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News Article | May 28, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Florida Pain Relief Group, a division of Physician Partners of America (PPOA), is proud to announce that Sheldon K. Cho, MD, has joined its Winter Haven practice. Dr. Cho’s practice focuses on comprehensive interventional pain management, a specialty that concentrates on minimally invasive techniques to treat and manage many types of pain. Dr. Cho is a board-certified anesthesiologist with subspecialty qualifications in interventional pain medicine. His other key areas of interest include cancer pain management, and various procedures under fluoroscopy including spinal cord stimulator trail and implant, spine kyphoplasty, RFA, facet joint block, and epidural block. He holds certifications from the American Board of Pain Management, the American Board of Anesthesiology and the American Board of Addiction Medicine. He is also a member of the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians, and the ASA with a subspecialty in pain management. He earned his Bachelor of Science degree from Seoul National University, South Korea, and his medical degree from Seoul National University College of Medicine. He completed his surgery internship and anesthesiology residency at Nassau University Medical Center, Long Island, NY. Cho then completed a Cancer Pain Medicine fellowship in New York, NY with Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center’s Anesthesiology Department. He continued his medical career as a clinical instructor at the University of Rochester Medical Center, specializing in anesthesia regional block and pain medicine. He later served as clinical assistant professor at the University of California San Francisco UCSF and then as medical director at Anapa Pain Clinic in Los Angeles, specializing in interventional pain management. Dr. Cho sees his career as an opportunity to change a patient’s quality of life with proper pain management and interventional techniques. His patients, even those facing complex chronic pain issues, are put at ease with his reassurance and communication skills. For an appointment with Dr. Cho at Florida Pain Relief Group - Winter Haven, 7518 Cypress Gardens Blvd., call (321) 735-6218. The clinic is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Same-day appointments are often available. Physician Partners of America (PPOA) is a national healthcare organization focused on strengthening the doctor-patient relationship and improving patient outcomes. Founded in 2013 and headquartered in Tampa, Fla., PPOA and its affiliates – Florida Pain Relief Group, Texas Pain Relief Group, Texas Foot and Ankle Group, Urgent Care of Texas and National Medical Practices – share a common vision of ensuring the wellbeing of patients and providing their physician partners the opportunity to focus on the practice of medicine. This model allows physicians to be physicians, caring about patients and their needs in the face of ever more complex administrative requirements. For more information about Physician Partners of America, visit http://www.physicianpartnersofamerica.com.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

Tregs, a type of immune cell, may be the key in promoting healthy hair growth in humans. Researchers from the University of California San Francisco have discovered that when Tregs, which are associated with controlling inflammation and directly trigger stem cells in the skin are absent, the stem cells are unable to regenerate hair follicles, leading to baldness. “Our hair follicles are constantly recycling: when a hair falls out, the whole hair follicle has to grow back,” Dr. Michael Rosenblum, Ph.D., an assistant professor of dermatology at UCSF and senior author on the new paper, said in a statement. “This has been thought to be an entirely stem cell-dependent process but it turns out Tregs are essential. “If you knock out this one immune cell type, hair just doesn't grow.” According to the researchers, defects in Tregs might be responsible for alopecia areata—an autoimmune disorder that causes hair loss and could play a role in other forms of baldness including male pattern baldness. The researchers developed a technique for temporarily removing Tregs from the skin and tested it on mice. However, when they shaved patches of hair from the mice to make observations of the affected skin they found that the hair never grew back. After conducting imaging experiments, the researchers discovered that Tregs has a close relationship with the stem cells that reside within hair follicles and allow them to regenerate. By removing the T cells from the skin, hair growth was blocked only if it was done within the first three days after shaving a patch of skin, when follicle regeneration would normally be activated. However, if Tregs is removed once the regeneration had already started there was no impact on hair regrowth. Tregs inform the rest of the immune system of the difference between harmful entities in the body and helpful ones. When the cells do not properly function, a person may develop allergies to harmless substances including peanut protein or cat dander or possibly suffer from autoimmune disorders where the immune system turns on the body’s own tissues. Tregs is native to the body’s lymph nodes but can live permanently in other tissues where they seem to have evolved to assist with local metabolic functions as well as playing their normal roles as an anti-inflammatory. The researchers discovered that Tregs trigger stem cell activation directly through a cell-to-cell communication system and found that Tregs in the skin express unusually high levels of communication with a signaling protein called Jagged 1, compared to Tregs elsewhere in the body. They also found that by removing Tregs with microscopic beads covered in the protein they were able to restore communicating signaling in the stem cells and successfully active follicle regeneration. “It's as if the skin stem cells and Tregs have co-evolved, so that the Tregs not only guard the stem cells against inflammation but also take part in their regenerative work,” Rosenblum said. "Now the stem cells rely on the Tregs completely to know when it's time to start regenerating." The researchers also theorized that Tregs could play a role in wound repair because the same stem cells are responsible for helping heal the skin after an injury.


