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News Article | May 29, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

The inaugural edition of INBA-LLM India Fairs was a highly successful two city event series being produced by Indian National Bar Association (INBA). -- The inaugural edition ofwas a highly successful two city event series being produced by Indian National Bar Association (INBA). These were held on 03of May, 2017 at Hotel Shangri-La Eros, New Delhi and on 05of May, 2017 at Hotel Shangri-La, Bangalore.These landmark two city fairs were aimed at providing the perfect platform for aspiring Indian law students on one hand, and globally reputed law schools and universities from USA, Europe, New Zealand and Australia to meet and explore mutually and academically beneficial avenues of learning and growth.The following law schools were represented at these fairs: :·         Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law          USA·         The University of  Western Australia          Australia·         UC Hastings College of The Law          USA·         American University Washington College of Law          USA·         Birmingham Law School          United Kingdom·         University Of California School of Law          USA·         UC Davis School of Law          USA·         The University of New South Wales          Australia·         Auckland Law School          New Zealand·         Queen Mary University of London          United Kingdom·         Australian National University          Australia·         The Graduate Institute          Switzerland·         University  Of  Southampton          United Kingdom·         Manchester Metropolitan Law School          United Kingdom·         University Of  Maine School Of  Law          USAA concurrent seminar was also organized giving participating overseas schools an opportunity to present and demonstrate their sterling LLM syllabi and streams, details of scholarships and grants, campus amenities, and details of their illustrious faculty and acclaimed programs to a house full of law students and legal professionals.Speaking on the sidelines of the fair, Kaviraj Singh, Secretary General, Indian National Bar Association (INBA) said "This is a platform for Indian law students and law universities across the globe to come together on the same platform. The fair has been of great help to the students in India as it is being held in cooperation with leading foreign universities"Dr. B. Bala Bhaskar, Joint Secretary, Ministry of External Affairs, Govt. of India and Mr. Anup Kumar Varshney, Joint Secretary & Legislative Counsel, Ministry of Law & Justice, Govt. of India were among the leading personalities who visited the fair in New Delhi and spent quality time with the participants. In the Bangalore edition, the Keynote Address was delivered by Mr.Senior Advocate, High Court of Karnataka and Additional Advocate General, Government of Karnataka. These two events also witnessed panel discussions on the most contemporary topics relating to global education.The event was attended in huge numbers by students from various law disciplines from across the northern and southern regions of the country. At times, they were also accompanied by their senior faculty members – thus paving way for healthy deliberations.State Bank of India – India's largest PSU Bank also contributed to the success of this event by disseminating valuable information about various student loan options to visitors.The last presentation was given by Ms. Samudra Kugel, Chief Officer, South Asia Law Initiatives, Center for International Education from University of California Davis tells the students about the US Law and how Indian Law study is different from US Law.Mr. S. Devishankar in his closing remarks thanked all the International Law Schools, Indian Law Colleges, students, Panelists and partners for being a part of this Fair and for their valuable support to making this event successful.The Fair ended with overseas law schools participants expressing their satisfaction with the quality turnout and the various networking opportunities. Good feedback from all the participants and appreciated to organizing this LLM Fair and also express their willingness to be a part of the Fair in near future. A huge applause was given to the Law Interns who worked round the Clock to make this event a Success.


"We are very pleased to welcome Mohamad to ShangPharma Innovation. He is a highly successful professional with broad transaction expertise in all aspects of business and corporate development in the biopharmaceutical industry — financial, investor, licensing, strategic, and more," said Walter H. Moos, CEO of SPI. Earlier in his career, Mohamad was a researcher at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University Medical School, and Systemix. He received his undergraduate and graduate training in genetics and biological sciences at the University of California Davis and Stanford University and an MBA from Cornell University. Mohamad will aid in the achievement of key objectives at SPI which include facilitating and accelerating drug discovery with a focus on therapeutics and platform technologies, and also offering funding, other support, and incubator space to entrepreneurial partners. These partnerships include proof-of-concept research at academic and major medical centers, research institutes, and early-stage start-ups with the goal of achieving industry collaborations and/or venture capital financing. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/shangpharma-innovation-appoints-mohamad-moghadam-tabrizi-as-senior-vice-president-of-business-development-300462926.html


