Bristol, United Kingdom
Bristol, United Kingdom

The University of Bristol is a red brick research university located in Bristol, United Kingdom. It received its Royal Charter in 1909, and its predecessor institution, University College, Bristol, had been in existence since 1876.Bristol has been ranked 29th by the QS World University Rankings, and is ranked amongst the top ten of UK universities by QS, THE, and ARWU. A highly selective institution, it has an average of 14 applicants for each undergraduate place.Bristol is organised into six academic faculties composed of multiple schools and departments running over 200 undergraduate courses situated in the Clifton area along with three of its nine halls of residence. The other six halls are located in Stoke Bishop, an outer city suburb located 1.8 miles away. The University had a total income of £459.2 million in 2012/13, of which £120.1 million was from research grants and contracts. It is the largest independent employer in Bristol.Current academics include 21 Fellows of the Academy of Medical science, 13 Fellows of the British Academy, 13 Fellows of the Royal Academy of Engineering and 40 Fellows of the Royal Society.Bristol is a member of the Russell Group of research-intensive British universities, the European-wide Coimbra Group and the Worldwide Universities Network, of which the University's Vice-Chancellor Eric Thomas was chairman from 2005 to 2007. In addition, the University holds an Erasmus Charter, sending more than 500 students per year to partner institutions in Europe. Wikipedia.


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Patent
University of Bristol and Gloucestershire Hospitals Nhs Foundation Trust | Date: 2016-11-08

A probe, such as a spectroscopic probe, for enabling a fluid or tissue sample to be tested in situ. The probe includes a conduit, such as a hypodermic needle, that can be inserted into a test subject and a wave coupling arranged to direct electromagnetic radiation, such as light, from an energy source to the sample and/or from the sample to a receiver for analysis. The receiver may comprise a Raman spectroscope. The probe may include a carriage that can be used to move at least some of the optical coupling towards and away from the insertion tip of the conduit. The probe may include a pressure modifier that can be used to draw fluid into or expel fluid from the conduit.


Patent
University of Bristol | Date: 2016-09-09

There is presented an optical apparatus comprising first and second photon pair sources configured to convert at least one pump light photon into a first and second correlated signal and idler photon pairs. In one example, the apparatus is configured to use one of the signal and idler photons from the first correlated photon pair for controlling the conversion of the pump light photon in the second photon pair source. The apparatus may configured such that, at least one of the signal and idler photons from the first correlated photon pair is output from the first photon pair source onto an optical path wherein at least one of the signal and idler photons from the second correlated photon pair is output from the second photon pair source onto the optical path. A method is also provided for outputting one or more photons using the optical apparatus.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.90M | Year: 2016

The Arctic plays a key role in the Earths climate system and is an area of growing strategic importance for European policy. In this ETN, we will train the next generation of Arctic microbiology and biogeochemistry experts who, through their unique understanding of the Arctic environment and the factors that impact ecosystem and organism response to the warming Arctic, will be able to respond to the need for leadership from public, policy and commercial interests. The training and research programme of MicroArctic is made up of seven interlinked Work Packages (WP). WP1 to WP4 are research work packages at the cutting edge of Arctic microbiology and biogeochemistry and these will be supported by three overarching WPs (WP5-7) associated with the management, training and dissemination of results. WP1 will deliver information about the role of external inputs (e.g., atmospheric) of nutrients and microorganism that drive biogeochemical processes in relation to annual variation in Arctic microbial activity and biogeochemical processes. WP2 will explore ecosystem response on time scales of 100s of years to these inputs using a chrnosequence approach in the already changing Arctic. The effect of time and season and the warming of the Arctic on ecosystem functioning and natural resources will be quantified through geochemical analyses and next generation multi-omics approaches. Complementing WP1 and WP2, WP3 will focus on organism response and adaptation using a range of biochemical, molecular, experimental and culturing approaches. WP4 will address specific applied issues such as colonisation by pathogenic organisms and biotechnological exploitation of Arctic ecosystems. MicroArctic will bring together interdisciplinary experts from both the academic and non-academic sectors across Europe into a network of 20 Institutions across 11 countries.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Training Grant | Award Amount: 4.93M | Year: 2014

The global Robotics and Autonomous Systems (RAS) market was $25.5bn in 2001 and is growing. The market potential for future robotics and autonomous systems is of huge value to the UK. The need for expansion in this important sector is well recognised, as evidenced by the Chancellor of the Exchequers announcement of £35m investment in the sector in 2012, the highlighting of this sector in the 2012 BIS Foresight report Technology and Innovation Futures and the identification of robotics and autonomous systems by the Minister for Universities and Science in 2013 as one of the 8 great technologies that will drive future growth. This expansion will be fuelled by a step change in RAS capability, the key to which is their increased adaptability. For example, a home care robot must adapt safely to its owners unpredictable behaviour; micro air vehicles will be sent into damaged buildings without knowing the layout or obstructions; a high value manufacturing robot will need to manufacture small batches of different components. The key to achieving increased adaptability is that the innovators who develop them must, themselves, be very adaptable people. FARSCOPE, the Future Autonomous and Robotic Systems Centre for PhD Education, aims to meet the need for a new generation of innovators who will drive the robotics and autonomous systems sector in the coming decade and beyond. The Centre will train over 50 students in the essential RAS technical underpinning skills, the ability to integrate RAS knowledge and technologies to address real-world problems, and the understanding of wider implications and applications of RAS and the ability to innovate within, and beyond, this sector. FARSCOPE will be delivered by a partnership between the University of Bristol (UoB) and the University of the West of England (UWE). It will bring together the dedicated 3000 square metre Bristol Robotics Laboratory (BRL), one of the largest robotics laboratories in Europe, with a trainin and supervising team drawn from UoB and UWE offering a wide breadth of experience and depth of expertise in autonomous systems and related topics. The FARSCOPE centre will exploit the strengths of BRL, including medical and healthcare robotics, energy autonomous robotics, safe human-robot interactions, soft robotics, unconventional computing, experimental psychology, biomimicry, machine vision including vision-based navigation and medical imaging and an extensive aerial robotics portfolio including unmanned air vehicles and autonomous flight control. Throughout the four-year training programme industry and stakeholder partners will actively engage with the CDT, helping to deliver the programme and sharing both their domain expertise and their commercial experience with FARSCOPE students. This includes regular seminar series, industrial placements, group grand challenge project, enterprise training and the three-year individual research project. Engaged partners include BAE Systems, DSTL, Blue Bear Systems, SciSys, National Composites Centre, Rolls Royce, Toshiba, NHS SouthWest and OC Robotics. FARSCOPE also has commitment from a range of international partners from across Europe, the Americas and Asia who are offering student exchange placements and who will enhance the global perspective of the programme.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.2.1 | Award Amount: 5.85M | Year: 2011

One of the aspirations of machine learning is to develop intelligent systems that can address a wide variety of control problems of many different types. However, although the community has developed successful technologies for many individual problems, these technologies have not previously been integrated into a unified framework. As a result, the technology used to specify, solve and analyse one control problem typically cannot be reused on a different problem. The community has fragmented into a diverse set of specialists with particular solutions to particular problems. The purpose of this project is to develop a unified toolkit for intelligent control in many different problem areas. This toolkit will incorporate many of the most successful approaches to a variety of important control problems within a single framework, including bandit problems, Markov Decision Processes (MDPs), Partially Observable MDPs (POMDPs), continuous stochastic control, and multi-agent systems. In addition, the toolkit will provide methods for the automatic construction of representations and capabilities, which can then be applied to any of these problem types. Finally, the toolkit will provide a generic interface to specifying problems and analysing performance, by mapping intuitive, human-understandable goals into machine-understandable objectives, and by mapping algorithm performance and regret back into human-understandable terms.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 491.66K | Year: 2015

The worlds manufacturing economy has been transformed by the phenomenon of globalisation, with benefits for economies of scale, operational flexibility, risk sharing and access to new markets. It has been at the cost of a loss of manufacturing and other jobs in western economies, loss of core capabilities and increased risks of disruption in the highly interconnected and interdependent global systems. The resource demands and environmental impacts of globalisation have also led to a loss of sustainability. New highly adaptable manufacturing processes and techniques capable of operating at small scales may allow a rebalancing of the manufacturing economy. They offer the possibility of a new understanding of where and how design, manufacture and services should be carried out to achieve the most appropriate mix of capability and employment possibilities in our economies but also to minimise environmental costs, to improve product specialisation to markets and to ensure resilience of provision under natural and socio-political disruption. This proposal brings together an interdisciplinary academic team to work with industry and local communities to explore the impact of this re-distribution of manufacturing (RDM) at the scale of the city and its hinterland, using Bristol as an example in its European Green Capital year, and concentrating on the issues of resilience and sustainability. The aim of this exploration will be to develop a vision, roadmap and research agenda for the implications of RDM for the city, and at the same time develop a methodology for networked collaboration between the many stakeholders that will allow deep understanding of the issues to be achieved and new approaches to their resolution explored. The network will study the issues from a number of disciplinary perspectives, bringing together experts in manufacturing, design, logistics, operations management, infrastructure, resilience, sustainability, engineering systems, geographical sciences, mathematical modelling and beyond. They will consider how RDM may contribute to the resilience and sustainability of a city in a number of ways: firstly, how can we characterise the economic, social and environmental challenges that we face in the city for which RDM may contribute to a solution? Secondly, what are the technical developments, for example in manufacturing equipment and digital technologies, that are enablers for RDM, and what are their implications for a range of manufacturing applications and for the design of products and systems? Thirdly, what are the social and political developments, for example in public policy, in regulation, in the rise of social enterprise or environmentalism that impact on RDM and what are their implications? Fourthly, what are the business implications, on supply networks and logistics arrangements, of the re-distribution? Finally, what are the implications for the physical and digital infrastructure of the city? In addition, the network will, through the way in which it carries out embedded focused studies, explore mechanisms by which interdisciplinary teams may come together to address societal grand challenges and develop research agendas for their solution. These will be based on working together using a combination of a Collaboratory - a centre without walls - and a Living Lab - a gathering of public-private partnerships in which businesses, researchers, authorities, and citizens work together for the creation of new services, business ideas, markets, and technologies.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 567.20K | Year: 2016

Energy efficiency is one of the primary design constraints for modern processing systems. Hardware accelerators are seen as a key technology to address the high performance with limited energy issue. In addition the arrival of computing languages such as OpenCL offer a route to the programmer to target different types of multi-core accelerators using a single source code. Performance portability is a significant challenge specially if the accelerators have different microarchitectures such as is the case in CPU-GPU-FPGA systems. This research addresses the energy and performance challenge by investigating how a device formed by processing units with different granularities ranging from coarse grain CPU cores of different complexity, medium grain general purpose GPU cores and fine grain FPGA logic cells can be dynamically programmed. The challenge is to be able to program all these resources with a single programming model and create a run-time system that can automatically tune the software to the best execution resource from energy and performance points of view. The results from this research are expected to deliver new fundamental insights to the question of: How future computers can obtain orders of magnitude higher performance with limited energy budgets?


