimensional representation of the wall thickness loss distribution of the region of interest. The three-dimensional representation of the wall thickness is generated by ultrasonic waves generated by a transducer system that propagated through the region of interest.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Missile Defense Agency | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.50K | Year: 2014

The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate the feasibility of novel surface preparation methods that are easier to apply on metal substrates in various field environments while still enhancing the corrosion protective performance of topcoats. This is made possible by the characteristics of a patented pretreatment technology developed at Ecosil that can be spray or immersion applied. This novel pretreatment utilizes special silanes and water-soluble inorganic compounds to form a nano-structured hybrid pretreatment coating that can greatly enhance the paint adhesion of metal substrates. In addition, the hybrid pretreatment is compatible with both water and organic solvents. In this proposed work, we will make use of this unique characteristic to mix the pretreatment solution with cleaning agents such as water and organic solvents to form 2-in-1 cleaning-pretreatment systems. This effort would significantly simplify standard multi-step surface preparation procedures, and would make the surface preparation more field-friendly. Approved for Public Release 14-MDA-7979 (16 September14).


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.2.2.1-1 | Award Amount: 39.56M | Year: 2013

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability, leading to great personal suffering to victim and relatives, as well as huge direct and indirect costs to society. Strong ethical, medical, social and health economic reasons therefore exist for improving treatment. The CENTER-TBI project will collect a prospective, contemporary, highly granular, observational dataset of 5400 patients, which will be used for better characterization of TBI and for Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER). The generalisability of our results will be reinforced by a contemporaneous registry level data collection in 15-25,000 patients. Our conceptual approach is to exploit the heterogeneity in biology, care, and outcome of TBI, to discover novel pathophysiology, refine disease characterization, and identify effective clinical interventions. Key elements are the use of emerging technologies (biomarkers, genomics and advanced MR imaging) in large numbers of patients, across the entire course of TBI (from injury to late outcome) and across all severities of injury (mild to severe). Improved characterization with these tools will aid Precision Medicine, a concept recently advocated by the US National Academy of Science, facilitating targeted management for individual patients. Our consortium includes leading experts and will bring outstanding biostatistical and neuroinformatics expertise to the project. Collaborations with external partners, other FP7 consortia, and international links within InTBIR, will greatly augment scientific resources and broaden the global scope of our research. We anticipate that the project could revolutionize our view of TBI, leading to more effective and efficient therapy, thus improving outcome and reducing costs. These outcomes reflect the goals of CER to assist consumers, clinicians, health care purchasers, and policy makers to make informed decisions, and will improve healthcare at both individual and population levels.


News Article | December 16, 2016
Site: www.PR.com

Turf Nation Will No Longer Manufacture Turf for UBU Sports Brand Turf Nation has ceased manufacturing synthetic turf for the UBU Sports brands. Dalton, GA, December 16, 2016 --( The Turf Nation synthetic turf is manufactured using a highest grade C8 Polyethylene fiber that remains available thru Turf Nation. Over several years, this specially formulated fiber has proven its superior performance for durability & wear ability. Turf Nation’s C8 fiber is in hundreds of synthetic turf fields throughout United States, Canada, Mexico & Puerto Rico. Turf Nation has supplied synthetic turf, over the past eight years, that has been installed in many high-profile facilities including: US Bank Stadium (Vikings) NRG Stadium (Texans) MetLife Stadium (New York Giants & New York Jets) Paul Brown Stadium (Bengals) Mercedes Benz Super Dome (Saints) NFL Hall of Fame (Tom Benson Stadium) NFL Pro Bowl (Aloha Stadium) Ball Parks of America University of Wisconsin-Oshgosh (Titan Stadium) Nike World Headquarters (Bo Jackson Field) University of Cincinnati (Nippert Stadium) University of Oregon (Pape Field) University of Kentucky (Commonwealth Stadium) University of Houston (TDECU Stadium) Southern University (Ace W Mumford Stadium) New Mexico State University (Aggie Memorial Stadium) Tulane University (Yulman Stadium) St Cloud State (Husky Stadium) Saint Olaf College (Manitou Field) University of Hawaii (Aloha Stadium) Northwestern College (Reynolds Field) 11 NFL practice facilities 3 NFL spring training camp venues Countless prestigious collegiate and high school facilities Dalton, GA, December 16, 2016 --( PR.com )-- The high quality synthetic turf manufactured by Turf Nation is being used by 14 National Football teams including the NRG Stadium (home of the Houston Texans and the site of the upcoming 2017 NFL-Super Bowl LI) & the U.S. Bank Stadium (home of the Minnesota Vikings & venue of the 2018 Super Bowl LII). The previous NFL Super Bowl in 2013 (New Orleans-Superdome) and 2014 (New York-MetLife Stadium) have been played on turf manufactured by Turf Nation Inc. www.turfnation.com The Turf Nation synthetic turf is manufactured using a highest grade C8 Polyethylene fiber that remains available thru Turf Nation. Over several years, this specially formulated fiber has proven its superior performance for durability & wear ability. Turf Nation’s C8 fiber is in hundreds of synthetic turf fields throughout United States, Canada, Mexico & Puerto Rico.Turf Nation has supplied synthetic turf, over the past eight years, that has been installed in many high-profile facilities including:US Bank Stadium (Vikings)NRG Stadium (Texans)MetLife Stadium (New York Giants & New York Jets)Paul Brown Stadium (Bengals)Mercedes Benz Super Dome (Saints)NFL Hall of Fame (Tom Benson Stadium)NFL Pro Bowl (Aloha Stadium)Ball Parks of AmericaUniversity of Wisconsin-Oshgosh (Titan Stadium)Nike World Headquarters (Bo Jackson Field)University of Cincinnati (Nippert Stadium)University of Oregon (Pape Field)University of Kentucky (Commonwealth Stadium)University of Houston (TDECU Stadium)Southern University (Ace W Mumford Stadium)New Mexico State University (Aggie Memorial Stadium)Tulane University (Yulman Stadium)St Cloud State (Husky Stadium)Saint Olaf College (Manitou Field)University of Hawaii (Aloha Stadium)Northwestern College (Reynolds Field)11 NFL practice facilities3 NFL spring training camp venuesCountless prestigious collegiate and high school facilities Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Turf Nation


News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Bullen Ultrasonics, a globally recognized pioneer and leader in ultrasonic machining, announced today its achievement of certification to the aerospace industry’s AS9100 quality management standard. The certification recognizes Bullen’s excellence in machining ceramic matrix composite (CMC) components for the aerospace industry. AS9100 is the single common quality management standard for the aviation, space and defense industries, commonly referred to as the aerospace industry. The standard is based on organizational aerospace manufacturing processes and emphasizes the need to satisfy internal, governmental and regulatory requirements. It is endorsed by all major aerospace regulators, including the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). "Bullen’s achievement of the AS9100 certification puts us in elite company," said Tim Beatty, president of Bullen. "Our commitment to adhere to AS9100, the strictest of quality standards for the aerospace industry, will open many more doors for us and further propel the growth of our machining services for ceramic matrix composites.” Bullen Ultrasonics provides precision machining services for glass, ceramics and advanced materials to high technology industries. With the largest concentration of ultrasonic machining equipment in the world, Bullen machines components for aircraft engine parts; fiber optic networking; smart, implantable medical devices; DNA analysis and sequencing; pressure sensors for air bags in automobiles and trucks; environmental monitoring; and computer chips. CMCs are “super ceramics” that are as strong as metals but are two-thirds lighter in weight and can operate at much higher temperatures than the most advanced alloys. This combination allows aerospace engineers to design smaller engines with lighter components that generate more power, burn less fuel and don’t need as much air for cooling. Bullen recently experienced a period of significant capital investment in automation technology, established itself at the forefront of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) machining for the aerospace/defense industry, and solidified its leadership in the semiconductor, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), transportation/automotive, and medical and life sciences industries. Bullen was recently honored by the Dayton Business Journal’s 2016 Manufacturing Awards program,winning first place in its Innovation category. Bullen was recognized for the combination of its unique, cutting-edge ultrasonic machining methods, the company’s transition to automation in its equipment design, a company culture that promotes a continuous improvement process for employees, and its partnerships with local universities and research institutes, including University of Dayton, University of Cincinnati, Wright State University, Miami (Ohio) University, Miami Valley Career Technology Center and Sinclair Community College, among others. About Bullen Ultrasonics, Inc.: A globally recognized pioneer and leader in ultrasonic machining, Bullen Ultrasonics provides precision machining services for glass, ceramics and advanced materials to high technology markets. A leading manufacturer of high quality components to the semiconductor, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), transportation/automotive, defense, aerospace, and medical and life sciences industries, Bullen has the largest concentration of ultrasonic machining equipment in the world. Its services also include computer numeric control (CNC) machining, abrasive jet machining and micro electrical discharge machining (EDM) processing. Founded in 1971, Bullen is a privately-held, family-owned business based in Eaton, Ohio. For more information, visit http://www.bullentech.com or follow on Twitter @bullentech.


News Article | November 4, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

A new list from the Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) has identified the Best Physical Therapy Programs at colleges across the U.S. for 2016-2017. As a leading higher education information and resource provider, the site compared data on four-year and two-year schools offering vocational and physical therapy assistant training on-campus and online, giving top honors to Idaho State University, Florida Gateway College, College of Central Florida, Pensacola State College, University of Maine at Presque Isle and Western Iowa Tech Community College, San Juan College, Rhodes State College, Kansas City Kansas Community College and Delta College respectively. “In a field with some of the biggest job growth projections over the next decade, these vocational and physical therapy assistant programs provide a positive opportunity for students,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “The schools on these lists are offering exemplary training options for students interested in becoming physical therapy assistants or moving onto doctoral-level studies.” In order to earn a spot on the Community for Accredited Online Schools’ lists, colleges must meet specific base requirements. Each must hold regional accreditation and be registered as public or private not-for-profit institutions. Providing career placement services is another standard guideline all schools must comply with. To determine where each college ranks on each list, the site compares more than a dozen school-specific statistics, including student-teacher ratios and financial aid availability. A complete list of each school’s ranking and details on the data analysis and methodology used to determine which schools earned Best Physical Therapy Programs honors can be found at: Two-year schools on the Best Physical Therapy Programs list for 2016-2017 (alphabetical): Athens Technical College Baltimore City Community College Capital Community College Carl Albert State College Chattanooga State Community College Chippewa Valley Technical College Clark State Community College Del Mar College Delaware Technical Community College - Owens Delaware Technical Community College - Stanton/Wilmington Delta College Eastern Arizona College Edison State Community College Great Falls College Montana State University Guilford Technical Community College Hinds Community College Hutchinson Community College Itawamba Community College Jefferson College Jefferson Community and Technical College Kansas City Kansas Community College Kennebec Valley Community College Kilgore College Lone Star College Lorain County Community College Morgan Community College Mountwest Community and Technical College Murray State College North Central State College Northeast Community College Northeast Texas Community College Owens Community College Rhodes State College Roane State Community College San Juan College Sinclair College Somerset Community College South Arkansas Community College Southeast Community College State Fair Community College Technical College of the Lowcountry Trident Technical College Tulsa Community College Wallace State Community College - Hanceville Walters State Community College Washington State Community College Washtenaw Community College Weatherford College Western Iowa Tech Community College Zane State College Four-year schools on the Best Physical Therapy Programs list for 2016-2017 (alphabetical): Arkansas State University - Main Campus Arkansas Tech University Baker College of Flint Baker College of Muskegon Broward College California University of Pennsylvania Clarkson College College of Central Florida College of Southern Nevada Daytona State College Dixie State University Florida Gateway College Florida State College at Jacksonville Gulf Coast State College Hodges University Idaho State University Indian River State College Keiser University - Fort Lauderdale Kent State University at Ashtabula Kent State University at East Liverpool Lake Washington Institute of Technology Louisiana College Miami Dade College Missouri Western State University Mount Aloysius College New England Institute of Technology New York University Pennsylvania State University - Penn State Hazleton Pennsylvania State University - Penn State Shenango Pensacola State College Polk State College Seminole State College of Florida Siena Heights University South Texas College Southern Illinois University - Carbondale Southwestern Oklahoma State University St. Catherine University St. Petersburg College State College of Florida - Manatee-Sarasota SUNY College of Technology at Canton Touro College University of Cincinnati - Clermont College University of Evansville University of Indianapolis University of Maine at Presque Isle University of Saint Francis - Fort Wayne Villa Maria College Vincennes University Washburn University About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Leading online higher education resource center AffordableCollegesOnline.org has released it’s ranking of the Best Online Vocational & Trade Schools for 2016-2017. Lists include the top 100 schools offering trade or vocational training programs online, with Washburn University, University of Southern Mississippi, Siena Heights University, Weber State University and Fort Hays State University earning the highest scores in the four-year school category and East Mississippi Community College, San Juan College, Hutchinson Community College, New Mexico Junior College and Tulsa Community College earning the highest scores in the two-year school category. "Trade and vocational programs are making more of an impact when it comes to online education than ever before,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and Founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. "Although many trades require hands-on training, the schools on our lists are giving students more flexibility by offering vocational learning programs online.” Schools are evaluated on a variety of cost and quality standards to determine their position on the Best Online Vocational & Trade Schools list by AffordableCollegesOnline.org. Each is required to meet specific base standards; all institutions must be accredited, public or private not-for-profit entities and must offer in-state tuition below $5,000 per year at two-year schools or $25,000 per year at four-year schools. Eligible institutions are divided by whether they are two-year or four-year schools, weighed on factors such as financial aid offerings and online program variety, then scored against one another to determine rank. More information on the data points, methodology and specific scores given to each school on the Best Online Vocational & Trade Schools list can be found online at: Two-year schools receiving honors on the 2016-2017 Best Online Vocational & Trade Schools list: Atlanta Technical College Barton County Community College Bluegrass Community and Technical College Central Georgia Technical College Central Piedmont Community College Central Texas College Cincinnati State Technical and Community College Cossatot Community College of the University of Arkansas Cowley County Community College Crowder College East Arkansas Community College East Mississippi Community College Edgecombe Community College Fayetteville Technical Community College Gateway Community and Technical College Georgia Piedmont Technical College Grayson College Great Falls College Montana State University Holmes Community College Hutchinson Community College Indian Hills Community College Itawamba Community College Kansas City Kansas Community College Madisonville Community College Metropolitan Community College Moraine Park Technical College Navarro College New Mexico Junior College North Dakota State College of Science Northeast Iowa Community College-Calmar Northwest Mississippi Community College Oconee Fall Line Technical College Ozarks Technical Community College Pamlico Community College Panola College Pitt Community College San Juan College Seward County Community College and Area Technical School Shoreline Community College Sinclair College Southwest Virginia Community College Spokane Community College State Fair Community College Surry Community College Tallahassee Community College Three Rivers Community College Tulsa Community College Tyler Junior College Volunteer State Community College Western Nebraska Community College Four-year schools receiving honors on the 2016-2017 Best Online Vocational & Trade Schools list: California State University - East Bay Central Washington University Clarion University of Pennsylvania Clarkson College Clayton State University College of Southern Nevada East Carolina University East Tennessee State University Ferris State University Florida International University Fort Hays State University Granite State College Hampton University Hodges University Indiana State University Liberty University Morehead State University North Carolina Central University Northern Arizona University Northern State University Oklahoma State University-Main Campus Old Dominion University Oregon Institute of Technology Pennsylvania College of Technology Siena Heights University South Dakota State University Southern Polytechnic State University St. Petersburg College SUNY College of Technology at Canton The University of Alabama The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Tiffin University University of Cincinnati - Main Campus University of Louisiana at Monroe University of Massachusetts - Amherst University of Massachusetts - Lowell University of Michigan - Ann Arbor University of Mississippi University of North Carolina at Charlotte University of North Dakota University of Southern Mississippi Utah Valley University Vaughn College of Aeronautics and Technology Virginia Commonwealth University Washburn University Weber State University Western Carolina University Western Kentucky University Wichita State University William Woods University AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) has published it’s 2016-2017 Best Radiology Technician Programs ranking for 2016-2017. An online leader for higher education resources and information, AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org compared data from both online and on-campus programs, highlighting the following schools as those receiving top scores: Clarkson College, Valencia College, Weber State University, Idaho State University and Southern Illinois University Carbondale for four-year schools; Pitt Community College, Owensboro Community & Technical College, Somerset Community College, Washtenaw Community College and Chattanooga State Community College for two-year schools. “With higher median pay and job growth projections than many occupations in the U.S., radiology tech programs are a positive choice for college-bound students,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “Hundreds of radiology tech programs are available around the nation, but this list pinpoints the schools who offer the best combination of affordability, quality and flexibility for aspiring radiology technologists.” In order to qualify for the list, AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org requires all schools with a Radiology Technician program to meet several base criteria points. All colleges and universities must be accredited, two- or four-year public or private not-for-profit institutions. Each schools must also offer career placement services to its grads. Each school was ranked and scored by comparing more than a dozen data points, including cost and financial aid reports, student-teacher ratios and more. A full list of the 2016-2017 Best Radiology Technician Programs in the U.S. is included below. More details on the specific data and methodology used can be found at the link below, along with specific information on where each school placed in the ranking: Two-year schools recognized for providing the Best Radiology Technician Programs: Ashland Community and Technical College Bluegrass Community and Technical College Bunker Hill Community College Cape Fear Community College Chattanooga State Community College Chippewa Valley Technical College Columbus State Community College Community College of Denver Cuyahoga Community College East Central College Eastern Maine Community College Galveston College Georgia Northwestern Technical College Guilford Technical Community College Hagerstown Community College Hillsborough Community College Jefferson Community and Technical College Lakeland Community College Lakeshore Technical College Lone Star College Lorain County Community College Middlesex Community College Mountwest Community and Technical College North Arkansas College Northeast Community College Northwest Mississippi Community College Orangeburg-Calhoun Technical College Owens Community College Owensboro Community and Technical College Pitt Community College Rend Lake College Rhodes State College Roane State Community College Sinclair College Somerset Community College South Arkansas Community College Southcentral Kentucky Community & Technical College Southeast Arkansas College Southeast Community College Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College Southern Union State Community College SUNY Broome Community College Tallahassee Community College Technical College of the Lowcountry Truckee Meadows Community College Tulsa Community College Washtenaw Community College West Virginia Northern Community College Western Nebraska Community College Western Wyoming Community College Four-year schools recognized for providing the Best Radiology Technician Programs: Arkansas State University - Main Campus Baptist Memorial College of Health Sciences Bellevue College Bluefield State College Boise State University Briar Cliff University Broward College Clarkson College College of Southern Nevada Concordia University - Wisconsin Daytona State College Eastern Florida State College Florida SouthWestern State College Florida State College at Jacksonville Gulf Coast State College Idaho State University Keiser University - Fort Lauderdale La Roche College LIU Post Miami Dade College Minot State University Missouri Southern State University Morehead State University Mount Aloysius College Newman University Notre Dame of Maryland University Palm Beach State College Pensacola State College Saint Catharine College Santa Fe College Shawnee State University Siena Heights University South Florida State College Southern Illinois University - Carbondale Southwestern Oklahoma State University St. Catherine University St. Luke's College St. Petersburg College State College of Florida - Manatee-Sarasota Suffolk University University of Charleston University of Cincinnati - Blue Ash College University of Hartford University of Jamestown University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Sioux Falls University of St Francis Valencia College Vincennes University Weber State University About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


Ocean chemistry has strongly shaped the evolution of life and biogeochemical cycles on the Earth. Although it was known that the early oceans (>520 million years ago) were characterized by strong water-column stratification and limited oxidant availability, the detailed chemical structure of early Earth oceans has remained unclear. Recently, researchers in Wuhan have developed a model of the spatial structure of early-Earth ocean chemistry that significantly advances our understanding of how oceanic conditions influenced the evolution of higher life on our planet. The results of their study, "A theoretical prediction of chemical zonation in early oceans (>520 Ma)", was published as the cover article of Science China: Earth Sciences in Nov. 2015. The lead author of the paper is Chao Li, a professor of biogeochemistry at China University of Geosciences (Wuhan). Dr. Li's research team used the chemistry of sediment porewaters in modern productive continental margins and seawater in modern anoxic restricted basins as a model for that of early Earth oceans. On this basis, they developed a highly detailed, idealized chemical zonation model for the oxygen-deficient oceans that existed prior to 520 million years ago. "Earlier studies have shown that early-Earth oceans were generally stratified and had anoxic deep waters with very limited oxidant availability. These features are also characteristic of sediment porewaters of modern productive continental margins and the seawater of modern anoxic restricted basins, in which multiple chemical zones are developed owing to limited oxygen availability. It is inconceivable that similar chemical zones would not have developed in early-Earth oceans given the known limited oxygen availability at that time," said Dr. Li. He further explained that similar redox zones from shallow nearshore to deep offshore regions of the early oceans may have developed, including oxic (O2-containing), nitrogenous (NO3--NO2--enriched), manganous-ferruginous (Mn2+ or Fe2+-enriched), sulfidic (H2S-enriched), methanic (CH4-enriched), and ferruginous (Fe2+-enriched). These zones were dynamically maintained by a combination of processes including surface-water oxygenation by atmospheric free oxygen, nitrate reduction beneath the chemocline, nearshore manganese-iron reduction, sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, and hydrothermal Fe2+ inputs from the deep ocean. According to the researchers, one key difference between modern and ancient oceans is the spatial pattern of oxidant availability. Whereas modern oceans show vertical chemical gradients, early oceans are likely to have had pronounced lateral gradients owing to strong chemical inputs from rivers and mid-ocean hydrothermal systems, creating a series of wide, laterally inclined chemical zones across continental shelves. "The different spatial distribution of chemical zones in early oceans is likely to have had a major impact on early life." said Thomas Algeo, a professor at the University of Cincinnati (USA), who collaborated on the study. Dr. Algeo pointed that "our detailed chemical model for early-Earth oceans is consistent with increasing evidence that early-ocean chemistry was highly heterogeneous and temporally dynamic. For example, recent studies have demonstrated that a sulfidic zone was widely developed at intermediate water depths in the global ocean prior to 520 million years ago." "Most previous research on early-ocean chemistry consists of case studies based on one or a few sites. While these efforts are, without question, essential to reconstructing the ancient ocean's chemical state, the strong heterogeneity of early-ocean chemistry has made evaluation of its relationship to the evolution of early life extraordinarily difficult," said Bing Shen, a professor of geobiology at Peking University. "The precise redox framework proposed in Li et al. (2015) may help us to reconcile those conflicts and to precisely evaluate the co-evolutionary relationship between Earth's ocean chemistry and life". "The chemical zonation proposed for the early oceans likely reflects spatial patterns of oceanic oxygenation by rising atmospheric O2 levels in Earth history-- that is, direct oxygenation by atmospheric O2 from surface waters to bottom waters and indirect oxygenation by atmospheric O2 through input of continental weathering oxidants from nearshore shallow waters to distal deep waters. Thus, our model not only provides a robust theoretical framework for future studies of the evolution of ocean chemistry and biogeochemical cycles in early Earth history, but also may be of significance in understanding how progressive oxygenation of the Earth oceans influenced the evolution of early life," Dr. Li said.


News Article | November 19, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

CHICAGO--Patients with diabetes and suffering from acute kidney injury (AKI), proteinuria and uncontrolled blood sugar experience a sharp reduction in the number of years they have healthy renal function before being forced onto dialysis, according to researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine. The UC research team looked at 3,679 individuals with type 2 diabetes from a de-identified cohort of patients at the Cincinnati Veterans Affairs Medical Center and who were followed for a 10-year period, explains Charuhas Thakar, MD, professor and director of the UC Division of Nephrology, Kidney CARE Program. The three risk factors--AKI, proteinuria (leakage of protein into the urine) and poor blood sugar control--were used to classify patients into three groups, he says. Patients with diabetes who had none of these risk factors were compared against a group that had all three risk factors (severe risk) and another group that had only one or two of the risk factors (medium risk). "There are established risk factors in the diabetes literature," says Thakar. "One of them is the level of sugar control; if you don't control your sugar well your kidney disease progresses faster or if you leak protein in the urine and you have proteinuria, it tends to be an independent predictor of kidney disease in diabetics." Typically, a 50-year-old person with type 2 diabetes without any of the risk factors has kidney function of about 60 percent and is likely to lose renal function at around 1.9 to 2 percent annually, says Thakar. That means this individual would have 25 to 30 years before kidney failure forces the need for dialysis allowing the patient to have normal renal function up to age 80. But if the same individual with diabetes suffered from all three risk factors the loss of renal function would accelerate to nearly 5 percent annually, says Thakar. This means the patient would need dialysis within 12 years at age 62. For a patient with two of the three risk factors, there is still a medium risk of accelerated loss of renal function, he explains. "This is a big impact for a patient," says Thakar, who is corresponding author for the research. "You are talking about pruning 18 to 20 years off of when you will have to go on dialysis. It's very important information for a patient and clinician to know. The study is among the first to examine the interrelationship between these traditional risk factors for its effect on kidney disease progression." The research will be presented orally and as a poster at the American Society of Nephrology Kidney Week, on Saturday, Nov. 19, 2016, in Chicago, by Mollie Sands, a fourth-year medical student in the UC College of Medicine. She is first author of the research, while Anthony Leonard, PhD, UC assistant professor of family medicine, is also a co-author. Thakar says 29 million Americans have diabetes and one in three will have chronic kidney disease. He says patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease are among the most vulnerable to sustain acute kidney injury when hospitalized. Physicians need to consider looking at patients with diabetes who have different risk factors separately and design tailored strategies to both monitor and treat them, says Thakar. "We have the same tools in our arsenal to help these patients in terms of their progression of kidney disease; so our research raises questions and challenges the field of physicians," says Thakar. "We should find ways to monitor these three groups of patients differently and target our therapies. Future studies need to evaluate how we are going to change the trajectory of loss of renal function in these patients who may suffer a faster decline by either modifying existing treatment or discovering new therapies." The study was funded by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and the University of Cincinnati.


News Article | October 13, 2016
Site: www.gizmag.com

In order to monitor their blood glucose levels, diabetics typically have to perform finger-prick blood tests as often as several times a day. Thanks to research being conducted by scientists from the University of Texas at Dallas, however, a non-invasive alternative may be on the way. Led by Dr. Shalini Prasad, a team at the university is creating an electrochemical biosensor that continuously measures glucose in the wearer's sweat. The flexible device incorporates stacked metal/metal-oxide thin films within a porous polymer-based textile, and utilizes the same basic chemistry and enzymatic reaction found in blood glucose testing strips. That said, instead of being able to analyze a full drop of blood, the sensor will have to make do with the small amount of sweat that would be present on the skin underneath an adhesive patch, or perhaps beneath a health-tracking watch. To address this challenge, the scientists designed the sensor in such a way that a very small amount of sweat can spread evenly across its underside, making full contact with the integrated electrodes. Additionally, the surface topography of the polymer has been altered in such a way that it traps glucose oxidase molecules, essentially amplifying their signal. The sensor also compensates for the fact that throughout the day, the chemical composition of a person's sweat can change. More specifically, the pH can go up or down, plus exercise or stress can cause increases in compounds such as cortisol and lactic acid. All told, in order to get an accurate reading, less than a microliter of sweat is required – that's about as much liquid as "would fit in a cube the size of a salt crystal." Although the prototype has already been successfully tested on human sweat samples, a consumer version is likely still a few years away. In the meantime, diabetics might also want to keep an eye on similar sweat-analyzing technologies being developed by the University of Cincinnati, Korea's Institute for Basic Science and Fraunhofer. The research was described in a paper recently published in the journal Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical.


News Article | December 16, 2016
Site: co.newswire.com

Today, Turf Nation announced that it has ceased manufacturing synthetic turf for the UBU Sports Brand. The high quality synthetic turf manufactured by Turf Nation is being used by 14 National Football teams including the NRG Stadium (home of the Houston Texans and the site of the upcoming 2017 NFL-Super Bowl LI) & the U.S. Bank Stadium (home of the Minnesota Vikings & venue of the 2018 Super Bowl LII). The previous NFL Super Bowl in 2013 (New Orleans-Superdome) and 2014 (New York-MetLife Stadium) have been played on turf manufactured by Turf Nation Inc. www.turfnation.com The Turf Nation synthetic turf is manufactured using a highest grade C8 Polyethylene fiber that remains available through Turf Nation. Over several years, this specially formulated fiber has proven its superior performance for durability & wear ability. Turf Nation’s C8 fiber is in hundreds of synthetic turf fields throughout United States, Canada, Mexico & Puerto Rico. Turf Nation has supplied synthetic turf, over the past eight years, that has been installed in many high-profile facilities including: US Bank Stadium (Vikings) NRG Stadium (Texans) MetLife Stadium (New York Giants & New York Jets) Paul Brown Stadium (Bengals) Mercedes Benz Super Dome (Saints) NFL Hall of Fame (Tom Benson Stadium) NFL Pro Bowl (Aloha Stadium) Ball Parks of America University of Wisconsin-Oshgosh (Titan Stadium) Nike World Headquarters (Bo Jackson Field) University of Cincinnati (Nippert Stadium) University of Oregon (Pape Field) University of Kentucky (Commonwealth Stadium) University of Houston (TDECU Stadium) Southern University (Ace W Mumford Stadium) New Mexico State University (Aggie Memorial Stadium) Tulane University (Yulman Stadium) St Cloud State (Husky Stadium) Saint Olaf College (Manitou Field) University of Hawaii (Aloha Stadium) Northwestern College (Reynolds Field) 11 NFL practice facilities 3 NFL spring training camp venues Countless prestigious collegiate and high school facilities​


News Article | November 9, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org, the Community for Accredited Online Schools has released it’s ranking of the 2016-2017 Best Paralegal Schools in the U.S. Using more than a dozen unique statistics from both online and on-campus Paralegal programs across the country, the higher education resource provider awarded top marks to Madonna University, Hampton University, Colorado Mountain College, Utah Valley University and Mount Saint Joseph University for four-year schools and Metropolitan Community College, Cape Fear Community College, Cincinnati State Technical and Community College, Johnson County Community College and South Piedmont Community College for two-year schools. “Earning a paralegal degree can open many doors for students interested in law,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “These schools are going above and beyond to provide their students the stepping stones to success, whether they plan to go on to law school or begin a paralegal career immediately after graduation.” Schools earning a spot on the Best Paralegal Schools ranking are required to meet several standards. Each must hold regional accreditation and be registered as public or private not-for-profit institutions. Schools must also provide career placement services to students after graduation. The Community for Accredited Online Schools analyzes school-specific statistics, such as graduation rates, student teacher ratios and financial aid availability, to determine a score and rank for each qualifying college. The Best Two-Year and Four-Year Schools with Paralegal Programs in the U.S. are listed alphabetically below. Rankings and school scores can be found at the link below, along with details on the data and methodology used: Baker College of Auburn Hills Bay Path University College of Our Lady of the Elms College of Saint Mary College of Southern Nevada Colorado Mountain College Daemen College Davenport University Eastern Kentucky University Gannon University Hampton University Highline College Humphreys College – Stockton, Modesto Campuses Husson University Idaho State University Lewis-Clark State College Liberty University Madonna University Marian University Marist College Midland College Missouri Western State University Mount Saint Joseph University Pennsylvania College of Technology Roger Williams University Saint Mary of the Woods College St Petersburg College State College of Florida - Manatee-Sarasota Suffolk University Texas State University Touro College University of Akron Main Campus University of Alaska Fairbanks University of Arkansas - Fort Smith University of Cincinnati - Clermont College University of Cincinnati - Main Campus University of Detroit Mercy University of Great Falls University of Hartford University of La Verne University of Louisville University of North Georgia University of Toledo Ursuline College Utah Valley University Washburn University Webster University Wesley College Widener University - Delaware Campus William Woods University About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leader in higher education resources (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org), has released a ranking of the 100 Best Online Colleges in the nation for 2016-2017. The site honors the top 50 two-year schools and top 50 four-year schools respectively, with the University of Southern California, Harvard University, Drexel University, Canisius College and Concordia University Wisconsin earning the highest scores for overall excellence in online learning among four-year programs. East Mississippi Community College, Western Wyoming Community College, Kansas City Kansas Community College, Frank Phillips College and Tulsa Community College earned top scores among two-year schools. “Online education is becoming a bigger part of the college landscape each year,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “Schools being honored here are providing excellent education options online, upholding industry-leading quality standards and maximizing student success through support services.” The Community for Accredited Online Schools requires colleges to meet several quality standards to be considered for placement on their rankings and lists. Schools must, at minimum, hold both regional accreditation and be public or private not-for-profit institutions. Qualifying colleges are also scored and ranked based on school-specific statistics such as student-teacher ratios and graduation rates. A full list of the rankings and the data points and methodology used to determine the Best Online Colleges in the nation can be found at: 2016-2017 Best Online Colleges, schools included on the two-year list: Allen County Community College Amarillo College Barton County Community College Bluegrass Community and Technical College Central Georgia Technical College Central Texas College College of Southern Idaho Columbus State Community College Crowder College Dakota College at Bottineau Diablo Valley College East Mississippi Community College Fayetteville Technical Community College Forsyth Technical Community College Frank Phillips College Gateway Community and Technical College Guilford Technical Community College Haywood Community College Holmes Community College Hutchinson Community College Kansas City Kansas Community College Laramie County Community College Lenoir Community College Madisonville Community College Maysville Community and Technical College Mesa Community College Metropolitan Community College Northeast Community College Northwest Mississippi Community College Owensboro Community and Technical College Palo Alto College Pamlico Community College Panola College Pitt Community College Rio Salado College San Antonio College Sinclair College Somerset Community College Southwestern Community College Southwestern Oregon Community College St. Philip's College Stanly Community College State Fair Community College Three Rivers Community College Truckee Meadows Community College Tulsa Community College Tyler Junior College Wayne Community College West Kentucky Community and Technical College Western Wyoming Community College 2016-2017 Best Online Colleges, schools included on the four-year list: Auburn University Ball State University Buena Vista University Canisius College Champlain College Clemson University Columbia University in the City of New York Concordia University - Wisconsin Dallas Baptist University Drexel University Duquesne University East Carolina University Gardner-Webb University Granite State College Hampton University Harvard University Illinois Institute of Technology Indiana Wesleyan University Iowa State University Johns Hopkins University Kansas State University Keiser University - Ft. Lauderdale Lehigh University LeTourneau University Missouri University of Science and Technology New York University North Carolina State University at Raleigh Oklahoma State University - Main Campus Pennsylvania State University - Main Campus Prescott College Regis University Saint Joseph's College of Maine Saint Joseph's University Saint Leo University Siena Heights University Southwestern College Texas A & M University - College Station The University of Alabama University of Cincinnati - Main Campus University of Denver University of Florida University of Idaho University of Missouri - Columbia University of South Carolina - Columbia University of Southern California University of St. Francis University of Virginia - Main Campus Villanova University Washington State University Webster University About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