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

In this Sept. 14, 2014 photo, honeybees work in a hive located in an apple grove at Hartland Orchard, a family farm near the the Blue Ridge Mountains in Markham, Va. A U.S. survey of beekeepers released on Thursday, May 25, 2017 found improvements in the outlook for troubled honeybees. Winter losses were at the lowest levels in more than a decade with only 21 percent of the colonies dying.(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) WASHINGTON (AP) — There's a glimmer of hope for America's ailing honeybees as winter losses were the lowest in more than a decade, according to a U.S. survey of beekeepers released Thursday. Beekeepers lost 21 percent of their colonies over last winter, the annual Bee Informed Partnership survey found. That's the lowest winter loss level since the survey started in 2006 and an improvement from nearly 27 percent the winter before. The U.S. government has set a goal of keeping losses under 15 percent in the winter. "It's good news in that the numbers are down, but it's certainly not a good picture," said survey director Dennis vanEngelsdorp. "It's gone from horrible to bad." Reduction in varroa mites, a lethal parasite, is likely the main cause of the improvement, said vanEnglesdorp, a University of Maryland entomologist. He credited the reduction in the parasite to a new product to fight the mite and better weather for pesticide use. The 10-year average for winter losses is 28.4 percent. "We would of course all love it if the trend continues, but there are so many factors playing a role in colony health," said bee expert Elina Lastro Nino at the University of California Davis, who wasn't part of the survey. "I am glad to see this, but wouldn't celebrate too much yet." For more than a decade, bees and other pollinators have been rapidly declining with scientists blaming a mix of parasites, disease, pesticides and poor nutrition. While usually hive losses are worst in the winter, they occur year round. The survey found yearly losses also down, but not quite to record levels. About one third of the honey bee colonies that were around in April 2016 were dead a year later, the survey found. That's better than the year before when the annual loss rate was more than 40 percent. The survey, originally started by the U.S. government and now run by a nonprofit, is based on information from nearly 5,000 beekeepers who manage more than 360,000 colonies. University of Montana's Jerry Bromenshenk said the study gives too much weight to backyard beekeepers rather than commercial beekeepers. Follow Seth Borenstein on Twitter: @borenbears . His work can be found here .


SAN FRANCISCO, May 24, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- ShangPharma Innovation (SPI) today announced the appointment of Mohamad Moghadam-Tabrizi to the position of Senior Vice President, Business Development. Mr. Tabrizi previously served in senior and executive level positions in corporate business development at Nektar, investor relations and corporate communications at Depomed, healthcare investment banking at Needham, RBC Capital Markets, and Merrill Lynch, and as CFO at Alacritas (Omnicare). In these roles, Mohamad led numerous deals spanning the range of royalty monetization, out-licensing and in-licensing, manufacturing and supply, collaborations and partnerships, mergers and acquisitions, and public and private financings including roadshows and venture investments. "We are very pleased to welcome Mohamad to ShangPharma Innovation. He is a highly successful professional with broad transaction expertise in all aspects of business and corporate development in the biopharmaceutical industry — financial, investor, licensing, strategic, and more," said Walter H. Moos, CEO of SPI. Earlier in his career, Mohamad was a researcher at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University Medical School, and Systemix. He received his undergraduate and graduate training in genetics and biological sciences at the University of California Davis and Stanford University and an MBA from Cornell University. Mohamad will aid in the achievement of key objectives at SPI which include facilitating and accelerating drug discovery with a focus on therapeutics and platform technologies, and also offering funding, other support, and incubator space to entrepreneurial partners. These partnerships include proof-of-concept research at academic and major medical centers, research institutes, and early-stage start-ups with the goal of achieving industry collaborations and/or venture capital financing. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/shangpharma-innovation-appoints-mohamad-moghadam-tabrizi-as-senior-vice-president-of-business-development-300462926.html