News Article | March 23, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

The lungs play an important role in producing blood. Until this discovery, lungs were only associated with breathing, and the bone marrow was thought to be the one responsible for blood production. New research carried out at the University of California San Francisco has found that most of the platelets are actually produced in the lungs, and not in the bone marrow. The study was conducted on mice and it suggests that the lungs have a reservoir of blood stem cells that exist for backup, in case the bone marrow runs dry. The findings have been published in the journal Nature. Scientists have believed for a long time that the only cells responsible for blood production can be found in the bone marrow, as part of a process called hematopoiesis. This process supplies the body with the oxygen-carrying red blood cells that it needs in order to function normally, as well as the white blood cells that help the body against infection. Additionally, there are other components of blood production, such as the platelets, which are responsible with the blood clots formed after an injury to stop the bleeding. Megakaryocytes are the cells responsible for the production of platelets. While they have been found in lung tissue before, it was believed that they mainly live and carry out their platelets-producing process in the bone marrow. The research spotted the newly found function while they were imaging the lungs of living mice in an attempt to investigate the way platelets circulate through the lungs, interacting with the immune system. The mice had been modified so that their platelets were glowing and green. This process turned out to highlight a great number of megakaryocytes in the lungs, which was beyond the researchers's expectation. "When we discovered this massive population of megakaryocytes that appeared to be living in the lung, we realized we had to follow this up," noted Emma Lefrançais, co-first author of the study. Upon closer inspection, the team found that the megakaryocytes in the lungs were creating more than 10 million platelets an hour, this number accounting for more than a half of the total amount of platelets produced by a mouse. The population of platelets seems to be fed by megakaryocyte progenitor cells, as well as blood stem cells which live immediately outside of the lung vasculature. As part of the research, the team of scientists used video microscopy techniques to better analyze the population of platelets living in the lung area. "These results identify the lungs as a primary site of terminal platelet production and an organ with considerable hematopoietic potential," noted the research. The lungs seem to be responsible for a massive part of the work associated with blood production, while working with the bone marrow to do so. In an attempt to understand how the stem cells are carried from one place to another, the scientists transplanted lungs from normal animals into mice whose megakaryocytes were fluorescent. Shortly after the transplant, the "normal" lungs started to show glowing spots, which showed that megakaryocytes are only transported into the lungs, but they are born inside the bone marrow. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

SAN FRANCISCO, April 19, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Researchers found that an experimental mobile app from Posit Science can monitor mental health in ways that are both comparable and superior to current methods, according to a study just published. Mental health professionals currently tend to rely on having patients respond to standard questionnaires with multiple questions asking patients to self-rate and quantify their feelings on a scale or continuum. For example, the PHQ-9 and the GAD-7 are often used to quantify anxiety and depression – two of the most prevalent mental health problems. Such traditional assessments typically are administered infrequently, and rely on patients to remember how they felt at an earlier period of time. The ubiquity of mobile devices presents an opportunity for frequent self-administration of self-rating assessments. Researchers working at Posit Science developed the 12-question Immediate Mood Scale (IMS) to frequently measure and monitor self-rated mental health. The IMS is deployed on a standard mobile device, and uses icons and simple standardized questions on a regular basis to monitor how a patient feels over time. The IMS includes both anxiety and depression sub-scales. In a 110-person study, researchers found that results from the IMS highly correlated with results from the widely-used traditional depression and anxiety assessments, the PHQ-9 and GAD-7, and that the IMS was capable of predicting future performance in these measures. In addition, people could complete the IMS more quickly than traditional measures. Because the IMS is self-administered using a mobile device, users are able to report their mood much more frequently than they would typically using traditional assessments administered by a clinician. The researchers also reported that the study data showed that people with mild or moderate depression levels have greater variability in their mood than people with minimal or severe depression. Capturing these fluctuations offers new information not available through traditional