Orlando, FL, United States
Orlando, FL, United States

The University of Central Florida, commonly referred to as UCF, is a metropolitan public research university located in Orlando, Florida, United States. UCF is a member institution of the State University System of Florida, and it is the largest university in the United States by undergraduate enrollment and the country's second-largest by total enrollment.The university was founded by the Florida Legislature in 1963, and opened in 1968 as Florida Technological University, with the mission of providing personnel to support the growing U.S. space program at the Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on Florida's Space Coast. As the academic scope expanded beyond its original focus on engineering and technology, "Florida Tech" was renamed The University of Central Florida in 1978. Initial enrollment was only 1,948 students, as of 2014 enrollment consists of 60,810 students from over 140 countries, more than 40 states, Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C. The majority of the student population is located on the university's 1,415-acre main campus approximately 13 miles east-northeast of downtown Orlando and 55 miles south-southwest of Daytona Beach. The university offers over 200 degree options through twelve colleges and twelve satellite campuses throughout Central Florida. Since its founding, UCF has awarded almost 270,000 degrees, including 50,000 graduate, specialist and professional degrees, to over 230,000 alumni worldwide.UCF is a space-grant university and has made noted research contributions to optics, modeling and simulation, digital media, engineering and computer science, business administration, education, hospitality management, and the arts. It is considered an up-and-coming national university by U.S. News & World Report. UCF's official colors are black and gold and the university logo is a Pegasus, which "symbolizes the university’s vision of limitless possibilities." The university's intercollegiate sports teams, commonly known by their "UCF Knights" nickname and represented by mascot Knightro, compete in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I and the American Athletic Conference . Wikipedia.


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Patent
University of South Florida and University of Central Florida | Date: 2016-08-22

Electrospun nanofibrils and methods of preparing the same are provided. The electrospun nanofibrils comprise at least one polypeptide. A polypeptide can be dissolved in a solution, and the solution can be electrospun into a nanofibril. The solution can be added to a syringe or syringe pump, and an electric field can be applied to electrospin the at least one polypeptide.


Patent
University of South Florida and University of Central Florida | Date: 2016-08-22

Electrospun nanofibrils and methods of preparing the same are provided. The electrospun nanofibrils comprise at least one polypeptide. A polypeptide can be dissolved in a solution, and the solution can be electrospun into a nanofibril. The solution can be added to a syringe or syringe pump, and an electric field can be applied to electrospin the at least one polypeptide.


The present invention relates to, inter alia, a composition, a nanocomposite material, and a method for preparing the nanocomposite material. The nanocomposite material includes: a dielectric-silver nanocomposite material, the dielectric-silver nanocomposite material including a silver nanoparticle having a silver ion, and a dielectric material encapsulating the silver nanoparticle, where the silver ion chelates with a matrix of the dielectric material, and a surface plasmon band absorption of the dielectric-silver nanocomposite material lies outside a range of a visible region.


A thin film photonic structure that enables segregation of the effective absorption of the thin film and its intrinsic absorption while substantially eliminating bandwidth restrictions. In the form of an optical resonator, the structure includes two, multi-layer, aperiodic dielectric mirrors and a lossy, dielectric thin film and characterized by an intrinsic optical absorption over at least a one octave bandwidth. The two, multi-layer, aperiodic dielectric mirrors are characterized by a reflectivity amplitude that increases in-step with increasing wavelength over the at least one octave bandwidth. Upon a single incoherent beam of optical radiation having a spectrum over the at least one octave bandwidth incident on one side of the resonator structure, the lossy, dielectric thin film is characterized by an effective optical absorption over the at least one octave bandwidth that is greater than the intrinsic optical absorption over the at least one octave bandwidth.


Patent
University of Central Florida | Date: 2017-03-08

Embodiments of the present disclosure, in one aspect, relate to compositions including a copper/silica nanocomposite and a polymer, methods of making a composition, methods of using a composition, and the like. An embodiment of the present disclosure provides for a composition, among others, that includes: a copper/silica nanocomposite having a silica gel matrix that includes copper from one or more of copper nanopartides and copper ions, and a polymer selected from the group consisting of: polyvinylpyrrolidone, poryacrylamide, polylactic acid, polyglycolic acid, starch, a quaternary ammonium compound, and a combination thereof.