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: ECSEL-IA | Phase: ECSEL-02-2014 | Award Amount: 87.61M | Year: 2015

The key objective of PowerBase Enhanced substrates and GaN pilot lines enabling compact power applications is to ensure the availability of Electronic Components and Systems (ECS) for key markets and for addressing societal challenges, aiming at keeping Europe at the forefront of the technology development, bridging the gap between research and exploitation, creating economic and employment growth in the European Union. The project PowerBase aims to contribute to the industrial ambition of value creation in Europe and fully supports this vision by addressing key topics of ECSEL multi annual strategic plan 2014. By positioning PowerBase as innovation action a clear focus on exploitation of the expected result is primary goal. To expand the limits in current power semiconductor technologies the project focuses on setting up a qualified wide band gap GaN technology Pilot line, on expanding the limits of todays silicon based substrate materials for power semiconductors, improving manufacturing efficiency by innovative automation, setting up of a GaN compatible chip embedding pilot line and demonstrating innovation potential in leading compact power application domains. PowerBase is a project proposal with a vertical supply chain involved with contributions from partners in 7 European countries. This spans expertise from raw material research, process innovation, pilot line, assembly innovation and pilot line up to various application domains representing enhanced smart systems. The supporting partners consist of market leaders in their domain, having excellent technological background, which are fully committed to achieve the very challenging project goals. The project PowerBase aims to have significant impact on mart regions. High tech jobs in the area of semiconductor technologies and micro/nano electronics in general are expressed core competences of the regions Austria: Carinthia, Styria, Germany: Sachsen, Bavaria and many other countries/ regions involved.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: NERC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 1.47M | Year: 2015

Concerns are growing about how much melting occurs on the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS), and how much this melting will contribute to sea level rise (1). It seems that the amount of melting is accelerating and that the impact on sea level rise is over 1 mm each year (2). This information is of concern to governmental policy makers around the world because of the risk to viability of populated coastal and low-lying areas. There is currently a great scientific need to predict the amount of melting that will occur on the surface of the GrIS over the coming decades (3), since the uncertainties are high. The current models which are used to predict the amount of melting in a warmer climate rely heavily on determining the albedo, the ratio of how reflective the snow cover and the ice surface are to incoming solar energy. Surfaces which are whiter are said to have higher albedo, reflect more sunlight and melt less. Surfaces which are darker adsorb more sunlight and so melt more. Just how the albedo varies over time depends on a number of factors, including how wet the snow and ice is. One important factor that has been missed to date is bio-albedo. Each drop of water in wet snow and ice contains thousands of tiny microorganisms, mostly algae and cyanobacteria, which are pigmented - they have a built in sunblock - to protect them from sunlight. These algae and cyanobacteria have a large impact on the albedo, lowering it significantly. They also glue together dust particles that are swept out of the air by the falling snow. These dust particles also contain soot from industrial activity and forest fires, and so the mix of pigmented microbes and dark dust at the surface produces a darker ice sheet. We urgently need to know more about the factors that lead to and limit the growth of the pigmented microbes. Recent work by our group in the darkest zone of the ice sheet surface in the SW of Greenland shows that the darkest areas have the highest numbers of cells. Were these algae to grow equally well in other areas of the ice sheet surface, then the rate of melting of the whole ice sheet would increase very quickly. A major concern is that there will be more wet ice surfaces for these microorganisms to grow in, and for longer, during a period of climate warming, and so the microorganisms will grow in greater numbers and over a larger area, lowering the albedo and increasing the amount of melt that occurs each year. The nutrient - plant food - that the microorganisms need comes from the ice crystals and dust on the ice sheet surface, and there are fears that increased N levels in snow and ice may contribute to the growth of the microorganisms. This project aims to be the first to examine the growth and spread of the microorganisms in a warming climate, and to incorporate biological darkening into models that predict the future melting of the GrIS. References 1. Sasgen I and 8 others. Timing and origin of recent regional ice-mass loss in Greenland. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 333-334, 293-303(2012). 2. Rignot, E., Velicogna, I., van den Broeke, M. R., Monaghan, A. & Lenaerts, J. Acceleration of the contribution of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets to sea level rise. Geophys. Res. Lett. 38, L05503, doi:10.1029/2011gl046583 (2011). 3. Milne, G. A., Gehrels, W. R., Hughes, C. W. & Tamisiea, M. E. Identifying the causes of sea-level change. Nature Geosci 2, 471-478 (2009).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA | Phase: ICT-2013.9.8 | Award Amount: 1.21M | Year: 2013

The goal of this proposal is to create a coordination activity among consortia involved in the ICT-ENERGY subject with specific reference to bringing together the existing Toward Zero-Power ICT community organized within the ZEROPOWER C.A. and the novel MINECC (Minimising energy consumption of computing to the limit) community recently funded under the FET Proactive Call 8 (FP7-ICT-2011-8) Objective 9.8. The coordination activity is aimed at assessing the impact of the research efforts developed in the groups involved in the different consortia and proposing measures to increase the visibility of ICT-Energy related initiatives to the scientific community, targeted industries and to the public at large through exchange of information, dedicated networking events and media campaigns. The activities of our C.A. will inspire more research projects in this emerging area by generating broader acceptance for the developed technology and the benefits of its applications. ICT-Energy C.A. will facilitate broader interaction and feedback among the consortia members and stakeholders, thereby, consolidating progress in the field. Positive benefits to the European Community are foreseen in all great challenges of energy, security, environment and health by developing a strategic research agenda in low power, energy efficient ICT and making it happen.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SPA.2013.2.1-01 | Award Amount: 3.22M | Year: 2013

GENIUS is designed to boost the impact of the next European breakthrough in astrophysics, the Gaia astrometric mission. Gaia is an ESA Cornerstone mission scheduled for launch in October 2013 and aims at producing the most accurate and complete 3D map of the Milky Way to date. A pan-European consortium named DPAC is working on the implementation of the Gaia data processing, of which the final result will be a catalogue and data archive containing more than one billion objects. The archive system containing the data products will be located at the European Space Astronomy Centre (ESAC) and will serve as the basis for the scientific exploitation of the Gaia data. The design, implementation, and operation of this archive are a task that ESA has opened up to participation from the European scientific community. GENIUS is aimed at significantly contributing to this development based on the following principles: an archive design driven by the needs of the user community; provision of exploitation tools to maximize the scientific return; ensuring the quality of the archive contents and the interoperability with existing and future astronomical archives (ESAC, ESO, ...); cooperation with the only other two astrometric missions in the world, nanoJASMINE and JASMINE (Japan); and last but not least, the archive will facilitate outreach and academic activities to foster the public interest in science in general and astronomy in particular. GENIUS fits seamlessly into existing Gaia activities, exploiting the synergies with ongoing developments. Its members actively participate in these ongoing tasks and provide an in-depth knowledge of the mission as well as expertise in key development areas. Furthermore, GENIUS has the support of DPAC, several Gaia national communities in the EU member states, and will establish cooperation with the Japanese astrometric missions already mentioned.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: NERC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 510.21K | Year: 2014

The Atlantic Oceans conveyor belt circulation is a fundamental component of the global climate system, transporting heat from low to high latitudes, and thus warming Northern Europe. The strength of this circulation is thought to have varied abruptly in the past, giving rise to rapid climate changes of more than 10 degrees C in a decade during the last glacial period. Changes of this nature today would have a severe impact on society, so we want to know more about the sensitivity of this circulation. In order to do this, we will study intervals of rapid climate and circulation change in the past. To better understand these past circulation changes we will reconstruct the concentration of radiocarbon in surface and deep waters in the North Atlantic Ocean. This is known as a radiocarbon reservoir age, and it is highly sensitive to the rate of ocean circulation. Therefore, by reconstructing reservoir ages, we can tell how quickly the ocean was circulating during intervals of rapid climate change. We also need to know what the reservoir age was in the past if we want to use radiocarbon as a dating tool, to tell the age of geological and archeological objects and events. Radiocarbon can be thought of as a stopwatch for a geological sample. For a marine sample, however, there is already some time on the clock when we press go. This extra time before starting the clock is the reservoir age, and we must know what it is in order to accurately tell geological time. By reconstructing reservoir ages, we will therefore improve understanding of rapid circulation and climate change, and also improve the most important dating tool used in earth and archeological sciences. To reconstruct radiocarbon reservoir ages we need to measure the radiocarbon content of a sample, and also to know its age independently, so we can work out what was already on the clock when the sample formed. To do this we will make radiocarbon measurements on shells taken from sediment cores from the North Atlantic, and pair them with a range of exciting new techniques that can tell their age. Firstly we will look for layers of volcanic ash in the sediment cores, which we can date using their argon content, and match to precisely dated ash layers in ice cores and on Iceland. Secondly we can look at changes in sea surface temperature records, and match these to the same events that are precisely dated in ice cores. Thirdly we will use the concentration of thorium in sediments to tell how much sediment accumulated between these ash and temperature tie points. Fourthly, we will combine all this information using statistical modelling, which will also provide a good measure of the uncertainty in our results. This work will create maps of reservoir ages and how they changed in the North Atlantic over the last 10 to 50 thousand years, with a special focus on times of rapid climate change. To help us link the reservoir ages to different circulation regimes, we will use a climate model that can simulate radiocarbon. We will make this models ocean circulation operate in different ways, and see which circulations best match our data. This will allow us to better understand how ocean circulation changed in the past to cause rapid climate change, and improve confidence in how ocean circulation may operate in the future. Finally, we will package our reservoir age maps into a tool that can be used by earth scientists and archeologists to improve their radiocarbon dating.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 4.12M | Year: 2012

In everyday life, people listen to speech under a wide range of conditions that are non-optimal relative to the controlled conditions in laboratory experiments. Classical research methods can only deal with the effects of individual adverse conditions. This has contributed to the fragmentation of speech communication research in numerous sub-disciplines that have little interaction. While each type of adversity can have important consequences on its own, it is often the combination of conditions that conspire to create serious communication problems especially for elderly and hearing impaired persons. The long-term objective of Investigating Speech Processing in Realistic Environments (INSPIRE) is creating a community of researchers who can exploit synergies between the sub-disciplines that investigate individual aspects of speech communication, resulting in a new curriculum: Real-world speech communication. We will develop novel research methods that take advantage of the massive amounts of experimental data that are becoming available and allow for the analysis of communication behaviours in real-world situations characterised by simultaneous presence of multiple adverse conditions. Computational models will be developed that allow to predict speech intelligibility for normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners under realistic conditions. INSPIRE will create a permanent collection of measurement data and tools that are accessible for external researchers for testing and comparing speech intelligibility models, thus enabling a breakthrough improvement in hearing instrument tuning. INSPIRE will achieve its objectives by bringing together E(S)Rs with leading academic scientists from the core disciplines in speech communication, R&D personnel from leading companies in acoustics and hearing instruments and ENT specialists from hospitals that treat people with hearing impairments. All research projects in the network will address multiple adverse conditions.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC5-04-2015 | Award Amount: 6.82M | Year: 2016

ICARUS will develop innovative tools for urban impact assessment in support of air quality and climate change governance in the EU. This will lead to designing and implementing win-win strategies to improve the air quality and reduce the carbon footprint in European cities. An integrated approach will be used for air pollution monitoring and assessment combining ground-based measurements, atmospheric transport and chemical transformation modelling and air pollution indicators derived from satellite, airborne and personal remote sensing. The ICARUS methodology and toolkit will be applied in nine EU cities of variable size, socio-economic condition and history. Technological and non-technological measures and policy options will be analyzed and proposed to the responsible authorities for air pollution and/or climate change at the city level. Based on the advanced monitoring and assessment tools outlined above, a cloud-based solution will be developed to inform citizens of environment-conscious alternatives that may have a positive impact on air quality and carbon footprint and finally on their health and motivate them to adopt alternative behaviours. Agent-based modelling will be used to capture the interactions of population subgroups, industries and service providers in response to the policies considered in the project. Thus, social and cultural factors, socio-economic status (SES) and societal dynamics will be explicitly taken into account to assess overall policy impact. Our findings will be translated into a web-based guidebook for sustainable air pollution and climate change governance in all EU cities. ICARUS will develop a vision of a future green city: a visionary model that will seek to minimize environmental and health impacts. Transition pathways will be drawn that will demonstrate how current cities could be transformed towards cities with close to zero or negative carbon footprint and maximal wellbeing within the next 50 years.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2012.2.3.1 | Award Amount: 19.53M | Year: 2012