News Article | November 6, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) has announced it’s picks for the nation’s Best Medical Assistant Programs for 2016-2017. Comparing online and on-campus Medical Assistant programs around the U.S., the higher education information and resource provider awarded top overall scores to Youngstown State University, Goodwin College, North Seattle College, Peninsula College and the University of Alaska Fairbanks among four-year programs, and Pitt Community College, Haywood Community College, Augusta Technical College, Piedmont Community College and Cincinnati State Technical and Community College among two-year programs. “Like many other jobs in healthcare, there is a growing demand for up-and-coming medical assistants,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “Students looking for the best programs in the nation can turn to these schools, who we found to offer the best combination of overall quality and value when it came to Medical Assistant education.” To qualify for a spot on the Best Medical Assistant Programs list, schools must meet several standard requirements. Colleges must hold regional accreditation and be registered as public or private not-for-profit entities. Each must also provide career placement services to students. Scoring for qualifying schools is determined by comparison of over a dozen value-based metrics and statistics, including student-teacher ratios and financial aid offerings. A complete list of colleges on the Best Medical Assistant Programs list is included below. Details on where each specifically ranks and the data and methodology used can be found at: Alamance Community College Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College Athens Technical College Atlanta Technical College Augusta Technical College Blue Ridge Community and Technical College Bluegrass Community and Technical College Bunker Hill Community College Carteret Community College Central Community College Central Georgia Technical College Cincinnati State Technical and Community College Clark State Community College Columbus Technical College Eastern Arizona College Eastern New Mexico University - Roswell Campus Edison State Community College Forsyth Technical Community College Fox Valley Technical College Gateway Community and Technical College Georgia Northwestern Technical College Haywood Community College Henderson Community College Lanier Technical College Maysville Community and Technical College Metropolitan Community College Mid-State Technical College Moultrie Technical College Mount Wachusett Community College Mountwest Community and Technical College Nash Community College North Georgia Technical College Northland Pioneer College Oconee Fall Line Technical College Pamlico Community College Piedmont Community College Pitt Community College Richmond Community College Santa Fe Community College Savannah Technical College South Georgia Technical College South Piedmont Community College Southeastern Technical College Southern Regional Technical College Southwestern Community College Southwestern Oregon Community College Stanly Community College Terra State Community College Wilkes Community College Wiregrass Georgia Technical College Arkansas Tech University Baker College of Auburn Hills Baker College of Clinton Township Baker College of Flint Baker College of Muskegon Baker College of Port Huron Broward College Cabarrus College of Health Sciences California College San Diego California College San Diego Centralia College City College - Fort Lauderdale Clarion University of Pennsylvania CollegeAmerica - Cheyenne CollegeAmerica - Colorado Springs CollegeAmerica - Denver CollegeAmerica - Flagstaff CollegeAmerica - Fort Collins CollegeAmerica - Phoenix Columbia Basin College Concordia University-Wisconsin Davenport University Daytona State College Eastern Florida State College Florida State College at Jacksonville Goodwin College Highline College Idaho State University Jackson College Keiser University - Fort Lauderdale Lake Washington Institute of Technology Lewis-Clark State College Miami Dade College Palm Beach State College Peninsula College Pensacola State College Remington College - Shreveport Campus Remington College - Tampa Campus Seattle Community College - North Campus South Texas College Stevens-Henager College Trocaire College University of Akron Main Campus University of Alaska Anchorage University of Alaska Fairbanks University of Cincinnati - Blue Ash College University of Cincinnati - Clermont College University of North Georgia Wright Career College Youngstown State University About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


More evidence reveal that our prehistoric human ancestors had interbred with Neanderthals and another archaic line of ancient humans called Denisovans hundreds of thousands of years ago. A previous study conducted by scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology says that Neanderthals and Denisovans may have only split 430,000 years ago. If the findings of this study are correct, it would mean that the species Homo antecessor could be the common ancestor of modern humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans, scientists said. Now, a new study found that the genes of the Denisovans and Neanderthals who had interbred with our prehistoric ancestors actually live on today among modern Asians, Europeans, and in the Melanesians of Papua New Guinea. Led by scientist Svante Paabo who is also from the Max Planck Institute, the international team of researchers focused on the genetic code of Melanesians in particular, comparing the DNA sequences of 35 modern humans on islands off the New Guinea coast with DNA from Neanderthals and Denisovans. Their findings confirm theories that our human ancestors did not interbreed with other hominin species until after they left Africa. Even today, there is barely a trace of Neanderthal DNA in modern Africans. When our ancient human ancestors started traveling across Eurasia, they lived side-by-side and had a few run-ins with other species. Paabo said diverse populations of modern humans have various levels of Neanderthal DNA, and this means that ancient humans often ran into Neanderthals as they moved across Europe. "Substantial amounts of Neanderthal and Denisovan DNA can now be robustly identified in the genomes of present-day Melanesians," the researchers say. Molecular anthropologist Andrew Merriwether of Binghamton University said this is the first time that full genomes from blood samples collected 15 years ago in Melanesia have been sequenced. He said he was surprised that Denisovan and Neanderthal DNA even made it out as far as Papua New Guinea. They know that people have been on the island at least 48,000 years, especially because they have found human remains whose age go back that far. However, no one has ever been able to connect the remains to any other place, he said. "When you compare most of their genome sequences, they don't cluster with any other group," said Merriwether. "They've been there and been isolated for a very, very long time." In fact, researchers found that the genetic connection between ancient hominins and modern Melanesians were between 1.9 to 3.4 percent. This meant that modern human ancestors and early humans have interbred on at least three separate occasions. Benjamin Vernot of the University of Washington, who is also part of the study, said he believes that Denisovans and Neanderthals liked to wander. "And yes, studies like this can help us track where they wandered," added Vernot. The question now is this: how did the Denosivans make their way to the island of Melanesia? "Most people know back a few generations, maybe five generations, but where did we come from before that? That's what we want to find out," added Merriwether. The findings of the study are featured in the journal Science. The authors were from the Max Planck Institute, Binghamton University, Italy's University of Ferrara, the University of Washington, Temple University, the Coriell Institute for Medical Research, the University of Cincinnati, and the Institute for Medical Research in Papua New Guinea.


News Article | December 5, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

AffordableCollegesOnline.org, a leading higher education information and resource provider, has identified the Best Online Psychology Programs in the nation for 2016-2017. Comparing cost, quality and student performance metrics at hundreds of colleges and universities around the country, the site determined Washburn University, Colorado Christian University, Brescia University, Lesley University and the University of Texas Permian Basin to be among the top four-year schools and East Mississippi Community College, Western Wyoming Community College, Allen County Community College, Central Texas College and Holmes Community College to be among the top two-year schools for online psychology students. "Online psychology programs encompass all levels of learning, for students interested in earning everything from an associate to doctorate degree,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and Founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. “Our list recognizes schools who have established online programs for psychology majors that go above and beyond to promote student success and while providing the best overall value.” To be eligible for placement on an AffordableCollegesOnline.org ranking, schools must meet several minimum requirements. Each must be an accredited, public or private not-for-profit institution and offer in-state tuition rates below $5,000 annually at two-year schools or below $25,000 annually at four-year schools. More than a dozen additional statistics are compared to score each qualifying school for final rankings, including financial aid offerings, graduation rates and more. For complete details on data and methodology used, as well as a full ranking and scorecard for each online psychology program listed visit: Two-year schools on the Best Online Psychology Program ranking for 2016-2017: Allen County Community College Alvin Community College Amarillo College Barstow Community College Barton County Community College Bunker Hill Community College Carl Albert State College Central Texas College Chemeketa Community College Citrus College Cleveland State Community College Coastline Community College Cochise College Colorado Northwestern Community College Columbia State Community College Dakota College at Bottineau Diablo Valley College East Mississippi Community College Foothill College Gateway Community and Technical College Hazard Community and Technical College Holmes Community College Hopkinsville Community College Iowa Central Community College Kansas City Kansas Community College Madisonville Community College Mt San Jacinto Community College District Navarro College North Central State College Northcentral Technical College Northeast State Community College Northern Virginia Community College Northwest Mississippi Community College Odessa College Pellissippi State Community College Santa Rosa Junior College Sinclair College Somerset Community College Spokane Falls Community College Thomas Nelson Community College Truckee Meadows Community College Tyler Junior College West Hills College - Coalinga West Hills College - Lemoore West Valley College Western Oklahoma State College Western Wyoming Community College Williston State College Four-year schools on the Best Online Psychology Program ranking for 2016-2017: Bellevue University Brescia University Central Washington University Chadron State College Chaminade University of Honolulu Colorado Christian University Fort Hays State University Goodwin College Granite State College Indiana State University Indiana Wesleyan University Judson College Lee University Lesley University Mercy College Northern Arizona University Northwestern State University of Louisiana Ohio Christian University Oregon State University Pennsylvania State University - Main Campus Pennsylvania State University - Altoona Pennsylvania State University - Brandywine Saint Leo University Southwestern Adventist University Southwestern Assemblies of God University Southwestern College SUNY Empire State College The University of Alabama The University of Texas of the Permian Basin Thomas University Tiffin University Troy University Union College Union Institute & University University of Alaska Fairbanks University of Arkansas at Little Rock University of Cincinnati - Main Campus University of Great Falls University of Louisiana at Monroe University of Maine at Augusta University of Maryland - University College University of Memphis University of North Dakota University of Northern Colorado University of the Southwest Utah State University Viterbo University Washburn University Washington State University Western New Mexico University AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has ranked the best two- and four-year colleges with online programs in the state of Ohio for 2017. Among four-year schools a total of 41 made the list, with University of Akron, University of Toledo, University of Cincinnati, Ohio University and Ashland University coming in as the top five schools. The state’s top 18 two-year schools were also honored, with Sinclair College, Cincinnati State Technical and Community College, Belmont College, Edison State Community College and Columbus State Community College taking the top five spots. Schools were ranked based on over a dozen different data points. “Student enrollment in schools within the University System of Ohio has grown 8 percent over the past decade,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. “As more students pursue post-secondary degrees, the schools on our list are providing more flexible, high-quality learning opportunities outside the traditional classroom.” To be included on the Best Online Schools list, colleges must meet specific base requirements, including being institutionally accredited and public or private not-for-profit institutions. Each college is scored based on additional criteria that includes its employment and counseling resources, student/teacher ratios, graduation rates and financial aid availability. For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: Ohio’s Best Online Four-Year Schools for 2017 include the following: Ashland University Baldwin Wallace University Bowling Green State University-Main Campus Case Western Reserve University Cedarville University Cleveland State University Defiance College Franciscan University of Steubenville Franklin University God’s Bible School and College Hiram College Kent State University at Kent Kent State University at Salem Kettering College Malone University Miami University-Oxford Mount Carmel College of Nursing Mount Saint Joseph University Mount Vernon Nazarene University Muskingum University Notre Dame College Ohio Christian University Ohio University-Main Campus Otterbein University Shawnee State University The University of Findlay Tiffin University Union Institute & University University of Akron Main Campus University of Cincinnati-Main Campus University of Dayton University of Mount Union University of Northwestern Ohio University of Rio Grande University of Toledo Urbana University Ursuline College Walsh University Wright State University-Lake Campus Wright State University-Main Campus Youngstown State University Ohio’s Best Online Two-Year Schools for 2017 include the following: Belmont College Bowling Green State University-Firelands Central Ohio Technical College Cincinnati State Technical and Community College Clark State Community College Columbus State Community College Cuyahoga Community College Edison State Community College Hocking College Lakeland Community College Lorain County Community College Marion Technical College North Central State College Northwest State Community College Rhodes State College Sinclair College Stark State College University of Akron Wayne College ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

CINCINNATI--Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) have discovered that an ion channel, active within T cells (white blood cells), could be targeted to reduce the growth of head and neck cancers. This research, which was reported this month in Cancer Research, shows that defective Kv1.3 channels, which regulate calcium ions (Ca2+) presence in T cells, and Ca2+ abnormalities in tumor infiltrating lymphocytes--cells that attack and kill cancer cells--may contribute to the inability of the immune system to fight off head and neck cancers. By regulating their expression at the cellular level and using the body's own immune response to fight the tumor cells, patients with these cancers could have better, more effective outcomes. "Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is the sixth most common type of cancer, with a 5-year survival of 50 percent," says Laura Conforti, PhD, professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the UC College of Medicine, a researcher within the UC Cancer Institute and corresponding author on the study. "The heterogeneity of these tumors, the complex anatomy of the head and neck region and the proximity of these tumors to several vital organs and structures present a challenge in conventional treatment options of these cancers. "Immunotherapies aimed to boost the immune system to fight cancer cells are showing promising results in this group of patients." Conforti says that to survive and spread, tumors create a cozy microenvironment where they often go unrecognized by the immune system. "The extent to which CD8+ cells, a type of T cell capable of killing cancer cells, infiltrate the head and neck tumor affects disease progression and responsiveness to therapy," she says. "Also, how well CD8+ lymphocytes function within the confines of the tumor microenvironment determines their ability to eradicate cancer cells, and in the case of head and neck solid tumors, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes have multiple functional defects, decreasing their ability to work correctly." "The function of CD8+ lymphocytes depends on Ca2+, which is controlled by ion channels. In particular, Kv1.3 ion channels regulate Ca2+ influx into T cells. In this study, we assessed the role of Kv1.3 channel and Ca2+ fluxes on these lymphocytes' function in head and neck cancer," she adds. Conforti says that her team, led by Ameet Chimote, PhD, research associate in the Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, used tumor samples and blood from 14 patients with head and neck cancers to analyze how Kv1.3 effected the function of tumor infiltrating T lymphocytes. They found a 70 percent reduction in functional Kv1.3 channels in tumor infiltrating lymphocytes as compared to the blood T cells, which was accompanied by a decrease in Ca2+ levels and reduced ability to attack and kill cancer cells. "Overall our data showed that suppression of Kv1.3 channels in these lymphocytes, the cells that fight off cancer, contribute to their decreased function, raising the possibility that this channel may be used as a potential marker of functionally competent T cells that have infiltrated the tumor mass," Conforti says. "These findings are particularly timely as a recently published study in Nature proposes these channels as potential new target for immunotherapy in cancer. The authors in this study reported that overexpressing these channels in an animal model with cancer lead to increased survival. "Further studies are needed on this T cell channel to find out more about its effects on head and neck cancer and ways we can target it to improve outcomes." This work was funded by grant support from the National Institutes of Health (Grant R01CA95286) and a pilot grant from the University of Cincinnati Cancer Institute and was done in collaboration with Trisha Wise-Draper, MD, PhD, assistant professor in the Division of Hematology Oncology at the UC College of Medicine, a member of both the Cincinnati Cancer Center and UC Cancer Institute, and Keith Casper, MD, a former UC faculty member who is now at the University of Michigan.


News Article | November 23, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Leading higher education information and resource provider AffordableCollegesOnline.org has released its list of the 2016-2017 Best Online Counseling Degree Programs in the nation. A total of 34 schools across the U.S. made the list, which was determined by comparing a variety of value-based statistics and educational outcome data from each school. Top finishers include the University of Texas of the Permian Basin, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Amridge University, University of Cincinnati and the University of Alabama. "With many opportunities to specialize and grow a meaningful career, counseling is a niche field these schools are making an extra effort to maximize student success in,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and Founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. "From financial aid to placement services and overall affordability, these schools are providing the best overall combination of value and quality for counseling students in the nation.” To qualify for a spot on the AffordableCollegesOnline.org’s rankings schools must meet several basic requirements. Colleges must be institutionally accredited, public or private not-for-profit institution. Two-year schools must offer tuition under $5,000 per year for in-state students, while four-year schools must offer tuition under $25,000 per year for in-state students. From there, the site analyzes and compares a variety of qualitative and quantitative data points, tuition costs and more to come up with final scores and ranks for each school. An alphabetical listing of schools on the 2016-2017 Best Online Counseling Degree Programs list can be found below. For more details on data and methodology used to score each, visit: The Best Online Counseling Degree Programs in the U.S. for 2016-2017: Amridge University Bellevue University Brescia University California State University - East Bay Colorado State University - Fort Collins Crown College Indiana Wesleyan University Mercy College Mid-Atlantic Christian University Mississippi College Missouri State University - Springfield National University North Dakota State University - Main Campus Northwestern State University of Louisiana Ohio Christian University Oral Roberts University Oregon State University Pacific Oaks College Pennsylvania State University - Main Campus Spring Arbor University The University of Alabama The University of Texas of the Permian Basin Thomas University Union Institute & University University of Alaska Fairbanks University of Arizona University of Cincinnati - Main Campus University of Houston-Victoria University of Maine at Augusta University of North Dakota University of Wisconsin - Stout Utah State University Viterbo University Western New Mexico University AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.


News Article | December 22, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

CINCINNATI--Cancer researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine have found an obesity-associated protein's role in leukemia development and drug response which could lead to more effective therapies for the illness. The study, which will be published in the Dec. 22 online edition of Cancer Cell and led by Jianjun Chen, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Cancer Biology, provided evidence that FTO--the protein associated with fat mass and obesity--plays a critical cancer-promoting role by regulating expression of a set of genes through a mechanism involving ribonucleic acid (RNA) modification and thereby increasing the reproduction of leukemia cells and prohibiting drug response. "N6-methyladenosine (m6A) RNA methylation, the most prevalent internal modification in messenger RNAs (mRNAs, which translate DNA) in genes, was first identified in 1970s. In 2011, Dr. Chuan He, professor of chemistry at the University of Chicago, a co-senior author of this paper, discovered for the first time that FTO actually functions as an eraser of m6A methylation. This means that it can remove the modification from RNA transcripts, or RNA copies, thereby showing that m6A modification is a reversible process and is highly likely it is of biological importance. In 2012, two groups independently reported the development of novel sequencing technologies to profile all m6A modification areas in the entire genome and showed that roughly one-third of mRNAs in individual mammal cells are targets of m6A modification, highlighting the prevalence and potential functional importance of m6A modification. "Recent studies have shown that m6A modification in mRNAs or non-coding RNAs plays critical roles in virtually all major normal biological processes such as tissue development and stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. However, little is known about the biological importance of m6A modification in the regulation of cancer-causing genes and/or tumor-suppressing genes in the development of tumors." Researchers in the study analyzed a microarray dataset of 100 human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples from patients and nine normal control samples as well as other large-scale microarray datasets of AML samples. They found that FTO was highly expressed in various subtypes of leukemia samples such as those that contained chromosome crossover (genetic exchange between chromosomes) or mutations in certain genes. The high level of FTO expression contributed to cancer cells multiplying and surviving and also promoted the development of leukemia in animal models and the non-response of cancer cells to therapeutic agents. Additionally, researchers found that genes like ASB2 and RARA, which were reported to inhibit leukemia cell growth and/or mediate the response of leukemia cells to therapeutic agents, were suppressed in the AML samples with higher FTO expression. The suppression of these genes was attributed to FTO-controlled decreased stability of their mRNA and was connected to FTO's m6A demethylase activity. "Our study shows, for the first time, the functional importance of the m6A modification machinery in leukemia," says Chen. "In addition, given the functional importance of FTO in the formation of leukemia and drug response, targeting FTO signaling may present a new therapeutic strategy to treat leukemia. As FTO may also play a cancer-promoting role in various types of solid tumors, besides leukemia, our discoveries may have a broad impact in cancer biology and cancer therapy. Further studies are needed to advance our understanding of the critical role of FTO in various types of cancers and to develop more effective novel therapeutic strategies based on such understanding to treat cancers." In addition to researchers from the University of Cincinnati, scientists from Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the University of Chicago; Baylor College of Medicine; and the First Affiliated Hospital Zhejiang University, Wuhan University and Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, all in China, were involved in the study. This study was funded by the National Institutes of Health (CA178454, CA182528,CA214965 and GM071440), the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, the American Cancer Society, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, the China Scholarship Council and the Foundation of Innovation Team for Basic and Clinical Research of Zhejiang Province. The authors cite no conflict of interest.


News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.scientificamerican.com

Editor's note (12/14/16): After weighing the latest science on general anesthetic and sedation exposure in young children, the U.S. FDA is requiring that warnings be added to the labels of these drugs about potential risks for children’s developing brains related to repeated or lengthy exposures. The game is a contemporary of the original Nintendo but it still appeals to today’s teens and lab monkeys alike—which is a boon for neuroscientists. It offers no lifelike graphics. Nor does it boast a screen. Primate players—whether human or not—are simply required to pull levers and replicate patterns of flashing lights. Monkeys get a banana-flavored treat as a reward for good performance whereas kids get nickels. But the game's creators are not really in it for fun. It was created by toxicologists at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in the 1980s to study how chronic exposure to marijuana smoke affects the brain. Players with trouble responding quickly and correctly to the game’s commands may have problems with short-term memory, attention or other cognitive issues. The game has since been adapted to address a different question: whether anesthetics used to knock pediatric patients unconscious during surgery and diagnostic tests could affect a youngster's long-term neural development and cognition. Despite 20 years’ worth of experiments in young rodents and monkeys, there have been few definitive answers. To date, numerous studies suggest that being put under with anesthesia early in life seems somehow related to future cognitive problems. But whether this association is causal or merely coincidence is unclear. Researchers do know that the young human brain is exceptionally sensitive. When kids are exposed to certain harmful chemicals in their formative years, that experience can fundamentally alter the brain’s architecture by misdirecting the physical connections between neurons or causing cell deaths. But unraveling whether anesthetics may fuel such long-term damage in humans remains a challenge. The connection does seem plausible. Anesthetics are powerful modulators of neurotransmission, or communication between neural cells, so the idea that early exposure to these chemicals may alter brain development does not seem far-fetched. Moreover, anesthesia exposure in animals has been linked to long-term learning and memory problems for almost all commonly used anesthetics. Merle Paule, director of the division of neurotoxicology at the FDA’s National Center for Toxicological Research, has spent decades studying how a variety of chemicals affect animals. Four years ago he and his colleagues reported that when rhesus monkeys are put under with ketamine—an anesthetic sometimes used for kids during short, painful procedures—it is associated with lasting damage to the brain as compared with control group monkeys that were not exposed. When the monkeys were five or six days old, they were put under using ketamine for a 24-hour period. The anesthetized monkeys, as a group, subsequently performed worse than control monkeys in tests on learning and discriminating by color and position. Some three years after that exposure the ketamine monkeys were often unable to select as many levers per second compared with the control animals. The differences, however, were relatively subtle and perhaps would not make much of a difference in the lives of individual monkeys. Yet on a larger level, because the subjects performed slightly worse than the controls, it gives researchers and clinicians pause. And still, seven years after their ketamine treatment, those monkeys continue to show below-normal brain function, Paule says. What’s more, his team also showed in separate work that similarly exposed monkeys suffer more brain-neuron deaths. Most recently Paule’s team has found in preliminary work that when monkeys were put under with a mix of isoflurane and nitrous oxide—similar to what is often used in young humans—just one eight-hour period of anesthesia was linked with long-term development and learning issues in those nonhuman primates. But translating that finding to humans is not perfect: Pediatric surgery in humans rarely takes that length of time. The new monkey work has not yet been submitted to a peer-reviewed publication but Paule presented preliminary results during a recent FDA Science Forum open to the public in May 2015 at the agency’s offices in Silver Spring, Md. Based on these kind of findings, Paule says, researchers need to explore if there is a harm threshold for each anesthetic regimen used in humans and determine if there is anything that can be done to ameliorate or prevent the adverse effects already seen in nonhuman primates. In humans, a growing body of work is already suggesting there may be cause for concern. One retrospective study published in Pediatrics in 2011 found that children who had multiple anesthesia exposures before two years of age were twice as likely (compared with those who were not exposed) to be diagnosed with a learning disability—even when overall health was taken into account. Children who had only a single course of anesthesia, however, did not exhibit elevated levels of such disorders. There are dueling research findings, however. Another study, published in Pediatrics in 2012, found that when children under three years old had even one surgical procedure that required general anesthesia, those children appeared to be more likely to have difficulties with abstract reasoning and language by age 10. Despite conflicting results like these, groups including the FDA and American Academy of Pediatrics decided the same year there was enough evidence to endorse a consensus statement which stated that “increasing evidence…[now] suggests the benefits of these agents should be considered in the context of their potential to cause harmful effects.” Still, their statement stopped short of recommending avoiding anesthesia all together. Instead, it said that in the absence of conclusive evidence it would be unethical to withhold sedation and anesthesia when necessary. Since then additional study findings have heightened concerns. Another report, published in Pediatrics this month, found that children under four years of age who had been under general anesthesia for an average of 37 minutes tended to score lower as a group on listening comprehension and performance IQ tests than those who were not exposed. Such cognitive deficits in the anesthetized kids were also associated with brain changes in the occipital cortex and cerebellum. Yet, like the ketamine monkey studies, these types of deficits may not be significant in the daily lives of children. “Maybe scoring three, four or five points worse on IQ tests may not mean much for an individual, but if you lower the IQ in all the kids that have anesthesia exposure early in life, that could put a big burden on society in general,” says lead author Andreas Loepke, a professor of clinical anesthesia and pediatrics at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. But is it the anesthesia that fueled future issues or might that exposure simply be a stand-in for some other larger problem affecting these children—say sicker kids needed surgery and went on to have future cognitive issues stemming from those health problems? Perhaps. “Even if you see an association, you don’t know if it’s anesthesia," says David Warner, a professor of anesthesiology at Mayo Clinic who is overseeing new long-term analysis of children. "With surgery other things like inflammatory response could perhaps cause issues and anesthesia may just be a marker, so that’s why a study like this can never be definitive,” he says. “We can never overcome that limitation but we are trying to account for variations.” That’s where the game comes into the picture. For the past three years his team has worked on an observational study that aims to explore how such anesthesia use relates to future learning disabilities. The same mechanized light game played by monkeys has been getting almost daily play from kids at Mayo who are participating in the research. If the research team can find anything in kids consistently affected from these exposures, say specific aspects of learning and memory and specific brain changes, that would be an important win for the field. The kids are doing more than gaming. They each come in for one four-hour testing session at Mayo. One hour is spent on the video game. (Kids typically win around $5 in nickels alongside the $100 they are paid for participating in the experiment.) The other three hours are spent completing a battery of various tests involving memory recall, card sorting and other widely accepted psychological tests. The lab, on average, sees one study child each workday and Warner expects to complete the study in spring 2017. Some of the kids had multiple anesthesia exposures or had experience with various anesthesia chemicals so the study may help shed light on differences there, too, or if there may be differences by sex. (Young children are usually completely anesthetized and not just sedated with lower doses of drugs for most medical procedures, which is another reason why their exposure levels may be high.) The study, like others that came before it, is observational rather than the ideal gold standard study where patients can be randomized to specific treatments. But the Mayo work can still help answer some as-yet unsettled questions. Warner believes his study is attractive because it will use methods to evaluate kids similar to those the FDA already used in monkeys, which will allow for direct comparison of the primate findings with human data. They both use the same test game with similar rewards—although children learn to play after watching a short instructional video whereas monkeys need to be extensively trained. The Mayo group has been following a group of middle and high school–aged teens who had general anesthesia before three years of age and comparing them with children who did not undergo anesthesia at that age. The control group is matched by birth weight, gestational age (for example, if they were born prematurely), parental education levels and if they, too, would have been likely to receive anesthesia but never did—say they were ill but their parents elected to postpone surgery because the condition was not life-threatening. Yet even with these results it will still be murky what to do next. Only a tiny fraction of kids—in the single digits—are put under at a young age. But those numbers as a whole shake out to mean that at least half a million children under three years old are exposed to anesthetic agents each year. Many of these surgeries are unavoidable. They treat life-threatening illnesses, avert serious health complications or substantially improve quality of life. The most common type of birth defect—congenital heart defects affecting the structure of an infant’s heart and its function—is one such example. About one in four babies born with heart defects need surgery or other procedures during the first year of life. And the same chemicals used for surgical anesthesia are also used to anesthetize kids during nonsurgical procedures such as MRI scans and CT scans to ensure patients do not move. “I think if the kids need these tests and they need to hold still for these tests, then we have to use the drugs,” Loepke says. “We are between a rock and a hard place there because if the kid doesn’t have these diagnostic tests and we don’t know what’s wrong with the kid, then the kid may suffer more because we didn’t figure out what was needed.” For his part, Warner says he hopes his team’s findings may prompt future research into alternative anesthesia formulas or the development of drugs to boost brain health in the aftermath of surgery. One area researchers may explore, for example, is if behavioral therapy to give kids more stimulation following surgery may offset anesthesia’s effects—something that has shown some promise in rodents. To truly confirm the link between anesthesia and deficits, however, a randomized study would need to be done. One such work is already underway, headed up by an Australian researcher. It compares infants undergoing hernia repair under general anesthesia versus those getting the surgery while they are anesthesized only in a specific region. Then the kids undergo neurocognitive testing at age five. Results from that study are expected in the next couple years. But for now doctors and researchers are carefully watching for the results from the Mayo study. As that research team doles out bags of nickels, parents and physicians are banking on a big return.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

NJ Spine & Orthopedic announces the arrival of Dr. Douglas Slaughter, who joins the expert minimally invasive spine care team as an orthopedic surgeon. NJ Spine & Orthopedic, a nationwide leader in minimally invasive spine surgery, treats patients with back and neck pain using state-of-the-art techniques. Dr. Slaughter is a board-certified orthopedic surgeon, who has been successfully practicing minimally invasive techniques for over 21 years, with a strong focus in reconstructive surgery for spinal injuries. Dr. Slaughter treats patients who experience conditions that affect muscles, bones, and joints due to sports and high-impact activity injuries, as well as age-related injuries due to degenerative spine conditions. Other areas of expertise include spinal stenosis and osteoarthritis. “Dr. Slaughter offers an invaluable level of orthopedic expertise to our team,” Dr. Scott Katzman, founder of NJ Spine & Orthopedic, said. “His dedication to treating every patient with the least invasive methods possible has allowed him to become a leading U.S. spine surgeon and a true asset to the NJSO team and our patients.” One of the many reasons we hired Dr. Slaughter was due to his vast experience with artificial disc replacement. Since we believe in maintaining motion in the cervical spine, his extensive training was a perfect fit to NJ Spine & Orthopedic. Dr. Slaughter’s bed side manner is top notch and patients love his gentle approach. Dr. Slaughter, a veteran of the United States Army Reserves, received his medical degree from The University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and served his residency in orthopedic surgery at Maricopa Medical Center in Phoenix, Arizona. He further honed his orthopedic expertise in spinal reconstructive surgery in New York City at Beth Israel Spine Institute under the direction of Dr. Michael Neuwirth. Other previous spine care experience includes Sonoran Spine Center in Phoenix, Arizona, where he personally developed spinal reconstructive surgery and minimally invasive surgery practices. For more information about Dr. Slaughter and NJ Spine & Orthopedic, visit NJSpineAndOrtho.com. About NJ Spine & Orthopedic NJ Spine & Orthopedic is a minimally invasive spine treatment center with offices throughout New Jersey, New York and Florida. The award-winning team of orthopedic surgeons and medical staff offer the latest technology and treatments to repair conditions of the spine that lead to back and neck pain. With over 50 years of combined surgery experience, NJ Spine & Orthopedic operates under a comprehensive treatment philosophy ranging from pain management methods to minimally invasive surgery, and is committed to finding the least invasive and most effective treatments for patients suffering from neck and back pain.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