measures, and could lead to more sensitive early detection of mood disorders. The study, published in the Journal for Medical Internet Research mhealth and uhealth, was conducted by researchers at Posit Science in collaboration with researchers at the University of California San Francisco and the University of California Berkeley. The study was funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), as part of a larger initiative focused on monitoring and improving the mental health of soldiers. “This simple study is a major first step forward in revolutionizing how we monitor and address brain health issues,” said Dr. Henry Mahncke, CEO of Posit Science. “It shows we can now harness mobile technology to provide individuals and their healthcare professionals with dynamic information about how people are feeling in real-time, which could open up many new treatments strategies, including earlier interventions.“ “We can imagine a near future in which you carry a brain health monitor on your phone, and in which providers, patients and caregivers can spot trends and early warning signs, and have tools, including training and other resources on that same phone, to intervene far in advance of negative events.” Posit Science is the leading provider of computerized brain training shown effective in multiple high quality studies.  Exercises and assessments in its BrainHQ online platform and app have shown benefits in more than 140 peer-reviewed science and medical journal articles (across varied populations), including significant gains from training as measured by standard assessments of cognition (e.g., speed, attention, memory), standard assessments of quality of life (e.g., mood, confidence, self-rated health), and real world activities (e.g., balance, driving, everyday activities). This new experimental app designed to monitor mood over time is being deployed in a DARPA-funded study investigating brain activity-based biomarkers for mood disorders, as well as the impact of BrainHQ training. Prior studies in healthy older adults showed a significant positive impact on mood from BrainHQ training.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

SAN FRANCISCO, April 19, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Researchers found that an experimental mobile app from Posit Science can monitor mental health in ways that are both comparable and superior to current methods, according to a study just published. Mental health professionals currently tend to rely on having patients respond to standard questionnaires with multiple questions asking patients to self-rate and quantify their feelings on a scale or continuum. For example, the PHQ-9 and the GAD-7 are often used to quantify anxiety and depression – two of the most prevalent mental health problems. Such traditional assessments typically are administered infrequently, and rely on patients to remember how they felt at an earlier period of time. The ubiquity of mobile devices presents an opportunity for frequent self-administration of self-rating assessments. Researchers working at Posit Science developed the 12-question Immediate Mood Scale (IMS) to frequently measure and monitor self-rated mental health. The IMS is deployed on a standard mobile device, and uses icons and simple standardized questions on a regular basis to monitor how a patient feels over time. The IMS includes both anxiety and depression sub-scales. In a 110-person study, researchers found that results from the IMS highly correlated with results from the widely-used traditional depression and anxiety assessments, the PHQ-9 and GAD-7, and that the IMS was capable of predicting future performance in these measures. In addition, people could complete the IMS more quickly than traditional measures. Because the IMS is self-administered using a mobile device, users are able to report their mood much more frequently than they would typically using traditional assessments administered by a clinician. The researchers also reported that the study data showed that people with mild or moderate depression levels have greater variability in their mood than people with minimal or severe depression. Capturing these fluctuations offers new information not available through traditional measures, and could lead to more sensitive early detection of mood disorders. The study, published in the Journal for Medical Internet Research mhealth and uhealth, was conducted by researchers at Posit Science in collaboration with researchers at the University of California San Francisco and the University of California Berkeley. The study was funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), as part of a larger initiative focused on monitoring and improving the mental health of soldiers. “This simple study is a major first step forward in revolutionizing how we monitor and address brain health issues,” said Dr. Henry Mahncke, CEO of Posit Science. “It shows we can now harness mobile technology to provide individuals and their healthcare professionals with dynamic information about how people are feeling in real-time, which could open up many new treatments strategies, including earlier interventions.