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: hosted2.ap.org

Survey finds US honeybee losses improve from horrible to bad (AP) — There's a glimmer of hope for America's ailing honeybees as winter losses were the lowest in more than a decade, according to a U.S. survey of beekeepers released Thursday. Beekeepers lost 21 percent of their colonies over last winter, the annual Bee Informed Partnership survey found. That's the lowest winter loss level since the survey started in 2006 and an improvement from nearly 27 percent the winter before. The U.S. government has set a goal of keeping losses under 15 percent in the winter. "It's good news in that the numbers are down, but it's certainly not a good picture," said survey director Dennis vanEngelsdorp. "It's gone from horrible to bad." Reduction in varroa mites, a lethal parasite, is likely the main cause of the improvement, said vanEnglesdorp, a University of Maryland entomologist. He credited the reduction in the parasite to a new product to fight the mite and better weather for pesticide use. The 10-year average for winter losses is 28.4 percent. "We would of course all love it if the trend continues, but there are so many factors playing a role in colony health," said bee expert Elina Lastro Nino at the University of California Davis, who wasn't part of the survey. "I am glad to see this, but wouldn't celebrate too much yet." For more than a decade, bees and other pollinators have been rapidly declining with scientists blaming a mix of parasites, disease, pesticides and poor nutrition. While usually hive losses are worst in the winter, they occur year round. The survey found yearly losses also down, but not quite to record levels. About one third of the honey bee colonies that were around in April 2016 were dead a year later, the survey found. That's better than the year before when the annual loss rate was more than 40 percent. The survey, originally started by the U.S. government and now run by a nonprofit, is based on information from nearly 5,000 beekeepers who manage more than 360,000 colonies. University of Montana's Jerry Bromenshenk said the study gives too much weight to backyard beekeepers rather than commercial beekeepers. Follow Seth Borenstein on Twitter: @borenbears . His work can be found here .


News Article | May 29, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Larger, heavier wheat kernels -- that's how associate professor Wanlong Li of the SDSU Department of Biology and Microbiology seeks to increase wheat production. Through a three-year, $930,000 U.S. Department of Agriculture grant, Li is collaborating with Bing Yang, an associate professor in genetics, development and cell biology at Iowa State, to increase wheat grain size and weight using a precise gene-editing tool known as CRISPR/Cas9. South Dakota State is one of seven universities nationwide to receive funding to develop new wheat varieties as part of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture's International Wheat Yield Partnership (IWYP) Program. The program supports the G20's Wheat Initiative, which seeks to enhance the genetics related to yield and develop varieties adapted to different regions and environmental conditions. The goal of IWYP, which was formed in 2014, is to increase wheat yields by 50 percent in 20 years. Currently, the yearly yield gain is less than 1 percent, but to meet the WYYP goal wheat yields must increase 1.7 percent per year. "It's a quantum leap," he said. "We need a lot of work to reach this." Humans consume more than 500 million tons of wheat per year, according to Li. However, United States wheat production is decreasing, because farmers can make more money growing other crops. He hopes that increasing the yield potential will make wheat more profitable. First, the researchers will identify genes that control grain size and weight in bread wheat using the rice genome as a model. The CRISPR editing tool allows the researchers to knockout each negatively regulating gene and thus study its function, according to Li. "CRISPR is both fast and precise," he added. "It can produce very accurate mutations." This technique will be used to create 30 constructs that target 20 genes that negatively impact wheat grain size and weight. From these, the University of California Davis Plant Transformation Facility, through a service contract, will produce 150 first-generation transgenic plants and the SDSU researchers will then identify which ones yield larger seeds. One graduate student and a research assistant will work on the project. "The end products are not genetically modified organisms," Li emphasized. "When we transfer one of the CRISPR genes to wheat, it's transgenic. That then produces a mutation in a different genomic region. When the plants are then self-pollinated or backcrossed, the transgene and the mutation are separated." The researchers then screen the plants to select those that carry the desired mutations. "This is null transgenic," Li said, noting USDA has approved this process in other organisms. Yang used this technique to develop bacterial blight-resistant rice. As part of the project, the researchers will also transfer the mutations into durum wheat. Ultimately, these yield-increasing mutations, along with the markers to identify the traits, can be transferred to spring and winter wheat.