A list of the nation’s Best Electrician Programs for 2016-2017 has been released by the Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org). As a leader in higher education information and resources for students, the site ranked schools offering on-campus or online electrician programs to find those providing the best overall value for students. Top finishers include Idaho State University, Great Basin College, Jackson College, Montana State University Northern and the College of Southern Nevada among four-year schools and East Mississippi Community College, Hinds Community College, Rockingham Community College, Augusta Technical College and Beaufort County Community College among two-year schools. “The need for qualified electricians is growing, and the programs on our list represent the best training opportunities for this in-demand trade,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “Our analysis shows students where to find the best combination of quality and affordability when it comes to earning an electrician degree.” The Community for Accredited Online Schools weighs over a dozen different data points, including statistics on cost, program features, graduation rates and more to determine a score for each electrician program in the country. To qualify for the Best Electrician Program lists, schools must also meet specific minimum requirements: institutions must be accredited public or private not-for-profit entities and must provide career placement assistance to students. A complete list of schools included on the Best Electrician Programs list is included below. To learn where each school ranks and for more information on the data analysis and methodology used, visit: Recognized as the Best Electrician Programs among two-year schools: Recognized as the Best Electrician Programs among four-year schools: Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology Bismarck State College Bluefield State College Brazosport College Capitol College College of Southern Nevada Daytona State College Dunwoody College of Technology Fairmont State University Florida State College at Jacksonville Great Basin College Gulf Coast State College Idaho State University Indian River State College Jackson College Kentucky State University Lake Washington Institute of Technology Lake-Sumter State College Lawrence Technological University LeTourneau University Missouri Western State University Montana State University-Northern New England Institute of Technology Northern Michigan University Northern New Mexico College Northwestern Michigan College Northwestern State University of Louisiana Palm Beach State College Pennsylvania College of Technology Pensacola State College Pittsburg State University Point Park University Rochester Institute of Technology Seattle Community College - North Campus Seminole State College of Florida South Florida State College State College of Florida - Manatee-Sarasota SUNY College of Technology at Alfred SUNY College of Technology at Canton SUNY College of Technology at Delhi University of Akron Main Campus University of Arkansas - Fort Smith University of Cincinnati - Main Campus University of Hartford Utah Valley University Valencia College Wayne State University West Virginia University at Parkersburg West Virginia University Institute of Technology Western New Mexico University About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


News Article | December 1, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Leading higher education information and resource provider AffordableCollegesOnline.org has released its ranking of the Best Online Registered Nursing (RN) Programs in the U.S. for 2016-2017. Analyzing more than a dozen unique data points on colleges and universities who offer online RN programs, the site honored 65 schools for providing the best overall value and quality for students. East Carolina University, Allen College, Seton Hall University, University of Alabama in Huntsville and West Virginia University were among the highest scoring four-year schools, while New Mexico Junior College, Amarillo College, West Kentucky Community and Technical College, Hopkinsville Community College and Kansas City Kansas Community College were among the highest scoring two-year schools. "There is a growing demand for health care workers, and quality registered nursing programs are growing more and more competitive,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and Founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. “Our list of schools gives registered nursing students a better idea of which programs offer the best combination of cost, quality curriculum and online learning flexibility.” AffordableCollegesOnline.org requires schools to meet several minimum requirements to be eligible for placement on their rankings. Colleges must be accredited, public or private not-for-profit institutions and must offer in-state tuition rates below $5,000 annually at two-year schools or below $25,000 annually at four-year schools. Qualifying schools are scored and ranked based on a comparison of more than a dozen qualitative and quantitative statistics, including financial aid offerings and graduation rates by school. More details on data and methodology used to rank each online criminal justice program and a complete list of schools and scores is available at: Two-year schools with the Best Online Registered Nurse Programs for 2016-2017: Amarillo College Ashland Community and Technical College Bluegrass Community and Technical College Columbus State Community College Community College of Philadelphia Henderson Community College Hopkinsville Community College Jefferson Community and Technical College Kansas City Kansas Community College Madisonville Community College Minnesota West Community and Technical College New Mexico Junior College San Antonio College Somerset Community College Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College West Kentucky Community and Technical College Four-year schools with the Best Online Registered Nurse Programs for 2016-2017: Allen College Aurora University Ball State University Barry University Clayton State University Columbus State University Concordia University - Wisconsin Drexel University East Carolina University East Tennessee State University Fitchburg State University Gannon University Gardner-Webb University Georgia College and State University Graceland University - Lamoni Indiana State University La Salle University Loyola University Chicago Minot State University Missouri State University-Springfield New Mexico State University - Main Campus North Carolina Central University Northern Arizona University Olivet Nazarene University Sacred Heart University Seton Hall University South Dakota State University The College of Saint Scholastica University of Alabama in Huntsville University of Arkansas University of Central Florida University of Cincinnati-Main Campus University of Colorado, Colorado Springs University of Delaware University of Hawaii at Manoa University of Massachusetts - Amherst University of Massachusetts - Boston University of Massachusetts - Lowell University of Memphis University of North Alabama University of North Dakota University of North Florida University of Northern Colorado University of Southern Indiana University of the Incarnate Word University of Toledo Villanova University Wayland Baptist University West Virginia University Western Kentucky University AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

CINCINNATI--A University of Cincinnati (UC) researcher who has developed an immunotherapy to help reverse cocaine addiction that's been successful in animal models says he hopes to have it in clinical trials in human volunteers within a year. Andrew Norman, PhD, professor in the UC College of Medicine's Department of Pharmacology and Cell Biophysics, has led a team of researchers in the development of a human monoclonal antibody--derived from a single cell--for use against a specific target, in this case cocaine. If the antibody is injected into the bloodstream, it attaches to cocaine, preventing it from entering the brain and limiting its behavioral effects. This humanized monoclonal antibody has previously been shown by Norman and his colleagues to reduce cocaine's effects in an animal model of relapse. "Initially, everything was pre-clinical. We developed this antibody, and we were able to produce enough to test in animals," says Norman. "In all our in vivo and in vitro testing, the antibody was very effective, and it worked beautifully. Based on those very successful pre-clinical studies, we got the go ahead to move forward toward clinical studies. This is translational research, moving from molecule to mouse to man." Norman's research is funded by a $6.28 million three-year grant from the National Institutes of Health. Toxicology studies and a second round of tests in animal models using the antibody are needed before an investigational drug application can proceed to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for human clinical trials, says Norman. If proven safe, the antibody would be most beneficial in assisting individuals who are highly motivated to overcome addiction, says Norman. "This will not cure addiction because addiction is presumably a brain affliction," says Norman. "This antibody is designed to not let cocaine get to the brain. It can only prevent the cocaine from being able to act to produce its usual effects on the brain. This will aid a person by decreasing the probability that a relapse event will occur. If it does, it will help prevent that event from being maintained." For an individual who has an intermittent relapse, the antibody will block the cocaine from getting to the brain and producing the high that addicts may crave, says Norman. The antibody can be given in doses that would remain effective for at least 30 days, a period long enough for a person in recovery to continue making progress in battling addiction, he says. Norman says the antibody does not cure addiction and it is not a panacea, but rather a means to assist individuals who still face the very difficult task of beating addiction. Addiction is a treatable disease, though; for some, managing it like other chronic diseases may be an option, according to the National Institutes of Health. It would still be possible for someone to override the human monoclonal antibody, but it would require a person in the throes of addiction to take an exceedingly large amount of cocaine to overwhelm the binding capacity of the antibody, explains Norman. "It will help keep people that are motivated to stay off cocaine from doing so by making sure any relapse event does not lead to a sustained relapsed event," says Norman. "If people are not highly motivated to quit cocaine, there is no reason that this will be helpful." "If this antibody works the way we believe it will in the body, then it gives clues as to how we should interpret drug effects in other addictive behaviors," he adds. "There are projects in other laboratories around the country to develop vaccines against addictive drugs such as opioids." Norman says the antibody is so specific to cocaine that it won't bind to other drugs in the body. "It won't interfere with other drug therapies that come along later on," he says. "So if somebody does develop a drug that does interact in the brain on the mechanisms and brain areas where cocaine exerts its effect relevant to its addictive properties, this antibody will be an adjunct to that and it won't interfere." This research is supported by a grant from the NIH's National Institute on Drug Abuse 1U01DA039550-01. Norman is named as a co-inventor on a patent application for the use of the humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody.


News Article | November 10, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Best Veterinary Technician Schools in the nation are being featured by AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org, the Community for Accredited Online Schools 2016-2017 rankings. Comparing both online and on-campus programs at two- and four-year schools across the U.S., the online higher education resource provider ranked schools providing the best overall value for Veterinary Technician students. Colorado Mountain College, St. Petersburg College, Lincoln Memorial University, Becker College, Medaille College, San Juan College, Athens Technical College, Windward Community College, Chattanooga State Community College and Northshore Technical Community College were among the highest scorers. “Job outlook projections show veterinary technician positions growing much faster than the national average through 2024,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “Schools on these lists are not only providing quality veterinary technician programs, but are also making an extra effort to help students land a job after graduation.” Schools must meet specific baseline requirements to be considered for a spot on the Best Veterinary Technician Schools ranking. All institutions must hold regional accreditation and be registered as public or private not-for-profit entities. Schools are also required to provide career placement services to their students. Once a school’s eligibility is determined, the Community for Accredited Online Schools scores and ranks each based on more than a dozen data points, including graduation rates, student teacher ratios and financial aid availability, to determine the overall Best Schools in the U.S. An alphabetical listing of the Best Veterinary Technician Schools for 2016-2017 is included below. To learn where each specifically ranks and to find more details on the data and methodology used to determine scores visit: The 2016-2017 Best Veterinary Technician Programs at Two-Year Schools list: Alamance Community College Arkansas State University - Beebe Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College Athens Technical College Bellingham Technical College Blue Ridge Community College Cedar Valley College Central Oregon Community College Chattanooga State Community College College of Southern Idaho Columbus State Community College Cosumnes River College Crowder College Delaware Technical Community College-Owens Delgado Community College Eastern Iowa Community College District Eastern Wyoming College Front Range Community College Gaston College Genesee Community College Gwinnett Technical College Harcum College Hillsborough Community College Hinds Community College Iowa Lakes Community College Jefferson College Jefferson State Community College Linn-Benton Community College Lone Star College Mesa Community College Middlesex Community College Murray State College Nebraska College of Technical Agriculture North Shore Community College Northeast Community College Northeast Iowa Community College-Calmar Northshore Technical Community College Northwest Mississippi Community College Norwalk Community College Ogeechee Technical College Owensboro Community and Technical College Pierpont Community and Technical College San Juan College Southern Regional Technical College Truckee Meadows Community College Tulsa Community College Volunteer State Community College Weatherford College Western Iowa Tech Community College Windward Community College The 2016-2017 Best Veterinary Technician Programs at Four-Year Schools list: Baker College of Clinton Township Baker College of Flint Baker College of Muskegon Baker College of Port Huron Becker College Brigham Young University-Idaho Colorado Mountain College Daytona State College Eastern Florida State College Fort Valley State University Kent State University at Tuscarawas Lincoln Memorial University Madison Area Technical College Medaille College Miami Dade College Michigan State University Mississippi State University Morehead State University Murray State University Navajo Technical University New England Institute of Technology North Dakota State University - Main Campus Northwestern State University of Louisiana Oklahoma State University - Oklahoma City Otterbein University Pensacola State College Purdue University - Main Campus Siena Heights University St. Petersburg College SUNY College of Technology at Alfred SUNY College of Technology at Canton SUNY College of Technology at Delhi Tuskegee University University of Alaska Anchorage University of Alaska Fairbanks University of Cincinnati - Blue Ash College University of Maine at Augusta University of Nebraska - Lincoln University of New Hampshire - Main Campus Vermont Technical College About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Leading higher education information and resource provider AffordableCollegesOnline.org has released its list of the Best Schools with Online Nurse Practitioner Programs in the U.S. for 2016-2017. The ranking cites the top 50 colleges and universities for online nurse practitioner students based on an in-depth cost and quality comparison. Highest scores were awarded to Stony Brook University, University of Cincinnati, Ball State University, University of St. Francis and Northern Arizona University. "The U.S. Department of Labor predicts Practitioners to be among of the most in-demand nursing positions in the nation through 20214,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and Founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. “Aspiring students will find the schools on our list offer the flexibility of an online education with exceptional overall quality and value compared to other nursing programs around the country.” To qualify for a spot on AffordableCollegesOnline.org’s rankings, schools to meet several minimum requirements. Each college cited is institutionally accredited and holds public or private not-for-profit standing. To maintain affordability standards, AffordableCollegesOnline.org requires schools to offer in-state tuition rates below $25,000 per year. Each qualifying school is scored based on a comparison of more than a dozen qualitative and quantitative statistics, including financial aid offerings and graduation rates by school. All eligible school scores are compared to determine the final top 50 list. For complete details on the data and methodology used to score each school and a full list of ranking colleges, visit: Top 50 Online Nurse Practitioner Programs in the Nation for 2016-2017: Ball State University Clarkson College Columbus State University Concordia University - Wisconsin Duquesne University East Tennessee State University Fitchburg State University Gardner-Webb University Georgia College and State University Graceland University - Lamoni Indiana State University Indiana University-Purdue University - Indianapolis Indiana Wesleyan University Loyola University New Orleans Maryville University of Saint Louis McNeese State University Michigan State University New Mexico State University - Main Campus Northern Arizona University Saint Joseph's College of Maine Samford University Seton Hall University Southern Adventist University Southern Illinois University - Edwardsville Stony Brook University The University of Alabama The University of Texas Medical Branch University of Alabama in Huntsville University of Arizona University of Arkansas University of Central Florida University of Central Missouri University of Cincinnati - Main Campus University of Colorado, Colorado Springs University of Detroit Mercy University of Hawaii at Manoa University of Indianapolis University of Louisiana at Lafayette University of Massachusetts - Amherst University of Memphis University of North Dakota University of Northern Colorado University of South Alabama University of Southern Indiana University of St. Francis West Virginia University Western Carolina University Western Kentucky University Winona State University Wright State University - Main Campus AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.


CINCINNATI, OH, November 23, 2016-- Dr. Linda S. Gravett, Founder and Senior Partner of Gravett and Associates and President and CEO of Just the Basics, Inc. has been recognized as a Distinguished Professional in her field through Women of Distinction Magazine. Dr. Linda S. Gravett was recently featured in a December 2015 edition of Women of Distinction Magazine.Spending her earlier years working as an Administrator for the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals, Dr. Linda S. Gravett left her position in 1991 to establish her own consulting firm, Gravett and Associates, as Founder and Senior Partner. Nearly two decades later, in 2009, she also purchased and took on the role of President of CEO of Just the Basics, Inc., which was originally founded in 1994.Based in Cincinnati, Ohio, Gravett and Associates is an international consulting firm that works with larger companies of more than 500 employees. Offering human resource management consulting and training services, to include human resource audits, development of performance management systems, the establishment of human resource metrics, and assistance in leveraging diverse workforce and executive coaching, they also provide online assessments in Leadership 360s, Emotional Intelligence, and Learning Agility. Each and every one of Gravett's associates boast more than 10 years of experience as human resources practitioners in the field, following in the company's mission to assist organizations acquire and develop skills, knowledge, and abilities that will ensure future success by helping manage a diverse workforce and by overseeing efforts with individual, strategic objectives and business needs.Meanwhile, Just the Basics, Inc. is a management consulting firm that specializes in human resource management for small businesses and non-profits. By helping to make a human resources expertise more accessible to clients, their mission is to improve the quality and productivity of organizations as well as services to executive management team members. Services and trainings are customized to fit the unique needs of clients and offer a variety of human resource management consulting and training services, to include human resource audits, development of performance evaluation systems, executive coaching, conflict resolution, and leadership training."My experiences as a Human Resources Practitioner early in my career provided me with a keen appreciation for how this role can support the company's success in carrying out its strategic objectives by having talent, learning agile employees," Gravett said about her tenured career in human resources.Over the course of Gravett's career in human resources, she has written and published six books to date: 'HRM Ethics: Perspectives for a New Millennium' (2002); 'Bridging the Generation Gap' (2007); 'Using Your Emotional Intelligence to Develop Others' (2009); 'Just a Couple of Women Talkin': The Real Story of Being a Woman Entrepreneur' (2011); 'Leadership in Balance: New Habits of the Mind' (2014); and 'Learning Agility: The Impact on Recruitment and Retention' (2016). She holds a BBA with a major in Accounting since 1977, a Master's in Labor and Employment Relations since 1991, and a PhD in Industrial Psychology, since 1995, all from the University of Cincinnati. She also holds the following certifications: Senior Certified Professional in Human Resources through the Society of Human Resource Management; and Certified EQ Coach and Consultant. Gravett was recently selected by Corporate Vision Magazine as the 'Most Influential Industrial Psychologist in the US' in 2016.For more information, visit www.justthebasics.com or www.gravett.com About Women of Distinction Magazine:Women of Distinction Magazine strives to continually bring the very best out in each article published and highlight Women of Distinction. Women of Distinction Magazine's mission is to have a platform where women can grow, inspire, empower, educate and encourage professionals from any industry by sharing stories of courage and success.Contact:Women of Distinction Magazine, Melville, NY631-465-9024


News Article | November 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Leading higher education information and resource provider AffordableCollegesOnline.org is highlighting schools with top online health sciences degree programs in a new ranking for 2016-2017. Two lists compare four-year and two-year schools offering health science degree programs nationwide, determining which offer the best combination of cost and quality for students. Of the lists of top 100 colleges, the highest finishers among four-year schools include the University of Mississippi, Washburn University, Siena Heights University, Weber State University and Davenport University, while top two-year schools include East Mississippi Community College, Holmes Community College, Hutchinson Community College, Metropolitan Community College and Barton County Community College. "Employment in healthcare occupations is projected to grow 19 percent, or much faster than the national average, from 2014 to 2024,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and Founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. “Students pursuing health science degrees can now find affordable, high quality learning options online through these schools, who are ultimately being highlighted here for their efforts to help students excel.” AffordableCollegesOnline.org has several minimum eligibility requirements each school on their rankings must meet. Colleges must be accredited, public or private not-for-profit institutions and must offer in-state tuition rates as follows: under $5,000 per year for two-year schools; under $25,000 per year for four-year schools. Those meeting eligibility requirements are then scored and ranked based on more than a dozen school-specific statistics, including financial aid offerings and graduation rates. Each school recognized on the top online health sciences degree programs list is included below. For more information on each school’s score and the data and methodology used to rank each can be found at: The Best Two-Year Schools for Online Health Sciences Students in 2016-2017: Allen County Community College Barton County Community College Beaufort County Community College Bluegrass Community and Technical College Central Texas College Colby Community College Collin College Columbus State Community College Cowley County Community College Crowder College Dakota College at Bottineau East Mississippi Community College Forsyth Technical Community College Gateway Community and Technical College GateWay Community College Great Falls College Montana State University Hazard Community and Technical College Holmes Community College Hutchinson Community College Indian Hills Community College Kansas City Kansas Community College Kilgore College Lakeshore Technical College Lanier Technical College Lenoir Community College Madisonville Community College Maysville Community and Technical College Metropolitan Community College National Park College North Central Missouri College North Dakota State College of Science Northwest Mississippi Community College Oklahoma City Community College Pamlico Community College Panola College Pitt Community College San Juan College Seward County Community College and Area Technical School Sinclair College Southwest Mississippi Community College Southwestern Community College Spokane Community College Spokane Falls Community College State Fair Community College Three Rivers Community College Truckee Meadows Community College Tyler Junior College Western Nebraska Community College Western Wyoming Community College Williston State College The Best Four-Year Schools for Online Health Sciences Students in 2016-2017: Allen College Augusta University Baker College Brigham Young University - Idaho Clarkson College Concordia University - Saint Paul Dakota State University Davenport University East Carolina University Ferris State University Goodwin College Granite State College Indiana University - Purdue University Indianapolis Keiser University - Fort Lauderdale Kent State University at Kent Midway College Midwestern State University Mississippi University for Women Montana State University - Billings Nebraska Methodist College of Nursing & Allied Health North Carolina A & T State University Northern Arizona University Oregon Institute of Technology Peirce College Presentation College Rutgers University - New Brunswick Siena Heights University St. Petersburg College SUNY Polytechnic Institute The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Thomas University Tiffin University University of Alabama at Birmingham University of Arkansas at Little Rock University of Cincinnati - Main Campus University of Florida University of Louisiana at Monroe University of Mississippi University of Missouri - Columbia University of Northern Colorado University of Oklahoma - Health Sciences Center University of Southern Indiana University of Toledo Viterbo University Washburn University Weber State University Western Carolina University Western Kentucky University Winston-Salem State University Youngstown State University AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.


News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org), a leading online higher education resource site, has released its list of the nation’s Best Paramedic Programs. Comparing data from both online and on-campus programs at two- and four-year schools, top scores went to Colorado Mountain College, Florida Gateway College, Santa Fe College, Midland College and College of Central Florida for four-year schools; Northland Pioneer College, Eastern New Mexico University Roswell, North Arkansas College, Arkansas State University Beebe and Galveston College for two-year schools for 2016-2017. “The U.S. Department of Labor shows the job outlook for paramedics is extremely favorable over the next decade,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “The schools on this list are raising the bar when it comes to Paramedic education, providing the best combination of affordability and quality to their students.” To qualify for the Best Paramedic Program list, the Community for Accredited Online Schools requires schools to meet specific baseline requirements. All institutions are required to be accredited public or private not-for-profit entities. Each must also offer students career placement assistance or services post-graduation. More than a dozen different school-specific metrics, from graduation rates to student-teacher ratios, are weighed against one another to determine individual school scores and placement on rankings. The full list of colleges included on the Best Paramedic Programs list is included below. Find more details on the methodology used to score each school, as well as specific scores at: Arizona Western College Arkansas Northeastern College Arkansas State University - Beebe Arkansas State University - Mountain Home Athens Technical College Belmont College Black River Technical College Central Community College Central New Mexico Community College Cincinnati State Technical and Community College Crowder College Del Mar College East Arkansas Community College East Mississippi Community College Eastern New Mexico University - Roswell Campus Estrella Mountain Community College Gadsden State Community College Galveston College Grayson College H. Councill Trenholm State Technical College Hill College Hillsborough Community College Hinds Community College Howard College Itawamba Community College Jefferson College Johnson County Community College Lakeshore Technical College Lenoir Community College Meridian Community College Mesa Community College Metropolitan Community College North Arkansas College North Florida Community College North Georgia Technical College Northeast Texas Community College Northern Maine Community College Northland Pioneer College Redlands Community College San Juan College Santa Fe Community College Sinclair College South Arkansas Community College Southeast Arkansas College Tallahassee Community College Trinidad State Junior College University of Arkansas Community Hope - Texarkana Wallace State Community College - Hanceville Western Iowa Tech Community College Western Nebraska Community College Arkansas Tech University Baker College of Clinton Township Baker College of Muskegon Bismarck State College Broward College Chipola College College of Central Florida College of Southern Nevada Colorado Mountain College Creighton University Daytona State College Dixie State University Drexel University Florida Gateway College Florida SouthWestern State College Florida State College at Jacksonville Goodwin College Great Basin College Idaho State University Jackson College Lake Michigan College Lewis-Clark State College Miami Dade College Midland College Missouri Southern State University Montana State University - Billings Oklahoma State University - Oklahoma City Palm Beach State College Pasco-Hernando State College Pensacola State College Polk State College Saint Josephs College Santa Fe College Seattle Community College - North Campus Seminole State College of Florida Shawnee State University Siena Heights University South Florida State College St. Petersburg College University of Alaska Fairbanks University of Arkansas at Monticello University of Cincinnati - Blue Ash College University of Cincinnati - Clermont College University of New Haven University of Sioux Falls Utah Valley University Valencia College Vincennes University Weber State University Youngstown State University About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


New Rochelle, NY, March 1, 2017--A pilot study of guanfacine, a controlled-release alpha2-agonist, in children and adolescents with general, separation-related, and social anxiety disorder showed the drug to be safe and well-tolerated and provided preliminary evidence of its potential effectiveness. The study supports further clinical testing of the drug in pediatric patients with anxiety, according to the results published in Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology website. Jeffrey Strawn, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (Ohio), and coauthors from Duke University School of Medicine (Durham, NC), Shire (Lexington, MA), Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute and New York Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital (New York, NY) compared the effects of guanfacine and placebo over 12 weeks in pediatric patients 6-17 years of age with a diagnosis of anxiety disorder. In the article entitled "Extended Release Guanfacine in Pediatric Anxiety Disorders: A Pilot, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial," the researchers report the effects of drug treatment and placebo on heart rate, blood pressure, suicidal thoughts and behavior, and multiple measures of anxiety. In addition to describing no remarkable adverse effects associated with guanfacine use, the authors suggest the potential for its use in treating children with other disorders that have co-occurring anxiety symptoms, such as ADHD. "The safety of guanfacine in this patient population is the first step in potentially developing an additional psychopharmacological treatment for children and adolescents with anxiety disorders," says Harold S. Koplewicz, MD, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology and president of the Child Mind Institute in New York. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published ten times per year online with Open Access options and in print. The Journal is dedicated to child and adolescent psychiatry and behavioral pediatrics, covering clinical and biological aspects of child and adolescent psychopharmacology and developmental neurobiology. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology website. Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, Games for Health Journal, and Violence and Gender. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.


News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

CINCINNATI--A study led by University of Cincinnati (UC) researchers is offering new insight in how the fungus Pneumocystis, thrives in the lungs of immune-compromised individuals, where it can cause a fatal pneumonia. The study, "Functional characterization of the Pneumocystis carinii Inositol Transporter 1," is currently available in the online edition of the journal, MBio and details the use of mouse models to identify a new drug therapy for the potential treatment of Pneumocystis pneumonia. Pneumocystis must transport inositol--a sugar-like nutrient essential for life in most organisms--obtained from the mammalian lung using a specific transporter, explains Melanie T. Cushion, PhD, senior associate dean for research and professor of internal medicine at the UC College of Medicine. "Identifying a drug to inhibit the transporter will kill these fungi because they can't synthesize inositol as they lack two enzymes to do so," says Cushion. "The transporters in humans and Pneumocystis are sufficiently different that inhibitors of the fungal transporter are not likely to impact the mammalian transporters. If that's the case, no toxicity is expected with this new line of drugs." These fungi are immune to common current anti-fungal therapies, and the gold standard therapy, trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole, often results in life-threatening allergic reactions in many patients. In the journal article, researchers characterized the transport of inositol in the fungus and found that it was highly selective for inositol and did not transport any other molecules, explains Cushion. For individuals living with HIV/AIDS, Pneumocystis jirovecii, causes a lethal pneumonia (PCP) despite the use of combined antiretroviral therapy in patients, says Cushion. The mortality rate from PCP is about 15 percent in HIV positive populations in the United States and other developed countries, while in the developing world or underserved populations in the U.S. the mortality rate approaches 80 percent, she explained. An advance in combating Pneumocystis could also help transplant patients who are on immunosuppressive drugs for life and other patients receiving these therapies for ailments such as rheumatoid arthritis, says Cushion. Cushion is joined in this research by co-authors Aleksey Porollo, PhD, UC assistant professor in the Department of Environmental Health and a researcher for Cincinnati Children's Medical Center; Edward Merino, PhD, UC associate professor in the Department of Chemistry; Anish Kizhakkekkara Vadukoot, PhD, a former UC post-doctoral fellow; Margaret Collins, senior research assistant in the UC Department of Internal Medicine; and Thomas Sesterhenn, senior research assistant in the UC Department of Internal Medicine. Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health under the award number HL119190 and by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.


PLYMOUTH MEETING, Pa., Nov. 21, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ:INO) today announced that Dr. David B. Weiner, its co-founder, board member and chair of its scientific advisory board, has been selected as a “Top 20 Translational Researcher” for the year 2015 by the editors of Nature Biotechnology magazine. The selection is based on the number of medical innovations that led to patents a researcher was granted in a calendar year. The designation “translational researcher” refers to basic research that can move from the lab bench to become patented medicine. Dr. Weiner’s patented innovations relate to advancing the field of DNA-based immunotherapies targeting challenging infectious diseases and cancers. Over his career he holds more than 100 issued and pending U.S. patents. From 1986 until 2015, Dr. Weiner’s lab was at the University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine. In 2016, Dr. Weiner joined The Wistar Institute, the nation’s first independent biomedical research institute, an NCI-designated Cancer Center, and an international leader in cancer, immunology and infectious disease research, as Executive Vice President, Director of its Vaccine Center and the W. W. Smith Charitable Trust Endowed Professorship in Cancer Research. Dr. J. Joseph Kim, Inovio's President and CEO, said, "This award acknowledges David’s innovation and commitment to creating tomorrow’s medicines with a revolutionary technology, DNA-based immunotherapies and vaccines, which Inovio is developing in early and late-stage clinical trials.  While I can say I am personally proud of my association with Dr. Weiner, which is now decades long, I can also say that we at Inovio as a team have tremendous respect and appreciation for his innovation and dedication to this field and congratulate him on this award.” Dr. Weiner is a world-renowned leader in immunology as well as gene vaccines and immunotherapy. In scientific circles he is known as the “father of DNA vaccines.” He has more than 350 peer-reviewed publications in scientific journals, including mainstream publications such as Scientific American, and has been designated by the Institute for Scientific Information as one of the top-cited scientists in the world. An inventor of more than 100 issued and pending U.S. patents, Dr. Weiner has received numerous honors including election as a fellow to the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2011 and the International Society for Vaccines in 2012. He was the recipient of the NIH Director’s Transformative Research Award and received the Vaccine Industry Excellence Award for Best Academic Research Team in 2015 at the World Vaccine Congress. Dr. Weiner was honored with the prestigious Hilleman Lectureship in 2015 at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Grand Rounds session and received a Stone Family Award from Abramson Cancer Center for his groundbreaking work on DNA vaccines for cancer immune therapy. David Weiner holds a Ph.D. in developmental biology from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, an M.S. in biology from the University of Cincinnati, and a B.S. in biology from SUNY at Stony Brook in Stony Brook, N.Y. Inovio is taking immunotherapy to the next level in the fight against cancer and infectious diseases. We are the only immunotherapy company that has reported generating T cells in vivo in high quantity that are fully functional and whose killing capacity correlates with relevant clinical outcomes with a favorable safety profile. With an expanding portfolio of immune therapies, the company is advancing a growing preclinical and clinical stage product pipeline. Partners and collaborators include MedImmune, The Wistar Institute, University of Pennsylvania, DARPA, GeneOne Life Science, Plumbline Life Sciences, Drexel University, NIH, HIV Vaccines Trial Network, National Cancer Institute, U.S. Military HIV Research Program, and Laval University. For more information, visit www.inovio.com. This press release contains certain forward-looking statements relating to our business, including our plans to develop electroporation-based drug and gene delivery technologies and DNA vaccines, our expectations regarding our research and development programs and our capital resources. Actual events or results may differ from the expectations set forth herein as a result of a number of factors, including uncertainties inherent in pre-clinical studies, clinical trials and product development programs, the availability of funding to support continuing research and studies in an effort to prove safety and efficacy of electroporation technology as a delivery mechanism or develop viable DNA vaccines, our ability to support our broad pipeline of SynCon® active immunotherapy and vaccine products, the ability of our collaborators to attain development and commercial milestones for products we license and product sales that will enable us to receive future payments and royalties, the adequacy of our capital resources, the availability or potential availability of alternative therapies or treatments for the conditions targeted by the company or its collaborators, including alternatives that may be more efficacious or cost effective than any therapy or treatment that the company and its collaborators hope to develop, issues involving product liability, issues involving patents and whether they or licenses to them will provide the company with meaningful protection from others using the covered technologies, whether such proprietary rights are enforceable or defensible or infringe or allegedly infringe on rights of others or can withstand claims of invalidity and whether the company can finance or devote other significant resources that may be necessary to prosecute, protect or defend them, the level of corporate expenditures, assessments of the company's technology by potential corporate or other partners or collaborators, capital market conditions, the impact of government healthcare proposals and other factors set forth in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2015, our Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2016, and other regulatory filings from time to time. There can be no assurance that any product in Inovio's pipeline will be successfully developed or manufactured, that final results of clinical studies will be supportive of regulatory approvals required to market licensed products, or that any of the forward-looking information provided herein will be proven accurate.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Using fuzzy logic, researchers at the University of Cincinnati program drones to make better navigational decisions on the fly The buzzword in drone research is autonomous -- having the unmanned aerial vehicle do most or all of its own flying. It's the only realistic way that drones will have commercially viable uses such as delivering that roll of toilet paper to customers, said Manish Kumar, associate professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Cincinnati's College of Engineering and Applied Science. Kumar and his co-authors, Nicklas Stockton, a UC researcher, and Kelly Cohen, aerospace engineering professor, considered the difficulty drones have in navigating their ever-changing airspace in a study presented at the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics SciTech 2017 Conference in January. This problem is compounded when the drone tries to land on a moving platform such as a delivery van or even a U.S. Navy warship pitching in high seas. "It has to land within a designated area with a small margin of error," Kumar said. "Landing a drone on a moving platform is a very difficult problem scientifically and from an engineering perspective." To address this challenge, UC researchers applied a concept called fuzzy logic, the kind of reasoning people employ subconsciously every day. While scientists are concerned with precision and accuracy in all they do, most people get through their day by making inferences and generalities, or by using fuzzy logic. Instead of seeing the world in black and white, fuzzy logic allows for nuance or degrees of truth. "In linguistic terms, we say large, medium and small rather than defining exact sets," he said. "We want to translate this kind of fuzzy reasoning used in humans to control systems." Fuzzy logic helps the drone make good navigational decisions amid a sea of statistical noise, he said. It's called "genetic-fuzzy" because the system evolves over time and continuously discards the lesser solutions. Stockton, Kumar and Cohen successfully employed fuzzy logic in a simulation to show it is an ideal system for navigating under dynamic conditions. Stockton, an engineering master's student who was lead author on the paper, is putting fuzzy logic to the test in experiments to land quadcopters on robots mounted with landing pads at UC's UAV Multi-Agent System Research (MASTER) Lab. "This landing project is a real-world problem. A delivery vehicle could have a companion drone make deliveries and land itself," Stockton said. Stockton is just the latest UC student mentored by Cohen who was offered a job, at least in part, for his experience in fuzzy logic. The U.S. Air Force offered Stockton a federal position to continue his engineering research at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base when he graduates this summer. UC doctoral graduate Nick Ernest, another student of Cohen's, started an artificial intelligence company called Psibernetix, Inc., that demonstrated the power of fuzzy logic last year when a fuzzy-logic-based artificial intelligence, dubbed ALPHA, bested a human fighter pilot in simulated dogfights. Retired U.S. Air Force Col. Gene Lee called ALPHA, "the most aggressive, responsive, dynamic and credible AI I've seen to date." Professor Cohen is confident about the team's approach. "Compared to other state-of-the-art techniques of adaptive thinking and deep learning, our approach appears to possess several advantages. Genetic fuzzy is scalable, adaptable and very robust," Cohen said. Cohen has authored more than 100 papers on fuzzy logic, a subject that is attracting increasing attention because of its broad applications in everything from manufacturing to medicine. UC is a world leader in fuzzy logic and teaches it at the undergraduate level, Cohen said. "It's important to introduce our students at an early stage to fuzzy approaches as it also provides them with an advantage as they enter the job market," Cohen said. The research was funded by a $500,000 grant from the National Science Foundation.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: phys.org

