Buea, Cameroon
Buea, Cameroon

University of Buea or Université de Buea is located in Buea in South West Cameroon near Mount Cameroon. It was founded as a university centre in 1985 and it became a university in 1992 on basis of government decree. It is one of the two English speaking universities alongside the newly created university of Bamenda in Cameroon.The university was born following wide-ranging university reforms in Cameroon. UB, as it is fondly referred to, was conceived in the English-speaking tradition; the University of Buea seeks to foster the essence of that system, while situating itself within the larger bilingual and multicultural context of Cameroon. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: NoE | Phase: HEALTH-2009-2.3.2-1 | Award Amount: 16.97M | Year: 2009

This is a proposal from 55 partners from 36 institutes to form a NoE that will seek to integrate European malaria research that is directed towards a better understanding of the basic biology of the parasite, its vector and of the biology of the interactions between the parasite and both its mammalian host and vectors. All the member institutes and researchers have demonstrated both their excellence and their ability to contribute to a successful network. The structure of the proposed network significantly evolves prior concepts of network structure introducing new modes of research that have recently emerged. Comprising of 4 research clusters the core activities will include molecular cell biology of the parasite, host immunity, vector biology, population biology and systems biology. One arm of the network activities will be concerned with the timely and effective translation of research respecting the IP rights of partner institutes. The network will also contribute significantly to the production of the next generation of malaria researchers through the operation of an expanded European PhD School for malaria research based at EMBL, students enjoying two supervisors based in different member states. Bespoke training courses for PhD students and network personnel will be offered throughout the duration of the network to maximise individual potential. To create a long term benefit from network activities a limited programme of post-doctoral fellowships within the network will be established. Furthermore, individual career mentoring facilities and an alumni association will continue to guide and engage network graduates. New members will be affiliated annually on a competitive basis with an emphasis on young, emerging Principle Investigators. Through the establishment of an umbrella Foundation and active lobbying of government and non-government funding agencies as well as the establishment of a charitable profile the network will strive to become self-determining.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: HEALTH-2007-2.3.2-13 | Award Amount: 560.75K | Year: 2009

Antimalarial drug discovery and development initiatives globally are fragmented and uncoordinated. We have brought together key organisations including MMV, WHO and AntiMal, an EU-funded FP6 Integrated Project represented by its coordinating institution and a number of academic malaria researchers, to resolve this problem through a logical series of meetings, conferences, workshops and dissemination strategies. The Gates Foundation will be involved as an invited participant. The action will co-ordinate leading European malaria research initiatives in antimalarial drug discovery and development, co-ordinate the European effort with international initiatives, engage industry and provide guidance on standardisation of core requirements of regulatory drug development. This will contribute towards generating global priorities and prepare the European antimalarial research agenda for the next decade.


The International Nurses Association is pleased to welcome Nge-Nwie Azefor-Misodi, RN, BSN to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare. Nge-Nwie Azefor-Misodi is a registered nurse with four years of experience in her field and a vast expertise in all facets of nursing. Nge-Nwie is currently serving patients as a CVICU Registered Nurse at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee. Nge-Nwie was educated at Barry University, where she graduated with her Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing in 2012. Prior to obtaining her Bachelor Degree, Nge-Nwie obtained a Bachelor of Science Degree in Sociology and Anthropology with a Minor in Journalism and Mass Communication from the University of Buea in Cameroon, West Africa, in 2001. She holds additional certifications in Advanced Cardiac Life Support, Basic Life Support, and Pediatric Life Support. To keep up to date in the challenging nursing field, Nge-Nwie maintains professional memberships with the American Nurses Association, The Tennessee Nurses Association, and the Florida Nurses Association. Nge-Nwie attributes her success to having great mentors, her passion for helping people, and her drive to make a difference in her community. When she is not assisting patients, she enjoys traveling, walking on the beach, and spending time in the great outdoors. Learn more about Nge-Nwie Azefor-Misodi by reading her upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare.