News Article | May 29, 2017
Site: www.winespectator.com

He co-founded Saintsbury and was a leader in California's pursuit of Burgundian grape greatness Napa Valley in the 1970s was still gaining fame with Cabernet Sauvignon when Richard Ward broke from the pack. He and David Graves took a chance on Pinot Noir and Chardonnay from Carneros. Their vision—and their winery Saintsbury—came into focus just ahead of a wave of interest in those two grapes and that region. Ward died May 27 at age 67 from complications related to a bone marrow transplant. He had been battling Myelodysplastic Syndrome, a blood cancer he developed after receiving radiation for prostate cancer, which he fought for 13 years. Ward and Graves founded Saintsbury, named for English writer and wine connoisseur George Saintsbury, in 1981. Within the decade they had Carneros on a new path, catapulting the region in southern Napa Valley to the front of a growing American interest in the wines of Burgundy. "We decided to make Pinot Noir, which was not a very popular variety then. It was a great challenge, but we felt if we could be successful we could be a bigger fish in a small pound,” said Ward, in a history compiled by the winery. The two also took a light-hearted spirit with wine, once referring to their experience as "Beaune in the U.S.A." Ward was born on Feb. 5, 1950, in Camp Lejeune, N.C., and grew up there and in Washington D.C. He earned a degree in structural engineering from Tufts University before moving to California to study enology at the University of California Davis. That's where he met Graves. The two decided to go into business together. Ward appeared headed toward a career with Cabernet until he and Graves tasted the potential of Carneros Pinot from Heiniman Vineyard on the Sonoma side of Carneros. They also checked out coastal sites from San Luis Obispo to Santa Barbara. "We were very impressed with what Sanford and Benedict were doing with cool climate fruit [in Santa Ynez Valley]," Graves told Wine Spectator. That sparked their interest. "Even then, while we could not have known the trajectory Pinot Noir would take, Cabernet Sauvignon had already assumed its place at the top of the heap," said Graves. "We are both prone to the attraction to what we are told is difficult: The road less travelled, in the words of Robert Frost. And the 1972 Burgundies were on the market, and I remember we were especially taken with the wines of Domaine Dujac." Saintsbury formed a partnership with key Carneros growers, which gave them a steady supply of top quality grapes. Ward and Graves broadened their appeal by introducing a lighter-styled, less-expensive Pinot called Garnet, starting in 1983, which proved a big seller. They expanded into numerous single vineyard bottlings from a handful of vineyards. In 2011, they sold Garnet to refocus on higher-end wines. When not at the winery, Ward was an avid gardener, reader and someone with an encyclopedic range of knowledge, loving to chat with friends on everything from world history, architecture, politics and chicken breeds. He earned the nickname Dr. Dick for his detailed explanations, and he wore it with pride. Ward is survived by his wife Linda Reiff; his children Philippa and Trent Ward of London; his mother Ella Meadows Giesey; and his sisters Normanide Fischer and Heidi Ravenel. Donations in his name can be sent to the National Bone Marrow Registry or by donating blood or platelets at a local blood bank.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A study led by ecologists at UC Berkeley has found significant flaws in the research used to challenge the U.S. Forest Service plan to restore Sierra Nevada forests to less dense, and less fire-prone, environments. Until recently, the consensus among forest ecologists was that before European settlers arrived in the Sierra, the forests were mostly open conifer forests dominated by big trees and low-to-moderately severe fires every eight to 12 years. The Forest Service recently released a plan to restore the range's forests back to this state following decades of fire suppression and timber harvesting regulations, which have created dense, fire-prone forests. But recent studies, using a newly developed methodology, have argued that the Sierra Nevada was actually a more dense forest than the consensus view. These new studies were used to back a lawsuit to stop the agency's plan to restore Sierra forests following the 2013 Rim Fire. The Berkeley study refutes the conclusions of these studies and identifies flaws in their methods. "We went through the data and showed that, in every case, this method estimated that the density of trees was two to three times higher than was the reality," said Carrie Levine, a Ph.D. student of forest ecology at Berkeley and lead author of the study. The study was recently published online in the journal Ecological Applications. Researchers from Harvard Forest, the USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station, the University of Montana, Utah State University, the University of California Davis, and the USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Region were also involved in the study. When the US was divvying up land in the West in the late-19th and early-20th centuries, the General Land Office performed surveys so that the land could be parceled and sold. Land was divided into square-mile blocks, with markers used to indicate every corner point. In case a marker was moved, so-called "witness trees" near the stake were identified as reference points. The result of this data is a grid survey of the entire American West. Using this historic field data, two ecologists at the University of Wyoming, Mark Williams and William Baker, developed a method that claims to calculate the area that a tree occupies, which is then used to calculate a forest's density. This approach is based on the observation that trees create space to keep other trees from cramming next to them, and that this space correlates to a tree's species and size. To assess the validity of this area-based method of density estimation in the Sierra Nevada, Levine and her co-authors assembled data from plots of mapped trees across the Sierra and Baja California, Mexico. They tested the performance of the area-based method in these mapped stands where the true density was known. Levine and colleagues found that the area-based method has two basic flaws when applied to the Sierra, the most notable being an inability to actually predict the area that a tree occupies based on its species and size due to a weak relationship between these variables. The other flaw was a failure to account for differences in the number of trees sampled at each corner. The methodological flaws led to an inflated number of trees estimated in a pre-European Sierra Nevada forest, Levine and colleagues argue. "We have a mapped plot where every tree is measured, so we know the true density," Levine said. The study is important not only for the current state of the Sierra Nevada, but for its future. "As climate changes, we want to have an accurate understanding of the past. This allows us to manage for forests that are resilient to the changes we're expecting in the future," Levine said.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