It's the only realistic way that drones will have commercially viable uses such as delivering that roll of toilet paper to customers, said Manish Kumar, associate professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Cincinnati's College of Engineering and Applied Science. Kumar and his co-authors, Nicklas Stockton, a UC researcher, and Kelly Cohen, aerospace engineering professor, considered the difficulty drones have in navigating their ever-changing airspace in a study presented at the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics SciTech 2017 Conference in January. This problem is compounded when the drone tries to land on a moving platform such as a delivery van or even a U.S. Navy warship pitching in high seas. "It has to land within a designated area with a small margin of error," Kumar said. "Landing a drone on a moving platform is a very difficult problem scientifically and from an engineering perspective." To address this challenge, UC researchers applied a concept called fuzzy logic, the kind of reasoning people employ subconsciously every day. While scientists are concerned with precision and accuracy in all they do, most people get through their day by making inferences and generalities, or by using fuzzy logic. Instead of seeing the world in black and white, fuzzy logic allows for nuance or degrees of truth. "In linguistic terms, we say large, medium and small rather than defining exact sets," he said. "We want to translate this kind of fuzzy reasoning used in humans to control systems." Fuzzy logic helps the drone make good navigational decisions amid a sea of statistical noise, he said. It's called "genetic-fuzzy" because the system evolves over time and continuously discards the lesser solutions. Stockton, Kumar and Cohen successfully employed fuzzy logic in a simulation to show it is an ideal system for navigating under dynamic conditions. Stockton, an engineering master's student who was lead author on the paper, is putting fuzzy logic to the test in experiments to land quadcopters on robots mounted with landing pads at UC's UAV Multi-Agent System Research (MASTER) Lab. "This landing project is a real-world problem. A delivery vehicle could have a companion drone make deliveries and land itself," Stockton said. Stockton is just the latest UC student mentored by Cohen who was offered a job, at least in part, for his experience in fuzzy logic. The U.S. Air Force offered Stockton a federal position to continue his engineering research at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base when he graduates this summer. UC doctoral graduate Nick Ernest, another student of Cohen's, started an artificial intelligence company called Psibernetix, Inc., that demonstrated the power of fuzzy logic last year when a fuzzy-logic-based artificial intelligence, dubbed ALPHA, bested a human fighter pilot in simulated dogfights. Retired U.S. Air Force Col. Gene Lee called ALPHA, "the most aggressive, responsive, dynamic and credible AI I've seen to date." Professor Cohen is confident about the team's approach. "Compared to other state-of-the-art techniques of adaptive thinking and deep learning, our approach appears to possess several advantages. Genetic fuzzy is scalable, adaptable and very robust," Cohen said. Cohen has authored more than 100 papers on fuzzy logic, a subject that is attracting increasing attention because of its broad applications in everything from manufacturing to medicine. UC is a world leader in fuzzy logic and teaches it at the undergraduate level, Cohen said. "It's important to introduce our students at an early stage to fuzzy approaches as it also provides them with an advantage as they enter the job market," Cohen said. Explore further: Using 'fuzzy logic' to optimize hybrid solar-battery systems


News Article | November 20, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

An analysis highlighting the 50 Best Vocational & Trade Programs in Ohio has been released by leading higher education resource site, Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org). Comparing data on colleges offering trade and vocational training, the site ranked the best two- and four-year schools for 2016-2017. Youngstown State University, University of Cincinnati Clermont College, University of Akron, Shawnee State University and University of Cincinnati Blue Ash College were among the top scoring four-year schools; Sinclair College, Belmont College, Columbus State Community College, Cincinnati State Technical and Community College and Stark State College were among the top scoring two-year schools. “Trade or vocational training programs give students skills to work in a variety of fast-growing industries immediately after graduation,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “The schools on this list are upholding excellence standards and demonstrating efforts to maximize student success through career placement and other services their trade and vocational programs offer.” To qualify for Ohio’s Best Trade Schools list, the Community for Accredited Online Schools requires all colleges to meet minimum quality standards. All colleges must be regionally accredited public or private not-for-profit institutions, and must offer career placement services to help maximize student success. The site compares each qualifying school based on more than a dozen unique factors, such as student-teacher ratios, graduation rates and more to come up with scoring and final rankings. A full list of the Best Trade Schools in Ohio, as well as details on the data points and methodology used to determine rankings can be found at: Belmont College Bowling Green State University - Firelands Central Ohio Technical College Cincinnati State Technical and Community College Clark State Community College Columbiana County Career and Technical Center Columbus State Community College Cuyahoga Community College Edison State Community College Lakeland Community College Lorain County Community College Marion Technical College North Central State College Northwest State Community College Ohio College of Massotherapy Ohio Institute of Allied Health Ohio State University Agricultural Technical Institute Owens Community College Remington College - Cleveland Campus Rhodes State College Sinclair College Southern State Community College Stark State College Terra State Community College U.S. Grant Joint Vocational School Washington State Community College Zane State College Ashland University Kent State University at Ashtabula Kent State University at East Liverpool Kent State University at Kent Kent State University at Salem Kent State University at Trumbull Kent State University at Tuscarawas Kettering College Miami University - Oxford Mount Saint Joseph University Ohio University - Lancaster Campus Ohio University - Main Campus Ohio University - Southern Campus Shawnee State University University of Akron Main Campus University of Cincinnati - Blue Ash College University of Cincinnati - Clermont College University of Cincinnati - Main Campus University of Northwestern Ohio University of Rio Grande University of Toledo Wright State University - Main Campus Youngstown State University About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


Steiner B.,University of Nebraska at Omaha | Wooldredge J.,University of Cincinnati
Justice Quarterly | Year: 2014

Studies have revealed systematic measurement errors in self-report data on crime and deviance resulting from poor recall and/or underreporting by certain groups of respondents. Official crime data have also been criticized, but for different reasons (e.g. gross underestimations of less serious offenses). Very similar observations have been made in studies of inmate crime (misconduct committed by prison inmates). Despite these criticisms, official data on inmate misconduct continue to be the most frequently used data in related studies. This study compared self-report and official data on inmate assaults, property thefts, and drug offenses for samples of inmates from 46 correctional institutions for adults in Ohio and Kentucky. Findings revealed that officially recorded misconduct underestimates the total volume of inmate crime. Analyses designed to uncover sources of the divergence between self-reported misconduct and officially recorded misconduct revealed far more consistencies than differences in the magnitude of inmate and facility effects on the different types of offenses. A few important differences did emerge in the magnitude of effects such as amount of time served (at the individual level) and facility population size (at the aggregate level). © 2012 Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences.


Silbergleit R.,University of Michigan | Durkalski V.,Medical University of South Carolina | Lowenstein D.,University of California at San Francisco | Conwit R.,U.S. National Institutes of Health | And 3 more authors.
New England Journal of Medicine | Year: 2012

Background: Early termination of prolonged seizures with intravenous administration of benzodiazepines improves outcomes. For faster and more reliable administration, paramedics increasingly use an intramuscular route. Methods: This double-blind, randomized, noninferiority trial compared the efficacy of intramuscular midazolam with that of intravenous lorazepam for children and adults in status epilepticus treated by paramedics. Subjects whose convulsions had persisted for more than 5 minutes and who were still convulsing after paramedics arrived were given the study medication by either intramuscular autoinjector or intravenous infusion. The primary outcome was absence of seizures at the time of arrival in the emergency department without the need for rescue therapy. Secondary outcomes included endotracheal intubation, recurrent seizures, and timing of treatment relative to the cessation of convulsive seizures. This trial tested the hypothesis that intramuscular midazolam was noninferior to intravenous lorazepam by a margin of 10 percentage points. Results: At the time of arrival in the emergency department, seizures were absent without rescue therapy in 329 of 448 subjects (73.4%) in the intramuscular-midazolam group and in 282 of 445 (63.4%) in the intravenous-lorazepam group (absolute difference, 10 percentage points; 95% confidence interval, 4.0 to 16.1; P<0.001 for both noninferiority and superiority). The two treatment groups were similar with respect to need for endotracheal intubation (14.1% of subjects with intramuscular midazolam and 14.4% with intravenous lorazepam) and recurrence of seizures (11.4% and 10.6%, respectively). Among subjects whose seizures ceased before arrival in the emergency department, the median times to active treatment were 1.2 minutes in the intramuscularmidazolam group and 4.8 minutes in the intravenous-lorazepam group, with corresponding median times from active treatment to cessation of convulsions of 3.3 minutes and 1.6 minutes. Adverse-event rates were similar in the two groups. Conclusions: For subjects in status epilepticus, intramuscular midazolam is at least as safe and effective as intravenous lorazepam for prehospital seizure cessation. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00809146.) Copyright © 2012 Massachusetts Medical Society.


Perez-Gil J.,Complutense University of Madrid | Weaver T.E.,University of Cincinnati
Physiology | Year: 2010

Pulmonary surfactant is an essential lipid-protein complex that stabilizes the respiratory units (alveoli) involved in gas exchange. Quantitative or qualitative derangements in surfactant are associated with severe respiratory pathologies. The integrated regulation of surfactant synthesis, secretion, and metabolism is critical for air breathing and, ultimately, survival. The goal of this review is to summarize our current understanding and highlight important knowledge gaps in surfactant homeostatic mechanisms. © 2010 Int. Union Physiol. Sci./Am. Physiol. Soc.


Nebert D.W.,University of Cincinnati | Wikvall K.,Uppsala University | Miller W.L.,University of California at San Francisco
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences | Year: 2013

There are 18 mammalian cytochrome P450 (CYP) families, which encode 57 genes in the human genome. CYP2, CYP3 and CYP4 families contain far more genes than the other 15 families; these three families are also the ones that are dramatically larger in rodent genomes. Most (if not all) genes in the CYP1, CYP2, CYP3 and CYP4 families encode enzymes involved in eicosanoid metabolism and are inducible by various environmental stimuli (i.e. diet, chemical inducers, drugs, pheromones, etc.), whereas the other 14 gene families often have only a single member, and are rarely if ever inducible or redundant. Although the CYP2 and CYP3 families can be regarded as largely redundant and promiscuous, mutations or other defects in one or more genes of the remaining 16 gene families are primarily the ones responsible for P450- specific diseases-confirming these genes are not superfluous or promiscuous but rather are more directly involved in critical life functions. P450-mediated diseases comprise those caused by: aberrant steroidogenesis; defects in fatty acid, cholesterol and bile acid pathways; vitamin D dysregulation and retinoid (as well as putative eicosanoid) dysregulation during fertilization, implantation, embryogenesis, foetogenesis and neonatal development. © 2013 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.1.2-2 | Award Amount: 15.68M | Year: 2013

The overall goal with INFECT is to advance our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms, prognosis, and diagnosis of the multifactorial highly lethal NSTIs. The fulminant course of NSTIs (in the order of hours) demands immediate diagnosis and adequate interventions in order to salvage lives and limbs. However, diagnosis and management are difficult due to heterogeneity in clinical presentation, in co-morbidities and in microbiological aetiology. Thus, there is an urgent need for novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies in order to improve outcome of NSTIs. To achieve this, a comprehensive and integrated knowledge of diagnostic features, causative microbial agent, treatment strategies, and pathogenic mechanisms (host and bacterial disease traits and their underlying interaction network) is required. INFECT is designed to obtain such insights through an integrated systems biology approach in patients and different clinically relevant experimental models. Specific objectives of INFECT are to: 1. Unravel specific mechanisms underlying diseases signatures though a bottom-up systems approach applied to clinically relevant experimental settings 2. Apply a top-down systems biology approach to NSTI patient samples to pin-point key host and pathogen factors involved in the onset and development of infection 3. Identify and quantify disease signatures and underlying networks that contribute to disease outcome 4. Exploit identified disease traits for the innovation of optimized diagnostic tools 5. Translate the advanced knowledge generated into evidence-based guidelines for classification and management, and novel therapeutic strategies We have gathered a team of multidisciplinary researchers, clinicians, SMEs and a patient organization, each with a unique expertise, technical platform and/or model systems that together provide the means to successfully conduct the multifaceted research proposed and efficiently disseminate/exploit the knowledge obtained.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

BILLINGS, MT, February 16, 2017-- Dr. Guy Glenn has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Now retired, Dr. Glenn amassed five decades of practiced experience in both the health care and military fields. He served as a commissioned second lieutenant for the U.S. Army and completed a medical internship at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Additionally, he served as a resident in pathology at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center for four years. During the 1970s, Dr. Glenn advanced through the ranks of the U.S. Army, becoming a colonel in 1972. Also during the '70s, he took on the role of pathology demonstrator at Royal Army Medical College, and chief of the department of pathology at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center.Dr. Glenn's educational background consists of a Bachelor of Science from Denison University and an MD from the University of Cincinnati. A diplomate of the American Board of Pathology, Dr. Glenn has contributed his knowledge to many articles in professional journals. Throughout his career, he has published more than 25 professional papers and presented additional findings at meetings and seminars. He also wrote and assisted in the composition and publishing of multiple medical guidelines, as well as a chapter on urine chemistry quality control in the Clinical Laboratory Annual in 1983. In order to remain current with changes in his field, Dr. Glenn affiliates himself with the College of American Pathologists, for which he is a fellow, as well as the Midland Empire Health Association, the Society of Medical Consultants to the Armed Forces, and the American Registry of Pathology.In recognition of professional excellence, Dr. Glenn was featured in more than 15 editions of Who's Who in America, as well as the 6th, 11th and 12th editions of Who's Who in Science and Engineering.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis now publishes many Who's Who titles, including Who's Who in America , Who's Who in the World , Who's Who in American Law , Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare , Who's Who in Science and Engineering , and Who's Who in Asia . Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


News Article | November 29, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Somewhere between Earth's creation and where we are today, scientists have demonstrated that some early life forms existed just fine without any oxygen. While researchers proclaim the first half of our 4.5 billion-year-old planet's life as an important time for the development and evolution of early bacteria, evidence for these life forms remains sparse including how they survived at a time when oxygen levels in the atmosphere were less than one-thousandth of one percent of what they are today. Recent geology research from the University of Cincinnati presents new evidence for bacteria found fossilized in two separate locations in the Northern Cape Province of South Africa. "These are the oldest reported fossil sulfur bacteria to date," says Andrew Czaja, UC assistant professor of geology. "And this discovery is helping us reveal a diversity of life and ecosystems that existed just prior to the Great Oxidation Event, a time of major atmospheric evolution." The 2.52 billion-year-old sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are described by Czaja as exceptionally large, spherical-shaped, smooth-walled microscopic structures much larger than most modern bacteria, but similar to some modern single-celled organisms that live in deepwater sulfur-rich ocean settings today, where even now there are almost no traces of oxygen. In his research published in the December issue of the journal Geology of the Geological Society of America, Czaja and his colleagues Nicolas Beukes from the University of Johannesburg and Jeffrey Osterhout, a recently graduated master's student from UC's department of geology, reveal samples of bacteria that were abundant in deep water areas of the ocean in a geologic time known as the Neoarchean Eon (2.8 to 2.5 billion years ago). "These fossils represent the oldest known organisms that lived in a very dark, deep-water environment," says Czaja. "These bacteria existed two billion years before plants and trees, which evolved about 450 million years ago. We discovered these microfossils preserved in a layer of hard silica-rich rock called chert located within the Kaapvaal craton of South Africa." With an atmosphere of much less than one percent oxygen, scientists have presumed that there were things living in deep water in the mud that didn't need sunlight or oxygen, but Czaja says experts didn't have any direct evidence for them until now. Czaja argues that finding rocks this old is rare, so researchers' understanding of the Neoarchean Eon are based on samples from only a handful of geographic areas, such as this region of South Africa and another in Western Australia. According to Czaja, scientists through the years have theorized that South Africa and Western Australia were once part of an ancient supercontinent called Vaalbara, before a shifting and upending of tectonic plates split them during a major change in the Earth's surface. Based on radiometric dating and geochemical isotope analysis, Czaja characterizes his fossils as having formed in this early Vaalbara supercontinent in an ancient deep seabed containing sulfate from continental rock. According to this dating, Czaja's fossil bacteria were also thriving just before the era when other shallow-water bacteria began creating more and more oxygen as a byproduct of photosynthesis. "We refer to this period as the Great Oxidation Event that took place 2.4 to 2.2 billion years ago," says Czaja. Czaja's fossils show the Neoarchean bacteria in plentiful numbers while living deep in the sediment. He contends that these early bacteria were busy ingesting volcanic hydrogen sulfide -- the molecule known to give off a rotten egg smell -- then emitting sulfate, a gas that has no smell. He says this is the same process that goes on today as modern bacteria recycle decaying organic matter into minerals and gases. "The waste product from one [bacteria] was food for the other," adds Czaja. "While I can't claim that these early bacteria are the same ones we have today, we surmise that they may have been doing the same thing as some of our current bacteria," says Czaja. "These early bacteria likely consumed the molecules dissolved from sulfur-rich minerals that came from land rocks that had eroded and washed out to sea, or from the volcanic remains on the ocean's floor. There is an ongoing debate about when sulfur-oxidizing bacteria arose and how that fits into the earth's evolution of life, Czaja adds. "But these fossils tell us that sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were there 2.52 billion years ago, and they were doing something remarkable." This work was supported by the National Geographic Society-Waitt Grant Program and the NASA Astrobiology Institute. Czaja's paper, "Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria prior to the Great Oxidation Event from the 2.52 Ga Gamohaan Formation of South Africa," was published in Geology, a journal of the Geological Society of America. The GSA is allowing FREE access until Dec. 15.


News Article | November 8, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Ever wondered what's in the neighborhood pond? Technology developed by researchers at the University of Houston will allow you to test for waterborne pathogens by using your smartphone. "The goal is to have citizens help to investigate and monitor water quality near where they live, while educating people about potential threats in environmental or drinking water," said Wei-Chuan Shih, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at UH. "This type of citizen science is a priority for the National Science Foundation, to increase awareness of science and technology through individual participation." Shih received a $100,000 grant from the NSF citizen science initiative to develop the technology, which builds upon an inexpensive lens his lab created last year, allowing people to turn their smartphones into microscopes. "Almost everyone has a smartphone," he said. "Our goal is simple components that work with commercially available test kits, so people can order what they need to engage in this activity." He and members of his lab created DotLens to produce and distribute the inkjet printed lenses, which attach directly to a smartphone camera lens. The researchers now are using 3-D printing to create an attachment that provides a narrow-band light source, which will allow people using commercial water testing kits to see and identify waterborne pathogens. The attachment allows the user to control the light spectrum emitted, fine-tuning it to make different pathogens visible under magnification, said Yulung Sung, a doctoral candidate working in Shih's lab. Shih said the system initially will test for two types of pathogen: Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum, both of which can enter the body through the nose and mouth and cause intestinal infection. They can be serious - a 1993 outbreak of Cryptosporidium parvum in Milwaukee affected more than 400,000 people, according to a study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Test kits are already available to allow people to detect pathogens in water, but without fluorescent microscopy - a microscopic technique that employ a narrow spectrum of light - those pathogens aren't visible, even under magnification. The kits target specific pathogens, and if those pathogens are present when exposed to the light, they become visible. If there are no pathogens in the water sample, there's nothing to see. But most people don't have access to fluorescent microscopy. The DotLens and Shih's attachment serve as a low-cost alternative. The lenses sell for $12.99 and up; a price for the light source hasn't been set. By changing the light spectrum, researchers - and nonscientists armed with the attachment and a smartphone - could use the same system for other water contaminants, including lead, Shih said. Sung and Hoang Nguyen, who also is a PhD student working in Shih's lab, are currently testing the device on water samples collected from around the region in order to refine its performance and recording what they find. She said that two undergraduates, Fernando Campa from the University of Texas at Arlington and Kelly O'Shaughnessy from the University of Cincinnati, worked as the lab's first "citizen-scientists" over the summer under a NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates grant. Ultimately, Shih said he envisions an online map to be drawn collaboratively with citizen scientists, posting and sharing their findings. "This is like completing a puzzle with a community of citizen scientists who share similar interests," he said.


News Article | November 21, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Two faculty members at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), José M. Argüello, the Walter and Miriam Rutman Professor of Biochemistry, and L. Ramdas Ram-Mohan, professor of physics, have been elected Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world’s largest general scientific society. Election as a AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers in recognition of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. This year, 391 members have been awarded this honor. “We are delighted and very proud that Professors Argüello and Ram-Mohan are being honored by the AAAS,” said Bruce Bursten, WPI’s provost and retiring chair of the AAAS Section on Chemistry. “Election as a Fellow of the AAAS is a tangible recognition of our colleagues’ sustained academic excellence and their dedication to research and education.” Argüello was elected by the AAAS Section on Biological Sciences “for distinguished research discoveries elucidating the mechanisms underlying metal ion transport and the role of bacterial metal transporters in agriculture and infectious disease.” A member of the WPI faculty since 1996, he is a biochemist whose research focuses on the structure and function of proteins that transport heavy metals like copper, zinc, cobalt, and iron across cell membranes. These micronutrients perform fundamental functions in all living organisms, for example, maintaining structure, conferring catalytic activity to proteins, and participating in the transport of oxygen in the blood and the synthesis of sugars in plants. Metals also contribute to the virulence of pathogenic microorganisms and the ability of a cell to resist infection. Because of the importance of these basic biological functions, a better understanding of the mechanisms of heavy metal transport has implications for the treatment of a host of diseases, for human and animal nutrition, and for the bioremediation of heavy metal pollution. Argüello, who also holds an appointment as a member of the University of Massachusetts Center for Clinical and Translational Science, received a degree in biological chemistry from the National University of Cordoba and a PhD in biological sciences from the National University of Rio Cuarto in Argentina. He completed postdoctoral work in the Department of Physiology at the University of Pennsylvania and in the Department of Molecular Genetics at the University of Cincinnati. He has received multiple research grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), including an NIH Research Development Award for Minority Faculty in 1995 and a $1.3 million award in 2016 for a systematic study of copper in the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a leading cause of hospital-associated infections. He has published nearly 60 scientific articles in peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Biological Chemistry, the most-cited biomedical research journal in the world; Argüello was appointed to the journal's editorial board in 2012. He is the co-editor of the 2012 book Topics in Membranes: Metal Transporters (Elsevier). Argüello served as a program director in the Division of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences at the NSF's Directorate for Biological Sciences in 2009, and in 2010 was appointed to a four-year term on the NIH's Macromolecular Structure and Function (A) study section to participate in the review and evaluation of research proposals aimed at understanding the nature of biological phenomena and applying that knowledge to enhance human health. In 2012, he received WPI’s Board of Trustees’ Award for Outstanding Research and Creative Scholarship. Ram-Mohan was elected by the AAAS Section on Physics “for major contributions to the development of computational algorithms and important advances in theory of electronic and optical properties of solid state and semiconductor materials.” Since joining the WPI faculty in 1978 he has developed an international reputation as a pioneer in solid state physics, a field that has helped propel extraordinary advances in the speed and power of computers, telecommunications systems, lasers, and other high-tech devices. In addition to exploring the quantum mechanical properties of condensed matter, Ram-Mohan has developed powerful computational tools that have made it possible to predict with great accuracy the properties of increasingly complex semiconductor and optoelectronic devices and to precisely control the design of these ubiquitous systems. The director of the university's Center for Computational NanoScience, Ram-Mohan's work on high-energy physics, condensed matter, and semiconductor physics has resulted in more than 200 peer-reviewed publications that have garnered more than 3,800 citations. He is also the founder of wavefunction engineering, a method for specifying certain quantum properties of semiconductor heterostructures—assemblies of two dissimilar semiconductor materials that display unique electrical or optoelectronic properties. This innovative method arises from the application of the finite element method, or FEM, a numerical analysis technique used widely in engineering, to quantum heterostructures. Ram-Mohan, recognized as one of the foremost authorities on FEM, described this new field in his landmark 2002 book, Finite Element and Boundary Element Applications to Quantum Mechanics. He is also the founder of Quantum Semiconductor Algorithms Inc., which he established to commercialize his software for designing quantum semiconductor heterostructures. In 2012 he was named a Coleman Fellow at WPI in recognition of his entrepreneurial experience and expertise. Ram-Mohan's research has earned him numerous awards and honors, including election as a fellow of the American Physical Society, the Optical Society of America, the American Vacuum Society, Australian Institute of Physics, and the United Kingdom Institute of Physics. He has received the Engineering Excellence Award of the Optical Society of America and the Department of the Air Force Certificate of Achievement, and served as the Clark Way Harrison Distinguished Visiting Professorship at Washington University in St. Louis in 2005. In 2008 he was awarded the Sarojini Damodaran Fellowship to deliver lectures at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research in Mumbai. WPI has recognized his research, teaching, and service with the Sigma Xi Senior Faculty Award for Research Excellence, the Board of Trustees' Award for Outstanding Creative Scholarship and Research, the Board of Trustees' Award for Outstanding Teaching, and the Chairman’s Exemplary Faculty Prize. Professors Argüello and Ram-Mohan will receive an official certificate and a gold and blue (representing science and engineering, respectively) rosette pin during the AAAS annual meeting on Feb. 18, 2017, in Boston. They join four current AAAS fellows at WPI: Provost Bruce Bursten, Dean of Arts and Sciences Karen Kashmanian Oates, and biology professors David Adams and Pamela Weathers. Founded in 1865 in Worcester, Mass., WPI is one of the nation’s first engineering and technology universities. Its 14 academic departments offer more than 50 undergraduate and graduate degree programs in science, engineering, technology, business, the social sciences, and the humanities and arts, leading to bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees. WPI's talented faculty work with students on interdisciplinary research that seeks solutions to important and socially relevant problems in fields as diverse as the life sciences and bioengineering, energy, information security, materials processing, and robotics. Students also have the opportunity to make a difference to communities and organizations around the world through the university's innovative Global Projects Program. There are more than 45 WPI project centers throughout the Americas, Africa, Asia-Pacific, and Europe.


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

WUXI, China, 31. Oktober 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Die IoT-Weltmesse findet vom 30. Oktober bis zum 1. November 2016 in Wuxi statt. Die Messe ist eine Gemeinschaftsinitiative des chinesischen Ministeriums für Industrie und Informationstechnologie, des chinesischen Ministeriums für Wissenschaft und Technik und der Volksregierung der Provinz Jiangsu. Sie wird von der Chinesischen Akademie der Wissenschaften (CAS), der Internationalen Fernmeldeunion (ITU), dem Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), dem Global Standard 1 (GS1) und Auto-ID Labs unterstützt und ist die größte und renommierteste landesweite Messe des Internet-der-Dinge-Sektors in China. Die Internationale Chinesische IoT-Messe findet seit 2010 im Jahresrhythmus statt und hat seither einen hohen Bekanntheitsgrad erlangt. Im Oktober dieses Jahres hat sie sich mit Genehmigung des Zentralkomitees der Kommunistischen Partei Chinas und des Staatsrats der Volksrepublik China zur Weltmesse für das Internet der Dinge umbenannt. Im Vergleich zu früheren Jahren ist die Messe größer mit renommierteren Teilnehmern und fortschrittlicheren Technologien. Verschiedene Ausstellungen und aufgewertete Technologien machen die Veranstaltung zu einem Neubeginn für die Internet-der-Dinge-Messe. Die Messe mit dem Motto „IoT-Ära einläuten, globale Intelligenz teilen" umfasst verschiedene Aktivitäten wie beispielsweise den IoT-Wuxi-Gipfel, die zentrale Ausstellung für IoT-Anwendungen und -Produkte, den nationalen chinesischen Hochschul-Innovationswettbewerb für IoT-Anwendungen und das 4. Treffen der Lenkungsgruppe der Wuxi National Sensor Network Innovation Demonstration Zone. Am IoT-Wuxi-Gipfel nahmen einheimische und internationale Gäste teil. Grundsatzreden gab es von Zhang Xiaogang, Präsident der Internationalen Organisation für Normung (ISO), und Malcolm Johnson, stellvertretender Generalsekretär der Internationalen Fernmeldeunion (ITU). Zu den Rednern zählten außerdem Khalil Najafi, Professor am Fachbereich Electrical and Computer Engineering an der University of Michigan, Nadia Magnenat Thalmann, Gründerin und Leiterin des MIRALab-Forschungslabors an der Universität Genf, Alain Crozier, Leiter und CEO von Microsoft Greater China Region, Wu Hequan, Mitglied der Chinesischen Akademie der Ingenieurwissenschaften, Wang Jian, Chief Technology Officer bei Alibaba, Zhang Shunmao, Präsident von Huawei Marketing and Solutions, und Liu Haitao, Vorsitzender der World Sensing Net Group (WSN Group). Neben einem IoT-Wettbewerb für Hochschulstudenten und einer Jobbörse gab es eine Pressekonferenz, bei der der Bauplan für eine zukunftsweisende „Internet-der-Dinge-Stadt" enthüllt wurde, um die Entwicklung der IoT-Branche in Wuxi voranzubringen. Die Messe zählte über 3.000 Gäste aus 23 Ländern und Regionen, darunter 10 Ministeriumsleiter und 24 Mitglieder der Chinesischen Akademie der Wissenschaften und der Chinesischen Akademie der Ingenieurwissenschaften, Vorsitzende internationaler Gesellschaften, der Erfinder des integrierten CMOS-Schaltkreises und der Gründer des MEMS-Forschungszentrums in Singapur. Zu den Gästen gehörten darüber hinaus Führungskräfte von Staatsbetrieben wie China Railway, State Grid, Sinopec, PetroChina und Aviation Industry Corporation of China. Anwesend waren zudem Professoren des MIT, der University of Colorado, University of Michigan, University of Cincinnati, University of Washington, Universität Genf und Tsinghua-Universität. Dem Event beiwohnen werden außerdem Technologieleiter von internationalen Unternehmen wie IBM, Siemens, Microsoft, Bosch, GE, Nokia, NTT, SK Telecom, ARM, Kaspersky, Honeywell und Tesla Motors und einheimischen Unternehmen wie China Mobile, China Telecom, China Unicom, Huawei, Lenovo, Inspur, Haier, Midea, Foxconn, Alibaba, Baidu, Tencent, JD.com, Qihoo 360 und Neusoft. Mit einer von 32.000 m2 auf 50.000 m2 vergrößerten Ausstellungsfläche finden auf der Messe 489 Aussteller Platz, die den Besuchern über interaktive Displays interessante Technologieanwendungen und Praxisbeispiele präsentieren werden. Unter den Messeteilnehmern finden sich Namen wie IBM, Siemens, OMRON, ARM, Infineon Technologies, China Telecom, China Mobile, China Unicom, XCMG, China North Industries Group Corporation, Aisino Corporation, Huawei, ZTE, Alibaba, Tencent, JD.com, AsiaInfo, Hikvision und Lenovo.


