Preston, United Kingdom
Preston, United Kingdom

The University of Central Lancashire is a university based in Preston, Lancashire, England. The university has its roots in The Institution For The Diffusion Of Useful Knowledge which was founded in 1828. Subsequently known as Harris Art College, then Preston Polytechnic, then Lancashire Polytechnic, in 1992 it was granted University status by the Privy Council. The university is the fifth largest in the UK in terms of student numbers. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

Patent
University of Central Lancashire | Date: 2014-07-09

Provided are methods for detecting brain cancer in a subject, methods of predicting a clinical outcome in a patient with brain cancer, methods of monitoring the progression of brain cancer in a patient, and methods of grading a patients brain cancer. The methods utilise various micro RNAs that the inventors have found to be useful in these manners.


Patent
University of Central Lancashire | Date: 2017-01-18

The present invention relates to methods of diagnosing and/or prognosing proliferative disorders, especially brain cancers (e.g. gliomas). In particular, the present invention provides a means to conveniently detect malignant tumours merely by assaying or analysing blood (particularly blood serum). Cytokines and/or angiogenesis factors in blood serum have been found to be surprisingly powerful at indicating the presence of brain cancers in a subject. Moreover, spectroscopic analysis, especially ATR-FTIR analysis, of a blood sample has been demonstrated to be surprisingly effective at producing a signature that can be correlated with the presence, extent, severity, or aggressiveness of malignant tumours in a subject.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: NFRP-10-2014 | Award Amount: 3.18M | Year: 2016

The present situation of nuclear energy in Europe asks for a continuing effort in the field of Education and Training aimed to assure a qualified workforce in the next decades. In this scenario, the present proposal is aimed at enhancing and networking the Europe-wide efforts initiated in the past decades by different organisations belonging to academia, research centres and industry to maintain and develop Education and Training in the nuclear fields. This will allow consolidating, developing and better exploiting the achievements already reached in the past and to tackle the present challenges in preparing the European workforce in the nuclear fields. The main objectives of the proposal are: 1. SURVEY AND COORDINATION OF NETWORKING IN E&T AND VET IN THE NUCLEAR AREAS 2. DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF COORDINATED E&T AND VET EFFORTS (Master and Summer Courses for continuous professional development) 3. GENERATIONAL TRANSFER OF EXPERTISE (Sustainable production of educational material) 4. CROSS BORDER TRANSFER OF EXPERTISE (Implementation of ECVET based exchanges among industrial bodies) 5. REINFORCING ETI ACTIONS FOR SHARING AND ENHANCING NUCLEAR SAFETY CULTURE COMPETENCE 6. FACILITATING THE NUCLEAR TRANSITION IN FUSION: COORDINATING THE E&T ACTIONS The European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN), as coordinator of the proposed action, together with the other Participants, is committed to pursue the above objectives, being fully coherent with the ones suggested in the call (NFRP10) and proposed by the SET Plan Roadmap for Education and Training for the nuclear sector, tightening at the same time the links among the different nuclear areas and better coordinating their contributions in the E&T fields. Strict links with the SNE-TP; IGD-TP and MELODI platforms and other relevant associations and bodies (EHRO-N, NUGENIA, EUTERP, IAEA, HERCA, etc.) will be implemented to assure coherence of this effort with similar other efforts going on in Europe.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: GARRI-6-2014 | Award Amount: 2.65M | Year: 2015

The goal of the TRUST Project is to catalyse a global collaborative effort to improve adherence to high ethical standards around the world. Achieving equity in international research is one of the pressing concerns of the 21st century. Many international groups and organisations are working on governance frameworks and standards to guide research activities after progressive globalization. However, their efforts are disparate and lacking a guiding vision. In an interdisciplinary collaboration between multi-level ethics bodies, policy advisors, civil society organisations, funding organisations, industry and academic scholars from a range of disciplines, this project combines long-standing, highly respected efforts to build international governance structures with new exciting network opportunities between Europe, India, Sub-Saharan Africa, China and Russia. TRUST will open up new horizons in improving adherence to high ethical standards in research globally. The projects strategic output are three sets of tools based on participatory engagement covering all continents: (1) a global code of conduct for funders, (2) a fair research contracting on-line tool and (3) a compliance and ethics follow-up tool, which takes limited resources into account.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: NFRP-12-2015 | Award Amount: 3.05M | Year: 2015

