Cambridge, United Kingdom
Cambridge, United Kingdom

The University of Cambridge is a collegiate public research university in Cambridge, England. Founded in 1209, Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's third-oldest surviving university. It grew out of an association formed by scholars leaving the University of Oxford after a dispute with townsfolk; the two "ancient universities" have many common features and are often jointly referred to as "Oxbridge".Cambridge is formed from a variety of institutions which include 31 constituent colleges and over 100 academic departments organised into six Schools. The university occupies buildings throughout the town, many of which are of historical importance. The colleges are self-governing institutions founded as integral parts of the university. In the year ended 31 July 2014, the university had a total income of £1.51 billion, of which £371 million was from research grants and contracts. The central university and colleges have a combined endowment of around £4.9 billion, the largest of any university outside the United States. Cambridge is a member of many associations, and forms part of the "golden triangle" of English universities and Cambridge University Health Partners, an academic health science centre. The university is closely linked with the development of the high-tech business cluster known as "Silicon Fen".Students' learning involves lectures and laboratory sessions organised by departments, and supervisions provided by the colleges. The university operates eight arts, cultural, and scientific museums, including the Fitzwilliam Museum and a botanic garden. Cambridge's libraries hold a total of around 15 million books, 8 million of which are in Cambridge University Library which is a legal deposit library. Cambridge University Press, a department of the university, is the world's oldest publishing house and the second-largest university press in the world. Cambridge is regularly placed among the world's best universities in different university rankings. Beside academic studies, student life is centred on the colleges and numerous pan-university artistic activities, sports clubs and societies.Cambridge has many notable alumni, including several eminent mathematicians, scientists, politicians, and 90 Nobel laureates who have been affiliated with it. Throughout its history, the university has featured in literature and artistic works by numerous authors including Geoffrey Chaucer, E. M. Forster and C. P. Snow. Wikipedia.


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Noorani I.,University of Cambridge
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences | Year: 2017

For precise motor control,we must be able to not only initiate movements with appropriate timing, but also stop them. The importance of stopping tended to be overlooked in research in favour of studying movement itself, sowe are still only beginning to understand the neural basis of action cancellation. However, the development of models of behaviour in a wider range of tasks, and their relation to neural recordings has provided great insight into the underlying neurophysiology. Here we focus on developments of the linear approach to threshold with ergodic rate (LATER) model, relating these to complementary neurophysiological studies. It is tempting to consider that there may be a unifying mechanism for cancelling impending decisions in many contexts and how future efforts may clarify this possibility. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.


Patent
Glaxosmithkline and University of Cambridge | Date: 2017-04-19

The present invention relates to a method of treating pre-term labour with retosiban in subjects with conditions resulting in uterine overdistension including polyhydroamnios and multiple gestation. In another aspect, the invention relates to a method of preventing pre-term labour in subjects by the prophylactic administration of retosiban.


Patent
University of Cambridge | Date: 2016-12-28

A medical or surgical brace apparatus (100) for treating a neuropathy and protecting the course of a nerve in a limb of the body. The apparatus comprises a sleeve baselayer (1) formed to fit, or configured to conform to fit, a portion of the limb around a joint and to grip the limb, such that a portion of the sleeve baselayer is proximal to the joint and a portion is distal of the joint; and a deformable exoskeleton (3) configured to fit around the joint of a body such that a portion of the exoskeleton is proximal to the joint and a portion is distal of the joint, the exoskeleton comprising a spine (10) and a plurality of ribs (9) coupled to the spine; wherein the exoskeleton is coupled to the sleeve baselayer such that when the sleeve baselayer is worn fitted on the limb, the spine of the exoskeleton is aligned with, and arranged to follow, at least part of the course of the nerve, and the ribs are aligned transverse to the course of the nerve to bridge across the nerve to protect it.


Patent
University of Cambridge and Cambridge Enterprise Ltd | Date: 2015-07-16

A perineal prostate biopsy apparatus comprising a cannula for reaching a prostate gland of an adult human male through his perineum; and a coaxial needle comprising a hollow needle shaft having an open piercing tip at its distal end and being arranged to lie within the cannula so that the piercing tip protrudes from a distal end of the cannula; and, a stylet adapted to lie within the hollow needle shaft so that a distal tip of the stylet closes the piercing tip of the needle.


Al Olama A.A.,University of Cambridge
Nature Genetics | Year: 2014

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 76 variants associated with prostate cancer risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify additional susceptibility loci for this common cancer, we conducted a meta-analysis of >10 million SNPs in 43,303 prostate cancer cases and 43,737 controls from studies in populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry. Twenty-three new susceptibility loci were identified at association P < 5 × 10-8; 15 variants were identified among men of European ancestry, 7 were identified in multi-ancestry analyses and 1 was associated with early-onset prostate cancer. These 23 variants, in combination with known prostate cancer risk variants, explain 33% of the familial risk for this disease in European-ancestry populations. These findings provide new regions for investigation into the pathogenesis of prostate cancer and demonstrate the usefulness of combining ancestrally diverse populations to discover risk loci for disease. © 2014 Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited. All Rights Reserved.

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