News Article | January 3, 2016
Site: www.nanotech-now.com

Abstract: Semblant, the market leader in protective nanocoatings and liquid damage prevention for electronic devices, today announced that it has appointed Donald Cunningham (Don) as Chief Commercial Officer and Senior Vice President, Worldwide Sales and Marketing. "We are delighted to welcome Don into the company," said Simon McElrea, CEO of Semblant. "Don brings exceptional commercial leadership to Semblant in sales, and critically, technology licensing experience. His leadership is especially valuable at this important juncture when our mobile phone customers are ramping Semblant's MobileShield nanotechnology solution into volumes exceeding one million units per day." Don brings more than 30 years of executive sales and licensing leadership experience in the consumer electronics, semiconductor, printed circuit board assembly and materials industries. Prior to joining Semblant, Don was Vice President of Licensing and Sales for Tessera Technologies, where he led the company's highly successful turnaround licensing initiative. Before joining Tessera in 2011, Don led all microelectronics technology licensing activities at GE. Prior to GE, Don held various senior leadership positions at Texas Instruments and Amkor Technology. Don holds multiple patents in semiconductor and cell phone technologies, and has a Bachelor of Science in industrial management from the University of Cincinnati. About Semblant Semblant is the global leader in innovating and deploying nanomaterials in the electronics industry. The company's unique nanotechnology solutions, backed by a broad range of fundamental patents, have been designed specifically to protect electronic devices from liquid ingress, corrosion and many other forms of damage. With thicknesses in the submicron range, Semblant's proprietary plasma-based conformal coatings and protective surface treatments provide remarkable improvements in product reliability, product lifetime, return/repair/resale economics and customer brand loyalty. The company's proprietary equipment sets are cleanroom compliant, high-volume-manufacturing-proven (greater than 1 million units per day capacity installed), and the resulting materials are entirely reworkable (solder-through) and ultra-green (including PFOA- and PFOS-free). To date, the company has provided solutions to the mobile phone, wearable, enterprise computing, network infrastructure, medical device, automotive and space-military-aerospace markets, as well as the printed circuit board and semiconductor/semiconductor packaging industries. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


News Article | December 15, 2016
Site: www.cemag.us

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine have been able to generate multifunctional RNA nanoparticles that could overcome treatment resistance in breast cancer, potentially making existing treatments more effective in these patients. The study, published in the Dec. 14 online edition of American Chemical Society’s ACS Nano and led by Xiaoting Zhang, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Cancer Biology at the UC College of Medicine, shows that using a nanodelivery system to target HER2-positive breast cancer and stop production of the protein MED1 could slow tumor growth, stop cancer from spreading and sensitize the cancer cells to treatment with tamoxifen, a known therapy for estrogen-driven cancer. MED1 is a protein often produced at abnormally high levels in breast cancer cells that when eliminated is found to stop cancer cell growth. HER2-positive breast cancer involves amplification of a gene encoding, or programming, the protein known as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, which also promotes the growth of cancer cells. MED1 co-produces (co-expresses) and co-amplifies with HER2 in most cases, and Zhang’s previous studies have shown their interaction plays key roles in anti-estrogen treatment resistance. "Most breast cancers express estrogen receptors, and the anti-estrogen drug tamoxifen has been widely used for their treatment,” says Zhang, who is also a member of the Cincinnati Cancer Center and the UC Cancer Institute. "Unfortunately, up to half of all estrogen receptor-positive tumors are either unresponsive or later develop resistance to the therapy. In this study, we have developed a highly innovative design that takes advantage of the co-overexpression of HER2 and MED1 in these tumors.” Zhang and researchers in his lab found that these RNA nanoparticles were able to selectively bind to HER2-overexpressing breast tumors, eliminating MED1 expression and significantly decreasing estrogen receptor-controlled target gene production. The RNA nanoparticles not only reduced the growth and spread of the HER2-overexpressing breast cancer tumors, but also sensitized them to tamoxifen treatment. "These bio-safe nanoparticles efficiently targeted and penetrated into HER2-overexpressing tumors after administration in animal models,” he says. "In addition, these nanoparticles also led to a dramatic reduction in the cancer stem cell content of breast tumors when combined with tamoxifen treatment. Cancer stem cells, as you know, are tumor-causing cells that are known to play essential roles in tumor spread, recurrence and therapy resistance. Eliminating these cells could represent an improved and more desirable treatment strategy for breast cancer patients. "These findings are highly promising for potential clinical treatment of advanced metastatic and tamoxifen-resistant human breast cancer. Further studies are still needed and hopefully soon we’ll be able to test our nanoparticles in clinical trials at the UC Cancer Institute’s Comprehensive Breast Cancer Center.” Along with Zhang, the first author of the study is Yijuan Zhang, PhD, with co-authors Marissa Leonard and Yongguang Yang, PhD from his lab at UC. Other collaborators include Ohio State University researchers Dan Shu, PhD, and Yi Shu, PhD, in the laboratory of RNA nanotechnology expert Peixuan Guo, PhD. This study was supported by the UC Cancer Institute Drake Pilot Award, Ride Cincinnati, a Cincinnati Cancer Center Pilot Grant, the Susan G. Komen Career Catalyst Research Grant (KG110028), the National Institutes of Health (R01CA197865, R01 EB019036) and the U.S. Department of Defense Idea Award (W81XWH-15-1-0052). Zhang cites no conflict of interest; however, Guo is the cofounder of Biomotor and RNA Nanotechnology Development Corp. Ltd.


News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

CINCINNATI--Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine have been able to generate multifunctional RNA nanoparticles that could overcome treatment resistance in breast cancer, potentially making existing treatments more effective in these patients. The study, published in the Dec. 14, 2016, online edition of American Chemical Society's ACS Nano and led by Xiaoting Zhang, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Cancer Biology at the UC College of Medicine, shows that using a nanodelivery system to target HER2-positive breast cancer and stop production of the protein MED1 could slow tumor growth, stop cancer from spreading and sensitize the cancer cells to treatment with tamoxifen, a known therapy for estrogen-driven cancer. MED1 is a protein often produced at abnormally high levels in breast cancer cells that when eliminated is found to stop cancer cell growth. HER2-positive breast cancer involves amplification of a gene encoding, or programming, the protein known as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, which also promotes the growth of cancer cells. MED1 co-produces (co-expresses) and co-amplifies with HER2 in most cases, and Zhang's previous studies have shown their interaction plays key roles in anti-estrogen treatment resistance. "Most breast cancers express estrogen receptors, and the anti-estrogen drug tamoxifen has been widely used for their treatment," says Zhang, who is also a member of the Cincinnati Cancer Center and the UC Cancer Institute. "Unfortunately, up to half of all estrogen receptor-positive tumors are either unresponsive or later develop resistance to the therapy. In this study, we have developed a highly innovative design that takes advantage of the co-overexpression of HER2 and MED1 in these tumors." Zhang and researchers in his lab found that these RNA nanoparticles were able to selectively bind to HER2-overexpressing breast tumors, eliminating MED1 expression and significantly decreasing estrogen receptor-controlled target gene production. The RNA nanoparticles not only reduced the growth and spread of the HER2-overexpressing breast cancer tumors, but also sensitized them to tamoxifen treatment. "These bio-safe nanoparticles efficiently targeted and penetrated into HER2-overexpressing tumors after administration in animal models," he says. "In addition, these nanoparticles also led to a dramatic reduction in the cancer stem cell content of breast tumors when combined with tamoxifen treatment. Cancer stem cells, as you know, are tumor-causing cells that are known to play essential roles in tumor spread, recurrence and therapy resistance. Eliminating these cells could represent an improved and more desirable treatment strategy for breast cancer patients. "These findings are highly promising for potential clinical treatment of advanced metastatic and tamoxifen-resistant human breast cancer. Further studies are still needed and hopefully soon we'll be able to test our nanoparticles in clinical trials at the UC Cancer Institute's Comprehensive Breast Cancer Center." Along with Zhang, the first author of this study is Yijuan Zhang, PhD, with co-authors Marissa Leonard and Yongguang Yang, PhD from his lab at UC. Other collaborators include Ohio State University researchers Dan Shu, PhD, and Yi Shu, PhD, in the laboratory of RNA nanotechnology expert Peixuan Guo, PhD. This study was supported by the UC Cancer Institute Drake Pilot Award, Ride Cincinnati, a Cincinnati Cancer Center Pilot Grant, the Susan G. Komen Career Catalyst Research Grant (KG110028), the National Institutes of Health (R01CA197865, R01 EB019036) and the U.S. Department of Defense Idea Award (W81XWH-15-1-0052). Zhang cites no conflict of interest; however, Guo is the cofounder of Biomotor and RNA Nanotechnology Development Corp. Ltd.


News Article | November 29, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Fractal Analytics (http://www.fractalanalytics.com), one of the largest pure play providers of analytics, today announced that Andy Walter, former Vice President, Global Commercial Services of The Procter & Gamble Company (P&G), has joined them as a strategic advisor. "We are very excited to have Andy join us. Andy's experience in the Consumer Goods and Retail space and his expertise in scaling solutions by combining analytics & IT will be invaluable to our clients as they improve decision making through data and analytics," said, Pranay Agrawal, Co-founder and CEO, Fractal Analytics. Over the course of his 26-year career at P&G, Walter has built up deep expertise in the integration of emerging and core technologies, supply chain management, sales and marketing and consumer and business analytics. In his most recent assignment, he oversaw more than 1,500 IT, analytics, and other professionals. "I am delighted to join Fractal and look forward to working with the team who has been creating value by institutionalizing analytics at some of the most loved Fortune 500 consumer brands," said Andy Walter. Walter also has more than 15 years' experience working on boards and in board level advisory roles. He is currently on the board at Digimarc Corporation and Virtualitics LLC. He has previously served on the GS1 US Board of Governors including as Chair for their technology committee and is a trustee and treasurer of the non-profit Ovarian Cancer Alliance of Greater Cincinnati. Prior to joining P&G as an IT manager in 1990, Walter worked for Monsanto Co. from 1988-90. He earned a bachelor's degree in computer science from the University of Cincinnati in 1992. Fractal Analytics is a strategic analytics partner to the most admired Fortune 500 companies globally and helps them power every human decision in the enterprise by bringing analytics and AI to the decision. Fractal Analytics has more than 1000 people across 12 global locations including the United States, UK and India and has been named a 'Cool Vendor in Analytics' and a 'Vendor to watch' by Gartner. Fractal is privately held and has investors including Khazanah, who invested $100 million in 2016 and TA Associates, who invested $25 million in 2013.


News Article | December 16, 2015
Site: www.fastcompany.com

This week back in 2011, during a heated GOP race for the presidency, the leading candidate in the polls was Newt Gingrich. The winner of the Iowa caucus in 2012, which kicks off the primary season, was Rick Santorum (remember him?). Four years before that, the leading national candidate was Rudy Giuliani and the Iowa caucus was clinched by Mike Huckabee. We all complain about polls—there are too many of them and they dominate election coverage—but one of the best reasons to dismiss them is that they are notoriously unreliable at predicting the actual results, especially so early in the campaign. Right now, Donald Trump dominates national polls of likely GOP voters and Ted Cruz is leading in polls of likely GOP voters in Iowa. It is obvious to most polling experts that such polls have no serious predictive value—at least not until a few days closer to the actual voting—yet the media and an overabundance of political pundits announce the results of numerous such polls on an almost hourly basis every day as if they have some substantive value. What the Polling Experts Say We talked to polling experts Al Tuchfarber and Cliff Zukin to explain why such polls are so unreliable and to set the record straight on pre-presidential election survey methodologies and results. Tuchfarber is professor emeritus of political science at the University of Cincinnati and was the founder and director of the UC Institute for Policy Research from 1971 to 2004. Zukin is professor of political science and public policy, Eagleton Institute of Politics and Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Policy, Rutgers University, and past president elect and current member of the Executive Council for the American Association for Public Opinion Research (AAPOR). "These pre-election polls are demonstrably inaccurate right now," Tuchfarber says. "When you get to the last few days (pre-Iowa caucus and New Hampshire primary voting) they are close but not perfect." "It is not a great system from the get-go, and the role of polls in setting expectations is one of those things that happens but it is not very healthy," Zukin adds. Zukin recently had a paper published on the AAPOR site, titled "A Primer on Pre-election Polls: Or Why Different Election Polls Sometimes have Different Results," and Tuchfarber recently authored a guest column for Sabato’s Crystal Ball—a popular site out of the University of Virginia’s Center for Politics that keeps close tabs on presidential elections—titled "60 Days Until Iowa: Are the Polls Predicting the Winners?" Tuchfarber wrote that we should definitely not trust the predictive power of either the national polls or state polls at this point in the process, adding that "we can figure that perhaps anywhere from one-half to two-thirds of the interviewed respondents in these polls won’t actually vote in a primary or caucus." Zukin’s primer alone, synthesized below in brief, is a kind of laundry list that tells us in no uncertain terms why pre-presidential election polling is more of an art than a science: Sampling error percentages—where margin of error plus or minus X percentage points is noted—are misleading because the sampling error is typically larger than it may seem "and is one of the major reasons why polls may differ, even when conducted around the same time." The most modern modes of surveying include telephone (landline and cell), and Internet/online, and they all have drawbacks for enabling polling accuracy. Telephone surveys frequently use random digit dialing (RDD) to ensure distribution by geography, or registration based sampling (RBS) to draw from public lists of registered voters. Both of these methods miss a substantial portion of the electorate. Regarding cell phones, and in particular smart phones, more people than ever use them (a 2015 Pew Research Center study showed that 64% of American adults own smartphones), but federal law prohibits auto dialers to contact smart phones (they have to be hand dialed). This makes cell phone surveying more expensive than landline surveying, which, in turn, causes some surveying organizations to skimp on the number of cell phone interviews. Another survey mode includes recorded voice calls, as opposed to live interviewers, known as IVR for interactive voice response, and called robo-polls—also unable to call cell phones and hence cost-prohibitive to accurately represent voters. Additionally, there is no way of knowing who actually answers a robo-poll. Internet/online polls also have major issues, namely that pollsters have not yet figured out how to obtain a representative sample of Internet users, making most online polls based purely on non-probability samples. Timing and field procedures also come into play, along with question ordering and wording. "Polls don’t predict; they describe the situation at the moment," Zukin writes. Polls taken over different dates (field period), such as over one day or seven days, for instance, yield different results. An event might happen at any given time during a field period, impacting polls and thus making them harder to predict. In addition, the ways in which questions are asked, as well as what order they are in, affect poll results. For example, "a line of questioning on the willingness to vote for a woman as president could lead to an overstatement of intentions to vote for Clinton and Fiorina in subsequent questions." Weighting and determining probable voters also need to be considered. Weighting uses basic math to identify probable voters and their common characteristics based on census data, but it is far from an exact science. "Even the best polls cannot interview a perfect sample, due to non-response and non-coverage, among a variety of reasons," Zukin explains. There is also a general problem inherent to these polls whereby there is an over-reporting of peoples’ intention to vote. "When respondents’ self-report of intentions in pre-election polls have been compared to actual turnout, we have historically found a large over-report of voting intentions." Tuchfarber succinctly adds that getting a good sample of people who will actually vote is "the pollster’s nightmare." The only way for pollsters to possibly overcome that nightmare is to have what Tuchfarber refers to as "tight screening," which entails interviewing a high number of possible voters to get to the people who will actually vote. However, this is an expensive process overall. "Each interview costs you an arm and a leg," he says. "It costs so much to do these well, and they have fewer [financial] resources to do it," Zukin says. "For most organizations it does not make good economic sense to put in all the money that they need to in order to do it right. That is why there are more of these Internet opt-in polls with non-probability samples out there because they cost almost nothing to do." We can see how this has been playing out with the October announcements from two highly respected presidential election pollsters—Gallup and Pew Research—with both substantially cutting back on polling for the current presidential race. Still, there are a group of pollsters whose methodologies do have a tighter screening than most, notably, as Tuchfarber claims, the Monmouth University Polling Institute and the Selzer & Company public opinion survey organization that is behind the recent Des Moines Register/Bloomberg Politics Iowa Poll. Zukin also mentioned Monmouth as well as the Quinnipiac University polls. For more on this, as well as plenty of additional viewpoints on pollsters, in general, see Nate Silver’s FiveThirtyEight poll rating site, last updated in September 2014, in which the historical accuracy and methodologies of polls have been analyzed. Finally, we need to keep in mind that the results of the Iowa caucus vote, as well as the New Hampshire primary vote on Feb. 9, have a very strong cascading influence on the next primaries, with the South Carolina Republican primary on February 20, the Nevada caucus on February 23, and the South Carolina Democratic primary on February 27. Super Tuesday this year, when the largest number of states hold primary elections, is March 1. The problem with this is that voters in both the first caucus and first primary are not representative of mainstream America, with 60% of Republican Iowa caucus voters identified as Evangelical Christians, and New Hampshire primary voters, both Republican and Democrat, identified as non-diverse, estimated at 94% non-Hispanic whites.


The International Nurses Association is pleased to welcome Terri N. Buzzell, RN, BSN, LSN, to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare. Terri N. Buzzell is a Registered Nurse currently serving patients at Premier Health Partners in Lebanon, Ohio. Terri holds over 19 years of experience and an extensive expertise in all facets of nursing, especially critical care nursing and nurse management. Terri N. Buzzell graduated with her Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing from the University of Cincinnati in Ohio in 1997, becoming a Registered Nurse. Terri is also a Licensed School Nurse, holds additional certification in Advanced Cardiac Life Support. Furthermore, Terri is currently studying for her Master Degree in both Nursing and in Health Administration. To keep up to date with the latest advances in her field, Terri maintains a professional membership with the Ohio Association of School Nurses, the National Association of School Nurses, and the Ohio Nurses Association. She attributes her great success to the empathy she has for her patients, and the close bond she builds with them. When she is not assisting patients, Terri enjoys reading and traveling. Learn more about Terri N. Buzzell here and be sure to read her upcoming publication in Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare.


In the battle for the 21st century workplace, computers are winning. And the odds of us puny humans making a comeback are not very good. A January 2017 report from the McKinsey Global Institute estimated that roughly half of today’s work activities could be automated by 2055, give or take 20 years. (McKinsey helpfully offers a search portal to find out how likely you’ll be given the boot by a bot.) Bottom line is robots want our jobs. And no one is going to build a wall around them or tariff them out of existence. In a way this is nothing new. Technology has been replacing human labor since the invention of the wheel. Typically, though, machines have stepped in to perform relatively low-skill, low-wage, highly repetitive work. The least digitizable jobs have belonged to recreational therapists, members of the medical profession, social workers, teachers, and managers. The reason: computers are not yet as good as humans at things like personal interaction and off-the-cuff decision making. Thanks to advances in artificial intelligence, natural language processing, and inexpensive computing power, jobs that once weren’t considered good candidates for automation suddenly are. For example, a decade ago researchers thought the complexity of navigating an automobile around obstacles and through traffic was beyond the reach of silicon. Now virtually every auto maker (as well as companies like Apple) is working on a driverless car. The number and types of jobs that computers can do has expanded enormously in just a few years, ranging from the predictable to the absurd. The tasks least likely to be replaced by a computer, according to a widely cited 2013 Oxford study on job digitization, are those requiring the highest degrees of social and creative intelligence. But even there the digitized writing is on the LCD wall. For years, computers have been creating art, music and literature – just usually not very good art, music and literature. Robot poetry and computer-generated music have become genres unto themselves, but so far they’ve failed to have much impact on the already dismal employment prospects for human poets and musicians. Last February, the first algorithmically authored musical, Beyond the Fence, debuted in London’s West End – though to less than stellar reviews. Still, there are glimmers of a future where algorithms and artists compete head to head. The winner of the 2016 RobotArt competition, National Taiwan University’s TAIDA, creates pointillist-style compositions that would not look out of place hanging next to a Seurat. Last April, a computer-generated novel titled, appropriately enough, The Day a Computer Writes a Novel, was in the running for Japan’s Hoshi Shinichi Literary Award. The judges were unaware the book was produced via AI. Kulitta, music composition software written by Yale computer science lecturer Donya Quick, has fooled “musical sophisticates” into thinking its original phrases were composed by Johann Sebastian Bach, according to a report in Yale News. But for the time being – or at least until algorithms learn how to suffer for their art – humans will continue to have the upper hand when it comes to creativity. “Highly creative jobs are probably pretty safe for a while,” says Tom Davenport, co-author of Only Humans Need Apply: Winners and Losers in the Age of Smart Machines. “There have been a few attempts to have computers write screenplays and TV scripts, and they have been uniformly horrible thus far.” There are other hopeful signs. Instead of being replaced wholesale, most people in high-skill positions will likely find themselves working alongside their inanimate colleagues, not unlike the way we use computers instead of typewriters and calculators. McKinsey estimates that 60% of today’s occupations have at least some portion that can be automated. This is already happening in fields such as medicine, law and banking. When not writing cookbooks or kicking ass at Jeopardy, for example, IBM Watson is helping doctors diagnose medical conditions and analyze MRIs. Electronic discovery platforms such as Symantec’s eDiscovery and Kroll Ontrack help attorneys sift through thousands of documents in a few hours. And AI-driven services such as FutureAdvisor or Wealthfront help consumers make investment decisions, freeing up human financial advisers to work on more high-net-worth accounts. Davenport says there are five paths for surviving in a workplace dominated by robots. You can move up in the organizational chain to monitor the computer’s work or make high-level decisions about what to computerize. You can focus on parts of your job computers aren’t good at, or find a new career where computers are less likely to dominate. Finally, he says, you can choose to work on creating the technology that will automate the 21st century. Michael Jones, assistant professor of economics at the University of Cincinnati, believes the problem of displaced workers can be overcome with education and training – though what positions workers should be trained to fill is not entirely clear. No one knows what new jobs will look like in 10 or 20 years, just as no one anticipated the position of drone repair technician in the 1990s. “Automation can not only create advantages for society as a whole but also for individual workers, if they can retool their skills and use technology to complement their job, not replace it,” Jones says. “But are all of these people capable of acquiring new skills? And even if they are, do they want to do it?” Jones adds that traditional vocations like plumbers, electricians, and carpenters are likely to be less affected by digital disruption. And while easily automated jobs will be increasingly rare, they probably won’t go away entirely, says JP Gownder, vice-president and principal analyst for Forrester. “I believe for the most part people value the human touch, but it may become a bit of a luxury good,” he says. “Imagine a world 15 or 20 years from now where most people get their manicures from robots. Rich people might still want to get one from a real person.” And if you happen to be one of the unlucky millions who lose their job to an algorithm? A robot recruiter such as Entelo or Gild might be able to help you find a new one.


News Article | November 8, 2016
Site: phys.org

"The goal is to have citizens help to investigate and monitor water quality near where they live, while educating people about potential threats in environmental or drinking water," said Wei-Chuan Shih, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at UH. "This type of citizen science is a priority for the National Science Foundation, to increase awareness of science and technology through individual participation." Shih received a $100,000 grant from the NSF citizen science initiative to develop the technology, which builds upon an inexpensive lens his lab created last year, allowing people to turn their smartphones into microscopes. "Almost everyone has a smartphone," he said. "Our goal is simple components that work with commercially available test kits, so people can order what they need to engage in this activity." He and members of his lab created DotLens to produce and distribute the inkjet printed lenses, which attach directly to a smartphone camera lens. The researchers now are using 3-D printing to create an attachment that provides a narrow-band light source, which will allow people using commercial water testing kits to see and identify waterborne pathogens. The attachment allows the user to control the light spectrum emitted, fine-tuning it to make different pathogens visible under magnification, said Yulung Sung, a doctoral candidate working in Shih's lab. Shih said the system initially will test for two types of pathogen: Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum, both of which can enter the body through the nose and mouth and cause intestinal infection. They can be serious - a 1993 outbreak of Cryptosporidium parvum in Milwaukee affected more than 400,000 people, according to a study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Test kits are already available to allow people to detect pathogens in water, but without fluorescent microscopy - a microscopic technique that employ a narrow spectrum of light - those pathogens aren't visible, even under magnification. The kits target specific pathogens, and if those pathogens are present when exposed to the light, they become visible. If there are no pathogens in the water sample, there's nothing to see. But most people don't have access to fluorescent microscopy. The DotLens and Shih's attachment serve as a low-cost alternative. The lenses sell for $12.99 and up; a price for the light source hasn't been set. By changing the light spectrum, researchers - and nonscientists armed with the attachment and a smartphone - could use the same system for other water contaminants, including lead, Shih said. Sung and Hoang Nguyen, who also is a PhD student working in Shih's lab, are currently testing the device on water samples collected from around the region in order to refine its performance and recording what they find. She said that two undergraduates, Fernando Campa from the University of Texas at Arlington and Kelly O'Shaughnessy from the University of Cincinnati, worked as the lab's first "citizen-scientists" over the summer under a NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates grant. Ultimately, Shih said he envisions an online map to be drawn collaboratively with citizen scientists, posting and sharing their findings. "This is like completing a puzzle with a community of citizen scientists who share similar interests," he said.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Eric T. Baumgartner, Ph.D. has been appointed vice president of academics at Milwaukee School of Engineering effective July 15, 2017. Baumgartner comes to MSOE from Ohio Northern University where he has served as dean of the T.J. Smull College of Engineering and a mechanical engineering professor since 2006. While at ONU, he executed strategic plans and fundraising campaigns on behalf of the college, and also developed new partnerships and degree programs. He previously was a senior member of the engineering staff at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. “Dr. Baumgartner brings a wealth of experience to MSOE,” said Dr. John Walz, president of MSOE. “His academic leadership and credentials along with years of experience in industry made him the ideal candidate for vice president of academics. I am excited to welcome Dr. Baumgartner to MSOE’s leadership team.” Baumgartner also taught at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and Michigan Technological University. He holds a bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering from the University of Notre Dame; a master’s degree in aerospace engineering from the University of Cincinnati, a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Notre Dame and a certificate from the Institute for Educational Management at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. While at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Baumgartner held leadership roles on the Mars Science Laboratory Sample Acquisition/Sample Processing and Handling team and Mars Exploration Rover project that successfully launched, landed and operated the Curiosity, Spirit and Opportunity rovers on the surface of Mars. “I am incredibly humbled and excited by the opportunity to serve as the next vice president of academics at Milwaukee School of Engineering. MSOE has a long-standing commitment to excellence in engineering, business and nursing education,” said Baumgartner. “I look forward to collaborating with the faculty and staff to continue the growth and development of the academic programs at MSOE so that both the institution and its graduates have a positive impact on the region and the nation.” Baumgartner and his work have been recognized with several honors, including the NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal, Kern Entrepreneurial Engineering Network (KEEN) Outstanding Dean Award and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Robotics and Automation Award. MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,900 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 97% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.


Prototype of Company's Technology to be Showcased at Leading European Automobile Manufacturer in Early 2017 CORVALLIS, OR--(Marketwired - Nov 15, 2016) - 3D Nanocolor Corporation ("3D Nanocolor" or "Company"), a wholly owned subsidiary of Marathon Patent Group, Inc. ( : MARA), today announced that it has signed an exclusive license agreement with the University of Cincinnati covering their patent pending applications based on 3D Nanocolor's electrokinetic (EK) technology. The inventions were made at the University's highly acclaimed Novel Devices Laboratory and grounded on the EK technology originally developed at HP Inc. The patent applications are designed to advance smart window technology based on electrokinetic film technology. 3D Nanocolor has also completed and shipped a prototype of its technology that will be showcased to executives at a leading European automobile manufacturer in early 2017. The Company previously announced that it had recently named two new former HP alums to its team. Dr. James E. Abbot was named Electronic Film Engineering Director, and Cassady Roop, Senior Electrical Engineer. Tim Koch, 3D Nanocolor's Chief Technology Officer, stated, "We're pleased to announce recent progress in the form of an exclusive agreement with the University of Cincinnati covering their patent pending applications based on 3D Nanocolor's electrokinetic (EK) technology. The recent addition of two highly capable and accomplished technologists with specific experience in our field of technology, combined with our prototype of our technology being showcased to executives of a leading Eurpoean automobile manufacturer in early 2017, gives us cause for optimism. We are working diligently and looking forward to the opportunity to ultimately bring a disruptive commercial ready technology to market." About 3D Nanocolor Corporation 3D Nanocolor's EK technology resulted from years of R&D at HP Inc. (formerly known as Hewlett-Packard Company). As with many technologies, a portfolio of patents demonstrates its novelty and application. HP is a world-leader in microfluidic technology. 3D Nanocolor continues to build up HP's published research into EK technology and decades of physical-science development. Our EK technology uses a film with electrically charged nanoparticles, suspended in an engineered fluid, allowing for electronic control of the color, transparency, and contrast of the film. Our sophisticated approach is aesthetically superior to any other dynamic glass solution. The advanced and versatile solution allows for a large selection of colors. Other dynamic glass solutions are generally provided with a bluish tint, which may not match the décor of a building and may cast an unpleasant light. EK technology can provide tints that complement the design of a building and cast a more pleasant light. About Marathon Patent Group Marathon is an IP licensing and commercialization company. The Company acquires and manages IP rights from a variety of sources, including large and small corporations, universities and other IP owners. Marathon has a global focus on IP acquisition and management. The Company's commercialization division is focused on the full commercialization lifecycle which includes discovering opportunities, performing due diligence, providing capital, managing development, protecting and developing IP, assisting in execution of the business plan, and realizing shareholder value. To learn more about Marathon Patent Group, visit www.marathonpg.com. About Marathon Advisors Marathon Advisors is a wholly owned subsidiary of Marathon that provides advisory services to Marathon and other IP owners. To learn more about Marathon Advisors, visit www.marathonadvisorssa.com. Safe Harbor Statement Certain statements in this press release constitute "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the federal securities laws. Words such as "may," "might," "will," "should," "believe," "expect," "anticipate," "estimate," "continue," "predict," "forecast," "project," "plan," "intend" or similar expressions, or statements regarding intent, belief, or current expectations, are forward-looking statements. While the Company believes these forward-looking statements are reasonable, undue reliance should not be placed on any such forward-looking statements, which are based on information available to us on the date of this release. These forward looking statements are based upon current estimates and assumptions and are subject to various risks and uncertainties, including without limitation those set forth in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC"), not limited to Risk Factors relating to its patent business contained therein. Thus, actual results could be materially different. The Company expressly disclaims any obligation to update or alter statements whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law.


News Article | December 17, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Ivy Mobility Inc., a leading provider of Software-as-a-Service Apps for the consumer goods industry, is expanding its global advisory board of renowned members. The Board members contribute their insights to the company on global trends and outlook, strategic development, go to market channels, and information technology and their relevance to the consumer goods industry. The Board meets several times a year and will also attend industry forums and trade events. Together, the Board members contribute their market and industry expertise and insights to Ivy’s R&D and Innovation process. “The Global Advisory Board is an unrivaled team of consumer goods thinkers and information technology leaders, whose insights into the intersection of retail execution, direct store delivery, and enterprise mobility will be a valuable input to our innovation process,” said Rajiv Prabhakar, Founder and Director, Ivy Mobility. “I am honored to join the Advisory board and excited by the opportunity to provide Ivy’s strong team of consumer goods professionals with our collective view on, sales channels, route to market, merchandising, and mobility, and strategic developments, that affect markets and can impact Ivy’s clients.”, said Andy Walter. Biography: Andy Walter is a business results-driven professional with extensive experience in strategy, development, execution, and operations across Shared Services and IT. He led the Commercial Services & Delivery Organization (over 1500 IT and multifunctional professionals) for P&G’s Global Business Services (GBS). He was responsible for IT & Shared Services for all Global Business Units and Markets around the world. His team was accountable for developing cutting-edge capabilities for P&G to win “where it matters most,” with Consumers, Shoppers, and Retailers. This included all eBusiness, Consumer Services, BI/Analytics, Sales Force Solutions, Project Delivery, Business Process Services, and A&D / Company restructuring efforts. He has over 15 years working on Boards and in Board level advisory roles. As a member of he is advising on company strategy and execution into the Consumer Goods & Retail environments. Across numerous non-profit board (GS1, Ovarian Cancer Alliance, Multiple Sclerosis Society) and Private & Public Company Board & CEO strategic level advisory roles with Digimarc, Fractal Analytics, and Virtualitics LLC, he brings leadership, industry & functional expertise, operations, an incredible personal network, and strategic thinking to the critical business challenges facing companies and organizations. With over 25 years of experience, Andy’s career has spanned a variety of assignments including Global R&D, Product Supply & Manufacturing, Marketing, and International Sales & Operations. Andy also designed and led the industry-leading Business Intelligence / Analytics journey across P&G. Under his leadership, P&G received the first-ever Excellence in Analytics Award by The International Institute of Analytics. His teams have also been recognized with CIO 100 Awards in 2010, 2011, and 2012. In 2013, Harvard Business School added a P&G-based case study to their analytics’ curriculum. Andy credits such recognition to clear “Play to Win” strategy choices, relentless talent development, and breakthrough strategic partnerships. His team delivered the largest M&A portfolio in the history of P&G…over $12B in transformation of the largest CPG company in the world. Andy is driven by the belief that people and relationships make the difference—that “The day we claim success is the day we fail.” An inspirational and in-touch leader in diversity, organization design / capability, strategic partner management, and industry influence, he’s clear that value comes from execution where it matters most… with consumers! He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science from the University of Cincinnati. Ivy, is a leader in cloud-based software for the consumer goods industry. Ivy Mobility has been in the business of providing applications that allow our customers to improve route to market and win more at the shelf for over 14 years. We are proud to provide our customers with the broadest portfolio in the industry today and market leading vertical software applications pre-defined to meet the needs of consumer goods companies. The single fully configurable platform supports Direct Store Delivery, Retail Execution, Merchandising, Distributor Management System, Counter Sales, and Insights. We serve customers in over 20 countries, support over 105,000 end user customers, and over 5.5 million outlets. Ivy is headquartered in the Singapore, with offices in North America, Europe, Asia, Middle East, and Latin America. For more information about the company and its portfolio of products, visit http://www.ivymobility.com and follow Ivy on social media channels.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

CINCINNATI--Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine have discovered a new potential strategy to personalize therapy for brain and blood cancers. These findings are reported in the Feb. 28 edition of Cell Reports. "We found a new combination of therapeutics that could treat cancers that lack a protein called PTEN. PTEN is an important tumor suppressor, which means that it stops cell growth and division according to the needs of the body," says David Plas, PhD, Anna and Harold W. Huffman Endowed Chair for Glioblastoma Experimental Therapeutics. Plas is an associate professor in the Department of Cancer Biology, a member of the University of Cincinnati Cancer Institute and a researcher in the Brain Tumor Center of the UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute. Atsuo Sasaki, PhD, and Hala Elnakat Thomas, PhD, both in the Division of Hematology Oncology at the UC College of Medicine, were collaborators on the study. In early work using experimental therapeutics in human cancer cells and in tumor models, the Plas laboratory showed that stopping the production and function of the protein S6K1 could eliminate PTEN-deficient glioblastoma cells. Glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of brain cancer, is difficult to treat with targeted therapeutics. "We used support from the Huffman Foundation to conduct a sophisticated biochemical analysis of how cells respond to S6K1 targeting," Plas says. "Combining the biochemical results with computational analysis gave us the insight that we needed--there are targets in addition to S6K1 that can be hit to trigger the elimination of PTEN-deficient cancer cells." With the new information, the research team tested pharmaceutical-grade drug combinations for the ability to eliminate PTEN-deficient cancer cells. Results showed that the drugs LY-2779964 and BMS-777607 work together to specifically eliminate PTEN-deficient cells. "This is a completely new combination of targets in oncology," Plas says. "We have great hope that our new data will lead academic and industry researchers to investigate S6K1 as the center of new combination strategies for cancers of the brain, blood and other tissues." Future work in the project will test the safety and efficacy of the new combination using tumor models, with the goal of preparing the combination strategy for clinical trial. Ronald Warnick, MD, medical director of the UC Brain Tumor Center and a professor in the Department of Neurosurgery within the UC College of Medicine, adds that this kind of project is necessary in finding new and beneficial therapies for brain tumors. "There is a desperate need for novel therapeutic agents for patients with glioblastoma," he says. "This combination of drugs has the potential to become a game-changer." This study was funded by the American Cancer Society, the National Institutes of Health (R01 CA133164, R01 CA168815, R21NS100077, R01NS089815), the UC Brain Tumor Center, the Anna and Harold W. Huffman Endowed Chair for Glioblastoma Experimental Therapeutics and the UC Medical Scientist Training Program. Plas cites no conflict of interest.