The International Nurses Association is pleased to welcome Nge-Nwie Azefor-Misodi, RN, BSN to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare. Nge-Nwie Azefor-Misodi is a registered nurse with four years of experience in her field and a vast expertise in all facets of nursing. Nge-Nwie is currently serving patients as a CVICU Registered Nurse at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee. Nge-Nwie was educated at Barry University, where she graduated with her Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing in 2012. Prior to obtaining her Bachelor Degree, Nge-Nwie obtained a degree from the University of Buea in Cameroon, West Africa, in 2001 with a major in Sociology and Anthropology, as well as a minor in Journalism and Mass Communication. She holds additional certifications in Advanced Cardiac Life Support, Basic Life Support, and Pediatric Life Support. To keep up to date in the challenging nursing field, Nge-Nwie maintains professional memberships with the American Nurses Association, The Tennessee Nurses Association, and the Florida Nurses Association. Nge-Nwie attributes her success to having great mentors, her passion for helping people, and her drive to make a difference in her community. When she is not assisting patients, she enjoys traveling, walking on the beach, and spending time in the great outdoors. Learn more about Nge-Nwie Azefor-Misodi by reading her upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare.


Cho-Ngwa F.,University of Buea
BMC complementary and alternative medicine | Year: 2014

Onchocerciasis caused by Onchocerca volvulus is the world's second leading infectious cause of blindness. There is currently no cure for the disease. Ivermectin, the current drug of choice is only microfilaricidal and suboptimal response to it is increasingly being reported. Thus, in contributing to the search for a cure, crude extracts and chromatographic fractions of Craterispermum laurinum and Morinda lucida were screened in vitro, against the bovine and most popular model of the parasite, Onchocerca ochengi. Extracted parasites were cultured in RPMI-1640 based media for 05 days in the presence of control drugs, test drugs or drug diluents only. Microfilarial motility was scored using microscopy while adult worm viability was determined biochemically by MTT/formazan colorimetry. Cytotoxicity and acute toxicity of active fractions were tested on monkey kidney epithelial cells (LLCMK2) and in Balb/c mice, respectively. Out of the 18 extracts screened, the methanolic extracts of the leaves of both plants recorded the highest activities against both the microfilariae (IC100 of 125 μg/ml for both extracts) and adult worms (IC100 of 250 μg/ml and 500 μg/ml for M. lucida and C. laurinum respectively). The most active chromatographic fraction was obtained from M. lucida and had an IC50 of 7.8 μg/ml and 15.63 μg/ml on microfilariae and adult worms respectively, while the most active fraction from C. laurinum had an IC50 of 15.63 μg/ml and 46.8 μg/ml, respectively on microfilariae and adult worms. The 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50s) on LLCMK2 cells ranged from 15.625 μg/ml to 125 μg/ml for the active fractions. No acute toxicity was recorded for the extracts from both plants. Phytochemical analysis of the most active fractions revealed the presence of sterols, alkaloids, triterpenes, saponins and flavonoids. This study validates the use of these plants by traditional health practitioners in managing the disease, and also suggests a new source for isolation of potential lead compounds against Onchocerca volvulus.


Monekosso G.L.,University of Buea
Academic Medicine | Year: 2014

Developments in medical education in Sub-Saharan Africa over the past 100 years have been characterized by the continent's unique history. During the first half of the 20th century, the Europeans effectively installed medical education in their African colonies. The years 1950 to 1960 were distinguished by successful movements for independence, with new governments giving priority to medical education. By 1980, there were 51 medical schools in Sub-Saharan Africa. The period from 1975 to 1990 was problematic both politically and economically for Sub-Saharan Africa, and medical schools did not escape the general difficulties. War, corruption, mounting national debts, and political instability were characteristics of this period. In many countries, maintaining medical school assets - faculty members, buildings, laboratories, libraries - became difficult, and emigration became the goal of many health professionals. In contrast, the past 20 years have seen rapid growth in the number of medical schools in Sub-Saharan Africa. Economic growth and political stability in most Sub-Saharan African countries augur well for investment in health systems strengthening and in medical education. There are, nonetheless, major problem areas, including inadequate funding, challenges of sustainability, and the continuing brain drain. The 20th century was a time of colonialism and the struggle for independence during which medical education did not advance as quickly or broadly as it did in other regions of the world. The 21st century promises a different history, one of rapid growth in medical education, leading to better care and better health for the people of Africa.