The overall objectives of the INNWIND.EU project are the high performance innovative design of a beyond-state-of-the-art 10-20MW offshore wind turbine and hardware demonstrators of some of the critical components. These ambitious primary objectives lead to a set of secondary objectives, which are the specific innovations, new concepts, new technologies and proof of concepts at the sub system and turbine level. The progress beyond the state of the art is envisaged as an integrated wind turbine concept with i) a light weight rotor having a combination of adaptive characteristics from passive built-in geometrical and structural couplings and active distributed smart sensing and control, ii) an innovative, low-weight, direct drive generator and iii) a standard mass-produced integrated tower and substructure that simplifies and unifies turbine structural dynamic characteristics at different water depths. A lightweight blade design will be demonstrated at a MW scale turbine. The drive train innovations include a super conducting generator; pseudo magnetic drive train and a light weight re-design of the bedplate for reduced tower top mass. The superconducting generator technology and the pseudo magnetic drive technology will be demonstrated at relevant scales by participating industry. The concepts are researched individually at the component level but also at the wind turbine system level in an integrated approach. Their benefits are quantified through suitable performance indicators and their market deployment opportunities are concretely established in two dedicated integrating work packages. The consortium comprises of leading Industrial Partners and Research Establishments focused on longer term research and innovation of industrial relevance. The project addresses the heart of the Long Term R&D Programme of the New Turbines and Components strand of the European Wind Initiative (EWI) established under SET-Plan, the Common European Policy for Energy Technologies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.1.1 | Award Amount: 12.49M | Year: 2012

Traffic demand is increasing dramatically, year on year, with typical growth figures of up to 60% for Internet based traffic. Such traffic increase is impacting on both network costs and power consumption. Moreover, traffic is not only increasing but becoming much more dynamic, both in time and direction. For these reasons, transport network evolution from current DWDM systems towards elastic optical networks, based on flexgrid transmission and switching technologies, could significantly increase both transport network scalability and flexibility. Further benefits come from multilayer interworking mechanisms enabling electronic switching technologies (IP/MPLS, OTN, etc) to directly control the bandwidth of the Bandwidth Variable Transponders (BVT) for optical bandwidth optimization purposes.This then defines the key objective behind IDEALIST: To research in detail a cost and power efficient transport network architecture able to carry a wide range of signal bandwidths, each of which will be varying in real time in direction and magnitude, and some of which will be extremely large and possibly exceeding 1Tb/s. The network architecture proposed by IDEALIST is based on four technical pillars: Transport systems enabling flexible transmission and switching beyond 400Gbps per channel. Control plane architecture for multilayer and multidomain elastic optical networks. Dynamic network resources allocation at both IP and elastic optical layers Multilayer network optimization tools enabling both off-line planning and on-line network re-optimization in elastic optical networks.The intention is that the IDEALIST network architecture will be easily industrialised. Therefore, feasibility studies and experimental implementation and demonstration of prototypes will be key activities, as well. IDEALIST will also feed the collaboration with other Projects and the submission of contributions to ITU-T, OIF, IETF, thus reinforcing European position in standardization bodies.


The present invention relates to a conjugate that specifically targets a calcineurin inhibitor to T cells, such as Th17 cells, for use in a method for the treatment of an inflammatory disease. The invention also relates to a method for treating an inflammatory disease by administering a conjugate that specifically targets a calcineurin inhibitor to T cells, such as Th17 cells. In addition, the invention relates to a method for identifying a subject likely to be resistant to steroid treatment, as well as a subject likely to benefit from treatment with a calcineurin inhibitor.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: GARRI-5-2014 | Award Amount: 1.99M | Year: 2015

Research integrity is a growing concern among scientists, research organisations, policy makers, and the public, expressed in a proliferation of ethical codes, guidelines, and procedures. While this proliferation calls for harmonisation and coordination, there is little factual knowledge about the actual processes leading to misconduct or the effectiveness of current integrity policies. PRINTEGER analyses the incidence and individual, social, and organisational causes and dynamics of misconduct. It also analyses how institutions respond to allegations, specifically in interaction with neighbouring law, the media, complex research organisations, and systemic changes in research. From the perspective of the research work floor, including the daily work of journal editors or research managers, PRINTEGER will analyse how current instruments of integrity policy operate in practice. How do guidelines most contribute to integrity? What other instruments and procedures will promote integrity? PRINTEGER will provide concrete tools and advice to promote research integrity in Europe through four specific target groups: advice on an optimal policy mix and opportunities for harmonisation to research policy makers; best practice approaches to foster integrity for research leaders and managers; advice on the use of IT tools and organisational measures for research support organisations; practice-informed educational tools for ethical training and reflection of early career scientists. PRINTEGER uses a unique approach that looks at procedures and guidelines, but also analyses how they operate in the context of daily research practice. For this purpose, PRINTEGER gathers not only ethicists, but also very pertinent expertise that has barely informed integrity policy so far: legal studies, scientometrics, and social sciences, such as criminology and media studies; all flanked by intensive stakeholder consultation and dissemination activities to maximise impact.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC1-PM-04-2016 | Award Amount: 10.41M | Year: 2017

Early life is an important window of opportunity to improve health across the full lifecycle. European pregnancy and child cohort studies together offer an unique opportunity to identify a wide range of early life stressors linked with individual biological, developmental and health trajectory variations, and to the onset and evolution of non-communicable diseases. LIFECYCLE will establish the EuroCHILD Cohort Network, which brings together existing, successful pregnancy and child cohorts and biobanks, by developing a governance structure taking account of national and European ethical, legal and societal implications, a shared data-management platform and data-harmonization strategies. LIFECYCLE will enrich this EuroCHILD Cohort Network by generating new integrated data on early life stressors related to socio-economic, migration, urban environment and life-style determinants, and will capitalize on these data by performing hypothesis-driven research on early life stressors influencing cardio-metabolic, respiratory and mental health trajectories during the full lifecycle, and the underlying epigenetic mechanisms. LIFECYCLE will translate these results into recommendations for targeted strategies and personalized prediction models to improve health trajectories for current and future Europeans generations by optimizing their earliest phase of life. To strengthen this long-term collaboration, LIFECYCLE will organize yearly international meetings open to pregnancy and child cohort researchers, introduce a Fellowship Training Programme for exchange of junior researchers between European pregnancy or child cohorts, and develop e-learning modules for researchers performing life-course health studies. Ultimately, LIFECYCLE will lead to a unique sustainable EuroCHILD Cohort Network, and provide recommendations for targeted prevention strategies by identification of novel markers of early life stressors related to health trajectories throughout the lifecycle.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-13-2016 | Award Amount: 6.91M | Year: 2017

The Future Media Internet (FMI) will be driven by evolving existing over-the-top (OTT) solutions towards a stronger integration with emerging programmable communication and computing infrastructures to address consumer demand for personalised, interactive, mobile and localised media experiences. Creating a trusted platform that brings together technology, creative sectors and consumers in the development of pioneering media applications and services will be crucial to drive European innovation and competitiveness. FLAME will address this goal by establishing an FMI ecosystem based on the Experimentation-as-a-Service (EaaS) paradigm that supports large-scale experimentation of novel FMI products and services using real-life adaptive experimental infrastructures encompassing not only the compute and storage facilities but also the underlying software-enabled communication infrastructure. FLAMEs ecosystem will engage both the creative industries (broadcast, gaming, etc.) and ICT industries (telcos, services) responsible for online distribution, broadcast, communication, and distribution of digital content. Through acceleration methodologies and an advanced experimentation platform (surrogate service management, adaptive service routing, experimental media service chains and experimentation toolbox), FLAME will allow industry, SMEs and entrepreneurs to conduct experiments in real-life experimental infrastructures and gain insight into the performance, acceptance and viability of solutions. FLAMEs innovation potential will be maximised by establishing FLAME Trailblazers (Bristol, Barcelona) to show the way for FLAME Replicators across Europe using a replication process based on best practice sustainability, governance, and engagement models, and infrastructure standards and specifications. A 3rd party investment strategy will create a vibrant FMI ecosystem that adds significant value to current FIRE\ efforts, and puts in place measures for long term sustainability.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-13-2016 | Award Amount: 5.38M | Year: 2017

Key industrial sectors e.g. automotive, are rapidly transformed by digital and communication technologies leading to the fourth industrial revolution. New ones are in the making, e.g. Smart Cities, which inspire a new breed of applications and services. The salient characteristic of these sectors, known as verticals, is that they are rapidly becoming open ecosystems built on top of common physical infrastructures and resources. This requires a high degree of technological convergence among vertical industries empowering them with enhanced technical capacity to trigger the development of new, innovative products, applications and services. 5G network infrastructures and embodied technologies are destined to become a stakeholder driven, holistic environment for technical and business innovation integrating networking, computing and storage resources into one programmable and unified infrastructure. It is this 5G vision that when it is further projected to accommodate verticals raises a number of technical issues Motivated by them, 5GinFIRE project aspires to address two interlinked questions: - Q1: How such a holistic and unified environment should look like? - Q2: How can 5GinFIRE host and integrate verticals and concurrently deal with reconciling their competing and opposing requirements? Addressing these key questions, 5GinFIRE main technical objective is to build and operate an Open, and Extensible 5G NFV-based Reference (Open5G-NFV) ecosystem of Experimental Facilities that integrates existing FIRE facilities with new vertical-specific ones and enables experimentation of vertical industries. In order to guarantee architectural and technological convergence the proposed environment will be built in alignment with on-going standardization and open source activities. Accordingly, the Open5G-NFV FIRE ecosystem may serve as the forerunner experimental playground wherein innovations may be proposed before they are ported to emerging mainstream 5G networks.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: BG-01-2015 | Award Amount: 10.23M | Year: 2016

The objective of SponGES is to develop an integrated ecosystem-based approach to preserve and sustainably use vulnerable sponge ecosystems of the North Atlantic. The SponGES consortium, an international and interdisciplinary collaboration of research institutions, environmental non-governmental and intergovernmental organizations, will focus on one of the most diverse, ecologically and biologically important and vulnerable marine ecosystems of the deep-sea - sponge grounds that to date have received very little research and conservation attention. Our approach will address the scope and challenges of ECs Blue Growth Call by strengthening the knowledge base, improving innovation, predicting changes, and providing decision support tools for management and sustainable use of marine resources. SponGES will fill knowledge gaps on vulnerable sponge ecosystems and provide guidelines for their preservation and sustainable exploitation. North Atlantic deep-sea sponge grounds will be mapped and characterized, and a geographical information system on sponge grounds will be developed to determine drivers of past and present distribution. Diversity, biogeographic and connectivity patterns will be investigated through a genomic approach. Function of sponge ecosystems and the goods and services they provide, e.g. in habitat provision, bentho-pelagic coupling and biogeochemical cycling will be identified and quantified. This project will further unlock the potential of sponge grounds for innovative blue biotechnology namely towards drug discovery and tissue engineering. It will improve predictive capacities by quantifying threats related to fishing, climate change, and local disturbances. SpongeGES outputs will form the basis for modeling and predicting future ecosystem dynamics under environmental changes. SponGES will develop an adaptive ecosystem-based management plan that enables conservation and good governance of these marine resources on regional and international levels.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.12.1 | Award Amount: 11.49M | Year: 2013