Home > Press > Nanostructures promise big impact on higher-speed, lower-power optical devices: University of Cincinnati physicists are seeing big potential in small semiconductor nanowires for improved optical infrared sensor technologies Abstract: With new technology getting smaller and smaller, requiring lower power, University of Cincinnati physics research points to new robust electronic technologies using quantum nanowire structures. The semiconductor nanowires may lead to advances in sensitive electronic technology including heat detecting optical infrared sensors and biomedical testing, all of which can fit inside small electrical devices. Supported by multiple National Science Foundation grants, the UC research team is working with a collaborative team of physicists, electronic materials engineers and doctoral students from around the world -- all to perfect the growth and development of crystalline nanowires that could form the backbone of new nanotechnologies. But to fully apply this technology to modern devices, UC researchers are first looking closely -- on a fundamental level -- at how energy is distributed and measured along thin-strand nanowires so small that thousands of them could theoretically fit inside a human hair. "Now that we know the technology can be developed, we need to understand exactly how the electrical processes work inside the nanowire cores," say Howard Jackson and Leigh Smith, professors of physics at the University of Cincinnati. "After finally perfecting a standardized process for growing and developing crystalline nanowire fibers with our partners at the Australian National University in Canberra, we have been able to take it one step further. "Using a combination of materials like indium gallium arsenide and indium phosphide, we can develop thin nanowire cores with protective outer shells." It turns out that these unique nanowire materials have unusually large spin orbit interactions, which the researchers find can conduct electricity really well and may allow the use of spin to enable new computing paradigms. Jackson and Smith are presenting these findings at the American Physical Society Conference, in Baltimore, March 16, titled, "Exploring Dynamics and Band Structure in Mid Infrared GaAsSb and GaAsSb/InP Nanowire Heterostructures." SMALL YET MIGHTY The researchers claim the secret to the success of this multi-collaborative effort is in the combination of materials used to create the nanowires. Initially grown at the Australian National University in Canberra, the nanowires are sprouted from a combination of beads of molten gold scattered across a particular surface. As the process is heated inside a chamber using indium gallium arsenide gases, long microscopically thin core fibers sprout up from between the controlled surface environment. Other material combinations are then introduced to form an outer shell acting as a sheath around each core, resulting in quantum nanowire semiconducting heterostructures all uniform in size, shape and behavior. After the fibers are shipped across the globe to Cincinnati, Jackson, Smith and their team of doctoral students are then able to use sophisticated equipment to measure the electrical and photovoltaic potentials of each fiber along its surface. In earlier research, the collaborative team found extrinsic and intrinsic problems when the fiber cores did not have the outer sheath-like shells. "If we don't have this outer sheath, the nanowires have a very short energy lifetime, says Jackson. "When we surround the core with this sheath, the energy lifetime can go up by an order or two orders of magnitude." And while gallium arsenide alone is a very common semiconductor, its energy gap is large and in the visible range, which absorbs light. To achieve success in detecting optical heat or infrared, the team says using indium gallium arsenide fibers have smaller energy gaps that can be used successfully in optical detector devices. doctoral student in physics lab with laser lights "The goal for one of our research equipment grants is to work with the local L3 Cincinnati Electronics Company, which makes infrared (small gap) detectors for night-vision imaging for military applications," says Smith. "Future direct applications for this type of technology also include medical devices that detect body heat, as well as remote sensors installed in iphones that can be used for environmental purposes that detect and measure heat loss in houses." The researchers say this new nanowire technology is unique because it can turn different wavelengths of light into an electrical signal, and in this case it means turning an infrared light into an electric signal that can be measured. Smith explains that with the geometry of the nanowires you can have a long axis running the length of the wire, which gives you lots of possibilities for absorption as the light comes down, but then you also have this very small diameter. "When contacts are interspersed along either side, essentially then the electrons in the holes don't have to travel very far before they are collected," says Smith. "So in principle it can become a more effective detector as well as a more effective solar cell." SMALL DIMENSION NANOWIRES "When you get to very small dimensions in nanowires that are small in diameter, but are a few microns long, those properties then change and can show quantum properties and become almost one-dimensional," says Jackson. "The physics then changes as you change those sizes." Jackson and Smith found that the nanowire's ultra-thin outer shells functioned best at widths of four to eight nanometers, which is 25,00 and 12,500 times smaller respectively, than the diameter of a human hair. When looking at the overarching benefits of working with microscopic nanostructures the researchers see tremendous potential for its ability to pack much more high-energy efficiency into small devices with finite space. It's getting closer to a win-win for everyone, they're saying, especially when this research enters the next stage, bringing it closer to functioning inside electronic and optical sensor devices. "Our fundamental investigation is still a step away from a direct optical device application," says Jackson. "But you can clearly see over time that this collaborative research has made an impact." ### Additional contributors to the research are UC physics doctoral students, Nadeeka Wickramasuriya, Yuda Wang and Samuel Linser. Collaborators from the Australian National University in Canberra, Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, are Xiaoming Yuan, Philippe Caroff, Hoe Tan and Chennupati Jagadish. NSF FUNDING * NSF "Major Research Instrumentation: Development of a Mid-infrared Optical Microscope for Investigation of Femtosecond Dynamics of Single Large Spin Orbit Semiconductor Heterostrucutures," Leigh Smith and Howard Jackson, $492,983 plus cost sharing of $201,798 or a total of $694,781. * NSF "MRI: Acquisition of a Ultra-High Resolution Analytical Scanning Electron Microscope for Multidisciplinary Research and Education," V. Vasudevan, PI, several co-PIs including L. Smith and H. Jackson, $531,693 plus significant cost sharing from the State of Ohio and CEAS and A&S to bring the total to >$900,000. * NSF "GOALI: Infrared Nanowire Heterostructures: Fundamentals and Emerging Detector Applications," Leigh Smith and Howard Jackson, $400,000. * NSF DMR "Carrier and Spin Dynamics in Large Spin-Orbit Semiconductor Nanowire Heterostructures," Leigh Smith and Howard Jackson, $489,551. Teaching and Broader Impacts: * NSF-IUSE "Enhancing Student Success in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics by Transforming the Faculty Culture," H. Jackson, PI, $97,148. This grant is provided as a supplement to a presently funded grant for Biology, Chemistry, and Physics so that the Department of Mathematics can be included in these efforts. The currently funded grant is NSF-IUSE "Enhancing Student Success in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics by Transforming the Faculty Culture," $643,000, 9/01/2014 - 8/31/2018, Howard Jackson (PI). * NSF Collaborative Research: Resource and Repository: Broader Impacts of the NSF-CMP Program, Leigh Smith and others $150,000. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

WATERTOWN, Mass., Nov. 17, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Tetraphase Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ:TTPH), a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company developing novel antibiotics to treat life-threatening multidrug-resistant (MDR) infections, today announced the publication of results from IGNITE1, the Company’s phase 3 clinical trial which evaluated eravacycline compared to ertapenem for the treatment of complicated intra-abdominal infection (cIAI), in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Surgery.  The article, titled “IGNITE1: A Phase III, Randomized Multicenter Prospective Study to Assess the Efficacy and Safety of Eravacycline vs. Ertapenem in Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infections,” is available online and will appear in a forthcoming print issue of the journal. In the trial, eravacycline was well tolerated and demonstrated statistical non-inferiority to ertapenem using the primary endpoint of clinical response at the test-of-cure (TOC) visit, under the guidance set by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA). “The incidence of life-threatening infections caused by drug-resistant bacteria is increasing at alarming rates. Without the introduction of new antibiotics, a clear public health threat is evolving,” said Joseph Solomkin, M.D., Professor Emeritus in the Department of Surgery at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, and lead author of the JAMA paper.  “These published data demonstrate eravacycline’s ability to cure these infections as a monotherapy because of its activity against Gram-positive, Gram negative and anaerobic bacteria, including those resistant to commonly used antibiotics. These data support its potential as a novel antibiotic treatment option for serious intra-abdominal infections.” “The positive results from IGNITE1 demonstrate that treatment with eravacycline could fill an unmet need in patients with cIAI, particularly those with difficult-to-treat infections,” said Guy Macdonald, President and CEO of Tetraphase.  “These results, along with those from our ongoing phase 3 IGNITE4 trial in cIAI, which are expected in the fourth quarter of 2017, will form the basis of a New Drug Application submission for eravacycline in cIAI.” About IGNITE1 IGNITE1 was a randomized, multi-center, double-blind, double-dummy, global phase 3 clinical trial designed to assess the efficacy and safety of eravacycline, dosed intravenously 1 mg/kg every 12 hours, compared with ertapenem, dosed intravenously 1 g every 24 hours, for four up to 14 days. Per the trial design, 541 adult patients were enrolled in the trial at 66 centers worldwide. Under the guidance set by the FDA and the EMA, the primary endpoint of the trial was clinical response at TOC visit, which took place 25 to 31 days after the initial study drug dose, in the two treatment arms. For the FDA, the primary analysis was conducted using a 10% non-inferiority margin in the microbiological intent-to-treat (micro-ITT) population. For the EMA, the primary analysis was conducted using a 12.5% non-inferiority margin in the all-treated (MITT) and clinically evaluable (CE) patient populations. In the IGNITE1 study, in the micro-ITT population, the lower and upper bounds of the 95% confidence interval were -7.1% and 5.5%, respectively.  In the MITT and CE populations, the lower and upper bounds of the 99% confidence interval were -9.2% and 5.6%; and -7.9% and 4.4%, respectively. Eravacycline demonstrated high clinical cure rates against Gram-negative pathogens, including those that were carbapenem-resistant, 3rd/4th generation cephalosporin-resistant, or multidrug-resistant. About IGNITE4 IGNITE4 is a phase 3 randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, multicenter, prospective study that is designed to assess the efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics of twice-daily eravacycline (1 mg/kg every 12 hours) compared with meropenem (1 g every 8 hours) for the treatment of cIAI.  The study is expected to enroll approximately 450 adult patients at 75 centers worldwide.  Per agreement with the FDA and EMA, the primary endpoint of IGNITE4 is clinical response at the TOC visit, which will be analyzed using a 12.5% non-inferiority margin.  The primary analysis populations will be the micro-ITT population for the FDA and the MITT and CE populations for the EMA. About Eravacycline Eravacycline is a novel, fully-synthetic tetracycline antibiotic being developed for the treatment of serious infections, including those caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens that have been highlighted as urgent public health threats by both the World Health Organization and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC).  Eravacycline is Tetraphase’s lead product candidate in phase 3 clinical development for the treatment of complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAI) and complicated urinary tract infections (cUTI). Eravacycline is currently being investigated in the Company’s phase 3 IGNITE (Investigating Gram-negative Infections Treated with Eravacycline) program.  To date, eravacycline has been tested in over 1,300 patients and has been tested in two completed phase 3 trials – IGNITE1 in patients with cIAI and IGNITE2 in patients with cUTI.  In IGNITE1, twice-daily IV eravacycline met the primary endpoint by demonstrating statistical non-inferiority of clinical response compared to ertapenem, was well tolerated, and achieved high cure rates in patients with Gram-negative pathogens, including resistant isolates.  Tetraphase is currently evaluating eravacycline in a second phase 3 clinical trial in patients with cIAI (IGNITE4) comparing twice-daily IV eravacycline to meropenem.  Assuming a positive outcome in IGNITE4, the Company plans to use the results from IGNITE1 and IGNITE4 to support an NDA submission for IV eravacycline for the treatment of patients with cIAI.  The Company plans to initiate IGNITE3, an additional phase 3 trial evaluating once-daily IV eravacycline in patients with cUTI.  Assuming a positive outcome, the Company plans to use the results from IGNITE3 to support a supplemental NDA (sNDA) submission for eravacycline in cUTI.  In parallel, Tetraphase is continuing its efforts to develop an oral dose formulation of eravacycline. A phase 1 clinical program is ongoing which is designed to evaluate and optimize the oral dosing regimen for eravacycline. About Tetraphase Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Tetraphase is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company using its proprietary chemistry technology to create novel antibiotics for serious and life-threatening bacterial infections, including those caused by many of the multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria highlighted as urgent public health threats by the CDC. Tetraphase has created more than 3,000 novel tetracycline analogs using its proprietary technology platform.  Tetraphase's pipeline includes three antibiotic clinical candidates: eravacycline, which is in phase 3 clinical trials, and TP-271 and TP-6076, which are in phase 1 clinical trials. Please visit www.tphase.com for more company information. Forward-Looking Statements Any statements in this press release about our future expectations, plans and prospects, including statements regarding our strategy, future operations, prospects, plans and objectives, and other statements containing the words “anticipates,” “believes,” “expects,” “plans,” “will” and similar expressions, constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Actual results may differ materially from those indicated by such forward-looking statements as a result of various important factors, including: whether results obtained in early or interim clinical trials will be indicative of results obtained in future clinical trials; whether eravacycline or any other clinical candidate will advance through the clinical trial process on a timely basis; whether the results of the Company’s trials will warrant regulatory submission and regulatory approval from the United States Food and Drug Administration or equivalent foreign regulatory agencies; whether, if any clinical candidate obtains approval, it will be successfully distributed and marketed; and other factors discussed in the “Risk Factors” section of our quarterly report on Form 10-Q, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 3, 2016. In addition, the forward-looking statements included in this press release represent our views as of November 17, 2016. We anticipate that subsequent events and developments will cause our views to change. However, while we may elect to update these forward-looking statements at some point in the future, we specifically disclaim any obligation to do so.


SANTA MONICA, Calif., Nov. 10, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Opiant Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (“Opiant”) (OTCQB:OPNT), a specialty pharmaceutical company developing pharmacological treatments for substance use, addictive and eating disorders, announced the appointment of Thomas T. Thomas, CFA, to the company’s Board of Directors. Mr. Thomas worked at Genentech, Inc. for more than twelve years, culminating as the company’s Corporate Treasurer. His responsibilities included treasury operations, cash and investment management, corporate finance, global procurement, enterprise risk management, business continuity, and real estate. “With his valuable background, we welcome Thomas T. Thomas to our Board of Directors,” said Roger Crystal, M.D., Chief Executive Officer of Opiant. “We consider his experience at Genentech to be a great asset to Opiant.” “There’s an unmet need for new addiction treatments and Opiant’s compelling approach could have a transformative impact on patients and their families,” Mr. Thomas said. “Opiant could make significant contributions to the field of addiction medicine.” “With NARCAN® Nasal Spray now approved by the FDA and widely available to treat opioid overdoses, via our partner Adapt Pharma, we are focused on advancing our pipeline and Mr. Thomas has the financial experience to help Opiant achieve this,” said Dr. Crystal. Mr. Thomas currently serves as a board member at the Cancer Prevention Institute of California. After his career at Genentech, Mr. Thomas served as Chief Financial Officer and Interim Chief Executive Officer at Stupski Foundation, an organization working to transform the public school system. He has also served in financial roles at Del Monte Foods, Inc. and GE Capital. Mr. Thomas is a Chartered Financial Analyst and has a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Cincinnati. “Opiant is aggressively addressing a serious public health issue with its nasal opioid antagonist technology in NARCAN®,” Mr. Thomas said. “As I join Opiant’s board, I look forward to using my corporate financial experience to help the company advance its pipeline and business operations, and bring forward new and innovative therapies that improve patient’s lives, while continuing to build Opiant’s shareholder value.” Opiant Pharmaceuticals, Inc., is a specialty pharmaceutical company developing pharmacological treatments for substance use, addictive and eating disorders. Over 45 million people in the U.S. have one of these disorders. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), a division of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), describes these disorders as chronic relapsing brain diseases which burden society at both the individual and community levels. With its innovative opioid antagonist nasal delivery technology, Opiant is positioned to become a leader in these treatment markets. Its first product, NARCAN® Nasal Spray, is approved for marketing in the U.S. by the company’s partner, Adapt Pharma Limited. Currently, Opiant is developing opioid antagonists for the treatment of substance use, addictive and eating disorders, with a near term focus on cocaine use disorder, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder (BED). For more information please visit: www.opiant.com. This press release contains forward-looking statements. These statements relate to future events or our future financial performance and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our or our industry’s actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed, implied or inferred by these forward-looking statements. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “could,” “would,” “expects,” “plans,” “intends,” “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “predicts,” “projects,” “potential,” or “continue” or the negative of such terms and other comparable terminology. These statements are only predictions based on our current expectations and projections about future events. You should not place undue reliance on these statements. Actual events or results may differ materially. In evaluating these statements, you should specifically consider various factors. These and other factors may cause our actual results to differ materially from any forward-looking statement. We undertake no obligation to update any of the forward-looking statements after the date of this press release to conform those statements to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events, except as required by applicable law.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

BOISE, ID--(Marketwired - Feb 15, 2017) - Gold Torrent, Inc. ( : GTOR) ("Gold Torrent" or the "Company"), a junior mining company focused on the development of high grade gold properties in North America, announced today that it has entered into a convertible preferred note and investment agreement (the "Agreement") with CRH Mezzanine Pte. Ltd., a Singapore private limited company (the "Preferred Note Investor") and CRH Funding II Pte. Ltd., a Singapore private limited company (the "Stream Investor") for a $2,000,000 convertible preferred note and a $11,250,000 gold and silver prepayment arrangement for the Company's Lucky Shot Gold Project (the "Project") near Anchorage, Alaska. On February 14, 2017 the Company received $1,900,000 in proceeds from the note, net of legal expenses, to be used as part of the Company's initial investment in the Project. Concurrent with the closing and funding of the convertible preferred note, the Company and Miranda U.S.A., Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of Miranda Gold Corp of Canada ("Miranda"), executed a joint venture operating agreement and formed Alaska Gold Torrent, LLC, an Alaska limited liability company ("Alaska Gold") under which the Company owns a seventy percent (70%) undivided interest in the Project. Under the terms of the Agreement, the Company borrowed $2,000,000 from the Preferred Note Investor evidenced by convertible preferred notes which will convert into 15% of the shares of common stock of the Company on a post-money basis on the earlier of: (i) a Canadian Going Public Transaction or (ii) funding of the Gold and Silver Prepayment Agreement (the "Streaming Arrangement") and following an equity raise by the Company of $5,000,000 or more (of which $2,000,000 will be the conversion of the preferred notes). The obligations under the preferred notes are secured by a first priority security interest in all of the assets of the Company pursuant to the terms of a security and pledge agreement. The Company also entered into the Streaming Arrangement among the Stream Investor, the Company, Miranda and Alaska Gold, under which the Stream Investor will invest up to US$11,250,000, which will be credited to the Company's investment in Alaska Gold, as follows: (i) US$6,500,000 upon satisfaction of certain Tranche 1 conditions; and, (ii) US$4,750,000 upon satisfaction of certain Tranche 2 conditions including receipt of all necessary permits. The obligations of Alaska Gold under the Streaming Agreement are secured by a deed of trust, and guaranteed by the Company. In consideration of the $11,250,000 investment by the Stream Investor, Alaska Gold's Project will deliver 18% of its annual production of refined gold and silver to the Stream Investor until it has received 20,000 ounces of gold equivalent ("Ounces"); 10% of the annual production until an additional 5,000 Ounces have been delivered; and 5% of the annual production thereafter coming from the patented mining claims of Alaska Gold and 2.5% of the production coming from the unpatented mining claims. The delivery of Ounces and the repayments under the Gold and Silver Prepayment Agreement shall be borne entirely from the Company's interest from its Alaska Gold allocations and cash distributions. Miranda shall be entitled to receive it allocations and the resulting cash distributions using calculations that determine the after-tax cash flow distributions that would have occurred on an "all equity" basis showing cash distributions and allocations assuming the financing had not occurred. The Company is entitled to 90% of the Alaska Gold cash flow until $10,000,000 is returned, 80% until the remainder of its investment in Alaska Gold in excess of $10,000,000 is returned and 70% thereafter. Alaska Gold is subject to certain events of default under the Gold and Silver Prepayment Agreement including if, from the date of the Tranche 1 drawdown, Alaska Gold fails to produce at least 5,000 and deliver to the Stream Investor at least 1,000 Ounces by the 18th month; produce at least 10,000 and deliver to the Stream Investor at least 2,000 Ounces by the 24th month; produce 20,000 and deliver to the Stream Investor at least 4,000 Ounces by the 36th month; deliver to the Stream Investor at least 10,000 Ounces by the 48th month; deliver to the Stream Investor at least 19,400 Ounces by the 60th month; and deliver to the Stream Investor at least 23,900 Ounces by the 72nd month. In consideration for the commitments under the Agreement, the Company issued the Preferred Note Investor common stock purchase warrants to purchase two million shares of common stock of the Company at an exercise price of US$0.50 per share for a period of three (3) years from the date of issuance. In conjunction with the transaction, the Company and the Preferred Note Investor also entered into an Investor Rights Agreement, and an Indemnity Agreement. The convertible preferred note and warrants were issued in reliance upon the exemption from registration afforded by Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act and/or Rule 506 of Regulation D as promulgated by the SEC under the Securities Act. As part of the Agreement, CRH nominated Mr. Pat Okita, PhD to join the Gold Torrent board of directors and the board has unanimously approved his appointment. Mr Okita joins the board effective today. Mr. Okita earned a PhD in Geology from the University of Cincinnati and has extensive experience in mining research, asset acquisition, joint ventures, fiscal management, project management and geoscience. Daniel Kunz, Chairman and CEO of Gold Torrent, Inc. stated, "We are very pleased to enter into this transaction with CRH and welcome Pat Okita to our board of directors. The CRH investments allow Gold Torrent to complete its 70% interest in Alaska Gold, capitalize Alaska Gold with funds required to construct a gold recovery plant and re-enter the Lucky Shot Mine, and provide the project with working capital to hire key management and employees to initiate permitting and finalize engineering and planning to initiate construction." Peter Yu, Director of CRH stated, "We are fortunate to have the opportunity to partner with Daniel Kunz and his team to bring the high-grade Lucky Shot gold mine back into production. For CRH, this investment adds another high-quality project to our portfolio. We believe that Alaska Gold Torrent has significant scope to expand its resource and production beyond the current mine plan." About the Lucky Shot Gold Project In March 2016, an updated Canadian NI43-101 standard mineral resource estimate was completed on the Project by Hard Rock Consulting, LLC ("HRC") resulting in 121,500 ounces of gold contained in 206,500 tonnes grading an average of 18.3 grams per tonne ("g/t") gold classified as measured and indicated mineral resources. An additional 35,150 ounces of gold contained in 59,000 tonnes grading an average of 18.5 g/t gold are classified as inferred mineral resources, all based on a 5.0 g/t cutoff. In July 2016, a NI 43-101 preliminary feasibility study (the "PFS") was completed by HRC resulting in 93,274 ounces of gold contained in 207,000 tonnes grading an average of 14.0 g/t, classified as proven and probable mineral reserves. The PFS includes a mine plan and cost estimate with annual gold production of approximately 25,000 ounces of gold per year (after pre-production and build-up) at a underground mining rate of 200 tonnes per day. The mine plan includes a total of 87,612 ounces gold contained in 174,500 tonnes and a grade of 15.6g/t at an all-in sustaining cash cost of $675.00 per ounce of gold produced. The PFS's gold recovery plant utilizes gravity-only gold recovery methods, without chemical treatment, and produces no toxic tails. The plant is expected to capture coarse visible gold contained in the mesothermal quartz vein material by crushing and screening the material into multiple size fractions and then separating the gold using jigs, spirals and tables. Past historical on-site gold production occurred prior to World War II and records show that gravity methods achieved some 89% recovery. Independent test work completed on the quartz material as part of the PFS confirmed gravity-only gold recovery. Historical production records indicate that between 1918 and 1942 some 667,000 ounces of gold were produced from the project area at an average grade of 1.2 oz/ton (37.5 g/t). Historical records, geologic evidence and recent drilling also indicate that the gold is deposited in deep-seated mesothermal quartz veins that plunge at about 30 degrees to depth with continuation of mineralization to at least the mines' deepest points. The Project has had no down-dip exploration. The existing Project infrastructure includes approximately 500 meters of underground access via the Enserch adit; lessor-owned man-camp, facilities and used equipment to support mining; and road access. The Project also has a 30-acre mill site on private land adjacent to line electrical power and we plan to transport the high-grade ore from the mine to the plant via a 26-mile road using 20-ton highway haul trucks. The development plan is to initiate gold production based on the PFS and not based on a full feasibility study of the mineral reserves demonstrating that level of economic and technical viability. Readers are cautioned that there is increased uncertainty and higher risk of economic and technical failure associated with such production decisions. The scientific and technical disclosure in this press release has been reviewed and approved by Mr. G. Peter Parsley, Professional Geologist, a consultant to the Company, who is a qualified person within the meaning of National Instrument 43-101. About CRH CRH Mezzanine and CRH Funding are wholly-owned subsidiaries of Cartesian Royalty Holdings Pte. Ltd. ("CRH"). CRH offers innovative financing structures with the goal of creating long-term growth and value in world-class gold projects around the globe. CRH is an affiliate of Cartesian Capital Group, LLC, a global private equity firm with proven expertise in assisting closely-held companies develop into global market leaders. Cartesian Capital Group manages more than US$2.4 billion in capital and has offices in New York, Sao Paulo, Shanghai, Warsaw, and Bermuda. www.cartesianroyalty.com. About Gold Torrent, Inc. Gold Torrent is an exploration and development company with a key project located in Alaska, USA. Gold Torrent's priority is to develop and advance the Lucky Shot Gold Project, ultimately resulting in gold production, and an increase in value for shareholders. Gold Torrent continues to pursue high-grade gold opportunities in safe mining jurisdictions. www.goldtorrentinc.com. This press release is neither an offer to sell, nor a solicitation of offers to purchase, securities. Forward Looking Statements: This news release contains forward-looking statements regarding future events and Gold Torrent's future results that are subject to the safe harbors created under the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Securities Act"), and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act"), and applicable Canadian securities laws. Forward-looking statements include, among others, estimates of resources. These statements are based on current expectations, estimates, forecasts, and projections about Gold Torrent's exploration projects, the industry in which Gold Torrent operates and the beliefs and assumptions of Gold Torrent's management. Words such as "expects," "anticipates," "targets," "goals," "projects," "intends," "plans," "believes," "seeks," "estimates," "continues," "may," variations of such words, and similar expressions and references to future periods, are intended to identify such forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are subject to a number of assumptions, risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond our control, including such factors as the results of exploration activities and whether the results continue to support continued exploration activities, unexpected variations in ore grade, types and metallurgy, volatility and level of commodity prices, the availability of sufficient future financing, potential changes to royalties and taxes imposed by the Alaska government and other matters discussed under the caption "Risk Factors" in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2016, and our other periodic and current reports filed with the SEC and available on www.sec.gov. Readers are cautioned that forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and that actual results or developments may differ materially from those expressed or implied in the forward-looking statements. Any forward-looking statement made by us in this release is based only on information currently available to us and speaks only as of the date on which it is made. We undertake no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement, whether written or oral, that may be made from time to time, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise. The Company undertakes no obligation to update or revise such forward-looking statements to reflect new information, events or circumstances occurring after the date of this press release.


News Article | December 8, 2016
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

HOUSTON, TX, December 08, 2016-- Frank Arnett, MD, has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Widely regarded for his focus on the genetics of rheumatic disease, Dr. Arnett has taught medical doctors and academic students for nearly four decades. Since entering the field of rheumatology, he has contributed more than 600 publications in his fields of expertise, which includes genome-wide scans, genetics of rheumatic disease, and the mapping of three genes causing Scleroderma. Dr. Arnett has been featured in numerous medical journals, including the Annals of Rheumatic Disease, the Journal of Rheumatology, Arthritis and Rheumatology, Nature Genetics, PLOS Genetics, Science, American Journal of Human Genetics, and Annals of Internal Medicine. As a professor emeritus with the University of Texas Medical School, he is certified in internal medicine, rheumatology and diagnostic immunology.Dr. Arnett began his career upon receiving an MD from the University of Cincinnati in 1968. He completed a residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital before joining the medical team as a fellow of rheumatology in 1970. During the next decade, Dr. Arnett launched a career as a respected doctor, researcher and educator. In 1984, he joined the University of Texas Medical School in Houston as the director of the division of rheumatology, a position he held until 2001. Dr. Arnett also served as chairman of internal medicine (2000-2004) and he retired in 2010.Throughout the course of his career, Dr. Arnett has been continually recognized for his commitment to medicine and education. Between 2000 and 2010, he was the recipient of the Best Doctors in America Award, as well as the TIAA Distinguished Educator Award and President Scholar Teaching and Research Award from the University of Texas Medical School. Since 2011, Dr. Arnett has been honored with inclusion in Who's Who in America and Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare. Although he is now retired, Dr. Arnett maintains active involvement with the Heritage Society of the University of Texas, the American College of Physicians (Master), the American College of Rheumatology (Master), and the Association of American Physicians.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis now publishes many Who's Who titles, including Who's Who in America , Who's Who in the World , Who's Who in American Law , Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare , Who's Who in Science and Engineering , and Who's Who in Asia . Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: en.prnasia.com

WUXI, China, Oct. 31, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- The World IoT Expo is held from October 30th to November 1st, 2016 in Wuxi. The expo is jointly hosted by the Chinese Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, the Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology and Jiangsu Provincial People's Government. Jointly supported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), International Telecommunication Union (ITU), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Global Standard 1 (GS1) and Auto-ID Labs, it is the largest and highest scale national-level exposition of the Internet of Things sector in China. The China International IoT Expo has been held annually since 2010, and has become widely known over the past six years. This October, approved by the CPC Central Committee and State Council, it was renamed as the World Internet of Things Exposition. Compared with previous years, this year's event will boast a larger scale, higher-level participants and more advanced technologies. With numerous exhibits and upgraded technologies, the event fosters a new beginning for the Internet of Things Exposition. With the theme of "Create IoT Era, Share Global Intelligence", this expo consists of various activities including the IoT Wuxi Summit, the main exhibition of IoT applications and products, the China National College Innovation Competition of IoT Applications and the 4th Meeting of the Governing Group of Wuxi National Sensor Network Innovation Demonstration Zone. The IoT Wuxi Summit invited guests from home and abroad, such as the president of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Zhang Xiaogang and deputy secretary-general of ITU Malcolm Johnson, to deliver keynote speeches. The speakers also includes Khalil Najafi, professor of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Division at the University of Michigan; Nadia Magnenat Thalmann, founder and head of the MIRALab Research Laboratory at the University of Geneva; Alain Crozier, head and chief executive of Microsoft Greater China Region; Wu Hequan, academician of the Chinese Academy of Engineering; Wang Jian, chief technology officer at Alibaba; Zhang Shunmao, the president of Huawei Marketing and Solutions and Liu Haitao, chairman of World Sensing Net Group (WSN Group). In addition to an IoT competition for college students and a job fair, the event also includes a press conference for releasing the construction plan for a world-class "Internet of Things town" to promote the development of Wuxi's IoT industry. The IoT Wuxi Summit has the following features: More than 3,000 guests from 23 countries and regions attended the exhibition, including 10 ministerial leaders, and 24 academicians of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Chinese Academy of Engineering, directors of international associations, the inventor of the COMS integrated circuit and the founder of MEMS Research Center in Singapore. Participants also include senior managers from State-owned companies such as China Railway, State Grid, Sinopec, PetroChina, Aviation Industry Corporation of China. In addition, professors from MIT, University of Colorado, University of Michigan, University of Cincinnati, University of Washington, University of Geneva of Switzerland, Tsinghua University are also in attendance. Managers in charge of technology at overseas companies including IBM, Siemens, Microsoft, Bosch, GE, Nokia, NTT, SK Telecom, ARM, Kaspersky, Honeywell and Tesla Motors, as well as domestic ones, including China Mobile, China Telecom, China Unicom, Huawei, Lenovo, Inspur, Haier, Midea, Foxconn, Alibaba, Baidu, Tencent, JD.com, Qihoo 360 and Neusoft will also take part in the event. With its exhibition area expanded to 50,000 m2 from 32,000 m2, the expo accommodates 489 exhibitors who will demonstrate technology applications and practical cases to visitors with interactive displays. Companies participating in the Expo include IBM, Siemens, OMRON, ARM, Infineon Technologies, China Telecom, China Mobile, China Unicom, XCMG, China North Industries Group Corporation, Aisino Corporation, Huawei, ZTE, Alibaba, Tencent, JD.com, AsiaInfo, Hikvision and Lenovo.