HoNESt (History of Nuclear Energy and Society) involves an interdisciplinary team with many experienced researchers and 24 high profile research institutions. HoNESts goal is to conduct a three-year interdisciplinary analysis of the experience of nuclear developments and its relationship to contemporary society with the aim of improving the understanding of the dynamics over the last 60 years. HoNESts results will assist the current debate on future energy sources and the transition to affordable, secure, and clean energy production. Civil societys interaction with nuclear developments changes over time, and it is locally, nationally and transnationally specific. HoNESt will embrace the complexity of political, technological and economic challenges; safety; risk perception and communication, public engagement, media framing, social movements, etc. Research on these interactions has thus far been mostly fragmented. We will develop a pioneering integrated interdisciplinary approach, which is conceptually informed by Large Technological Systems (LTS) and Integrated Socio-technical System (IST), based on a close and innovative collaboration of historians and social scientists in this field. HoNESt will first collect extensive historical data from over 20 countries. These data will be jointly analyzed by historians and social scientists, through the lens of an innovative integrated approach, in order to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying decision making and associated citizen engagement with nuclear power. Through an innovative application of backcasting techniques, HoNESt will bring novel content to the debate on nuclear sustainable engagement futures. Looking backwards to the present, HoNESt will strategize and plan how these suitable engagement futures could be achieved. HoNESt will engage key stakeholders from industry, policy makers and civil society in a structured dialogue to insert the results into the public debate on nuclear energy.


Academic and practitioner interest in the physical performance of male professional soccer players in the competition setting determined via time-motion analyses has grown substantially over the last four decades leading to a substantial body of published research and aiding development of a more systematic evidence-based framework for physical conditioning. Findings have forcibly shaped contemporary opinions in the sport with researchers and practitioners frequently emphasising the important role that physical performance plays in match outcomes. Time-motion analyses have also influenced practice as player conditioning programmes can be tailored according to the different physical demands identified across individual playing positions. Yet despite a more systematic approach to physical conditioning, data indicate that even at the very highest standards of competition, the contemporary player is still susceptible to transient and end-game fatigue. Over the course of this article, the author suggests that a more pragmatic approach to interpreting the current body of time-motion analysis data and its application in the practical setting is nevertheless required. Examples of this are addressed using findings in the literature to examine (a) the association between competitive physical performance and 'success' in professional soccer, (b) current approaches to interpreting differences in time-motion analysis data across playing positions, and (c) whether data can realistically be used to demonstrate the occurrence of fatigue in match-play. Gaps in the current literature and directions for future research are also identified. © 2013 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 190.92K | Year: 2016

For thousands of years and across the globe, humans have painted images in caves and on other stone surfaces. Some painted sites were later revisited by people who added new paintings on top of the older. Such sites can be very colourful, complex assemblages of paintings placed one on top the other, so much so that it can be very difficult to discern the sequence of painting over very long periods of time. While archaeologists have developed many sophisticated theories to interpret these paintings, and pieces of the paintings that have fallen off may be recovered to analyze in a laboratory, until recently it has been very difficult to analyse the paintings using powerful scientific equipment while the paintings remain on the rock surface. However, technolgoical advances have produced small transportable devices which now allow for detailed on site analyses that do not harm the paintings. These non-destructive portable technologies can scan the cave, rock-surface, and paintings in 3-Dimensions; can use X-ray technology to determine the chemical elements used to make the pigment that makes the painting; laser instruments to identify organic components of the paintings; and can use portable digital photography to reveal hidden layers normally barely perceptible to the human eye. Unravelling the Gordian Knot Project will apply all of these methods to analyze the spectacular and colourful paintings at the site called Pleito, found in California, USA. Pleito is one of the most complex painted sites in the world. It has hundreds of individual paintings with many colours, including different shades of red, black, white, yellow, orange, green, and blue. This is the widest colour palette of any known site in North American and, importantly, it has multiple panels where paintings have been placed over earlier ones. This kind of overpainting, known as superimposition, presents the greatest challenge to rock-art researchers in their attempts to understand painted art found in the landscape. Even though such complex paintings are challenging, they offer to the archaeologist who can unravel the sequence the greatest chance of understanding the development of paintings through time. Within the site of Pleito, a panel known to researchers as the Gordian Knot is the most elaborate panel found there, making it one of the most complex prehistoric panels found anywhere in the world. The name of this project is derived from this panel, and so Pleito and its complex sequences of overpainting executed in various colours is an ideal case to disentangle the history of painting events. The method employed will integrate a range of portable technologies including portable X-Ray Fluorescence, portable Raman Spectroscopy, Highlight Reflectance Transformation, dStretch digital photography, and portable digital laser scanning to unravel the sequence of painting that makes up one of the most complex sites found anywhere in the world. These techniques will help address questions concerning traditions of pigment use and give insights into the role of the art within Native society. The project includes a state-of-the-art website with a 3-D recreation to be housed at the California State University, Channel Islands, offering an alternative to site visitation as a means to experience the site without risk of damaging the ancient paintings. Also, a new conditional assessment will compare degradation of the site to a 2003 baseline report to see how much of the paintings have recently eroded away: finally, a series of experiments combining different pigments with different types of binding agents will give us material to test with both lab based and portable equipment in the creation of a spectral database: this will give us a series of different chemical readings to compare with the actual paintings and allow researchers across the world to compare results from their discoveries with the Gordian Knot Spectral Databasee