The Mont-Blanc project aims to develop a European Exascale approach leveraging on commodity power-efficient embedded technologies. The project has developed a HPC system software stack on ARM, and will deploy the first integrated ARM-based HPC prototype by 2014, and is also working on a set of 11 scientific applications to be ported and tuned to the prototype system.\n\nThe rapid progress of Mont-Blanc towards defining a scalable power efficient Exascale platform has revealed a number of challenges and opportunities to broaden the scope of investigations and developments. Particularly, the growing interest of the HPC community in accessing the Mont-Blanc platform calls for increased efforts to setup a production-ready environment.\n\nThe Mont-Blanc 2 proposal has 4 objectives:\n1. To complement the effort on the Mont-Blanc system software stack, with emphasis on programmer tools (debugger, performance analysis), system resiliency (from applications to architecture support), and ARM 64-bit support\n2. To produce a first definition of the Mont-Blanc Exascale architecture, exploring different alternatives for the compute node (from low-power mobile sockets to special-purpose high-end ARM chips), and its implications on the rest of the system\n3. To track the evolution of ARM-based systems, deploying small cluster systems to test new processors that were not available for the original Mont-Blanc prototype (both mobile processors and ARM server chips)\n4. To provide continued support for the Mont-Blanc consortium, namely operations of the Mont-Blanc prototype, and hands-on support for our application developers\n\nMont-Blanc 2 contributes to the development of extreme scale energy-efficient platforms, with potential for Exascale computing, addressing the challenges of massive parallelism, heterogeneous computing, and resiliency. Mont-Blanc 2 has great potential to create new market opportunities for successful EU technology, by placing embedded architectures in servers and HPC.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP-SICA | Phase: ENV.2011.4.1.1-1 | Award Amount: 8.67M | Year: 2011

Today, countries use a wide variety of methods to monitor the carbon cycle and it is difficult to compare data from country to country and to get a clear global picture. The current global observational and modelling capabilities allow us to produce estimates of carbon budget at different level (from local to global) but many uncertainties still remain. Decision makers need now more than ever systematic, consistent and transparent data, information and tools for an independent and reliable verification process of greenhouse gas emissions and sinks. Therefore higher quality and quantity of CO2 and CH4 data, from different domains and with an enhanced spatial and temporal resolution, need to be collected by a globally integrated observation and analysis system. This can be obtained by the coordinated Global Carbon Observation and Analysis System that this project aims at designing, addressing the climate targets of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) toward building a Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) for carbon. Specific objectives of the GEOCARBON project are: Provide an aggregated set of harmonized global carbon data information (integrating the land, ocean, atmosphere and human dimension) Develop improved Carbon Cycle Data Assimilation Systems (CCDAS) Define the specifications for an operational Global Carbon Observing System Provide improved regional carbon budgets of Amazon and Central Africa Provide comprehensive and synthetic information on the annual sources and sinks of CO2 for the globe and for large ocean and land regions Improve the assessment of global CH4 sources and sinks and develop the CH4 observing system component Provide an economic assessment of the value of an enhanced Global Carbon Observing System Strengthen the effectiveness of the European (and global) Carbon Community participation in the GEO system


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CP-ARTEMIS | Phase: SP1-JTI-ARTEMIS-2013-AIPP5 | Award Amount: 93.92M | Year: 2014

Embedded systems are the key innovation driver to improve almost all mechatronic products with cheaper and even new functionalities. Furthermore, they strongly support todays information society as inter-system communication enabler. Consequently boundaries of application domains are alleviated and ad-hoc connections and interoperability play an increasing role. At the same time, multi-core and many-core computing platforms are becoming available on the market and provide a breakthrough for system (and application) integration. A major industrial challenge arises facing (cost) efficient integration of different applications with different levels of safety and security on a single computing platform in an open context. The objective of the EMC project (Embedded multi-core systems for mixed criticality applications in dynamic and changeable real-time environments) is to foster these changes through an innovative and sustainable service-oriented architecture approach for mixed criticality applications in dynamic and changeable real-time environments. The EMC2 project focuses on the industrialization of European research outcomes and builds on the results of previous ARTEMIS, European and National projects. It provides the paradigm shift to a new and sustainable system architecture which is suitable to handle open dynamic systems. EMC is part of the European Embedded Systems industry strategy to maintain its leading edge position by providing solutions for: . Dynamic Adaptability in Open Systems . Utilization of expensive system features only as Service-on-Demand in order to reduce the overall system cost. . Handling of mixed criticality applications under real-time conditions . Scalability and utmost flexibility . Full scale deployment and management of integrated tool chains, through the entire lifecycle Approved by ARTEMIS-JU on 12/12/2013 for EoN. Minor mistakes and typos corrected by the Coordinator, finally approved by ARTEMIS-JU on 24/01/2014. Amendment 1 changes approved by ECSEL-JU on 31/03/2015.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2012.6.4-2 | Award Amount: 7.73M | Year: 2013

This project will improve the consortium capacity of assessment of volcanic hazards in Supersites of Southern Italy by optimising and integrating existing and new observation/monitoring systems, by a breakthrough in understanding of volcanic processes and by increasing the effectiveness of the coordination between the scientific and end-user communities. More than 3 million of people are exposed to potential volcanic hazards in a large region in the Mediterranean Sea, where two among the largest European volcanic areas are located: Mt. Etna and Campi Flegrei/Vesuvius. This project will fully exploit the unique detailed long-term in-situ monitoring data sets available for these volcanoes and integrate with Earth Observation (EO) data, setting the basic tools for a significant step ahead in the discrimination of pre-, syn- and post-eruptive phases. The wide range of styles and intensities of volcanic phenomena observed on these volcanoes, which can be assumed as archetypes of closed conduit and open conduit volcano, together with the long-term multidisciplinary data sets give an exceptional opportunity to improve the understanding of a very wide spectrum of geo-hazards, as well as implementing and testing a large variety of innovative models of ground deformation and motion. Important impacts on the European industrial sector are expected, arising from a partnership integrating the scientific community and SMEs to implement together new observation/monitoring sensors/systems. Specific experiments and studies will be carried out to improve our understanding of the volcanic internal structure and dynamics, as well as to recognise signals related to impending unrest or eruption. Hazard quantitative assessment will benefit by the outcomes of these studies and by their integration into the cutting edge monitoring approaches thus leading to a step-change in hazard awareness and preparedness and leveraging the close relationship between scientists, SMEs, and end-users.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2011.1.3-04 | Award Amount: 3.91M | Year: 2012

Infections with parasitic worms (nematodes and trematodes) represent a significant economic and welfare burden to the European ruminant livestock industry. The increasing prevalence of anthelmintic resistance means that current control programmes are costly and unsustainable in the long term. Recent changes in the epidemiology, seasonality and geographic distribution of helminth infections have been attributed to climate change. However, other changes in environment (e.g. land use) and in livestock farming, such as intensification and altered management practices, will also have an impact on helminth infections. Sustainable control of helminth infections in a changing world requires detailed knowledge of these interactions. GLOWORM will devise new, sustainable strategies for the effective control of ruminant helminthoses in the face of global change. We will: (1) optimise diagnosis, by developing novel, high-throughput diagnostic tests for mixed helminth infections, sub-clinical infections and anthelmintic resistance, (2) map, monitor and predict the impact of global change on parasite epidemiology, leading to spatial risk maps and improved forecasting of disease, (3) produce predictive models to identify optimal future intervention strategies, (4) identify and mitigate the economic impacts of infections and (5) involve end-users in the production and dissemination of detailed advice for effective worm control. We will work together to develop a panel of innovative technologies and models to monitor and predict changing patterns of infection and disease, optimise the use of anthelmintics to limit the development and spread of drug resistance, and reduce the overall economic impact of helminth infections. GLOWORM will contribute to the continued productivity and profitability of European livestock farming by delivering new tools, strategies and recommendations for the monitoring, surveillance, and sustainable control of helminth infections in grazing livestock.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2012.6.4-3 | Award Amount: 11.65M | Year: 2012

This project aims to predict individual disease risk related to the environment, by characterizing the external and internal exposome for common exposures (air and drinking water contaminants) during critical periods of life, including in utero. A large amount of health data is now available from longitudinal cohorts in both children and adults, with detailed information on risk factors, confounders and outcomes, but these are not well linked with environmental exposure data. The exposome concept refers to the totality of environmental exposures from conception onwards, and is a novel approach to studying the role of the environment in human disease. This project will move the field forward by utilising data on individual external exposome (including sensors, smartphones, geo-referencing, satellites), and omic profiles in an agnostic search for new and integrated biomarkers. These tools will be applied in both experimental short-term studies and long-term longitudinal studies in humans. The ultimate goal is to use the new tools in risk assessment and in the estimation of the burden of environmental disease. The involvement of two SMEs, one specialized in sensors and smartphone development, the other in complex data integration, will increase the chances of a successful impact on European Public Health. This multidisciplinary proposal combines: development of a general framework for the systematic measurement of the internal and external exposome in Europe in relation to air and water contamination, as a way to reduce uncertainty in risk assessment and to address the effects of mixtures and complex exposures; evaluation of health outcomes and key physiological changes in short-term studies (including a randomized trial) and life-course studies with a large amount of information on diet, physical activity and anthropometry; evaluation of the burden of disease in the European population, based on state-of-the-art assessment of population exposures.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.1.1-1-B | Award Amount: 15.82M | Year: 2012

EURenOmics will integrate several established consortia devoted to rare kidney diseases with eminent need and potential for diagnostic and therapeutic progress (i.e. steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome, membranous nephropathy, tubulopathies, complement disorders such a haemolytic uraemic syndrome, and congenital kidney malformations). The Consortium has access to the largest clinical cohorts assembled to date (collectively >10,000 patients) with detailed phenotypic information and comprehensive biorepositories containing DNA, blood, urine, amniotic fluid and kidney tissue. The project aims to (1) identify the genetic and epigenetic causes and modifiers of disease and their molecular pathways; (2) define a novel mechanistic disease ontology beyond phenotypical or morphological description; (3) develop innovative technologies allowing rapid diagnostic testing; (4) discover and validate biomarkers of disease activity, prognosis and treatment responses; and (5) develop in vitro and in vivo disease models and apply high-throughput compound library screening. For these purposes we will integrate comprehensive data sets from next generation exome and whole-genome sequencing, ChiP-sequencing, tissue transcriptome and antigen/epitope profiling, and miRNome, proteome/peptidome, and metabolome screening in different body fluids within and across conventional diagnostic categories. These data will be combined in a systems biology approach with high-resolution clinical phenotyping and findings obtained with a large array of established and novel in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo disease models (functiomics) to identify disease-associated genetic variants involved in monogenic or complex genetic transmission, disease-defining molecular signatures, and potential targets for therapeutic intervention. These efforts will converge in the development of innovative diagnostic tools and biomarkers and efficient screening strategies for novel therapeutic agents.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2010-1.1.29 | Award Amount: 8.13M | Year: 2011