“ “We can imagine a near future in which you carry a brain health monitor on your phone, and in which providers, patients and caregivers can spot trends and early warning signs, and have tools, including training and other resources on that same phone, to intervene far in advance of negative events.” Posit Science is the leading provider of computerized brain training shown effective in multiple high quality studies.  Exercises and assessments in its BrainHQ online platform and app have shown benefits in more than 140 peer-reviewed science and medical journal articles (across varied populations), including significant gains from training as measured by standard assessments of cognition (e.g., speed, attention, memory), standard assessments of quality of life (e.g., mood, confidence, self-rated health), and real world activities (e.g., balance, driving, everyday activities). This new experimental app designed to monitor mood over time is being deployed in a DARPA-funded study investigating brain activity-based biomarkers for mood disorders, as well as the impact of BrainHQ training. Prior studies in healthy older adults showed a significant positive impact on mood from BrainHQ training.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

SAN FRANCISCO, April 19, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Researchers found that an experimental mobile app from Posit Science can monitor mental health in ways that are both comparable and superior to current methods, according to a study just published. Mental health professionals currently tend to rely on having patients respond to standard questionnaires with multiple questions asking patients to self-rate and quantify their feelings on a scale or continuum. For example, the PHQ-9 and the GAD-7 are often used to quantify anxiety and depression – two of the most prevalent mental health problems. Such traditional assessments typically are administered infrequently, and rely on patients to remember how they felt at an earlier period of time. The ubiquity of mobile devices presents an opportunity for frequent self-administration of self-rating assessments. Researchers working at Posit Science developed the 12-question Immediate Mood Scale (IMS) to frequently measure and monitor self-rated mental health. The IMS is deployed on a standard mobile device, and uses icons and simple standardized questions on a regular basis to monitor how a patient feels over time. The IMS includes both anxiety and depression sub-scales. In a 110-person study, researchers found that results from the IMS highly correlated with results from the widely-used traditional depression and anxiety assessments, the PHQ-9 and GAD-7, and that the IMS was capable of predicting future performance in these measures. In addition, people could complete the IMS more quickly than traditional measures. Because the IMS is self-administered using a mobile device, users are able to report their mood much more frequently than they would typically using traditional assessments administered by a clinician. The researchers also reported that the study data showed that people with mild or moderate depression levels have greater variability in their mood than people with minimal or severe depression. Capturing these fluctuations offers new information not available through traditional measures, and could lead to more sensitive early detection of mood disorders. The study, published in the Journal for Medical Internet Research mhealth and uhealth, was conducted by researchers at Posit Science in collaboration with researchers at the University of California San Francisco and the University of California Berkeley. The study was funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), as part of a larger initiative focused on monitoring and improving the mental health of soldiers. “This simple study is a major first step forward in revolutionizing how we monitor and address brain health issues,” said Dr. Henry Mahncke, CEO of Posit Science. “It shows we can now harness mobile technology to provide individuals and their healthcare professionals with dynamic information about how people are feeling in real-time, which could open up many new treatments strategies, including earlier interventions.“ “We can imagine a near future in which you carry a brain health monitor on your phone, and in which providers, patients and caregivers can spot trends and early warning signs, and have tools, including training and other resources on that same phone, to intervene far in advance of negative events.” Posit Science is the leading provider of computerized brain training shown effective in multiple high quality studies.  Exercises and assessments in its BrainHQ online platform and app have shown benefits in more than 140 peer-reviewed science and medical journal articles (across varied populations), including significant gains from training as measured by standard assessments of cognition (e.g., speed, attention, memory), standard assessments of quality of life (e.g., mood, confidence, self-rated health), and real world activities (e.g., balance, driving, everyday activities). This new experimental app designed to monitor mood over time is being deployed in a DARPA-funded study investigating brain activity-based biomarkers for mood disorders, as well as the impact of BrainHQ training. Prior studies in healthy older adults showed a significant positive impact on mood from BrainHQ training.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