Patent
University of Central Florida | Date: 2017-02-10

A phase converting device capable of use over a broad wavelength range, which may be used for optical beam transformations and combining, conversion of resonator and waveguide modes, correction of aberrations in optical systems, and selection of photons with specific phase profile. This provides significant advantages in high power laser systems. Large-mode-area fibers can be used to provide higher incident powers than can be achieved by single-mode fibers, reducing the number of elements in a system necessary to achieve the desired output. The profiles of these LMA fiber modes can then be converted from the undesired modes into the desired mode while combing their total power into a single beam.


Patent
University of Central Florida | Date: 2017-05-24

Disclosed herein are compositions comprising a CT20 peptide and methods of using the disclosed compositions to treat cancers expressing chaperonin containing TCP (CCT).


Patent
University of Central Florida | Date: 2017-05-31

A computing device may include a memory and a processor cooperating therewith to receive a plurality of data streams from at least one data source to be relayed to different destinations on demand, where each data stream has a respective content identifier associated therewith. The processor may further determine when a first one of the data streams for a first destination shares identical data with a second one of the data streams for a second destination based upon the respective content identifiers associated therewith, and suspend relaying the second data stream to the second destination, and begin relaying the first data stream to the second destination, based upon the determination that the first and second data streams share identical data based upon the respective content identifiers associated therewith.


Kolpashchikov D.M.,University of Central Florida
Chemical Reviews | Year: 2010

The advances in the development of binary probe (BPs) and their improved selectivity in comparison with other hybridization-based techniques were studied. The first BP, which used Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), was suggested in 1988. A commonly adopted BP architecture employs the different affinity mode BPs. In this design one strand with a longer analyte binding arm binds tightly to the position abutting to the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) site. A second shorter analyte binding arm interrogates the SNP site by forming stable hybrid only with the perfectly matched sequence. The design of BPs employs self-assembly of more than two nucleic acid components. The same principle is adopted by DNA nanotechnology, which deals with constructing objects and functionally active assemblies from DNA molecules. Newly designed constructs based on aptamers, DNA junctions, and DNA enzymes offer an opportunity to utilize DNA probes that avoid direct covalent attachment with organic dyes.


Cuenya B.R.,University of Central Florida
Accounts of Chemical Research | Year: 2013

The field of heterogeneous catalysis has received a remarkable amount of interest from scientific and industrial perspectives because of its enormous impact on the world's economy: more than 90% of chemical manufacturing processes use catalysts. Catalysts are also essential in converting hazardous waste into less harmful products (car exhaust) and in generating power (fuel cells). Yet in all applications, it remains a challenge to design long lasting, highly active, selective, and environmentally friendly catalytic materials and processes, ideally based on Earth-abundant elements. In addition, the field needs more satisfactory experimental and theoretical approaches to minimize trial and error experiments in catalyst development.Nanocatalysis is one area that is developing rapidly. Researchers have reported striking novel catalytic properties, including greatly enhanced reactivities and selectivities, for nanocatalysts compared to their bulk counterparts. Fully harnessing the power of nanocatalysts requires detailed understanding of the origin of their enhanced performance at the atomic level, which in turn requires fundamental knowledge of the geometric and electronic structures of these complex systems.Numerous studies report on the properties that affect the catalytic performance of metal naoparticles (NPs) such as their size, interaction with their support, and their oxidation state. Much less research elucidates the role played by the NP shape. Complicating the analysis is that the preceding parameters are not independent, since NP size and support will affect which NP shapes are most stable. In addition, we must consider the dynamic nature of NP catalysts and their response to the environment, since the working state of a NP catalyst might not be the state in which the catalyst was prepared, but rather a structural and/or chemical isomer that responded to the particular reaction conditions. In order to address the complexity of real-world catalysts, researchers must undertake a synergistic approach, taking advantage of a variety of in situ and operando experimental methods. With the continuous shrinking of the scale of material systems, researchers require more sensitive experimental probes and computational approaches that work across a wide range of temperatures and chemical environments.This Account provides examples of recent advances in the preparation and characterization of NP catalysts with well-defined shapes. It discusses how to resolve the shape of nanometer-sized catalysts via a combination of microscopy and spectroscopic approaches, and how to follow their evolution in the course of a chemical reaction. Finally, it highlights that, for structure-sensitive reactions, controlled synthesis can tune catalytic properties such as the reaction rates, onset reaction temperature, activity, and selectivity. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

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