VISIONAIR is a project of creation of a European infrastructure that should be a unique, visible and attractive entry towards high level visualisation facilities. These facilities must be open to the access of a wide set of research communities. By integrating existing facilities, it will create a world-class research infrastructure enabling to conduct frontier research. This integration will provide a significant attractiveness and visibility of the European Research Area. Current scientific challenges concern climate evolution, environmental risks, health, energy, etc. and require the management of more and more complex information. The development of information technologies, the increasing complexity of the information to be handled and analysed, along with the increasing capacities in scientific and engineering simulations, call for the development of increasingly powerful visualisation tools and methods. The Europe Research Area must be able to compete with other big Research Areas when addressing the previously defined challenges. By integrating visualisation facilities with the VISIONAIR project, ERA will be able to answer integrated challenges out of the scope of usually disseminated research teams. Both, physical access and virtual services, will be provided by the infrastructure. A full access to visualisation dedicated software will be organised, while physical access on high level platforms, will be partially (about 20% of global usage) open for other scientists for free on behalf of excellence of submitted projects. The partners of this project propose to build a common infrastructure that would grant access to high level visualisation facilities and resources to researchers. Indeed, researchers from Europe and from around the world will be welcome to carry out research projects using the visualisation facilities provided by the infrastructure. Visibility and attractiveness of ERA will be increased by the invitation of external projects.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: ENV.2012.6.1-5 | Award Amount: 1.36M | Year: 2012

Growing concern over the difficulty of efforts to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions has recently led to an intense discussion of Climate Engineering (CE) - techniques for global-scale intervention to offset global warming. These have great potentials, but also entail serious risks and uncertainties. CE is rapidly gaining scientific, political, commercial, and public attention, and the first national and international assessments of CE schemes have already been published. However, a distinct European perspective, particularly with regard to the EU and how CE relates to its ambitious climate targets, is still missing. The project European Trans-disciplinary Assessment of Climate Engineering (EuTRACE) has been formed to fill this gap. It will (1) pool top independent experts engaged in CE and general climate research across Europe to develop a next-generation assessment of the potentials, uncertainties, risks, implications, and the criteria to assess whether or not to implement various CE options; (2) actively engage in dialogue with the public and policy makers and other civil society stakeholders to disseminate information about CE and to adequately address concerns and perspectives across Europe and globally and incorporate them in the assessment; (3) outline policy options and pathways for the EU and its partners in Europe and abroad to address the challenges CE poses; and (4) identify the most important gaps in current understanding of climate engineering. 14 partner organizations from five countries ranging from the natural sciences & engineering, social sciences and the humanities have joined forces to address these questions. The assessment approach of EuTRACE is supported by European-level policy makers, and the consortium has already established partnerships with a large international network of top researchers from Europe, North America and Asia.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRAIA-1-2014-2015 | Award Amount: 13.00M | Year: 2015

Particle physics is at the forefront of the ERA, attracting a global community of more than 10,000 scientists. With the upgrade of the LHC and the preparation of new experiments, the community will have to overcome unprecedented challenges in order to answer fundamental questions concerning the Higgs boson, neutrinos, and physics beyond the Standard Model. Major developments in detector technology are required to ensure the success of these endeavours. The AIDA-2020 project brings together the leading European infrastructures in detector development and a number of academic institutes, thus assembling the necessary expertise for the ambitious programme of work. In total, 19 countries and CERN are involved in this programme, which follows closely the priorities of the European Strategy for Particle Physics. AIDA-2020 aims to advance detector technologies beyond current limits by offering well-equipped test beam and irradiation facilities for testing detector systems under its Transnational Access programme. Common software tools, micro-electronics and data acquisition systems are also provided. This shared high-quality infrastructure will ensure optimal use and coherent development, thus increasing knowledge exchange between European groups and maximising scientific progress. The project also exploits the innovation potential of detector research by engaging with European industry for large-scale production of detector systems and by developing applications outside of particle physics, e.g. for medical imaging. AIDA-2020 will lead to enhanced coordination within the European detector community, leveraging EU and national resources. The project will explore novel detector technologies and will provide the ERA with world-class infrastructure for detector development, benefiting thousands of researchers participating in future particle physics projects, and contributing to maintaining Europes leadership of the field.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Fellowship | Award Amount: 1.24M | Year: 2015

Future information and communication networks will certainly consist of both classical and quantum devices, some of which are expected to be dishonest, with various degrees of functionality, ranging from simple routers to servers executing quantum algorithms. The realisation of such a complex network of classical and quantum communication must rely on a solid theoretical foundation that, nevertheless, is able to foresee and handle the intricacies of real-life implementations. The study of security, efficiency and verification of quantum communication and computation is inherently related to the fundamental notions of quantum mechanics, including entanglement and non-locality, as well as to central notions in classical complexity theory and cryptography. The central Research objective of our proposal is an end to end investigation of the verification and validation of quantum technologies, from full scale quantum computers and simulators to communication networks with devices of varying size and complexity down to realistic ``quantum gadgets. This goal represents a key challenge in the transition from theory to practice for quantum computing technologies. We will work closely with experimentalists and engineers to ensure that theoretical progress takes Development considerations into account, and will design prototypes for proof-of-principle demonstrations of our methods. The experimental aspects of our proposal are supported by the PIs associate directorial position at the Oxford led hub, joint projects with the York led hub as well as other ongoing collaborations with experimental labs in France and Austria. Meanwhile the required expertise in engineering design would be supported through a new collaboration of the PI as part of the Edinburgh Li-Fi research and development centre. The Deployment axis, complementing our core activity in research-development, will be built upon the unique Edinburgh entrepreneurial culture supported by Informatics Ventures as well as a dedicated senior business advisory board (which sponsored the PIs recent patent on quantum cloud). Advances to the problem of secure delegated computation would have an immediate significant consequence on how computational problems are solved in the real world. One can envision virtually unlimited computational power to end users on the go, using just a simple terminal to access the computing cloud which would turn any smartphone into a quantum-enhanced phone. This will generate new streams of growth for the UK cyber security sector as well as complementary business developments for the National quantum technology investment.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-26-2016 | Award Amount: 5.31M | Year: 2017

MULTIDRONE aims to develop an innovative, intelligent, multi-drone platform for media production to cover outdoor events, which are typically held over wide areas (at stadium/city level). The 4-10 drone team, to be managed by the production director and crew, will have: a) increased decisional autonomy, by minimizing production crew load and interventions and b) improved robustness, security and safety mechanisms (e.g., embedded flight regulation compliance, enhanced crowd avoidance, autonomous emergency landing, communications security), enabling it to carry out its mission even against adverse conditions or crew inaction and to handle emergencies. Such robustness is particularly important, as the drone team has to operate close to crowds and may face an unexpected course of events and/or environmental hazards. Therefore, it must be contextually aware and adaptive with improved perception of crowds, individual people and other hazards. As this multi-actor system will be heterogeneous, consisting of multiple drones and the production crew, serious human-in-the-loop issues will be addressed to avoid operator overload, with the goal of maximizing shooting creativity and productivity, whilst minimizing production costs. Overall, MULTIDRONE will boost research on multiple-actor systems by proposing novel multiple-actor functionalities and performance metrics. Furthermore, the overall multidrone system will be built to serve identified end user needs. Specifically, innovative, safe and fast multidrone audiovisual shooting will provide a novel multidrone cinematographic shooting genre and new media production techniques that will have a large impact on the financially important EU broadcasting/media industry. It will boost production creativity by allowing the creation of rich/novel media output formats, improving event coverage, adapting to event dynamics and offering rapid reaction speed to unexpected events.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.1.1 | Award Amount: 10.05M | Year: 2014

The role of Data Centres (DCs) is vital for the Future Internet. However, DC infrastructures are already stressed by data volumes and service provisioning and consumption trends. Emerging demands cannot be addressed by todays DCs and call for a massive redesign or even transformation of DC architectures.COSIGN proposes a new DC architecture empowered by advanced optical technologies and will demonstrate novel solutions capable of sustaining the growing resource and operational demands of next generation DC Networks. COSIGN aims to move away from todays vendor specific, manually controlled, performance and scale limited DCs towards scalable DC solutions able to support future-proof dynamic, on-demand, low-latency, energy efficient and ultra-high bandwidth DC solutions. COSIGN introduces disruptive transformations in the data plane, significant advances to the control plane and major innovations in the DC virtualization and service orchestration: In the DC Data Plane, COSIGN will deliver an entirely-optical solution enabling scalable top-of-rack switches, ultra-low latency and high volume DC interconnects with high spatial dimensioning. In the DC Control Plane, COSIGN will build upon and extend the Software Defined Networks (SDN) paradigm leveraging capabilities from high-performance optical technologies while developing technology agnostic protocols for software/user defined routing and control. For the DC Management and Orchestration, COSIGN will implement a coherent framework for optical network and IT infrastructure abstraction, virtualization and end-to-end service orchestration.COSIGN brings together a unique combination of skills and expertise able to deliver, for the first time, a coordinated hardware and software architecture, which will guarantee the scale and performance required for future DCs. Results will be demonstrated in challenging industrial setting, leveraging a DC validation platform from Interoute a leading European service provider


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: SCC-01-2015 | Award Amount: 29.25M | Year: 2016

The objective of REPLICATE is to demonstrate Smart City technologies in energy, transport and ICT in districts in San Sebastia, Florence and Bristol addressing urban complexity and generate replication plans in other districts and in follower cities of Essen, Nilufer and Lausanne. Main challenges for cities are to increase the overall energy efficiency, to exploit better local resources in terms of energy supply and demand side measures. For successful implementation of Smart City technologies two main elements are considered: - Cities are the customer: considering local specificities in integrated urban plans and the need to develop monitoring systems to extract conclusions for replication. - Solutions must be replicable, interoperable and scalable. REPLICATE considers also the complexity of cities, the tangible benefits for citizens, the financial mechanisms and the new business models. The 3 pillars implemented in the pilots with the engagement of citizens, private actors and authorities are: - Low energy districts: cost-effective retrofitting, new constructive techniques with optimal energy behaviour and high enthalpy RES in residential buildings. Include also efficient measures in public and residential buildings: ICT tools, PV, shading or natural ventilation; district heating is demonstrated hybridising local biomass, recovered heat and natural gas. - Integrated Infrastructure: deployment of ICT architecture, from internet of things to applications, to integrate the solutions in different areas. Smart Grids on electricity distribution network to address the new challenges, connecting all users: consumers, producers, aggregators and municipality. Intelligent lighting will allow automated regulation of the amount of light and integration of IP services via PLC. - Urban mobility: sustainable and smart urban bus service, electric urban bike transport, 3-wheeler delivery and transport services, deployment of EV charging infrastructures and ICT tools.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FETOPEN-01-2016-2017 | Award Amount: 2.89M | Year: 2017

This H2020-FETOPEN-2016-2017 proposal initiates a major international effort to direct polymorphism in pharmaceutical compounds through crystallizing in high magnetic fields. The ability to direct polymorphism would have a transformative effect on almost all pharmaceutical compounds, and hence on society. It is proposed that MagnaPharm will drive forward innovation in pharmaceuticals by exploiting our new discovery that the polymorph and properties of carbamazepine, indomethacin and coronene can be controlled through the application of magnetic fields. We will apply our method to a range of pharmaceutical compounds, as guided by our project partner AstraZeneca, one of the largest pharmaceutical companies in the world. We will initially target 12 of the most high-profile, high-worth generic drugs with the aim of controllably synthesizing the desired polymorph of each (the lowest-energy polymorph and/or most processable form with desired properties). We aim for this goal via an international multidisciplinary approach centred around our discovery, underpinned by the development of a profound theoretical understanding of the effects of magnetic fields on organic crystal growth, that will direct the synthetic effort, all drawing on results from cutting edge spectroscopic and crystallographic characterisations. With the 12 representative generic drug molecules targeted in the initial stages of MagnaPharm responsible for 18 billion of sales per year worldwide, and the development of many new pharmaceuticals being hampered by solid form issues, control over the production of the most pharmaceutically desired crystal is a truly paradigm-shifting prospect.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2013.6.4-1 | Award Amount: 14.89M | Year: 2013

