University of Cesena

Cesena, Italy

University of Cesena

Cesena, Italy

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Francavilla R.,University of Bari | Ercolini D.,University of Naples Federico II | Piccolo M.,University of Bari | Vannini L.,University of Bologna | And 12 more authors.
Applied and Environmental Microbiology | Year: 2014

This study aimed to investigate the salivary microbiota and metabolome of 13 children with celiac disease (CD) under a glutenfree diet (treated celiac disease [T-CD]). The same number of healthy children (HC) was used as controls. The salivary microbiota was analyzed by an integrated approach using culture-dependent and -independent methods. Metabolome analysis was carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-solid-phase microextraction. Compared to HC, the number of some cultivable bacterial groups (e.g., total anaerobes) significantly (P<0.05) differed in the saliva samples of the T-CD children. As shown by community-level catabolic profiles, the highest Shannon's diversity and substrate richness were found in HC. Pyrosequencing data showed the highest richness estimator and diversity index values for HC. Levels of Lachnospiraceae, Gemellaceae, and Streptococcus sanguinis were highest for the T-CD children. Streptococcus thermophilus levels were markedly decreased in T-CD children. The saliva of T-CD children showed the largest amount of Bacteroidetes (e.g., Porphyromonas sp., Porphyromonas endodontalis, and Prevotella nanceiensis), together with the smallest amount of Actinobacteria. T-CD children were also characterized by decreased levels of some Actinomyces species, Atopobium species, and Corynebacterium durum. Rothia mucilaginosa was the only Actinobacteria species found at the highest level in T-CD children. As shown by multivariate statistical analyses, the levels of organic volatile compounds markedly differentiated T-CD children. Some compounds (e.g., ethyl-acetate, nonanal, and 2-hexanone) were found to be associated with T-CD children. Correlations (false discovery rate [FDR],<0.05) were found between the relative abundances of bacteria and some volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The findings of this studyindicated that CD is associated with oral dysbiosis that could affect the oral metabolome. © 2014, American Society for Microbiology.


Ercolini D.,University of Naples Federico II | Francavilla R.,University of Bari | Vannini L.,University of Bologna | Vannini L.,University of Cesena | And 6 more authors.
Scientific Reports | Year: 2015

Fourteen Saharawi celiac children following an African-style gluten-free diet for at least two years were subjected to a change of diet to an Italian-style gluten-free diet for 60 days. Significant differences were identified in the salivary microbiota and metabolome when Saharawi celiac children switched from African- to Italian-style dietary habits. An Italian-style gluten-free diet caused increases in the abundance of Granulicatella, Porphyromonas and Neisseria and decreases in Clostridium, Prevotella and Veillonella, altering the 'salivary type'of the individuals. Furthermore, operational taxonomic unit co-occurrence/exclusion patterns indicated that the initial equilibrium of co-occurring microbial species was perturbed by a change in diet: the microbial diversity was reduced, with a few species out-competing the previously established microbiota and becoming dominant. Analysis of predicted metagenomes revealed a remarkable change in the metabolic potential of the microbiota following the diet change, with increased potential for amino acid, vitamin and co-factor metabolism. High concentrations of acetone and 2-butanone during treatment with the Italian-style gluten-free diet suggested metabolic dysfunction in the Saharawi celiac children. The findings of this study support the need for a translational medicine pipeline to examine interactions between food and microbiota when evaluating human development, nutritional needs and the impact and consequences of westernisation.


De Angelis M.,University of Bari | Montemurno E.,University of Bari | Piccolo M.,University of Bari | Vannini L.,University of Bologna | And 7 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