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-IF-EF-ST | Phase: MSCA-IF-2015-EF | Award Amount: 195.45K | Year: 2016

My research aims to make a significant contribution to the scholarship on contemporary Black women artists in the US & the UK. It will pose a polemical formulation of Black feminist literature and visual arts of the 1980s and 90s in light of postcolonial scholarship. These two decades saw a flowering of talent of Black British and American women: in the US they are described as Black Womens Renaissance and in the UK as Black Arts Movement. Both movements came to fruition in the aftermath of civil rights and feminist struggles of black people in the US and UK. This project will investigate how the work of African American and Black British female artists reflected interaction and intersection of cultural nationalism and black feminism. It will demonstrate that feminist narratives and artworks of that period, usually not associated with black cultural nationalism, played a pivotal role in the continuation of indigenous cultural politics of Black cultural nationalism, which came to being in the 1960s and 70s in the US. During that period African American art strove to validate black culture as a culture possessing its own ideas and forms of aesthetic expression. The cause of BCN was propelled through the veneration of Black values, sensibilities, symbols, and rituals, which, as this project will argue, became also central to the identity politics of the artists of Black Women Renaissance and Black Arts Movement in the decades that followed. My project will demonstrate that this strategy of validating black culture, which was so empowering in the 1960s and 70s, ultimately turned to be counter-productive for the goals of black feminism, as it created a limited number of positions from which black womens subjectivity could be articulated. UCLan with its world-class researchers in transatlantic studies (i.e. Prof. Rice) and Black Arts and black feminism (i.e. Prof. Lubaina Himid, a founder of Black Arts Movement) provides an ideal host institution.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: STFC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 832.11K | Year: 2015