Assessing individual exposure to environmental stressors and predicting health outcomes implies that both environmental exposures and epi/genetic variations are reliably measured simultaneously. HEALS (Health and Environment-wide Associations based on Large population Surveys) brings together in an innovative approach a comprehensive array of novel technologies, data analysis and modeling tools that support efficiently exposome studies. The general objective of HEALS is the refinement of an integrated methodology and the application of the corresponding analytical and computational tools for performing environment-wide association studies in support of EU-wide environment and health assessments. The exposome represents the totality of exposures from conception onwards, simultaneously identifying, characterizing and quantifying the exogenous and endogenous exposures and modifiable risk factors that predispose to and predict diseases throughout a persons life span. The HEALS approach brings together and organizes environmental, socio-economic, exposure, biomarker and health effect data; in addition, it includes all the procedures and computational sequences necessary for applying advanced bioinformatics coupling thus effective data mining, biological and exposure modeling so as to ensure that environmental exposure-health associations are studied comprehensively. The overall approach will be verified and refined in a series of population studies across Europe including twin cohorts, tackling different levels of environmental exposure, age windows of exposure, and socio-economic and genetic variability. The HEALS approach will be applied in a pilot environment and health examination survey of children including singletons and sets of twins with matched singletons (each twins pair having also a matched singleton) covering ten EU Member States (the EXHES Study). The lessons learned will be translated into scientific advice towards the development of protocols and guidelines for the setting up of a larger European environment and health examination survey.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.1.1 | Award Amount: 3.35M | Year: 2012

The main objective of the LIGHTNESS project is the design, implementation and experimental evaluation of high performance data centre interconnects through the introduction of innovative photonic switching and transmission inside data centres. Harnessing the power of optics will enable data centres to effectively cope with the unprecedented demand growth to be faced in the near future, which will be driven by the increasing popularity of computing and storage server-side applications in the society. Indeed, the deployment of optical transmission systems leveraging Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) allows the transmission of more than a hundred of wavelength channels operating at 10, 40, 100 Gb/s and beyond. This effectively results in unlimited bandwidth capacities of multiple Terabit/s per fibre link, which can be efficiently utilized through next-generation all-optical switching paradigms like Optical Circuit Switching (OCS) or Optical Packet Switching (OPS).In this context, the LIGHTNESS project will join efforts towards the demonstration of a high-performance all-optical hybrid data plane for data centre networks, combining both OCS and OPS equipment to implement transport services tailored to the specific applications throughput and latency requirements. To this goal, an OPS node suitable for intra- data centre connectivity services will be developed and prototyped during the project, together with an enhanced Top of the Rack (TOR) switch seamlessly connecting servers in each rack to the hybrid OCS/OPS inter-cluster network. As an additional achievement of LIGHTNESS, the OCS/OPS inter-cluster network will be empowered with a control plane entity able to dynamically provision both OCS and OPS transport services in response of either the data centre management plane or the enhanced ToR switch. Such a control plane will also be developed and prototyped for integration in the final LIGHTNESS demo throughout the project.The LIGHTNESS project, joining partners with broad expertise in all data centre, optical data plane and optical control plane worlds, will bring innovation to the realization of data centre networking solutions meeting the real needs in such environments.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 3.62M | Year: 2012

The proposed ITN (NanoS3) have assembled eight academic groups with complementary expertise in synthesis, modeling and characterization. They are joined by two full industrial partners active in the development of novel luminescent materials (LuminoChem), and in the home and personal care sectors (Procter and Gamble). Two associated partners will contribute to the work of our proposed network: BioTalentum is an SME in the field of stem-cell research and the Institute for Surface Chemistry (YKI) is a world-leading research institute in applied surface chemistry. Our work will focus on three priority areas of research: 1: Organizing Soft Nanoparticles 2: Dynamics of Soft Nanoparticles 3: Soft Nanoparticles at Interfaces These S&T objectives are combined with the ambitious objectives to train and promote qualified research project managers in the field of soft matter nanoscience, capable to work in research or industry together with experts in different disciplines and in different countries. We will accomplish our goal by training early stage researchers in a wide variety of modern bulk and surface techniques, as well as in modelling and synthetic methods. We will organize a series of tutorial courses on specialized topics, organize network workshops, and implement secondments and visits. To develop the complementary skills needed to start a successful career either in academia or in R&D we will organize trainings in e.g. Project management, Proposal writing, Presentation skills, IP and patent rights and Innovation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2011-1.1.10.;INFRA-2011-1.1.11. | Award Amount: 10.44M | Year: 2011

InGOS will support and integrate the observing capacity of Europe for non-CO2 greenhouse gases (NCGHG: CH4, N2O, SF6, H2 and halocarbons). The emissions of these gases are very uncertain and it is unknown how future climate change will feedback into the land use coupled emissions of CH4 and N2O. The NCGHG atmospheric abundances will increase further in the future and the emissions of these gases are an attractive target for climate change mitigation policies. InGOS aims to improve the existing European observation system so that this will provide us insight into the concentration levels and European and extra-European emissions of the NCGHGs. The data from the network will enable to better constrain the emissions of NCGHGs within the EU and show whether emission reduction policies are effective. The data from the network is designed to allow to detect the spatial and temporal distribution (hotspots) of the sources and to detect changes in emissions due to mitigation and feedbacks with climate change. To strengthen the European observation system, the project has several objectives: Harmonize and standardize the measurements. Provide capacity building in new member states and countries with inadequate existing infrastructure. Support existing observation sites and transfer of selected sites into supersites. Integrate and further integrate marine observations of the NCGHGs with land-based observations Improve measurement methods by testing new innovative techniques and strategies. Test advanced isotope techniques for application in the network to enable attribution of the atmospheric fractions to source categories Integrate data for network evaluation by using inverse modeling and data-assimilation methods and developments in bottom up inventories Link the network to remote sensing data of column abundances from in-situ and satellite observations Prepare for the integration of the NCGHG network with the Integrated Carbon Observation System


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: ENV.2011.1.3.3-1 | Award Amount: 4.57M | Year: 2011

Our knowledge of the causative links between subsurface processes, resulting unrest signals and imminent eruption is, today, wholly inadequate to deal effectively with crises of volcanic unrest. The VUELCO project consortium has come together for a multi-disciplinary attack on the origin, nature and significance of volcanic unrest from the scientific contributions generated by collaboration of ten partners in Europe and Latin America. Dissecting the science of monitoring data from unrest periods at six type volcanoes in Italy, Spain, the West Indies, Mexico and Ecuador the consortium will create global strategies for 1) enhanced monitoring capacity and value, 2) mechanistic data interpretation and 3) identification of reliable eruption precursors; all from the geophysical, geochemical and geodetic fingerprints of unrest episodes. Experiments will establish a mechanistic understanding of subsurface processes capable of inducing unrest and aid in identifying key volcano monitoring parameters indicative of the nature of unrest processes. Numerical models will help establish a link between the processes and volcano monitoring data to inform on the causes of unrest and its short-term evolution. Using uncertainty assessment and new short-term probabilistic hazard forecasting tools the scientific knowledge base will provide the crucial parameters for a comprehensive and best-practice approach to 1) risk mitigation, 2) communication, 3) decision-making and 4) crisis management during unrest periods. The VUELCO project consortium efforts will generate guidance in the definition and implementation of strategic options for effective risk mitigation, management and governance during unrest episodes. Such a mechanistic platform of understanding, impacting on the synergy of scientists, policy-makers, civil protection authorities, decision-makers, and the public, will place volcanic unrest management on a wholly new basis, with European expertise at its peak.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 4.24M | Year: 2013

The research training focuses on the substantive and theoretical challenges posed by universities new role in a global knowledge economy, and especially the contrast between developments in Europe and the Asia Pacific rim. In recent years, massive effort has been put into reforming, managing and marketing universities in Europe and elsewhere in the world. The justification is that universities are to play a new role in the formation of the EHEA and ERA and in driving a knowledge-based economy. The reform processes are, arguably, themselves producing new ways of organising this economy in world regions and reforming the higher education sector itself. This research training project provides ESRs and ERs with the theoretical, methodological and technical skills to analyse these processes in Europe and the Asia Pacific Rim.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.1.1-02 | Award Amount: 7.98M | Year: 2012

The objective of the EU-PLF project is to deliver a validated Blueprint for an animal and farm-centric approach to innovative livestock farming in Europe proven through extensive field studies. This blueprint represents a manual for farmers and their surrounding industry including high tech SMEs and other stakeholders. It is a reference tool offering pragmatic guidance on how Precision Livestock Farming (PLF) systems can be applied to farm level in order to create value for the farmer and other stakeholders. EU-PLF is based on the PLF concept that represents the continuously automated measurements directly on the animal or in its environment. Beyond the use of the PLF data (body movements or sounds, etc.) for monitoring and management, the data can be translated into key indicators on animal welfare, animal health, productivity and environmental impact. Highly experienced European teams from different disciplines with a proven track record in animal and PLF-related fields - animal scientists, veterinarians, ethologists, bio-engineers, engineers, social scientists and economists, leading industrial market players in the livestock industry and high tech SMEs have joined to deliver a useful PLF Blueprint. Most of the academic partners are leading previous research projects funded by the EU in animal and PLF related fields. To ensure that the Blueprint assists the European livestock industry beyond the duration of the project, 50 SMEs or potential starters will be identified all over Europe to play a key role in the EU-PLF project. With a competition for SMEs and starters, the best ideas get funding to design a PLF-prototype with their high tech innovative solutions. In collaboration with a leading industrial PLF-partner, they use the Blueprint to bring their prototype to farm level. This allows developing business models and linking high tech SMEs to European industry players to create new PLF-products with global impact.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CS | Phase: JTI-CS-2012-1-GRA-02-019 | Award Amount: 4.23M | Year: 2013

The proposal tackles the CfP JTI-CS-2012-1-GRA-02-019. Within the project a Wind-Tunnel-Model is designed, built and tested that is capable of being tested with two main purposes: - access the extend of laminarity on the wing - evaluate the performance of LC&A system in the trailing edge of the wing In order to do this the project tackles different points: - a model design is performed that creates a wind-tunnel model with an elastic behaviour comparable to the full-scale wing. This model is as big as possible, although fulfilling all specifications in terms of wind-tunnel restrictions (size, maximum force) in order to allow a hig Reynolds-Number and therefore allow to assess the laminar extend on the wing during the tests in a way that the results are comparable to the full-scale tests. - a first possible LC&A solution which is input to the project is evaluated and optimized and compared with a solution, that was newly designed and optimized LC&A within the project. The best solution is scaled down to model scale and implemented into the model. Within the tests step/ gaps and contaminats are introduced to the model in order to evaluate the stability of the laminar behaviour of the wing with respect to this parameters. In the second test-phase the LC&A devices are used in order to modify the load-distribution on the wing. Before testing the model-wing a ground-vibration test is performed in order to show that the model can be operated safely in the wind-tunnel.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: ENV.2010.1.2.3-2 | Award Amount: 4.58M | Year: 2011