SAN FRANCISCO, April 19, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Researchers found that an experimental mobile app from Posit Science can monitor mental health in ways that are both comparable and superior to current methods, according to a study just published. Mental health professionals currently tend to rely on having patients respond to standard questionnaires with multiple questions asking patients to self-rate and quantify their feelings on a scale or continuum. For example, the PHQ-9 and the GAD-7 are often used to quantify anxiety and depression – two of the most prevalent mental health problems. Such traditional assessments typically are administered infrequently, and rely on patients to remember how they felt at an earlier period of time. The ubiquity of mobile devices presents an opportunity for frequent self-administration of self-rating assessments. Researchers working at Posit Science developed the 12-question Immediate Mood Scale (IMS) to frequently measure and monitor self-rated mental health. The IMS is deployed on a standard mobile device, and uses icons and simple standardized questions on a regular basis to monitor how a patient feels over time. The IMS includes both anxiety and depression sub-scales. In a 110-person study, researchers found that results from the IMS highly correlated with results from the widely-used traditional depression and anxiety assessments, the PHQ-9 and GAD-7, and that the IMS was capable of predicting future performance in these measures. In addition, people could complete the IMS more quickly than traditional measures. Because the IMS is self-administered using a mobile device, users are able to report their mood much more frequently than they would typically using traditional assessments administered by a clinician. The researchers also reported that the study data showed that people with mild or moderate depression levels have greater variability in their mood than people with minimal or severe depression. Capturing these fluctuations offers new information not available through traditional measures, and could lead to more sensitive early detection of mood disorders. The study, published in the Journal for Medical Internet Research mhealth and uhealth, was conducted by researchers at Posit Science in collaboration with researchers at the University of California San Francisco and the University of California Berkeley. The study was funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), as part of a larger initiative focused on monitoring and improving the mental health of soldiers. “This simple study is a major first step forward in revolutionizing how we monitor and address brain health issues,” said Dr. Henry Mahncke, CEO of Posit Science. “It shows we can now harness mobile technology to provide individuals and their healthcare professionals with dynamic information about how people are feeling in real-time, which could open up many new treatments strategies, including earlier interventions.“ “We can imagine a near future in which you carry a brain health monitor on your phone, and in which providers, patients and caregivers can spot trends and early warning signs, and have tools, including training and other resources on that same phone, to intervene far in advance of negative events.” Posit Science is the leading provider of computerized brain training shown effective in multiple high quality studies.  Exercises and assessments in its BrainHQ online platform and app have shown benefits in more than 140 peer-reviewed science and medical journal articles (across varied populations), including significant gains from training as measured by standard assessments of cognition (e.g., speed, attention, memory), standard assessments of quality of life (e.g., mood, confidence, self-rated health), and real world activities (e.g., balance, driving, everyday activities). This new experimental app designed to monitor mood over time is being deployed in a DARPA-funded study investigating brain activity-based biomarkers for mood disorders, as well as the impact of BrainHQ training. Prior studies in healthy older adults showed a significant positive impact on mood from BrainHQ training.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

SAN FRANCISCO, April 19, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Researchers found that an experimental mobile app from Posit Science can monitor mental health in ways that are both comparable and superior to current methods, according to a study just published. Mental health professionals currently tend to rely on having patients respond to standard questionnaires with multiple questions asking patients to self-rate and quantify their feelings on a scale or continuum. For example, the PHQ-9 and the GAD-7 are often used to quantify anxiety and depression – two of the most prevalent mental health problems. Such traditional assessments typically are administered infrequently, and rely on patients to remember how they felt at an earlier period of time. The ubiquity of mobile devices presents an opportunity for frequent self-administration of self-rating assessments. Researchers working at Posit Science developed the 12-question Immediate Mood Scale (IMS) to frequently measure and monitor self-rated mental health. The IMS is deployed on a standard mobile device, and uses icons and simple standardized questions on a regular basis to monitor how a patient feels over time. The IMS