This consolidated grant proposal brings together research within the Jeremiah Horrocks Institute (JHI) of the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) in the key research areas of solar physics, stellar astrophysics, Galactic astrophysics, and extra-Galactic astrophysics. In all of these areas, we will be addressing key science questions at the cutting edge of astrophysical research. Some examples of these are given here. In the area of solar physics we will look at issues such as including accurate modelling in our understanding of the interface between the solar corona, photosphere and chromosphere, in order to provide quantitative insight into the solar coronal heating problem. We will simulate the motions of solar energetic particles (SEPs) in the heliosphere in order to study SEP transport from the Sun to the Earth. This will link into a study of the relation between solar eruptive events and SEP transport, which in turn will allow us to make more accurate predictions of space weather effects on the Earth. We will also study the rotation of sunspots and understand what causes them to rotate, in order to discover to what extent rotating flares and sunspots lead to solar eruptions. In another study we will discover what effect planets in our solar system have in shaping the zodiacal cloud. In the area of stellar astrophysics, we will solve some of the currently unanswered key questions in star formation, particularly those surrounding the formation, structure and evolution of prestellar cores. This is important, because there is believed to be a link between the core mass function and the stellar Initial Mass Function (IMF). It is planned that this will lead us to a true physical understanding of the origin of the IMF itself. As part of this study we will look at the roles of turbulence and magnetic fields in star formation. We will also study the evolution of discs around protostars and the effects of binarity on planet formation, and model the migration of giant planets in discs around protostars to see how this is affected by stellar luminosity and the properties of the disc. We will also use Kepler data to explore and understand internal angular momentum transport in hydrogen-burning, main-sequence stars. In the areas of Galactic and extra-Galactic astrophysics we plan to measure the ages and abundance patterns of stellar populations in galaxies, to understand when and where the stars formed. We will model physical processes in star-forming systems within the disc of a galaxy in order to develop quantitative predictions for stellar migration in the Milky Way disc. One of the overall goals in this area is to infer the mass assembly of the Milky Way, and hence to understand the formation and evolution of the Milky Way as a whole. In external galaxies we will develop recollimation shock simulations in extra-galactic jets to include additional physics and realistic conditions, in order to better understand these highly energetic phenomena. We will resolve the FeII problem in quasars, and finally we will study ultra-large quasar groups that apparently exceed the homogeneity scale limit, to begin to understand the Universe on its largest scales.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: MRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 165.83K | Year: 2016

Many people with Parkinsons disease do not respond well to therapy with the most widely-used drug called L-DOPA, having uncontrollable body movements that make them feel ashamed or even fall and get injured. We and other doctors think that this occurs because proteins called dopamine receptors associate in unusual structures called heteromers in nerve cells. However, no one knows how and where heteromers are formed, whether they affect other receptors and if it actually makes people feel bad. We have shown that there really are many more heteromers in brains of the animals with experimental Parkinsons disease put on human therapy. Now, we want to use special animals that will enable us to see where heteromers are formed. Further, we made contacts with companies to make smaller proteins of our design that will break heteromers apart, which could then be used to prevent side effects of drugs. A part of the brain that is essential for manifestations of Parkinsons disease is called striatum. It is controlled by inflow of impulses that release a substance called dopamine. The main problem of Parkinsons disease is that the source of dopamine is lost. In therapy, L-DOPA serves to compensate for the lack of dopamine. Importantly, not all nerve cells in striatum are the same: there are two subtypes with contrasting properties, particularly how they react to dopamine. Nerve cells communicate and transmit information across structures called synapses. The sending nerve cell (presynaptic) relays the information by releasing chemical transmitters. The receiving cell (postsynaptic) detects that signal by specialized receptor proteins present on its body or fine extensions called dendrites. At the points of contact, dendrites have bud-like protrusions called dendritic spines that possess molecular machinery necessary to process the signal. Different types of dopamine receptors in striatal spines respond to dopamine differently, transmitting the signal in a specific way. Normally they stand apart, but can also aggregate into heteromers, which will transmit the signal in a different way. Among other specialized receptor proteins in spines are AMPA and NMDA receptors, responsible for nearly all of the fast communication between neurones in the brain. A lot is known about interplay between AMPA, NMDA and dopamine receptors, both in health and Parkinsons disease. For example, we know many ways how they affect each other to work more or less strongly or how the signals from one receptor make other receptors to incorporate into the synapse or completely leave it, thus modulating the overall synaptic function. Almost nothing is, however, known whether the same rules apply when dopamine receptor-heteromers are present, or about the consequences they may have in Parkinsons disease. This is important because it could tell us why patients brains make wrong calculations and send wrong signals that result in unwanted movements. To answer all these questions, we will use special animals that allow us to tell between subtypes of nerve cells in striatum, even allowing us to see when heteromers are present in them, because they become fluorescent. We will apply chemicals that cause Parkinsons disease-like condition in these animals. Then, using special methods, we will be able to track the fluorescent dopamine receptor heteromers and see them within the living cells. To achieve this, we will use a powerful confocal microscopy to see tiny details within nerve cells. We are good in applying this methodology, so we can minimize the number of animals used. Understanding what heteromers do and how they themselves are regulated will help us try to find the way to prevent them from overtaking control over striatum. This will help us devise a new strategy in fight against Parkinsons disease and the deleterious side effects of its treatment.

Loading University of Central Lancashire collaborators
Loading University of Central Lancashire collaborators