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

WUXI, China, Oct. 31, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- The World IoT Expo is held from October 30th to November 1st, 2016 in Wuxi. The expo is jointly hosted by the Chinese Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, the Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology and Jiangsu Provincial People's Government. Jointly supported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), International Telecommunication Union (ITU), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Global Standard 1 (GS1) and Auto-ID Labs, it is the largest and highest scale national-level exposition of the Internet of Things sector in China. The China International IoT Expo has been held annually since 2010, and has become widely known over the past six years. This October, approved by the CPC Central Committee and State Council, it was renamed as the World Internet of Things Exposition. Compared with previous years, this year's event will boast a larger scale, higher-level participants and more advanced technologies. With numerous exhibits and upgraded technologies, the event fosters a new beginning for the Internet of Things Exposition. With the theme of "Create IoT Era, Share Global Intelligence", this expo consists of various activities including the IoT Wuxi Summit, the main exhibition of IoT applications and products, the China National College Innovation Competition of IoT Applications and the 4th Meeting of the Governing Group of Wuxi National Sensor Network Innovation Demonstration Zone. The IoT Wuxi Summit invited guests from home and abroad, such as the president of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Zhang Xiaogang and deputy secretary-general of ITU Malcolm Johnson, to deliver keynote speeches. The speakers also includes Khalil Najafi, professor of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Division at the University of Michigan; Nadia Magnenat Thalmann, founder and head of the MIRALab Research Laboratory at the University of Geneva; Alain Crozier, head and chief executive of Microsoft Greater China Region; Wu Hequan, academician of the Chinese Academy of Engineering; Wang Jian, chief technology officer at Alibaba; Zhang Shunmao, the president of Huawei Marketing and Solutions and Liu Haitao, chairman of World Sensing Net Group (WSN Group). In addition to an IoT competition for college students and a job fair, the event also includes a press conference for releasing the construction plan for a world-class "Internet of Things town" to promote the development of Wuxi's IoT industry. The IoT Wuxi Summit has the following features: More than 3,000 guests from 23 countries and regions attended the exhibition, including 10 ministerial leaders, and 24 academicians of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Chinese Academy of Engineering, directors of international associations, the inventor of the COMS integrated circuit and the founder of MEMS Research Center in Singapore. Participants also include senior managers from State-owned companies such as China Railway, State Grid, Sinopec, PetroChina, Aviation Industry Corporation of China. In addition, professors from MIT, University of Colorado, University of Michigan, University of Cincinnati, University of Washington, University of Geneva of Switzerland, Tsinghua University are also in attendance. Managers in charge of technology at overseas companies including IBM, Siemens, Microsoft, Bosch, GE, Nokia, NTT, SK Telecom, ARM, Kaspersky, Honeywell and Tesla Motors, as well as domestic ones, including China Mobile, China Telecom, China Unicom, Huawei, Lenovo, Inspur, Haier, Midea, Foxconn, Alibaba, Baidu, Tencent, JD.com, Qihoo 360 and Neusoft will also take part in the event. With its exhibition area expanded to 50,000 m2 from 32,000 m2, the expo accommodates 489 exhibitors who will demonstrate technology applications and practical cases to visitors with interactive displays. Companies participating in the Expo include IBM, Siemens, OMRON, ARM, Infineon Technologies, China Telecom, China Mobile, China Unicom, XCMG, China North Industries Group Corporation, Aisino Corporation, Huawei, ZTE, Alibaba, Tencent, JD.com, AsiaInfo, Hikvision and Lenovo.


Diab D.L.,University of Cincinnati | Watts N.B.,Mercy Health Osteoporosis and Bone Health Services
Current Opinion in Endocrinology, Diabetes and Obesity | Year: 2013

There are numerous effective pharmacologic treatment options for postmenopausal osteoporosis. Bisphosphonate drug holidays continue to be an area of significant debate. ©2013 Wolters Kluwer Health Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


SubramanianVignesh K.,University of Cincinnati | LanderoFigueroa J.A.,Agilent Technologies | Porollo A.,University of Cincinnati | Caruso J.A.,Agilent Technologies | And 2 more authors.
Immunity | Year: 2013

Macrophages possess numerous mechanisms to combat microbial invasion, including sequestration of essential nutrients, like zinc (Zn). The pleiotropic cytokine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) enhances antimicrobial defenses against intracellular pathogens such as Histoplasma capsulatum, but its mode of action remains elusive. We have found that GM-CSF-activated infected macrophages sequestered labile Zn by inducing binding to metallothioneins (MTs) in aSTAT3 and STAT5 transcription-factor-dependentmanner. GM-CSF upregulated expression of Znexporters, Slc30a4 and Slc30a7; the metal wasshuttled away from phagosomes and into the Golgi apparatus. This distinctive Zn sequestration strategy elevated phagosomal H+ channel function and triggered reactive oxygen species generation by NADPH oxidase. Consequently, H.capsulatum was selectively deprived of Zn, thereby halting replication and fostering fungal clearance. GM-CSF mediated Zn sequestration via MTs invitro and invivo in mice and in human macrophages. These findings illuminate a GM-CSF-induced Zn-sequestration network that drives phagocyte antimicrobial effector function. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.


Vesper C.,Central European University | Richardson M.J.,University of Cincinnati
Experimental Brain Research | Year: 2014

How is coordination achieved in asymmetric joint actions where co-actors have unequal access to task information? Pairs of participants performed a non-verbal tapping task with the goal of synchronizing taps to different targets. We tested whether 'Leaders' knowing the target locations would support 'Followers' without this information. Experiment 1 showed that Leaders tapped with higher amplitude that also scaled with specific target distance, thereby emphasizing differences between correct targets and possible alternatives. This strategic communication only occurred when Leaders' movements were fully visible, but not when they were partially occluded. Full visual information between co-actors also resulted in higher and more stable behavioral coordination than partial vision. Experiment 2 showed that Leaders' amplitude adaptation facilitated target prediction by independent Observers. We conclude that fully understanding joint action coordination requires both representational (i.e., strategic adaptation) and dynamical systems (i.e., behavioral coupling) accounts. © 2014 Springer-Verlag.


Maurizi M.R.,U.S. National Cancer Institute | Stan G.,University of Cincinnati
Cell | Year: 2013

Protein degradation by the ClpXP protease requires collaboration among the six AAA+ domains of ClpX. Using single-molecule optical tweezers, Sen et al. show that ClpX uses a coordinated succession of power strokes to translocate polypeptides in ATP-tunable bursts before reloading with nucleotide. This strategy allows ClpX to kinetically capture transiently unfolded intermediates. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.


ClatterbuckSoper S.,Johns Hopkins University | ClatterbuckSoper S.,U.S. National Cancer Institute | Dator R.,University of Cincinnati | Limbach P.,University of Cincinnati | Woodson S.,Johns Hopkins University
Molecular Cell | Year: 2013

Assembly of 30S ribosomal subunits from their protein and RNA components requires extensive refolding of the 16S rRNA and is assisted by 10-20 assembly factors in bacteria. We probed the structures of 30S assembly intermediates in E.coli cells, using a synchrotron X-ray beam to generate hydroxyl radical in the cytoplasm. Widespread differences between mature and pre-30S complexes in the absence of assembly factors RbfA and RimM revealed global reorganization of RNA-protein interactions prior to maturation of the 16S rRNA and showed how RimM reduces misfolding of the 16S 3' domain during transcription invivo. Quantitative 14N/15N mass spectrometry of affinity-purified pre-30S complexes confirmed the absence of tertiary assembly proteins and showed that N-terminal acetylation of proteins S18 and S5 correlates with correct folding of the platform and central pseudoknot. Our results indicate that cellular factors delay specific RNA folding steps to ensure the quality of assembly. •Pre-30S ribosomes were visualized insitu by X-ray footprinting on whole cells•Pre-30S structures reveal widespread refolding of pre-rRNA late in assembly•RimM and RbfA change folding paths of the 16S 5' and 3' domains•Quantitative mass spectrometry correlates protein acetylation with rRNA structure. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.


Heppner K.M.,Oregon Health And Science University | Perez-Tilve D.,University of Cincinnati
Frontiers in Neuroscience | Year: 2015

Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) enhances meal-related insulin secretion, which lowers blood glucose excursions. In addition to its incretin action, GLP-1 acts on the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in the brain to suppress feeding. These combined actions of GLP-1R signaling cause improvements in glycemic control as well as weight loss in type II diabetes (T2DM) patients treated with GLP-1R agonists. This is a superior advantage of GLP-1R pharmaceuticals as many other drugs used to treat T2DM are weight neutral or actual cause weight gain. This review summarizes GLP-1R action on energy and glucose metabolism, the effectiveness of current GLP-1R agonists on weight loss in T2DM patients, as well as GLP-1R combination therapies. © 2015 Heppner and Perez-Tilve.


Wuthrich M.,University of Wisconsin - Madison | Deepe Jr. G.S.,Veterans Affairs Hospital | Deepe Jr. G.S.,University of Cincinnati | Klein B.,University of Wisconsin - Madison
Annual Review of Immunology | Year: 2012

Only a handful of the more than 100,000 fungal species on our planet cause disease in humans, yet the number of life-threatening fungal infections in patients has recently skyrocketed as a result of advances in medical care that often suppress immunity intensely. This emerging crisis has created pressing needs to clarify immune defense mechanisms against fungi, with the ultimate goal of therapeutic applications. Herein, we describe recent insights in understanding the mammalian immune defenses deployed against pathogenic fungi. The review focuses on adaptive immune responses to the major medically important fungi and emphasizes how dendritic cells and subsets in various anatomic compartments respond to fungi, recognize their molecular patterns, and signal responses that nurture and shape the differentiation of T cell subsets and B cells. Also emphasized is how the latter deploy effector and regulatory mechanisms that eliminate these nasty invaders while also constraining collateral damage to vital tissue. © 2012 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Husseinzadeh N.,University of Cincinnati | Husseinzadeh H.D.,University of Pennsylvania
Gynecologic Oncology | Year: 2014

Objectives The mechanistic (mammalian) targets of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors with known growth Inhibitory effect are currently in clinical trial for treatment of human cancer. The aim of this review is to present current incorporating these new drugs as single agents or in combination with other therapeutic modalities for treatment of gynecologic cancer. Methods A PubMed search was conducted on "mTOR inhibitors" and "human cancer". The relevant studies published between the year 2000 to present were reviewed. Those related to gynecologic cancer (cervical, endometrial and ovarian) were selected for this manuscript. The result of published data and their clinical application in gynecologic malignancies are presented. Results mTOR is directly involved in many cell signaling pathways, and mTOR inhibitors have demonstrated anti-tumor activity against a variety of human malignancies, including gynecologic cancers. Combinations of mTOR inhibitors with other treatment modalities, e.g. cytotoxic chemotherapy, hormonal therapies, and other targeted molecular agents, have shown encouraging results particularly in endometrial and ovarian cancer. Conclusions Patients with advanced or recurrent gynecologic cancers who have failed initial treatment are need of new treatment modalities. There is strong evidence that mTOR inhibitors limit tumor proliferation and progression. The PI3k/AKT/mTOR pathway is often deregulated in gynecologic cancer. Patients with PIK3CA mutations are more responsive to PI3K/AKT/mTOR inhibitors than patients without these mutations. Routine screening for PIK3CA mutations warrants further investigation when PI3K/AKT/mTOR inhibitors are considered in treatment of patients with gynecologic cancer. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


Diab D.L.,University of Cincinnati | Watts N.B.,Mercy Health Osteoporosis and Bone Health Services
Expert Opinion on Drug Safety | Year: 2014

Introduction: Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody against the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand. It is an antiresorptive agent that reduces osteoclastogenesis. Areas covered: This drug evaluation reviews denosumab for use in osteoporosis. Denosumab has been shown to improve bone mineral density (BMD) and to reduce the incidence of new vertebral, hip and nonvertebral fractures in postmenopausal women. It prevents bone loss and reduces vertebral fracture risk in men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer who are receiving androgen deprivation therapy. It has also been shown to improve BMD in men with osteoporosis unrelated to androgen deprivation therapy. Safety concerns include infections, cancer, skin reactions, cardiovascular disease, hypocalcemia, osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femur fractures. Expert opinion: Although bisphosphonates are typically preferred as initial therapy for osteoporosis, denosumab could be used as initial therapy in select patients at high risk for fracture, including older patients who have difficulty with the dosing requirements of oral bisphosphonates, patients who are intolerant of or unresponsive to other therapies, and in those with impaired renal function. Additional data is needed to address issues regarding treatment duration and discontinuation, as well as to provide more information regarding denosumab's efficacy and safety. © Informa UK, Ltd.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: ENV.2008.3.1.1.2. | Award Amount: 2.36M | Year: 2009

The concept of the project is based on the development of innovative nanostructured UV-Visible photocatalysts for water treatment and detoxification by using doped TiO2 nanomaterials with visible light response. The project aims at an efficient and viable water detoxification technology exploiting solar energy and recent advances in nano-engineered titania photocatalysts and nanofiltration membranes for the destruction of extremely hazardous compounds in water. To this aim, the UV-vis responding titania nanostructured photocatalysts will be stabilized on nanotubular membranes of controlled pore size and retention efficiency as well as on carbon nanotubes exploiting their high surface area and unique electron transport properties to achieve photocatalytically active nanofiltration membranes. This will be the crucial component for the fabrication of innovative continuous flow photocatalytic-disinfection-membrane reactors for the implementation of a sustainable and cost effective water treatment technology based on nanoengineered materials. Comparative evaluation of the UV-visible and solar light efficiency of the modified titania photocatalysts for water detoxification will be performed on specific target pollutants focused mainly on cyanobacterial toxin MC-LR and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDC) in water supplies as well as classical water pollutants such us phenols, pesticides and azo-dyes. Particular efforts will be devoted on the analysis and quantification of degradation products. The final goal is the scale up of the photocatalytic reactor technology and its application in lakes, tanks and continuous flow systems for public water distribution.


News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: www.sciencenews.org

NEW ORLEANS — Chronic sleep problems are associated with atrial fibrillation — a temporary but dangerous disruption of heart rhythm — even among people who don’t suffer from sleep apnea. An analysis of almost 14 million patient records has found that people suffering from insomnia, frequent waking and other sleep issues are more likely than sound sleepers to experience a condition in which the upper chambers of the heart quiver instead of rhythmically beating, allowing blood to briefly stagnate. “Even if you don’t have sleep apnea, is there something about sleep disruption that puts you at a higher risk of fibrillation,” said Gregory Marcus, a cardiologist at the University of California, San Francisco. “We should put a higher priority on studying sleep itself.” Marcus and Matthew Christensen, from the University of Michigan, presented their results November 14 at the annual meeting of the American Heart Association. People with atrial fibrillation have double the risk of having a heart attack, and up to five times the risk of stroke. Although the heart condition can be a consequence of aging, its prevalence is rising at about 4 percent per year for reasons that aren’t totally explained. In the United States, about 5 million people currently have the condition, and that number is expected to rise to 12 million by 2030. A large body of studies has found that sleep apnea, which occurs when a person stops breathing during the night, can lead to atrial fibrillation and a host of other health concerns. Identifying a risk of atrial fibrillation among people with no sleep apnea is unexpected, says Richard Becker, director of the University of Cincinnati Heart, Lung & Vascular Institute, who was not part of the study. Marcus, Christensen and colleagues analyzed data from three different sources, including the California Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, a database of almost 14 million patients. They also drew on records from more than 4,600 participants of Health eHeart Study who had filled out a sleep survey, and from the Cardiovascular Health Study, which has tracked more than 5,700 people for more than a decade. Those data allowed the researchers to follow patients over time, tracking which came first — the fibrillation or the sleep issues. The researchers included a variety of sleep disorders, such as insomnia, nighttime waking and shortened periods of rapid eye movement, or REM, sleep. Among the results: People who frequently woke had a 33 percent greater chance of developing atrial fibrillation in one analysis, and a 47 percent higher chance in another. For the eHeart group, insomnia increased the odds by 17 percent. And among more than 14 million California records studied, insomnia increased the odds of future atrial fibrillation by 36 percent. Analysis of a subgroup undergoing sleep studies showed that less REM sleep also was associated with a higher probability of developing atrial fibrillation. The study can’t explain why a lack of sleep even with normal breathing might hurt the heart, but the authors hypothesize that the mechanism could be tied to the body’s stress response. Becker believes that cardiologists should emphasize sleep just as they do diet and exercise for lifestyle management. To workaholic, screen-fixated Americans, “this study sends a powerful message about wellness as a continuum throughout the day and night,” he says. “It offers clinicians and the public a 360-degree view of what is important for good health.”


CLEVELAND, Dec. 14, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Lincoln Electric Holdings, Inc. (Nasdaq:LECO) (the “Company”) announced today that Frederick G. Stueber will retire from the Company as Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary in April 2017. Photos accompanying this announcement are available at Stueber’s retirement marks a distinguished 36-year career in law and 22 years as Lincoln Electric’s General Counsel and Secretary. While at Lincoln Electric, Stueber has led global litigation, corporate governance matters, mergers and acquisitions, corporate compliance, intellectual property, labor law and environmental, health and safety initiatives.  He also served as a member of the senior Management Committee.  During his tenure, he successfully led an industry defense group and collective plan against fume litigation which resulted in the dismissal of numerous cases against the Company and industry. Prior to joining Lincoln Electric in 1995, Stueber served at Jones Day for 13 years, the last six years as a corporate partner. He started his career as a law clerk for Federal Chief Judge Andrew A. Caffrey following his graduation from Harvard Law School. Christopher L. Mapes, Lincoln Electric’s Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer stated, “Fred has made innumerable contributions to the Company and has been a trusted strategic advisor and counselor to management and the Board. His acumen, passion for law and his willingness to face tough challenges has led to the successful defense of the organization and a transformative approach to litigation in our industry.  We thank Fred for his leadership in the organization, his community engagement on behalf of the Lincoln Electric Foundation, and wish him and his family our very best.” Upon Stueber’s retirement, Jennifer I. Ansberry will be promoted to Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary and she will serve as an officer of the Company.  Ansberry joined Lincoln Electric in 2004 and serves as Vice President, Deputy General Counsel and oversees the Company’s legal function in global mergers and acquisitions, securities law compliance, corporate governance and other general corporate legal matters. She also leads the Company’s environmental, health and safety organization. Prior to joining Lincoln Electric, she served as an associate at Thompson Hine LLP and Keating, Muething & Klekamp LLP. She received her J.D. from the University of Cincinnati - College of Law and received a B.B.A. in accounting from the University of Cincinnati. Lincoln Electric is the world leader in the design, development and manufacture of arc welding products, robotic arc welding systems, plasma and oxy-fuel cutting equipment and has a leading global position in the brazing and soldering alloys market.  Headquartered in Cleveland, Ohio, Lincoln has 48 manufacturing locations, including operations and joint ventures in 19 countries and a worldwide network of distributors and sales offices covering more than 160 countries.  For more information about Lincoln Electric and its products and services, visit the Company’s website at http://www.lincolnelectric.com.


News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

CINCINNATI--A growing body of research continues to raise concerns about the effects of head trauma sustained while participating in popular contact sports, particularly football. But this may not be confined to professional players only. A new study from researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine, show that even college-level players may be vulnerable to the effects of head trauma, and that even several years after graduation, college football players continue to show evidence of neuropathic brain changes. The findings were published online in the Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine. MRI scans of 11 former collegiate football players showed evidence of significantly lower cortical thickness within portions of both the frontal and temporal cortex of the brain, versus a similar group of track-and-field athletes. In many areas of the brain, decreased cortical thickness correlated with the number of reported concussions. "We found evidence of persistent cortical thinning in some former collegiate football players several years after the end of their active playing career. The former football players showed, on average, lower cortical thickness across prefrontal and temporal brain regions--areas of the brain involved in sustained attention, memory and executive abilities--cognitive domains critical to long-term professional and social function," says Cal Adler, MD, professor and vice chair for clinical research in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience at the UC College of Medicine and a co-principal investigator of the study. Over 60,000 students play intercollegiate football, and according to NCAA statistics, the sport accounts for more injuries than any other at the collegiate level. Moreover, tackle football can begin at an early age in some football leagues, and by high school, players may have already participated in contact play for several years. "Although many of the functional and cognitive effects of concussion seem to resolve over the months after an event, we have seen where elite athletes from a variety of contact sports can exhibit evidence of neuropathic changes as early as young adulthood," Adler says. "In this study, we saw evidence of correlations between the number of reported concussions and the extent of persistent thinning throughout the prefrontal and temporal cortex in the scans of these former college players," Adler says. Though the authors emphasize that this was a small, exploratory study, it adds to a growing literature around the potential impact of playing college level football on student athletes' neurological health, suggesting that at least some consequences of high-level collegiate football play may persist years after an athlete has hung up the uniform. "Larger studies following these football players as they age will be crucial to better understanding the risks of college athletics and the potential longer-term consequences of concussions in these young players," says Jon Divine, MD, co-principal investigator, professor in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the UC College of Medicine and director of primary care sports medicine. Divine is also head team physician for UC Athletics. The study was funded by a grant from the UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

CINCINNATI, March 02, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Cincinnati Bell Inc. (NYSE:CBB) today announced that Leigh R. Fox has been named president and chief executive officer, effective May 31, 2017.  He succeeds Ted Torbeck, who will retire on May 31, 2017.  Mr. Fox’s appointment has been approved by the board of directors consistent with the Company’s established succession plan. Mr. Torbeck, age 60, has led Cincinnati Bell as chief executive officer since January 2013.  After his retirement, Mr. Torbeck plans to remain a member of the Company’s board of directors and will devote his time and attention to ensuring a smooth transition of his duties to Mr. Fox. “The board shares my confidence that Leigh is the right leader to execute the Company’s strategy going forward,” said Phil Cox, chairman of the Company’s board of directors.  “Leigh has demonstrated exemplary leadership throughout his tenure at Cincinnati Bell.  He has taken on roles of increasing responsibility over the years and has consistently shown the vision and leadership necessary to be a successful CEO.” “I also wish to express my sincere gratitude to Mr. Torbeck for the outstanding job he has done as CEO for the past four years,” said Mr. Cox.  “Ted was instrumental in developing and executing a strategy that has significantly improved the Company’s balance sheet and vastly expanded the Company’s fiber-based, high-speed data network.  Ted has also been key to the board’s succession planning process to date and is committed to working closely with the board and Leigh to ensure a seamless transition.” Mr. Fox joined the Company in July 2001 and has held various positions of increasing responsibility at the Company including:  President and Chief Operating Officer (September 2016-present); Chief Financial Officer (October 2013-September 2016); Chief Administrative Officer (July 2013-October 2013); Senior Vice President of Finance and Operations (December 2012-July 2013); and Vice President of Finance at Cincinnati Bell Technology Solutions Inc. (October 2008-December 2012). Mr. Fox holds a bachelor's degree from Miami University and an MBA from the University of Cincinnati and is actively involved in the Cincinnati business community. Cincinnati Bell reaffirms its financial guidance for 2017: With headquarters in Cincinnati, Ohio, Cincinnati Bell Inc. (CBB) provides integrated communications solutions – including local and long distance voice, data, high-speed Internet and video – that keep residential and business customers in Greater Cincinnati and Dayton connected with each other and with the world. In addition, enterprise customers across the United States rely on CBTS, a wholly-owned subsidiary, for efficient, scalable office communications systems and end-to-end IT solutions. For more information, please visit www.cincinnatibell.com.


News Article | October 29, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

AffordableCollegesOnline.org has released its list of the Best Online Colleges in Ohio for 2016. As a leader in higher education and student resources, the site determined the University of Toledo, Tiffin University, Ohio University, Youngstown State University and Bowling Green State University offered the top five four-year online programs in the state. Sinclair College, Columbus State Community College, Belmont College, Cincinnati State Technical and Community College and Clark State Community College are recognized as Ohio’s top five two-year online programs. In all, more than 40 schools were recognized as part of the lists. "Enrollment growth at Ohio’s colleges and universities was one of the highest in the nation from 2006 to 2011,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and Founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. "As today’s students apply for college, they are also looking at the flexibility online learning offers. The schools on our lists are those offering the best overall quality and value for online education in Ohio.” Colleges are required to meet several basic requirements to qualify for a spot on the Best Online Colleges in Ohio lists. Schools must be regionally accredited and be public or private not-for-profit entities. There are also strict affordability standards each school must meet: two-year schools must provide in-state tuition no greater than $5,000 annually and four-year schools must provide in-state tuition no greater than $25,000 annually. Each college is ranked based on an in-depth analysis of more than a dozen value-based data points, including financial aid availability and graduation rates. To learn more about each school’s position on the lists and find details about the data and methodology used to rank each school, visit: The following list includes all two-year schools on the 2016 Best Online Colleges in Ohio ranking: The following list includes all four-year schools on the 2016 Best Online Colleges in Ohio ranking: Ashland University Bowling Green State University - Main Campus Cleveland State University Franklin University Gods Bible School and College Kent State University Kettering College Mercy College of Ohio Miami University - Oxford Mount Carmel College of Nursing Mount Vernon Nazarene University Ohio Christian University Ohio University - Main Campus Shawnee State University Tiffin University Union Institute & University University of Akron Main Campus University of Cincinnati - Main Campus University of Northwestern Ohio University of Rio Grande University of Toledo Urbana University Wright State University - Lake Campus Wright State University - Main Campus Youngstown State University AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.


News Article | April 25, 2016
Site: motherboard.vice.com

Imagine a human being born on the cusp of a robotic revolution. Let’s call him Bill. At first, when the machines take over the economy, Bill is stoked. He wakes up late every morning, smokes some 22nd century weed and then watches TV. Eventually, he gets bored. His degree in accounting has become worthless, because there is nothing he could do that couldn’t be done better by a machine. Bill plugs his brain into a virtual world, becomes obsessed with killing dragons and winning digital gold, and dies shriveled and alone as a level 900 paladin. The end of the world? No. Welcome to the robot ennui apocalypse. Pop culture has spent plenty of time pondering the robot uprising, usually involving hordes of mechanized warriors marching over smoldering rubble and human skulls. But what if machines take over the world in a good way? No more punching the clock; instead, artificial intelligence would do the dirty work, and people would be free to paint and climb mountains and perform one-man shows about being raised by robots. To many people, that sounds like utopia. Yet that scenario isn’t without its drawbacks. “For better or worse, a lot of our self-worth is connected to our work,” John Danaher, a law professor at NUI Galway who specializes in the ethics of emerging technology, told Motherboard. “So what would happen if traditional forms of labor were no longer available?” In his recently published paper, “Will Life Be Worth Living in a World Without Work? Technological Unemployment and the Meaning of Life,” Danaher imagines a future where robots can fill pretty much any job on the planet. We decided to contact some of the leading experts in economics and technology to ask what could go wrong in robot paradise. How It Could Work There is no scarcity in any of these scenarios. It’s not the “new disease” predicted by economist John Maynard Keynes, who warned of “technological unemployment” in an economy where starving people scramble for scraps left by capitalists and their super-efficient machines. Not that this bleak future isn’t possible, of course. When WhatsApp was purchased by Facebook in 2014 for $16 billion, the company only had 55 employees. Extrapolate that trend into the future and it’s not hard to imagine a few Mark Zuckerbergs controlling most of the world’s wealth with just a few underlings and servers. For the purposes of this article, however, let’s say civilization has decided to distribute the world’s wealth so that everyone can live a comfortable life without ever working a day in their lives. How on Earth could that go wrong? Most people remember the Pixar film WALL-E for the adorable robot love story, but it also contains a dystopian vision of humanity. Human beings suck down soft drinks while sitting in hovering recliners, from which they chat on video screens and watch ads for products from a company called Buy n Large. It’s what Columbia Law School professor Tim Wu dubbed the “sofalarity.” The threat isn’t that the Cylons will destroy humanity; it’s that we won’t be able to pry ourselves off the couch, Portlandia-style, while watching the Cylons on Battlestar Galactica. Silicon Valley evangelists want us to believe that technology will lead us to become fitter, happier, more productive citizens. And that could happen! But it also delivers plenty of ways to become lazy. If Bill, our hypothetical human born on the cusp of a robot revolution, wanted to be a poet or classical violinist, he would be set. Like a lot of people, however, he doesn’t really have a burning passion. In a previous life, he might have climbed the corporate ladder, which would have given himself a sense of purpose and something to focus on. People in previous studies, according to Danaher’s paper, reported “feeling anxious and bored outside of work when they are presumably free to engage in their preferred activities” even though “they still claim, when asked, to prefer play to work.” So even though Bill says he is happier without a job, he is actually feeling pretty anxious and unengaged. He also has streaming video, internet porn, food delivery apps, and shopping sites to instantly cater to his every desire. Put those factors together and you could see why he would never leave his house, let alone pursue great feats of scientific or artistic discovery. Kate Darling, a research specialist at the MIT Media Lab, gives human beings a little more credit. “I have a lot of faith in humanity and what drives us,” she told Motherboard. The WALL-E scenario doesn’t ring true to her because human beings are motivated by things other than money: altruism, creativity, pride, etc. There is no reason Bill couldn’t become the senior vice president of a company simply to prove he can, regardless of whether or not he needs the money. “We love to create systems,” Darling said. “If robots can do of all the jobs we have now, we will think of new jobs. We could see the rise of industries we can’t even anticipate yet.” And what if WALL-E was right? Who are we to judge the people in that movie? They seemed happy enough, smiling and laughing with their friends over their screens. For all we know, Darling noted, they could be gaining a sense of purpose by gamifying their leisurely lives. It’s a possibility that Danaher recognized as well. People could be satisfied playing elaborate games, he said. The social and mental challenges of leveling up in some advanced version of World of Warcraft might not be that different than those of corporate life; couldn’t some of the benefits be the same as well? Bill has a nice apartment, plenty of cash and no responsibilities. He could commit himself to a life of philosophical inquiry, but in the new robot utopia, the world is rife with DJs. He hits endless club nights until he has gone full Charlie Sheen. Robots keep the economy humming and food growing while Bill and his friends Instagram themselves doing shots of tequila and FutureCocaine. He wants to stop, but there isn’t a pressing need. Machines have mastered medical science, so he can keep the party going forever, or until he jumps off the balcony of his subsidized condo. He isn’t the only one. The human race becomes one giant orgy of drugs and sadness. Certainly, substance abuse could be a problem, said Danaher and James Hughes, executive director of the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies. But they aren’t too worried about it. “If you go back into history, we find wealthy aristocrats who weren’t all committing suicide and drowning in misery and drugs and drink,” Hughes told Motherboard. “They found occupations, even if it was just throwing dinner parties. They found things to do that they found meaningful.” A world where we’re all basically Lord Grantham? Yeah, that sounds OK. Plus, there is no guarantee drug use wouldn’t go down, Hughes said, once you eliminate the stress of poverty and give people ample resources to spend on recovery services. Sure, Bill spends all of his time watching Star Trek: Deep Space Nine on a levitating chair while getting high, but sometimes he still gets sad. So he hooks into a system that continuously keeps him happy. He never gets bored or anxious because he is plugged into something akin to a Matrix-style fantasy, although this is worse, because in the Matrix people still went to jobs and believed they were living their lives. In this scenario, robots would run the world while Bill laid in a tube, oblivious and blissed out until he died. It’s hard to put a positive spin on this scenario, but it’s also not clear how feasible it is. When machines were replacing agricultural labor in the early 20th century, people weren’t debating the costs and benefits to society of becoming a social media manager. It was a job that was impossible to conceive without computers and the internet. “The difficulty with far-off predictions is that we don’t know what kind of society we will be living in,” Darling said. Recently, robot waiters in China were replaced after they couldn’t even serve food properly. The DARPA Robotics Challenge in Pomona last year was famous for a blooper reel of (by our standards) incredibly advanced machines falling over like drunk 3-year-olds. And those are just mechanical issues. As MIT economist David Autor said in a paper released last year, “the challenges to substituting machines for workers in tasks requiring flexibility, judgment, and common sense remain immense.” The robots might take over most jobs one day. That day, however, isn’t soon, and who knows what the world will look like at that point. We could incorporate our computers into our bodies and become cyborgs, theorized Danaher’s paper, giving us “the best of both worlds” by utilizing machines to advance our civilization while at the same time letting us feel a sense of accomplishment with every new discovery. Everything Is the Same Bill has a great standard of living, economic stability and a sassy robot butler. But the person who owns the automated factory that built his sassy robot butler is richer than God. That could make Bill unhappy. Why? It’s called the relative income hypothesis, developed by Harvard economist James Duesenberry in 1949. It basically says that we feel rich when we make lots of money relative to our peers, not compared to some historical standard of living. That is why people who reported making $100,000 or more in a 2013 Washington Post survey said they wouldn’t feel “rich” unless they made at least half a million dollars a year. When the CEO of the company that makes all of the robots flashes her cash on TV, the masses, while doing well by modern standards, could still get jealous. “You could still see income inequality rise,” Darling said. “Basically, you would still have a lot today’s problems in that system.” Another issue? Robots can’t manufacture everything that people want, like Malibu mansions. “There is a finite amount of real estate on beaches,” Hughes said, “and we’re going to have to figure who gets what.” Counterpoint: Doing Nothing Will Be Awesome! Even if a world run by robots isn’t perfect, it’s hard to argue that most people would choose minimum wage jobs over a life of leisure. The list of self-help books dedicated to helping workers quit the rat race is long. It’s clear that many people would welcome having the freedom to choose what they want do with their time. “Work is simply translating input into output,” Michael Jones, an assistant professor in economics at the University of Cincinnati, told Motherboard. “Before the technological revolution, the output was used to meet our economic needs,” he said. “When our economic needs are solved in a robot utopia, our work output will be used to satisfy our spiritual, creative and intellectual needs.” Yes, it will be a golden age for artisanal chocolate makers, yoga teachers, and slam poets. And unlike today, it won’t be a dream available only to the upper-middle class or those willing to eat ramen and live with seven roommates—provided that everyone gets a piece of the utopian pie. Darling, Hughes, and Danaher mentioned the universal basic income (UBI) as a model for how the world’s economy might be divvied up. Basically, the idea is that everyone gets enough money to cover their basic expenses, so that nobody is worried about paying for groceries or rent or medical bills. You could spend years debating the finer points of this idea: How much do people get? Is there some basic requirement, such as military service or regular voting? But, in general, it seems like some form of UBI could make mass technological unemployment easier to swallow. Of course, the wealthy could still resent “welfare” recipients siphoning away their cash. “The idea that everyone should be working for their fair share, that’s part of a general moral intuition,” Hughes said. “If somebody is living off the fruits of everyone else’s labor and didn’t help dig out the roots and berries, they aren’t a good member of the tribe.” Getting over that instinct wouldn’t be easy. Sharing, however, might be easier if it means robots were making plenty of money for everyone. And if the robots feel cheated? Well then, that is a much bigger problem.