includes both anxiety and depression sub-scales. In a 110-person study, researchers found that results from the IMS highly correlated with results from the widely-used traditional depression and anxiety assessments, the PHQ-9 and GAD-7, and that the IMS was capable of predicting future performance in these measures. In addition, people could complete the IMS more quickly than traditional measures. Because the IMS is self-administered using a mobile device, users are able to report their mood much more frequently than they would typically using traditional assessments administered by a clinician. The researchers also reported that the study data showed that people with mild or moderate depression levels have greater variability in their mood than people with minimal or severe depression. Capturing these fluctuations offers new information not available through traditional measures, and could lead to more sensitive early detection of mood disorders. The study, published in the Journal for Medical Internet Research mhealth and uhealth, was conducted by researchers at Posit Science in collaboration with researchers at the University of California San Francisco and the University of California Berkeley. The study was funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), as part of a larger initiative focused on monitoring and improving the mental health of soldiers. “This simple study is a major first step forward in revolutionizing how we monitor and address brain health issues,” said Dr. Henry Mahncke, CEO of Posit Science. “It shows we can now harness mobile technology to provide individuals and their healthcare professionals with dynamic information about how people are feeling in real-time, which could open up many new treatments strategies, including earlier interventions.“ “We can imagine a near future in which you carry a brain health monitor on your phone, and in which providers, patients and caregivers can spot trends and early warning signs, and have tools, including training and other resources on that same phone, to intervene far in advance of negative events.” Posit Science is the leading provider of computerized brain training shown effective in multiple high quality studies.  Exercises and assessments in its BrainHQ online platform and app have shown benefits in more than 140 peer-reviewed science and medical journal articles (across varied populations), including significant gains from training as measured by standard assessments of cognition (e.g., speed, attention, memory), standard assessments of quality of life (e.g., mood, confidence, self-rated health), and real world activities (e.g., balance, driving, everyday activities). This new experimental app designed to monitor mood over time is being deployed in a DARPA-funded study investigating brain activity-based biomarkers for mood disorders, as well as the impact of BrainHQ training. Prior studies in healthy older adults showed a significant positive impact on mood from BrainHQ training.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Gary loved and took great joy in his family. He and his wife, Kathleen "Cab" Rogers, were married for 52 years and watched their four sons Andy, Matt, Brian and John, marry and have children of their own. His eleven grandchildren will dearly miss their Bwana, the name they called him which means 'headman' in Swahili. Gary is also survived by his mother, Virginia, and brothers, Don and Jim. "The joy in life is in the journey." Gary Rogers passed away doing what he loved, playing tennis at his home in Oakland, California, on May 2, 2017. Gary was the chairman and CEO of Oakland-based Dreyer's Grand Ice Cream, Inc., for 30 years. He also served as a former chairman of Safeway Inc., the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, and Levi Strauss & Co. Gary was born in Stockton, California, in 1942 and spent his youth in Marin County. A distinguished Eagle Scout, he attributed much of his personal character to his experiences as a Boy Scout, as an oarsman on the crew at UC Berkeley, and his family's deeply-held values of integrity and honor. In 1963, he graduated with a degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley. He was named UC Berkeley All University Athlete that same year and rowed in the 1964 U.S. Olympic Trials. In the summer of 1964, Gary married Kathleen "Cab" Tuck, whom he met while working on staff at the UC Berkeley Alumni Association Tahoe Alumni Center. Gary spent the mid-sixties serving a two-year term in the Army as a Lieutenant in the Air Defense Artillery based on Mount Tamalpais. In 1968, he earned his MBA from Harvard Business School and was honored as a George F. Baker Scholar. At 34, Gary and his business partner William F. "Rick" Cronk purchased Dreyer's Grand Ice Cream a small regional ice cream company based in Oakland, California. For the next 30 years, Gary served as Chairman and CEO of Dreyer's, and together with Rick, built Dreyer's into the best-selling ice cream company in the United States. Gary often said the building of the Dreyer's corporate culture was "the best thing we ever did at the company." It was a culture based on empowerment; respecting and trusting in the abilities of each individual. Every person felt a personal responsibility to "make a difference." It made Dreyer's a coveted place to work. In 2002, Dreyer's was sold to Nestle. Gary