A breakthrough envelope sealing technology that promises to transform the way home and commercial buildings are constructed is entering advanced field trials – the final process toward general market introduction. The new technology, called AeroBarrier™, is being showcased this week at the RESNET Building Performance Conference, where Aeroseal LLC, the sole owner of the technology, is signing up new partners interested in implementing AeroBarrier at new construction job sites. AeroBarrier offers a first-of-its-kind approach to effectively sealing the entire building envelope using an aerosolized sealing system that simultaneously measures and seals building envelope leaks in homes, multi-family apartments or commercial buildings. The computerized AeroBarrier process provides a faster, less expensive way to seal the building envelope and quickly meet even the most stringent building specifications for envelope tightness. The system automatically delivers a final certifiable report at the end of the sealing process, guaranteeing results. As part of the technology’s final analysis before general market introduction, Aeroseal LLC is forming partnerships with builders, developers, architects and contractors interested in using the breakthrough technology to build energy efficient structures. All new partners will have the unique advantage of being among the first to gain expertise in applying the technology and the first to market it to their customer base. “AeroBarrier represents a potential sea change in the way homes and buildings are constructed,” said Mark Modera, Principal Inventor, Sempra Energy chair in energy efficiency, professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Director of the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis. “With AeroBarrier, envelope sealing – a routine that is typically a long, expensive, labor-intensive process -- can now be completed in a matter of hours.” For the past 4 years and under grants provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, a team of researchers at the Western Cooling Efficiency Center (WCEC), University of California, Davis have been working to refine and finalize the development of the AeroBarrier technology, a process that has resulted in new worldwide patents. “AeroBarrier builds upon the aeroseal duct sealing technology that has revolutionized the way we seal duct systems,” said Amit Gupta, president and CEO of Aeroseal LLC. “Now, imagine a similar computerized approach to envelope sealing that, in one-step, can quickly seal all the leaks around windows, drywall, electrical outlets, canned lighting and other areas where leaks affect overall building performance.” The technology has already been field tested under various circumstances including a U.S. Department of Energy building project where AeroBarrier was demonstrated to be highly effective at sealing the envelope of newly constructed multifamily buildings and single family homes across the country. Becoming An AeroBarrier Partner Currently in advanced field trials, the technology is expected to be available on the market in early 2018. For more information about AeroBarrier technology or to request additional information on being an AeroBarrier partner, call (937) 428-9300. About Aeroseal LLC The Aeroseal brand is celebrating 20 years in the market with over 600 dealers offering duct sealing services around the world. Aeroseal LLC bought the patents and rights to Aeroseal technology in 2010 with focus on creating a portfolio of industry-changing energy efficiency solutions. For more information about Aeroseal LLC or aeroseal duct sealing technology, visit http://www.aeroseal.com.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