News Article | November 29, 2016
Site: astrobiology.com

Somewhere between Earth's creation and where we are today, scientists have demonstrated that some early life forms existed just fine without any oxygen. While researchers proclaim the first half of our 4.5 billion-year-old planet's life as an important time for the development and evolution of early bacteria, evidence for these life forms remains sparse including how they survived at a time when oxygen levels in the atmosphere were less than one-thousandth of one percent of what they are today. Recent geology research from the University of Cincinnati presents new evidence for bacteria found fossilized in two separate locations in the Northern Cape Province of South Africa. "These are the oldest reported fossil sulfur bacteria to date," says Andrew Czaja, UC assistant professor of geology. "And this discovery is helping us reveal a diversity of life and ecosystems that existed just prior to the Great Oxidation Event, a time of major atmospheric evolution." The 2.52 billion-year-old sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are described by Czaja as exceptionally large, spherical-shaped, smooth-walled microscopic structures much larger than most modern bacteria, but similar to some modern single-celled organisms that live in deepwater sulfur-rich ocean settings today, where even now there are almost no traces of oxygen. In his research published in the December issue of the journal Geology of the Geological Society of America, Czaja and his colleagues Nicolas Beukes from the University of Johannesburg and Jeffrey Osterhout, a recently graduated master's student from UC's department of geology, reveal samples of bacteria that were abundant in deep water areas of the ocean in a geologic time known as the Neoarchean Eon (2.8 to 2.5 billion years ago). "These fossils represent the oldest known organisms that lived in a very dark, deep-water environment," says Czaja. "These bacteria existed two billion years before plants and trees, which evolved about 450 million years ago. We discovered these microfossils preserved in a layer of hard silica-rich rock called chert located within the Kaapvaal craton of South Africa." With an atmosphere of much less than one percent oxygen, scientists have presumed that there were things living in deep water in the mud that didn't need sunlight or oxygen, but Czaja says experts didn't have any direct evidence for them until now. Czaja argues that finding rocks this old is rare, so researchers' understanding of the Neoarchean Eon are based on samples from only a handful of geographic areas, such as this region of South Africa and another in Western Australia. According to Czaja, scientists through the years have theorized that South Africa and Western Australia were once part of an ancient supercontinent called Vaalbara, before a shifting and upending of tectonic plates split them during a major change in the Earth's surface. Based on radiometric dating and geochemical isotope analysis, Czaja characterizes his fossils as having formed in this early Vaalbara supercontinent in an ancient deep seabed containing sulfate from continental rock. According to this dating, Czaja's fossil bacteria were also thriving just before the era when other shallow-water bacteria began creating more and more oxygen as a byproduct of photosynthesis. UC Professor Andrew Czaja indicates the layer of rock from which fossil bacteria were collected on a 2014 field excursion near the town of Kuruman in the Northern Cape Province of South Africa. "We refer to this period as the Great Oxidation Event that took place 2.4 to 2.2 billion years ago," says Czaja. Czaja's fossils show the Neoarchean bacteria in plentiful numbers while living deep in the sediment. He contends that these early bacteria were busy ingesting volcanic hydrogen sulfide -- the molecule known to give off a rotten egg smell -- then emitting sulfate, a gas that has no smell. He says this is the same process that goes on today as modern bacteria recycle decaying organic matter into minerals and gases. "The waste product from one [bacteria] was food for the other," adds Czaja. "While I can't claim that these early bacteria are the same ones we have today, we surmise that they may have been doing the same thing as some of our current bacteria," says Czaja. "These early bacteria likely consumed the molecules dissolved from sulfur-rich minerals that came from land rocks that had eroded and washed out to sea, or from the volcanic remains on the ocean's floor. There is an ongoing debate about when sulfur-oxidizing bacteria arose and how that fits into the earth's evolution of life, Czaja adds. "But these fossils tell us that sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were there 2.52 billion years ago, and they were doing something remarkable." This work was supported by the National Geographic Society-Waitt Grant Program and the NASA Astrobiology Institute. Czaja's paper, "Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria prior to the Great Oxidation Event from the 2.52 Ga Gamohaan Formation of South Africa," was published in Geology, a journal of the Geological Society of America.


News Article | August 26, 2016
Site: cleantechnica.com

Whenever a new fracking study comes out, you can be sure that fossil industry stakeholders will run over to the history machine and crank out a purported decades-long safety record. The problem is, until recent years fracking was confined mainly to low-population areas in the western US. Now that fracking has flooded into Pennsylvania and other northeastern states, researchers finally have a big enough data pool to draw some conclusions, and they ain’t pretty. Last year, researchers at Johns Hopkins University linked fracking to increased risk of premature birth in Pennsylvania (fracking is short for hydrofracturing, a formerly unconventional gas and oil drilling method that involves pumping high volumes of chemical brine into shale formations). In a stunning twist of irony, earlier this summer researchers at the same school found an increased risk of asthma linked to fracking in Pennsylvania — just in time for the Pennsylvania-based company Mylan to face withering criticism for price gouging related to its EpiPen asthma relief product. Deepening the irony, the Mylan CEO who oversaw the price increases is the daughter of US Senator Joe Manchin (D), a vigorous advocate for fracking who represents the neighboring state of West Virginia. The latest study from Johns Hopkins just turned up this week in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. Here’s the money quote: …Pennsylvania residents with the highest exposure to active natural gas wells operated by the hydraulic fracturing — or fracking — industry are nearly twice as likely to suffer from a combination of migraine headaches, chronic nasal and sinus symptoms, and severe fatigue. The researchers do offer an important caveat — the delivery mechanism from wellhead to symptoms in someone living nearby has yet to be charted with precision. However, the team does offer a “plausible” explanation: …Well development generates air pollution, which could provoke nasal and sinus symptoms. This type of drilling also produces stressors such as odors, noise, bright lights, and heavy truck traffic. Any of these stressors could increase the risk of symptoms. Migraine headaches, for example, are known to be triggered by odors in some individuals. As indicated by the Johns Hopkins team, fracking is an intensive industrial operation, so aside from any impacts that are specific to fracking, local residents may also be experiencing the kind of health impacts that any rural community would suffer when it is suddenly industrialized. That cluster primarily applies to surface impacts. The question of sub-surface impacts has opened up a whole ‘nother can of worms related to water quality. Due to the high volume of liquid involved, fracking has also been linked to water contamination and earthquakes related to wastewater disposal. As for the drilling operation itself, coincidentally (or not), this week the American Petroleum Institute also offered up a commentary on fracking safety, which was published by our friends over at Fuel Fix. As described by API, a new University of Cincinnati study of 23 water wells in the Utica shale formation, which partially encompasses Pennsylvania, found no linkage between nearby fracking operations and high methane concentrations in groundwater. So, here’s the predictable money quote from API: …the science is clear, and the evidence — including 65 years of safe operation — is overwhelming. No cases of drinking water contamination have been documented in the Marcellus, Utica, Barnett, Permian, Eagle Ford, Woodford, Fayetteville, Haynesville, Bakken, Denver- Julesburg, Piceance, Raton, or any other shale plays where hydraulic fracturing has been used. Considering that there are thousands of fracked wells in the US, it’s no surprise that some — or even the vast majority — have been good neighbors. However, that’s no consolation to the communities that are coping with unsafe wells. In fact, API cherry-picked the research team’s full body of work for its article. The researchers also sampled water wells in other shale formations and did find fracking-related methane concentrations. API’s choice of referring to the Utica formation was purposeful. It’s a relatively deep formation, and researchers are beginning to gather evidence that risks are greater when drilling takes place in shallow formations. A recent Stanford University study had this to say on the subject: … At least 6,900 oil and gas wells in the U.S. were fracked less than a mile (5,280 feet) from the surface, and at least 2,600 wells were fracked at depths shallower than 3,000 feet, some as shallow as 100 feet. This occurs despite many reports that describe fracking as safe for drinking water only if it occurs at least thousands of feet to a mile underground … Also, if you caught that thing about “documented” in the API statement, that’s a key word. Thanks to a Bush-era loophole in federal water safety regulations, drillers are entitled to keep the ingredients in their fracking brine under wraps. Drillers are also not required to test groundwater in the neighboring community before they begin drilling. That’s part of the reason why it has been almost impossible to document cases of water contamination. Settlements with gag orders have also provided the industry with an avenue for quashing documentation of contamination. Nevertheless, last spring a jury found enough evidence of methane contamination to award $4.24 million to two home owners affected by fracking operations in Dimock, Pennsylvania. API also cites a major study released by the US Environmental Protection Agency, which found no systematic impact on the nation’s water resources from fracking. However, the authors of the study were careful to point out that critical information gaps (see Bush loophole, above) prevented them from reaching any other conclusion. Far from providing any definitive answers about fracking safety, the EPA report was basically a cry for help. The scientific community has responded accordingly with a blistering critique calling for more data, so stay tuned. Follow me on Twitter and Google+.   Drive an electric car? 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News Article | November 1, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Nearly 160 years after the Emancipation Proclamation, the rift between white and black remains a significant feature of American life. Howard Rahtz’s new book, Race, Riots and The Police (Lynne Rienner 2016), provides a review of the history of race riots in America from the Red Summer of 1919 to the riots in Ferguson and Baltimore in 2014-2015. The book details not only the role of the police in riots over the years, but provides a clear set of steps focusing on reform to close the gap between police and the African-American community. A unique combination of experience and expertise positions Howard Rahtz as one of the most credible voices on police reform. A Cincinnati Police Captain (RET), Rahtz was an early practitioner of Community Policing, instructing at the Regional Community Policing Institute and authoring a guidebook for police officers interested in community policing. A use of force expert, Rahtz was heavily involved in changing use of force policy and training under the Cincinnati Collaborative Agreement. That agreement has been credited with improved police-community relations in Cincinnati, leading Attorney General Loretta Lynch to describe the CPD as a national model for police reform. Rahtz served as editor of the Use of Force Journal published by the International Law Enforcement Educators and Trainers Association (ILEETA). His second book, Understanding Police Use of Force, provides a balanced and insightful overview of the use of force in American policing. In Race, Riots, and the Police, Rahtz draws on his extensive first-hand experience to address this issue. Against the backdrop of the history of race riots in the United States, he offers a realistic approach for developing and maintaining a police force that is a true community partner. “An excellent book! It covers fresh ground and offers hope of not endlessly repeating the painful mistakes of the past.” —Richard Biehl, Chief of Police, Dayton, Ohio “Race, Riots, and the Police shows how our tough-on-crime strategies have perpetuated structural racism in our criminal justice system and also changed the nature of law enforcement away from guarding our communities. But Rahtz does not just point out what has gone wrong; he provides a compelling vision of what policing can look like if law enforcement leaders have the political will and the courage to change.” —Diane Goldstein, Executive Board, Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP) “This is an important book ... controversial, but refreshing; creative, yet practical. It affirms the critical role of police in our society, but it is also a call for change. I could not be more enthusiastic in my praise of this compelling work.” —Gerald S. Reid, University of Cincinnati "Rahtz, a seasoned police veteran, current officer trainer, and national speaker on police reform, goes beyond a textbook history and draws on current studies and situations to offer solutions. Given the timeliness of this publication, it is wholeheartedly recommended for public library collections. In addition to educating students, police officers, trainees, and government officials, it can also serve as a baseline and valuable tool for citizens interested in learning through his experience, research, and statistics as we see ongoing issues in our communities." — Joyce McIntosh, The Book List Howard Rahtz served for nearly two decades with the Cincinnati Police Department, retiring in 2007 as Commander of the Vice Control Unit. He currently teaches at police academies in the area and speaks nationally on police reform. In 2012, his third book, Drugs, Crime and Violence: From Trafficking to Treatment (Hamilton), was favorably reviewed, and like Race, Riots and Police, published just as the topic was making national headlines. He is also the author of Community Policing: A Handbook and Understanding Police Use of Force, which are used by police academies and law enforcement departments across the country. Lynne Rienner Publishers, celebrating 32 years of independent publishing, is known for bringing high quality, cutting-edge books in politics and the social sciences to the general market.


News Article | November 2, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Eliminating that morning 'Cup of Joe,' consuming processed foods high in nitrites or monosodium glutamate (MSG) and enjoying too much alcohol are potential headache triggers for individuals battling migraines, says Vincent Martin, MD, professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine. There are two different approaches to preventing headaches with diet. The first approach would be an elimination diet that avoids foods and beverages known to trigger headaches. The second approach would be follow a comprehensive diet whose very composition may prevent headaches, explains Martin, co-director of the Headache and Facial Pain Center at UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute and an expert in the area of migraine. His conclusions and others for migraineurs come after performing an exhaustive literature review of more than 180 research studies on the subject of migraine and diet. Martin's two-part review, "Diet and Headache" is available online in the scholarly publication Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain. It is co-authored by Brinder Vij, MD, associate professor in the UC Department of Neurology and Rehabilitation Medicine. "One of the most important triggers for headache is the withdrawal of caffeine," says Martin, who also sees patients at UC Health. "Let's say you regularly pound down three or four cups of coffee every morning and you decide to skip your morning routine one day, you will likely have full-fledged caffeine withdrawal headache that day." That said, too much coffee may also present a risk, no more than 400 milligrams daily -- one cup is 125 milligrams -- is probably the maximum for migraine patients, says Martin. "Large amounts of caffeine can bring on anxiety and depressive symptoms as well as headaches," he explains. Another trigger for migraine is MSG, which is a flavor enhancer used in a variety of processed foods, including frozen or canned foods, soups, international foods, snack foods, salad dressing, seasoning salts, ketchup, barbecue sauce, and heavily in Chinese cooking, says Martin, also a UC Health physician. "You eliminate it by eating fewer processed foods," explains Martin. "You eat more natural things such as fresh vegetables, fresh fruits and fresh meats. MSG is most provocative when consumed in liquids such as soups." Nitrites are preservatives food in processed meats such as bacon, sausage, ham and lunch meat to preserve color and flavor. Martin says a diary study found that five percent of individuals with migraine were statistically more likely to have an attack on days when they consume nitrites. Use of nitrites in foods has declined with stronger government regulation though checking labels remains a good idea, he explains. Alcohol is one of the most commonly reported dietary trigger factors for migraine and studies suggest vodka and red wines, especially those with highest histamine content are problematic, says Martin. There is a lot of interest in gluten-free diets, but they are only helpful in lessening headaches if the individuals suffer from celiac disease, which can be established by a positive blood test or intestinal biopsy, he adds. There have been three comprehensive diets whose very composition may prevent headaches such as low fat and low carbohydrate diets as well as those that increase the amount of omega-3 fatty acids and decrease the amount of omega-6 fatty acids, according to Martin. Vij, who is also associate director of the Headache and Facial Pain Center at the UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute, says low fat diets restrict the amount of fat in the diet to less than 20 percent of your daily energy requirements. "The beauty of these diets is that they not only reduce headaches, but may produce weight loss and prevent heart disease," says Vij ,a UC Health physician. Low carbohydrate diets such as ketogenic diets can reduce headache frequency, but it's not something to consider without strict physician supervision. The diet limits carbohydrates more than the well-known Atkins diet, Vij explains. One of the most promising diets for those with more frequent attacks of migraine is one that boosts your omega-3 fats while lessoning your omega-6 levels and that means tossing out polyunsaturated vegetable oils (corn, sunflower, safflower, canola and soy) in favor of flaxseed oil, says Martin. Foods to consume would include flaxseed, salmon, halibut, cod and scallops while those to avoid would be peanuts and cashews. "Persons with headache and migraine have more dietary options than ever. Ultimately a healthy headache diet excludes processed foods, minimizes caffeine and includes a lot of fruits, vegetables, fish and lean meats," Martin says. He adds, "After all, you are what you eat."


News Article | November 10, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

(WASHINGTON, Nov. 10, 2016) - The American Society of Hematology (ASH) is pleased to recognize the following trainees with the highest-scoring abstracts in the categories of undergraduate student, medical student, graduate student, resident physician, and postdoctoral fellow at the 58th ASH Annual Meeting December 3-6 in San Diego. "I am delighted to recognize these talented early-career researchers for their outstanding contributions to the study of hematology," said 2016 ASH President Charles S. Abrams, MD, of the University of Pennsylvania. "These individuals are shining examples of the promise of the next generation of scientists, and I am pleased that ASH provides the opportunity for rising stars to gain recognition by presenting their work in front of thousands of their distinguished colleagues from all over the world." Medical Student Matthew Hartwell Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY An Early Biomarker Algorithm Predicts Lethal Graft-Versus-Host Disease and Survival after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Publication #509 Graduate Student Xiaotian Zhang Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX High Order Chromatin Structure Regulates Gene Expression in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Self-Renewal and Erythroid Differentiation Publication #1033 Resident Physician Maximilian Witzel, MD Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany SWI/SNF Protein SMARCD2 Orchestrates Transcriptional Networks Controlling Hematopoiesis and Neutrophil Granulocytes in Humans, Mice and Zebrafish Publication #2 The ASH Giuseppe Bigi Memorial Award was established in 2015 to recognize an Italian trainee (undergraduate student, medical student, graduate student, resident physician, or post-doctoral fellow) based at an Italian institution who has the highest-scoring abstract submitted in the field of hematopoiesis and stem cells. This annual award is made possible by a generous grant from the Giuseppe Bigi Association, named for the late Giuseppe Bigi, MD, a well-known Italian scientist. The 2016 recipient is: Patrizia Sciancalepore, MD University of Turin, Turin, Italy ATP-Binding-Cassette A1 Regulates Extracellular Isopentenyl Pyrophosphate Release and Vγ9Vδ2 T-Cell Activation By Dendritic Cells Publication #3709 The Mary Rodes Gibson Memorial Award in Hemostasis and Thrombosis was established to recognize the trainee (undergraduate student, medical student, graduate student, resident physician, or post-doctoral fellow) who is the first author and presenter of the highest-scoring abstract submitted to the ASH Annual Meeting in the field of hemostasis and thrombosis. This annual award honoring excellence in hemostasis and thrombosis is made possible by the Mary Rodes Gibson Hemostasis-Thrombosis Foundation to continue the legacy of Mary Rodes Gibson, who suffered from severe, type 3 von Willebrand disease. This award will be presented during the invited speaker session of the Special Symposium on the Basic Science of Hemostasis and Thrombosis on Monday, December 5, from 4:30 - 6:00 p.m., in Ballroom 20BC in the San Diego Convention Center. The 2016 recipient is: Ranjeet Kumar Sinha, PhD The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA Novel R41Q- and R46Q-PAR1-Modified Mice Enable Proof-of-Concept Studies for In Vivo Protective Mechanisms of Action for Activated Protein C (APC) in Sepsis and Stroke Publication #13 Each year, ASH offers merit-based Minority Graduate Student Abstract Achievement Awards to select graduate students to acknowledge their accomplishments and to recruit and retain minority graduate students in the field of hematology through exposure to the ASH Annual Meeting. Morayo Adebiyi The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX Sphingosine-1-Phosphate (S1P) Signaling through S1P Receptor 1 (S1PR1) in Macrophage Contributes to Pain in Sickle Cell Disease Publication #2476 Stephanie N. Christie Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY Inhibiting SOX11-DNA Interaction in Mantle Cell Lymphoma Publication #1840 Briana Fitch University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA Mechanism of IL-10 Protective Effect in Development of Childhood B Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Publication #4075 Kamira K. Maharaj University of South Florida, Tampa, FL Combinatorial Effect of HDAC6i and Ibrutinib Therapy in CLL Murine Model Modulation of T Cell Compartment in a Preclinical CLL Murine Model By a Selective PI3K Delta Inhibitor, TGR-1202 Publications #2035 and #3236 Katelyn Melgar University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH Molecular Analysis and In Vivo Efficacy Studies on a Novel Chemical-Series of FLT3 Inhibitors in Human FLT3-ITD AML Publication #36 A complete list of Abstract Achievement Award recipients is available at http://www. The American Society of Hematology (ASH) (http://www. ) is the world's largest professional society of hematologists dedicated to furthering the understanding, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disorders affecting the blood. For more than 50 years, the Society has led the development of hematology as a discipline by promoting research, patient care, education, training, and advocacy in hematology. The official journal of ASH is Blood (http://www. ), the most cited peer-reviewed publication in the field, which is available weekly in print and online.


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Chicago, IL (November 17, 2016) --Although dialysis rates are similar in urban and rural areas, most remote rural counties in the United States lack in-county dialysis facilities. Of all the community hospitals in the country, only 38% are designated as rural hospitals, and it is estimated that two-thirds of rural hospitals do not offer acute dialysis due to a lack of dialysis and/or kidney specialists. A model telehealth program may help provide much-needed care to these regions, according to a study that will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2016 November 15¬-20 at McCormick Place in Chicago, IL. Charuhas Thakar, MD (University of Cincinnati) and his colleagues describe the development of a telemedicine program that partners a national dialysis provider with a rural hospital in Kentucky. Between January and April, they have treated more than a dozen patients (with >20 dialysis treatments) via the tele-nephrology program for conditions requiring medical, surgical, or critical care, and 67% of the patients were successfully treated and discharged from the rural hospital. The program now also provides 24/7 nephrology care other than dialysis to those patients with kidney and electrolyte disorders. "This innovative patient-centered program plans to build a hub-and-spoke model for specialty care, and can be emulated nationally," said Dr. Thakar. "Models need to examine clinical effectiveness and efficiency of tele-medicine in nephrology in both acute and chronic settings to reduce the burden of travel to satellite dialysis units for providers, and thus make dialysis and renal care available in more proximity to patients." ASN Kidney Week 2016, the largest nephrology meeting of its kind, will provide a forum for more than 13,000 professionals to discuss the latest findings in kidney health research and engage in educational sessions related to advances in the care of patients with kidney and related disorders. Kidney Week 2016 will take place November 15-20, 2016 in Chicago, IL. The content of this article does not reflect the views or opinions of The American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Responsibility for the information and views expressed therein lies entirely with the author(s). ASN does not offer medical advice. All content in ASN publications is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions, or adverse effects. This content should not be used during a medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Please consult your doctor or other qualified health care provider if you have any questions about a medical condition, or before taking any drug, changing your diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment. Do not ignore or delay obtaining professional medical advice because of information accessed through ASN. Call 911 or your doctor for all medical emergencies. Since 1966, ASN has been leading the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients. ASN has nearly 16,000 members representing 112 countries. For more information, please visit http://www. or contact us at 202-640-4660.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.spie.org

The FireFly architecture features free-space optics communication links and represents an extreme design approach to meet the requirements of modern robust data center networks. Data centers (DCs)—facilities that are used to centralize the IT operations and equipment of an organization—represent a critical piece of modern networked applications, in both the private and public sectors. The trend toward DCs has been driven by a number of key factors, e.g., economies of scale, reduced management costs, better use of hardware (via statistical multiplexing), and the ability to elastically scale applications in response to changing workload patterns. In particular, a robust network fabric is fundamental for the success of DCs, i.e., to ensure that the network does not become a bottleneck for high-performance applications. In this context, the design of a DC network must satisfy several goals, including high performance (e.g., high throughput and low latency), low equipment and management costs, robustness to dynamic traffic patterns, incremental expandability to add new servers or racks, as well as other practical concerns (e.g., cabling complexity, and power and cooling costs). Currently available DC network architectures, however, do not provide satisfactory solutions to these requirements. There are two main problems with traditional static (wired) networks. They are either ‘overprovisioned’ to account for worst-case traffic patterns and thus incur high costs (e.g., with fat trees or Clos architectures), or they are ‘oversubscribed’ (such as with simple trees or leaf-spine architectures). Although the latter networks have low costs, they offer poor performance because of their congested links. In recent studies, attempts have been made to overcome these limitations by augmenting a static ‘core’ with some flexible links (radio-frequency or optical wireless). These augmented architectures do show some promise, but they provide only a small improvement in performance. Moreover, all these architectures involve high cabling costs and complexities. In our work,1 we envision an extreme design point to meet the requirements of modern DC networks rather than trying to incrementally improve the cost-performance tradeoffs, high cabling complexity, and rigidity of current DC architectures. In our architecture vision—known as FireFly—we use free-space optics (FSO) communication links to realize a fully flexible, all-wireless inter-rack fabric. FSO communication technology is particularly well suited to our aim because it offers very high data rates (tens of Gb/s) over longranges (more than 100m), while having low transmission power and a small interference footprint. A conceptual overview of our FireFly architecture vision is shown in Figure 1. In our design, each top-of-rack (ToR) switch has flexible (steerable) FSO links that can be dynamically reconfigured to connect to other ToRs. The controller reconfigures the topology to adapt to current traffic workloads. This vision provides several benefits over current DC architectures. For instance, our topological flexibility (if achieved correctly) provides a low-cost option (i.e., few switches and links) with performance comparable to more expensive overprovisioned networks. In addition, our all-wireless fabric eliminates cabling complexity and associated overheads (e.g., obstructed cooling). Our approach can also facilitate new and radical DC topology structures that would otherwise remain at the ‘paper design’ phase because of their cabling complexity. Lastly, our method of flexibly turning links on or off brings us closer to realizing the aim of energy-proportional DCs (and the flexibility enables easier incremental expansion of a DC). Figure 1. Schematic illustration of the FireFly architecture. FSO: Free-space optics. ToR: Top of rack. The unique characteristics of our approach (i.e., the FSO-based inter-rack links and the fully flexible topology) give rise to novel algorithmic, networking, and system-level challenges that need to be addressed before our vision can be made into a reality. First, we need to develop cost-effective and robust link technologies that have small form factors and that can be steered at short timescales to impart flexibility. Second, we require algorithmic techniques to design the efficient and flexible networks. Third, we need new network management solutions. These may include algorithms for the joint optimization problem of runtime topology selection and traffic engineering, as well as data-plane mechanisms to guarantee various consistency and performance requirements. In our recent work,1 we have demonstrated the viability of our FireFly architecture by building a proof-of-concept prototype (with commodity components) for a steerable, small-form-factor FSO device (see Figure 2). We have also developed practical heuristics to address the algorithmic and system-level challenges in the network design and management of our architecture. In addition, we have developed techniques to provide line-of-sight for FSO links in the FireFly architecture. For our steerable, small-form-factor FSO device, we have been exploring the use of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) mirrors as a steering technology to steer the FSO beams with minimal latency. In this device, we use a collimated laser beam that is transmitted from the fiber collimator of an FSO terminal. The laser beam passes onto a gimbal-less two-axis MEMS micromirror (2mm diameter) and thus steers the beam in an ultrafast manner within a large optical deflection (10°) over the entire device bandwidth (1.2kHz). The MEMS mirror deflects the beam into a wide-angle lens that magnifies (about three times) the optical scan angles of the system. This magnification is linear and therefore results in an overall scan capability field of view of more than 30°. The power consumption of this system is less than 1mW and thus several orders of magnitude lower than that of galvanometer mirrors. The outgoing FSO beam from our MEMS beam-steering mechanism passes through autopoints and onto a receiving aperture (where it is efficiently coupled into a fiber collimator). With this fast and precise MEMS steering mechanism, we can switch the FSO from one rack to the next for reconfigurable networking. It also enables an autocorrection mechanism for fixing any misalignments (in real time). Figure 2. Photographs of the MEMS (microelectromechanical systems)-based proof-of-concept prototype assembly used to realize steerable FSO beams. In summary, we have designed the novel FireFly architecture for radically improving modern DC networks. Our vision includes unique characteristics, such as FSO-based inter-rack links and a fully flexible topology. Such features give rise to a number of algorithmic, networking, and system-level challenges that we are working to address. We have recently demonstrated the feasibility of our architecture with a proof-of-concept prototype for a MEMS-based steerable, small-form-factor FSO device. There are, however, various challenges that we need to address before we can realize commercialization of our architecture. In our current work we are thus building a small testbed for the FireFly architecture, which includes autoalignment through the use of galvanometers and MEMS steering technologies. We now plan to demonstrate the resilience of our FSO-link technologies against indoor effects, e.g., rack vibrations and temperature variations. This project was supported by the National Science Foundation award 1513866 (NeTS: Medium: Collaborative Research: Flexible All-Wireless Inter-Rack Fabric for Datacenters using Free-Space Optics) and represents a collaboration between faculty members, postdoctoral fellows, research associates, and graduate students at Pennsylvania State University, Stony Brook University, and Carnegie Mellon University. Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Pennsylvania State University Mohsen Kavehrad has been the W. L. Weiss Chair Professor of Electrical Engineering since 1997, and is the founding director of the Center for Information and Communications Technology Research. He has previously worked for Bell Laboratories and is a fellow of the IEEE. He is the author of more than 400 papers, several books and book chapters, and holds several patents. Department of Computer Science Stony Brook University Samir Das received his PhD in computer science from Georgia Institute of Technology. He previously studied at Jadavpur University, India, and the Indian Institute of Science. He has also worked briefly at the Indian Statistical Institute. He moved to Stony Brook in 2002 and was previously a faculty member at the University of Texas at San Antonio and then at the University of Cincinnati. Himanshu Gupta obtained his PhD in computer science from Stanford University in 1999 and his BTech from the Indian Institute of Technology in 1992. In his recent research he focuses on theoretical issues associated with wireless networking. In particular, he is interested in sensor networks and databases. His other research interests include database systems and theory, e.g., materialized views, (multiple) query optimization, and data analysis. Jon Longtin joined the mechanical engineering faculty in 1996. He is the author of more than 130 technical research publications, including a number of book chapters. He also holds six issued and three pending US patents. His expertise is in the thermal sciences, with a focus on the development of laser-based optical techniques for the measurement of temperature, concentration, and thermal properties. He is also interested in the use of ultrafast lasers for precision material processing and micromachining, and the development of sensors for harsh environments (e.g., direct-write thermal spray technology). He has been the recipient of a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science postdoctoral fellowship, the National Science Foundation's Faculty Early Career Development award and the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, and the Stony Brook Excellence in Teaching award. He is a registered professional engineer in New York State. School of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University Vyas Sekar is an assistant professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering department. He received his PhD from Carnegie Mellon University in 2010 and earned his bachelor's degree from the Indian Institute of Technology Madras (during which he was awarded the President of India Gold Medal). His research interests lie at the intersection of networking, security, and systems. He has also received a number of best paper awards, e.g., at the Association for Computing Machinery's SIGCOMM, CoNext, and Multimedia conferences.

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