also served as Chairman of Levi Strauss & Co., the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, and Safeway Inc. He was also a director of Shorenstein Properties, Stanislaus Food Products and the University of California San Francisco Medical Center. He founded and chaired the Oakland Dialogue, a group of East Bay political, educational, and business leaders. Gary was inducted into the Bay Area Business Hall of Fame, was named Harvard Business School Business Leader of the Year, and received the Wharton Business School Joseph Wharton Award. He has also received the University of California Bear of the Year Award. Gary was the primary benefactor of the University of California Cal Crew Forever Endowment Fund, the T. Gary Rogers Rowing Center, and the California Rowing Club for elite post-graduate oarsmen.  He was also a member of the High Performance Olympic Committee of U.S. Rowing. He held numerous public service leadership positions and was the benefactor of the Rogers Family Foundation, which supports the University of California, education and activities for youth in Oakland and the East Bay, Bay Area hospitals, and bioscience research and innovation organizations. Gary lived "The Spirit of Adventure." His passion for travel took him all over the world – to both the North and South Poles, the plains of the Serengeti, and the Amazon jungle. He sought out challenges and fought fiercely to overcome them, living by the motto, "There is no such thing as can't; there is only won't." Gary loved and took great joy in his family. He and his wife, Kathleen "Cab" Rogers were married for 52 years and they watched their four sons Andy, Matt, Brian and John, marry and have children of their own. His eleven grandchildren will dearly miss their Bwana, the name they called him which means 'headman' in Swahili. Gary is also survived by his mother, Virginia, and brothers, Don and Jim. "The joy in life is in the journey." Gary is survived by his wife, Kathleen "Cab" Rogers; mother Virginia Rogers (age 102); brothers Don (Judy) and Jim (Sandy) Rogers; sons Andy Rogers (Janine), Matt Rogers (Amy), Brian Rogers (Katie), and John Rogers (Lynnsay); and eleven grandchildren. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that Gary's legacy be recognized through donation to these worthy organizations: An outdoor memorial service will be held at the T. Gary Rogers Rowing Center on Monday, May 15 at 11:00 AM. T. Gary Rogers Rowing Center, 2999 Glascock St., Oakland, California. More information will be available on the Rogers Family Foundation website: www.rogersfoundation.org To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/rogers-family-statement-on-the-passing-of-t-gary-rogers-300451801.html


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

CME Outfitters (CMEO) hosted a live symposium on immunosuppression entitled, The Immunosuppression Balancing Act: Preserving Long-Term Allograft Function for Optimal Patient Outcomes, on Tuesday, May 2, 2017, as part of a national conference for clinicians in transplant medicine being held in Chicago, IL. In addition to the live symposium, available to attendees of the conference, CMEO offered a livestream broadcast for the duration of the event for those unable to attend the live meeting who wished to participate. Developing strategies to extend the life and functionality of every allograft is the current goal of transplant medicine and immunology and, while outcomes of renal and liver transplantation have improved, allograft loss continues to be a significant problem associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and costs. Education to clinicians about evaluating all aspects of post-transplant care, including regular monitoring, can lead to a decrease in the dysfunction or loss of allografts. Additionally, improving communication between the patient and clinician can encourage adherence to treatment and careful monitoring of medication levels to maintain quality of life. Moderator Flavio G. Vincenti, MD (Professor of Clinical Medicine & Surgery; Medical Director, Kidney-Pancreas Program, University of California San Francisco) was joined by John R. Lake, MD (Professor of Medicine & Surgery, University of Minnesota Medical School; Executive Medical Director, Solid Organ Transplantation Program, University of Minnesota Medical Center) for this 75-minute event to present the latest evidence on antibody-mediated complications, regular monitoring strategies to optimize immunosuppression, and ways to engage patients to promote adherence and improve overall outcomes. CMEO integrated the patient perspective into the symposium design to highlight the challenges and opportunities to coordinating care with patients. About CME Outfitters, LLC CME Outfitters develops and distributes live, recorded and web-based, outcomes- and evidence-based educational activities to thousands of clinicians each year and offers expert accreditation and outcome services for non-accredited organizations. CME Outfitters focuses on delivering education to specialty audiences, with strong expertise in neuroscience, inflammatory, infectious, and autoimmune diseases, and cardiovascular disease. For a complete list of certified activities and more information, visit http://www.cmeoutfitters.com or call 877.CME.PROS (877.263.7767).

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