In URGENCHE, a team of internationally recognised scientists in the areas of health risk assessment, urban energy demand and supply scenarios, urban planning, environmental science and epidemiology - in close collaboration with city partners in both Europe and China - develops and applies a methodological framework for the assessment of the overall risks and benefits of alternative greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction policies for health and well-being. These GHG reduction policies may affect public health in various ways, such as the choices made regarding the selection of fuels and means for space heating and transport, building codes to improve thermal efficiency, or urban development and zoning. A methodological framework will be developed and applied. This framework considers GHG emission reductions of energy demand and supply and transport scenarios in urban areas, the effect of these policies, and subsequently the impacts on human health and well-being. The GIS-based approach takes into account the advances made in integrated assessment in a large range of studies in Europe over recent years (many with participation of the project partners). The impact on human health and well-being of GHG policies may be the result of changes in exposure patterns of the urban population to environmental contaminants such as ambient and indoor air pollution as well as changes in housing, urban green spaces, workplaces, transport and lifestyles. Distribution of the impacts across different socioeconomic groups will be addressed. Results will be demonstrated for the year 2030 on a business-as-usual and two GHG emission reduction scenarios with emphasis on transport and buildings. URGENCHE will deliver a validated, methodological framework to assess urban GHG policies with the greatest co-benefits for health and well-being in cities ranging in population from 50,000 to 10 million, across various climatological conditions and differences in socio-economic background.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CS | Phase: JTI-CS-2013-1-GRA-02-022 | Award Amount: 2.32M | Year: 2014

The aim of Gust Load Alleviation techcniques assessment on wind tUnnel MOdel of advanced Regional aircraft (GLAMOUR) proposal is a technological optimisation and experimental validation through an aero-servo-elastic innovative WT model of gust load alleviation control systems for advanced Green Regional Aircraft. The expected benefits of such technologies are mainly the mitigation of gust load responses, the reduction of peak stresses so to potentially decrease sizing loads and consequently increase the weight saving. Most generally, the capability to control the load distribution spanwise could contribute to other global targets such as fatigue lifetime as well aeroelastic and aerodynamic performances. GLAMOUR project has these main objectives: - Validate the Load Alleviation techniques based on control architectures defined by ITD member - Develop of alternative control schemes - Design and manufacturing of a wind tunnel model representing half GRA aircraft dynamically scaled so to be used for experimental validation purpose. The model will be equipped with active split ailerons and elevator to be used for active control - Perform wind tunnel test with and without LA controls to validate both the proposed control schemes and the new ones developed by the consortium. To this aim, the wind tunnel proposed for experimental activity will be equipped with an ad hoc developed gust generator so to inspect the whole flight envelope and frequency bandwidth typical of the considered aircraft - Draw a final assessment on the global benefits achievable using LA technologies in both design and off-design flight conditions. Apart from the Project management workpackage (WP0), that includes exploitation and dissemination, the tasks to be done inside of the project are included in six workpackages.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: ENV.2010.1.3.2-1 | Award Amount: 4.58M | Year: 2011

The extreme consequences of recent catastrophic events have highlighted that risk prevention still needs to be improved to reduce human losses and economic damages. The KULTURisk project aims at developing a culture of risk prevention by means of a comprehensive demonstration of the benefits of prevention measures. The development of a culture of risk prevention requires the improvement of our: a) memory and knowledge of past disasters; b) communication and understanding capacity of current and future hazards; c) awareness of risk and d) preparedness for future events. In order to demonstrate the advantages of prevention options, an original methodology will be developed, applied and validated using specific European case studies, including transboundary areas. The benefits of state-of-the-art prevention measures, such as early warning systems, non-structural options (e.g. mapping and planning), risk transfer strategies (e.g. insurance policy), and structural initiatives, will be demonstrated. In particular, the importance of homogenising criteria to create hazard inventories and build memory, efficient risk communication and warning methods as well as active dialogue with and between public and private stakeholders, will be highlighted. Furthermore, the outcomes of the project will be used to efficiently educate the public and train professionals in risk prevention. KULTURisk will first focus on water-related hazards as the likelihood and adverse impacts of water-related catastrophes might increase in the near future because of land-use and/or climate changes. In particular, a variety of case studies characterised by diverse socio-economic contexts, different types of water-related hazards (floods, debris flows and landslides, storm surges) and space-time scales will be utilised. Finally, the applicability of the KULTURisk approach to different types of natural hazards (e.g. earthquakes, forest fires) will also be analysed.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Collaborative Research & Development | Award Amount: 8.75M | Year: 2013

The Evoque_e project will design and develop innovative hybrid and electric propulsion systems, integrated structures, power electronics, electric drives and energy optimisation. The project will deliver a technology platform which is scaleable, configurable and compatible. The collaboration of partners is led by Jaguar Land Rover, established large companies and 1st tier suppliers: GKN Driveline (GKN), Zytek Automotive, AVL Powertrain UK Ltd (AVL), TATA Steel and Johnson Matthey (Axeon). Three innovative SMEs: Delta Motorsport, Drive System Design (DSD) and Motor Design Ltd (MDL). Plus three leading Universities: Cranfield University, Bristol University and Newcastle University. For the first time, this unique project develops an integrated approach to system development and optimisation, from design to testing, encompassing three technology vehicle demonstrators: Mild Hybrid Electric Vehicle, Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle and a Battery Electric Vehicle. All vehicles will be based on the Range Rover Evoque platform optimised for high volume production and capable of delivering benchmark performance in terms of cost, weight and sustainable use of materials.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-01-2014 | Award Amount: 7.27M | Year: 2015

This programme of work will advance the understanding of the combined effects of factors that cause poor lung function, respiratory disability and the development of COPD . This will be achieved by examination of determinants of lung growth and lung function decline within existing cohorts that cover the whole life course, and which have followed, in detail, the respiratory health status of over 25000 European children and adults from the early 1990s to the present day. Following a comprehensive programme of risk factor identification we will generate a predictive risk score. The programme includes 1) identification of behavioural, environmental, occupational, nutritional, other modifiable lifestyle, genetic determinant of poor lung growth, excess lung function decline and occurrence of low lung function, respiratory disability and COPD within existing child and adult cohorts 2) generation of new data to fill gaps in knowledge on pre-conception and transgenerational determinants and risk factors 3) validation of the role of risk factors by integration of data from relevant disciplines, integration of data from the cohort-related population-based biobanks and exploitation of appropriate statistical techniques 4) generation of information on change in DNA methylation patterns to identify epigenetic changes associated with both disease development and exposure to specific risk factors 5) generation of a predictive risk score for individual risk stratification that takes account of the combined effects of factors that cause poor lung growth, lung function decline, respiratory disability, and COPD and 6) implementation of an online interactive tool for personalised risk prediction based which will be disseminated freely and widely to the population, patients and health care providers. The work will provide an evidence base for risk identification at individual and population level that can underpin future preventive and therapeutic strategies and policies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: SiS.2012.1.2-1 | Award Amount: 4.59M | Year: 2013

Synthetic biology (SynBio) offers huge potential for applications in energy, health and the environment. It also brings with it various challenges such as regulatory issues of biosafety, biosecurity and intellectual property rights, as well as potential environmental and socio-economic risks in developing countries. As yet, however, there is scant public knowledge about the technology. It is thus essential to establish an open dialogue between stakeholders concerning SynBios potential benefits and risks and to explore possibilities for its collaborative shaping on the basis of public participation. SYN-ENERGY will organise a wide range of mobilisation and mutual learning processes relating to these challenges. Besides a number of well-established European and international networks, the consortium encompasses and can mobilise a wide variety of stakeholders from science, industry, civil society, policy, education, art and other areas. Learning processes will contribute to a better understanding of SynBio research and innovation and to enhanced public engagement, while at the same time stimulating reflection on novel approaches to an inclusive governance framework that is capable of fostering responsible research and innovation. The processes will involve citizens and specific publics through well-established and innovative means of engagement, and will support the convergence of stakeholders and perspectives. Activities will be structured by four platforms, highlighting SynBios future, public, cultural and research & innovation perspectives. The iterative mutual learning process within SYN-ENERGY will be open to change in order to accommodate the dynamics of an emergent field. By dint of its approach, design and consortium, SYN-ENERGY will be a Science in Society activity with significant impact, raising public awareness of SynBio and yielding benefits for involved stakeholders, public discourse and European policy making in an international context.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-10-2014 | Award Amount: 6.00M | Year: 2015

We propose to revolutionize current endocrine diagnostics by replacing conventional, time-consuming single-analyte hormone assays with ambulatory dynamic endocrine diagnostics. Disorders of the adrenal and pituitary endocrine systems are not only accompanied by changes in absolute hormone levels, but also secretion patterns. The rapid circadian (24 hour) and ultradian (< 24 hour) cycling of hormone levels poses diagnostic challenges since random measurements do not always detect abnormalities. Furthermore, monitoring of treatment of endocrine diseases are often severely limited by lack of multiple measurements at different time points, which is impractical in an out-patient setting. To overcome these hurdles academic and commercial partners propose to: Develop a novel microdialysate sampling and analysis system for adrenal and pituitary hormonome profiling Validate the method in healthy vs. six populations with endocrine disorders Promote the system for demonstration in routine clinical practice by dissemination of results to relevant European stakeholders The portable fraction collector for subcutaneous microdialysate combined with state-or-the-art ultrasensitive assays by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectroscopy (LCMS/MS) and multiplex proximity extension assays (Proseek), will allow collection of 10 minute fractions for up to 72 hours while the person tends to daily life activities. LCMSMS and Proseek assays can generate a timeline of hormonomes covering the 24 hour cycle without losing sensitivity and specificity, producing not only hormone levels, but also secretion patterns for diagnostics and monitoring purposes. ULTRADIAN will deliver an ambulatory diagnostic system with unprecedented sensitivity and specificity for simplified diagnostics and monitoring of endocrine conditions, economisation of health care, and new products and markets for the European diagnostic sector.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CS | Phase: JTI-CS-2012-2-GRA-05-007 | Award Amount: 2.60M | Year: 2013

The proposed project tackles a CfP from the JTI-GRA ITD. Is focuses on the experimental optimization of a regional aircraft configuration and a subsequent optimization of take-off/ landing configuration. The regional aircraft has a wing designed for natural laminar flow, fuselage-mounted engines and a T-tail. Open configurational questions that are addressed tackle wing-tip devices and their performance, engine positions as well as tail-plane position and settings. In order to account for the fuselage-mounted engine the model will include a working propulsion system designed to fit the real engines. This first test-phase focuses on the configurational questions, the second test-phase tackles the optimization of the HLD-devices by testing different configurations. Therefore apart from the modular aircraft configuration the different control surfaces, HLD devices used for assessing the landing-configuration and stability and control issues for the different configurations will include actuators to allow continuous setting and fast wind-tunnel tests. Pressure tubes, sensors and a balance system to measure engine thrust will be introduced into the aircraft model, too. The consortium for this proposal consists of 5 partners which were chosen according to their experience in different fields needed in this proposal. The consortium is well balanced, including SMEs, University and Industry. The work proposed in this proposal covers the total design, including solutions for actuators, propulsion system, the manufacturing of the model, its Ground-Vibration-Test and the Wind-Tunnel Test as well as the final subsequent modifications needed to operate the model in subsequent tests as required in the CfP. Thus the work is structured in four different work-package, dealing with Management, Design & Manufacturing, Tests and Final Modifications.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2013.3.6-02 | Award Amount: 9.41M | Year: 2013

Cellular signaling systems are crucially important for a broad range of critical health and disease areas and high value industrial applications. Signaling systems are the target for more than half of the medicines marketed by the pharmaceutical industry, and form the main R&D area for the nutrition, flavour and fragrance industries. SynSignal is a multidisciplinary high-tech consortium working in synthetic biologys area of greatest untapped potential, delivering a synthetic biology toolbox and finished products custom designed for major present and future industrial applications of cellular signaling. Based on the leading expertise and innovative drive of the partners, SynSignal will address this urgent and imposing bottleneck, by providing new and sophisticated synthetic biology tools and technologies to overcome the challenges currently facing signaling-based product development. Putting in place the technological innovations, toolboxes, and application-focused materials created during SynSignal will have a dramatic impact on the accessibility of drug discovery technologies, particularly for cancer and diabetes, and for enabling technologies to create the next generation of flavours, fragrances, and nutritional ingredients. Our innovations will provide immediate benefits to the health and well-being of Europes citizens and to the competitiveness of key European industries alike, and catalyze their transition towards sustainable production principles. In addition, all partners in SynSignal themselves will draw great benefit from the activities proposed. Private sector partners will considerably enhance their discovery and technology platforms, thereby increasing their efficiency, output and valuation. Academic partners in SynSignal will decisively advance fundamental life science research in their laboratories and in the larger scientific community by creating enabling tools to tackle biological questions of unprecedented complexity in cellular signaling.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 4.06M | Year: 2014