This study aimed at investigating the fecal microbiota, and the fecal and urinary metabolome of non progressor (NP) and progressor (P) patients with immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN). Three groups of volunteers were included in the study: (i) sixteen IgAN NP patients; (ii) sixteen IgAN P patients; and (iii) sixteen healthy control (HC) subjects, without known diseases. Selective media were used to determine the main cultivable bacterial groups. Bacterial tag-encoded FLX-titanium amplicon pyrosequencing of the 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA was carried out to determine total and metabolically active bacteria, respectively. Biochrom 30 series amino acid analyzer and gas-chromatography mass spectrometry/solid-phase microextraction (GC-MS/SPME) analyses were mainly carried out for metabolomic analyses. As estimated by rarefaction, Chao and Shannon diversity index, the lowest microbial diversity was found in P patients. Firmicutes increased in the fecal samples of NP and, especially, P patients due to the higher percentages of some genera/species of Ruminococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Eubacteriaceae and Streptococcaeae. With a few exceptions, species of Clostridium, Enterococcus and Lactobacillus genera were found at the highest levels in HC. Bacteroidaceae, Porphyromonadaceae, Prevotellaceae and Rikenellaceae families differed among NP, P and HC subjects. Sutterellaceae and Enterobacteriaceae species were almost the highest in the fecal samples of NP and/or P patients. Compared to HC subjects, Bifidobacterium species decreased in the fecal samples of NP and P. As shown by multivariate statistical analyses, the levels of metabolites (free amino acids and organic volatile compounds) from fecal and urinary samples markedly differentiated NP and, especially, P patients. © 2014 De Angelis et al.


De Angelis M.,University of Bari | Piccolo M.,University of Bari | Vannini L.,University of Cesena | Vannini L.,University of Bologna | And 7 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

This study aimed at investigating the fecal microbiota and metabolome of children with Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS) and autism (AD) in comparison to healthy children (HC). Bacterial tag-encoded FLX-titanium amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP) of the 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA analyses were carried out to determine total bacteria (16S rDNA) and metabolically active bacteria (16S rRNA), respectively. The main bacterial phyla (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria and Verrucomicrobia) significantly (P<0.05) changed among the three groups of children. As estimated by rarefaction, Chao and Shannon diversity index, the highest microbial diversity was found in AD children. Based on 16S-rRNA and culture-dependent data, Faecalibacterium and Ruminococcus were present at the highest level in fecal samples of PDD-NOS and HC children. Caloramator, Sarcina and Clostridium genera were the highest in AD children. Compared to HC, the composition of Lachnospiraceae family also differed in PDD-NOS and, especially, AD children. Except for Eubacterium siraeum, the lowest level of Eubacteriaceae was found on fecal samples of AD children. The level of Bacteroidetes genera and some Alistipes and Akkermansia species were almost the highest in PDD-NOS or AD children as well as almost all the identified Sutterellaceae and Enterobacteriaceae were the highest in AD. Compared to HC children, Bifidobacterium species decreased in AD. As shown by Canonical Discriminant Analysis of Principal Coordinates, the levels of free amino acids and volatile organic compounds of fecal samples were markedly affected in PDD-NOS and, especially, AD children. If the gut microbiota differences among AD and PDD-NOS and HC children are one of the concomitant causes or the consequence of autism, they may have implications regarding specific diagnostic test, and/or for treatment and prevention. © 2013 De Angelis et al.


PubMed | University of Cesena, University of Bologna and University of Bari
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2014

This study aimed at investigating the fecal microbiota, and the fecal and urinary metabolome of non progressor (NP) and progressor (P) patients with immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN). Three groups of volunteers were included in the study: (i) sixteen IgAN NP patients; (ii) sixteen IgAN P patients; and (iii) sixteen healthy control (HC) subjects, without known diseases. Selective media were used to determine the main cultivable bacterial groups. Bacterial tag-encoded FLX-titanium amplicon pyrosequencing of the 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA was carried out to determine total and metabolically active bacteria, respectively. Biochrom 30 series amino acid analyzer and gas-chromatography mass spectrometry/solid-phase microextraction (GC-MS/SPME) analyses were mainly carried out for metabolomic analyses. As estimated by rarefaction, Chao and Shannon diversity index, the lowest microbial diversity was found in P patients. Firmicutes increased in the fecal samples of NP and, especially, P patients due to the higher percentages of some genera/species of Ruminococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Eubacteriaceae and Streptococcaeae. With a few exceptions, species of Clostridium, Enterococcus and Lactobacillus genera were found at the highest levels in HC. Bacteroidaceae, Porphyromonadaceae, Prevotellaceae and Rikenellaceae families differed among NP, P and HC subjects. Sutterellaceae and Enterobacteriaceae species were almost the highest in the fecal samples of NP and/or P patients. Compared to HC subjects, Bifidobacterium species decreased in the fecal samples of NP and P. As shown by multivariate statistical analyses, the levels of metabolites (free amino acids and organic volatile compounds) from fecal and urinary samples markedly differentiated NP and, especially, P patients.

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