Simon Modi, 17, has just crossed into Yumbe in northern Uganda from South Sudan and within a few hours will be bussed to Bidi Bidi, one of world’s largest refugee settlements. Within 24 hours, he and his relatives will be settled on a half-acre plot with the tools to farm and build a home. The Ugandan refugee operation is seamless. But for now, it fails to sooth Modi. All he knows is that his father was shot, he missed his exams, and his mother is trudging through savannah with six children. “Maybe tomorrow they will arrive. If not, I will go back to find them!” Three other boys clasp their heads. “We learned their story when they were crying,” says Mohamed Bran, who runs the collection point for refugees. “Their mother was killed, the fate of their father unknown.” Refugees are pouring in. Bran keeps a list of why. Besides “killing and torturing” are “abduction of men, trading has stopped, no schools, looting of properties”. “It was preventive fleeing,” says Charlie Yaxley of the UN high commissioner for refugees. “Now it is actual violence. They go through forest because of armed groups on the road.” On 21 February South Sudan declared famine. It is horribly grim. Yet inside Uganda something extraordinary is happening. The country has a no camp policy and has settlements instead – swathes of land availed to refugees. Refugees can move freely, work and own a business. “Uganda is incredibly switched on,” says Musarait Kashmiri from African Initiatives for Relief and Development, which has opened 343km of roads in Bidi Bidi. “Uganda is a showcase,” says Yaxley. The settlement has churches under trees, health units and schools for refugee and local children. Most refugees are ready to farm. “Since we crossed, we have not heard guns,” says Helena Kujang,who “followed the footsteps of citizens” to safety. “We are going to grow our own food. All the seeds that are available, we will plant.” Several reasons exist for Uganda’s outlier levels of hospitality. Its commissioner for refugees, David Kazungu, says “Ugandans have been in exile and know what it means, and refugees are important for social and economic transformation.” Jens Hesemann suggests the last might be key. A 2016 study by University of California Davis and the UN World Food Programme found that “refugees’ purchases benefit local and national economies, and economic benefits exceed the amount of donated aid”. “In many countries such an influx would have led to a crisis,” says the UNHCR senior field coordinator. “Here it’s working.” A small cotton farmer extols the change. “The refugees are an opportunity,” says Hamza Yassin, 23. “Before they came, this place was empty. But they’ve created a marketplace. We can now buy things close by.” “Providing land to refugees allows them to immediately start settling, as no one knows how long they will have to stay,” says Yann Libessart of Médecins Sans Frontières. “Markets will expand, and the distinction between a South Sudanese refugee settlement and a Ugandan village eventually blur. This could give an economic boost.” But Uganda’s great undertaking could go wrong. “The hosts have been outstanding and the settlement model is unique,” says Hesemann. “But it comes with high expectations that if communities host refugees, they will benefit. It needs to be followed with concrete funding, or it risks disenfranchising the community.” However, just 36% of the $251m (£204m) needed in 2016 has come through, and at least three further settlements have had to open since Bidi Bidi filled up. There is also a clear and present danger of profound environmental damage to a district already poor, losing soil, entirely dependent on wood to cook and build, and reliant on economic activities that degrade natural resources, such as sand mining, which breaks down riverbanks, and charcoal, brick making and tobacco curing, which consume millions of trees a year. “Almost all the population depends on the environment so anything that happens to it is a big problem,” says Serbeet Kawawa, Yumbe’s natural resources officer. “The question is how to make refugees and host communities lead a sustainable life.” Yumbe already teeters on food insecurity, and water is so scarce that it is tanked from the Nile to refugees. “What we are seeing is a total destruction of trees,” says district agriculture officer Rashid Kawawa. “They clear their land and use the standing ones for fuel. We risk losing our big ones, which are important for biodiversity and rain.” This also worries farmer Yasin. “I doubt we shall experience our wet season,” he says. One project is marking “1,000 mother trees of biological importance like mahogany and shea,” explains forest officer Zabibu Ocogour. But much more needs to be done, like “a programme to explain what we are doing. The refugees may not understand.” Planting and regenerating trees will give refugees prunings to cook with, reduce pressure on natural vegetation and address assaults on women collecting wood. FAO’s Guidance on safe access on firewood and alternative energy in humanitarian settings advocates woodlots, efficient stoves, and farming that produces food and fuel. Serbeet Kawawa appreciates the humanitarian shift. “It used to be rehabilitation after repatriation. Now it is prevent damage right from the start.” “We emphasise stopping uncontrolled bush burning,” adds Timothy Olum Ojwi of the Lutheran World Federation. “The challenge is the long dry spell. Planting has to wait. But we give refugees 70% of everything we do, and host communities are happy because they receive 30%.” This current exemplary state needs urgent support: 300,000 refugees from South Sudan are expected in 2017, according to UNHCR, and a projected $558m (£453m) will be needed for all South Sudanese, now totalling 762,672, in Uganda this year. “The authorities, humanitarian community and environment can only cope with so much,” says MSF’s Libessart. Cathy Watson is chief of programme development at the World Agroforestry Centre in Nairobi. Join our community of development professionals and humanitarians. Follow @GuardianGDP on Twitter

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