Cholera has been endemic in Douala since 1971. Most outbreaks start from Bepanda, an overcrowded neighbourhood with poor hygiene and sanitary conditions. We investigated water sources in Bepanda as reservoirs of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, determined its antibiotic susceptibility and some physico-chemical characteristics that could maintain the endemicity of this organism in Bepanda. Three hundred and eighteen water samples collected from 45 wells, 8 taps and 1 stream from February to July 2009 were analyzed for V. cholerae using standard methods. Isolates were characterized morphologically, biochemically and serologically. The disc diffusion technique was employed to investigate antibiotic susceptibility. Differences in prevalence of organism between seasons were analysed. Correlation strength and direction of association between physico-chemical parameters and occurrence of V. cholerae was analyzed using the Kendall tau_b non-parametric correlation. This was further confirmed with the forward-stepwise binary logistic regression. Eighty-seven (27.4%) samples were positive for V. cholerae. Isolation was highest from wells. The organism was isolated in the rainy season and dry season but the frequency of isolation was significantly higher (χ2 = 7.009, df = 1, P = 0.008) in the rainy season. Of the 96 confirmed V. cholerae isolates, 32 (33.3%) belonged to serogroup O1 and 64 (66.6%) were serogroup non-O1/non-O139. Isolates from tap (municipal water) were non-O1/non-O139 strains. Salinity had a significant positive correlation with isolation in the dry season (+0.267, P = 0.015) and rainy season (+0.223, P = 0.028). The forward-stepwise method of binary logistic regression indicated that as pH (Wald = 11.753, df = 1), P = 0.001) increased, odds of isolation of V. cholerae also increased (B = 1.297, S.E = 0.378, Exp(B) = 3.657). All isolates were sensitive to ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin. Multi-drug resistance was predominant among the non-O1/non-O139 isolates. V. cholerae was found in wells and stream in both seasons. Cholera will continue to be a health threat in Bepanda if intervention measures to prevent outbreak are not implemented. Continuous monitoring of water sources in this and other cholera high-risk areas in Cameroon is necessary, for a better preparedness and control of cholera.


Computer-aided drug design (CADD) often involves virtual screening (VS) of large compound datasets and the availability of such is vital for drug discovery protocols. We assess the bioactivity and "drug-likeness" of a relatively small but structurally diverse dataset (containing >1,000 compounds) from African medicinal plants, which have been tested and proven a wide range of biological activities. The geographical regions of collection of the medicinal plants cover the entire continent of Africa, based on data from literature sources and information from traditional healers. For each isolated compound, the three dimensional (3D) structure has been used to calculate physico-chemical properties used in the prediction of oral bioavailability on the basis of Lipinski's "Rule of Five". A comparative analysis has been carried out with the "drug-like", "lead-like", and "fragment-like" subsets, as well as with the Dictionary of Natural Products. A diversity analysis has been carried out in comparison with the ChemBridge diverse database. Furthermore, descriptors related to absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADMET) have been used to predict the pharmacokinetic profile of the compounds within the dataset. Our results prove that drug discovery, beginning with natural products from the African flora, could be highly promising. The 3D structures are available and could be useful for virtual screening and natural product lead generation programs.


Weledji E.P.,University of Buea
International Journal of Surgery | Year: 2014

Splenectomy is a powerful therapeutic procedure in a wide variety of medical disorders provided that it is not undertaken lightly and the risks are weighed against the potential benefits in each individual case. Most of this risk seems to be due to the underlying splenectomy indication and not to splenectomy alone. There has been an increased tendency in recent years towards splenic preservation to prevent not only the risk of subsequent overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI) but the long term risk of cardiovascular complications. As there is no condition that can be cured by splenectomy, this paper reviewed the rationale behind the indications for, and the associated risks. Method: Electronic searches of the medline (PubMed) database, Cochrane library, and science citation index were performed to identify original published studies on splenectomy. Relevant articles were searched from relevant chapters in specialized texts and all included. © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd.


This paper explores the response to risk of smallholder agricultural producers in the face of variable and changing climate in Cameroon. The low rainfall distribution in some regions of the country and the high inter-seasonal variability of rainfall makes crop production, on which the livelihood of rural inhabitants is based, a risky enterprise. Women farmers in Cameroon are an important group for whom risk aversion influences production outcomes and welfare. This study identifies and analyses the effect of climate risks on the productive activities and the management options of male and female farmers. Women-owned farms, on average, record profits of US$ 620 per hectare to about US$ 935 for crop enterprises across the different agroecological zones. Comparatively static results indicate that increases in climate variability and the uncertainty of climate conditions have an explicit impact on farm profit. The impacts of increased uncertainty in climate and risk aversion are ambiguous depending on the agroecology. Ex-ante and ex-post risk management options reveal that female-owned farms in the northern Sahel savannah zone rely on more sophisticated strategies to reduce the impact of shocks. While adapting to uncertain climate positively influences profit levels, risk measured as the variance of rainfall or temperature per unit variation in profit is significant. This analysis stresses the increased importance of climate risk management as a prelude to the panoply of adaptation choice in response to expected climatic change. © 2010 Integrated Research System for Sustainability Science, United Nations University, and Springer.

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