The Water Framework Directive (WFD) is the most significant EU legislation concerning surface water management. Programs of Measures are required to ensure water bodies achieve a good ecological status. It is important to predict the impact of interventions on water quality. Man-made and natural processes control surface water quality, these are highly complex with a range of sources, transport and transformation processes. Cost estimates by EU governments indicate that billions of euros will be spent over several decades to implement WFD. There is an increasing level of concern on the implementation cost (financial and carbon). Integrated water quality models designed to predict the quality of water across the linked urban and rural scales in a catchment is seen as a tool to optimise this cost. Integrated Catchment Modelling (ICM) is based on linking numerous empirically calibrated sub-models of water quality processes. Catchment scale WQ predictions are then used to justify investment. Current water quality sub-models contain significant uncertainty. Methods have been developed to quantify uncertainty at a level however little work has been carried out to investigate WQ uncertainty propagation between sub-models. QUICS will develop a generalised catchment wide approach to uncertainty assessment that can then be used in WFD implementation studies. It will address uncertainty propagation at the spatial and temporal scales found in catchments and develop tools to reduce uncertainty by optimising sampling and monitoring and the objective selection of model structure. This will reduce uncertainty in WQ predictions and result in better informed investment decisions and so have a significant impact on WFD implementation. QUICS contains leading water quality scientists, uncertainty experts and private sector water management practitioners and modellers. It will train researchers capable of developing and implementing uncertainty management tools into ICM studies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.1.1 | Award Amount: 2.78M | Year: 2012

CONTENT will focus on developing next generation high capacity end-to-end, heterogeneous infrastructure technologies to support the network of the future. The model proposed will be based on the Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) paradigm and provide a technology platform interconnecting geographically distributed IT resources that can support a variety of Cloud services. This platform will include an advanced multi-technology network infrastructure, through which IT resources are shared by multiple operators and service providers and accessed remotely on an on-demand basis. The network solution will be based on the integration of next-generation wireless access and optical access-metro network technologies. CONTENT has identified the most promising and future-proof technologies in the wireless and the optical access-metro network domains and focuses on their seamless integration to provide end-to-end connectivity of IT resources with fixed and mobile users. CONTENT will focus on a hybrid wireless solution based on WiFi and LTE and a WDM access-metro network with frame-based sub wavelength switching granularity, incorporating active nodes that also support backhauling of the wireless access network. To support the IaaS paradigm, CONTENT will adopt the concept of physical resources virtualization across the technology domains involved. Virtualization will facilitate sharing of physical resources among various virtual operators, introducing new business models and enabling new exploitation opportunities for the underlying physical infrastructures. CONTENTs main objective is to offer a rationalized cost and energy efficient network infrastructure suitable to support Cloud and mobile Cloud services for which it will provide a proof-of-concept demonstration. The CONTENT consortium comprises a unique combination of the required technical expertise, with high complementarities in skills as well as balanced industrial and academic participation to achieve this objective.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INT-04-2015 | Award Amount: 3.72M | Year: 2016

This Project aims to address an increasingly pressing global challenge: How to achieve the EUs development goals and the UNs Sustainable Development Goals, while meeting the global target of staying within two degrees global warming and avoid transgressing other planetary boundaries. EU policies must align with sustainable development goals (Article 11 TFEU). The impacts of climate change and global loss of natural habitat undermine the progress achieved by pursuing the Millennium Development Goals and threaten the realisation of EU development policy goals. Our focus is the role of EUs public and private market actors. They have a high level of interaction with actors in emerging and developing economies, and are therefore crucial to achieving the EUs development goals. However, science does not yet cater for insights in how the regulatory environment influences their decision-making, nor in how we can stimulate them to make development-friendly, environmentally and socially sustainable decisions. Comprehensive, ground-breaking research is necessary into the regulatory complexity in which EU private and public market actors operate, in particular concerning their interactions with private and public actors in developing countries. Our Consortium, leading experts in law, economics, and applied environmental and social science, is able to analyse this regulatory complexity in a transdisciplinary and comprehensive perspective, both on an overarching level and in depth, in the form of specific product life-cycles: ready-made garments and mobile phones. We bring significant new evidence-based insights into the factors that enable or hinder coherence in EU development policy; we will advance the understanding of how development concerns can be successfully integrated in non-development policies and regulations concerning market actors; and we provide tools for improved PCD impact assessment as well as for better corporate sustainability assessment.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: MG-2.1-2014 | Award Amount: 18.00M | Year: 2015

IN2RAIL is to set the foundations for a resilient, consistent, cost-efficient, high capacity European network by delivering important building blocks that unlock the innovation potential that exists in SHIFT2RAIL: innovative technologies will be explored and resulting concepts embedded in a systems framework where infrastructure, information management, maintenance techniques, energy, and engineering are integrated, optimised, shared and exploited. IN2RAIL will make advances towards SHIFT2RAIL objectives: enhancing the existing capacity fulfilling user demand; increasing the reliability delivering better and consistent quality of service; reducing the LCC increasing competitiveness of the EU rail system. To achieve the above, a holistic approach covering Smart Infrastructures, Intelligent Mobility Management (I2M)and Rail Power Supply and Energy Management will be applied. Smart Infrastructure addresses the fundamental design of critical assets - switches and crossings and tracks. It will research components capable of meeting future railway demands and will utilise modern technologies in the process. Risk and condition-based LEAN approaches to optimise RAMS and LCC in asset maintenance activities will be created to tackle the root causes of degradation. I2M researches automated, interoperable and inter-connected advanced traffic management systems; scalable and upgradable systems, utilising standardised products and interfaces, enabling easy migration from legacy systems; the wealth of data and information on assets and traffic status; information management systems adding the capability of nowcasting and forecasting of critical asset statuses. Rail Power Supply and Energy Management create solutions to improve the energy performance of the railway system. Research on new power systems characterised by reduced losses and capable of balancing energy demands, along with innovative energy management systems enabling accurate and precise estimates of energy flows.


Olmos Y.,King's College London | Hodgson L.,University of Bristol | Mantell J.,University of Bristol | Verkade P.,University of Bristol | Carlton J.G.,King's College London
Nature | Year: 2015

During telophase, the nuclear envelope (NE) reforms around daughter nuclei to ensure proper segregation of nuclear and cytoplasmic contents. NE reformation requires the coating of chromatin by membrane derived from the endoplasmic reticulum, and a subsequent annular fusion step to ensure that the formed envelope is sealed. How annular fusion is accomplished is unknown, but it is thought to involve the p97 AAA-ATPase complex and bears a topological equivalence to the membrane fusion event that occurs during the abscission phase of cytokinesis. Here we show that the endosomal sorting complex required for transport-III (ESCRT-III) machinery localizes to sites of annular fusion in the forming NE in human cells, and is necessary for proper post-mitotic nucleo-cytoplasmic compartmentalization. The ESCRT-III component charged multivesicular body protein 2A (CHMP2A) is directed to the forming NE through binding to CHMP4B, and provides an activity essential for NE reformation. Localization also requires the p97 complex member ubiquitin fusion and degradation 1 (UFD1). Our results describe a novel role for the ESCRT machinery in cell division and demonstrate a conservation of the machineries involved in topologically equivalent mitotic membrane remodelling events. © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Fellowship | Award Amount: 1.05M | Year: 2015

Healthcare is in need of more advanced therapies that integrate closely with the biological and physical systems of the human body. These include new treatments for age-related physical degradation, for example in the circulatory system, and post-operative functional restoration following surgery, including cancer removal, and trauma including traffic accidents. Unfortunately current medical treatments and devices rely heavily on conventional hard technologies that limit effectiveness and raise safety and cost issues. In contrast soft robotic technologies have the potential for close bio-integration by exploiting the soft-soft interfacing that is so prevalent in Nature. Soft robotics offers safer, scalable, lower cost and more effective personalised medical treatments. This fellowship will develop innovative modular soft robotic technologies for rapid exploitation in the next generation bio-integrative medical and therapeutic systems. To enable future soft robotic healthcare technologies requires a concerted effort across the development pipeline from fundamental biocompatible smart materials and their corresponding nonlinear viscoelastic mathematical modelling to efficient compliant mechanisms and complete compliant machines. Fundamental studies into materials and mechanisms will be undertaken and will feed into the identification and characterisation of a set of modular soft robotic components that act as building blocks for complete implantable medical devices. The technologies identified and developed will contribute directly to a step change in the sophistication of bio-integrative medical treatments. These will strengthen the UKs capability in the field of healthcare technologies and will make a significant contribution to improvements in standards of care and quality of life for a wide range of patients.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Fellowship | Award Amount: 488.45K | Year: 2016

Advances in High Performance Computing (HPC) and scientific software development will have increasingly significant societal impact through the computational design of new products, medicines, materials and industrial processes. However, the complexity of modern HPC hardware means that scientific software development now requires teams of scientists and programmers to work together, with different and non-overlapping skill-sets required from each member of the group. This complexity can lead to software development projects stalling. Investments in software development are in danger of being lost, either because key members of a team move on, or because a lack of planning or engagement means that a sustainable user and developer community has failed to gel around a particular code. Research Software Engineers (RSEs) can solve this problem. RSEs have the skills and training necessary to support software development projects as they move through different stages of the academic software lifecycle. Academic software evolves along this lifecycle, from being a code used by an initial team of researchers, through to a large multi-site community code used by academics and industrialists from across the UK and around the World. RSEs provide the training and support needed to help academic software developers structure their projects to support the sustainable growth of their user and developer communities. RSEs are also highly skilled programmers who can train software developers in advanced HPC techniques, and who can support developers in the implementation, optimisation and testing of complex and intricate code. Together with academic software developers, RSEs can support UK investment in HPC, and ensure that the potential of computational science and engineering to revolutionise the design of future products and industrial processes is realised. This project aims to develop sustainable RSE career pathways and funding at Bristol. This will support the growth of a sustainable team of RSEs at the University. Software development projects that will be supported include; the building of code to interface real biological cells with virtual simulated cells, so to support the rapid design of new biomanufacturing control processes; the development of code to more quickly model the behaviour of electrons in novel materials, to support the design of new fuel cells and batteries; code to improve our understanding of glass-like matter, so to help design new materials with exciting new properties; software to support modelling of the quantum interaction between laser light and microscopic nanoparticles, to support the design of optical tweezers and new optically driven nanomachines; and code to design new medicinal drugs and to understand why existing treatments are no longer working, thereby supporting the development of 21st century medicine. Finally, this project aims to create a coherent set of teaching materials in programming and research software engineering. These, together with the development of software to support science and programming lessons held in an interactive 3D planetarium, will help inspire and educate the next generation of scientists and RSEs. These materials will showcase how maths, physics, computing and chemistry can be used in the real world to create the high-tech tools and industries of the future.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.16M | Year: 2017

In the Roadmap for Mental Health and Wellbeing Research in Europe (ROAMER), top-priority is research into child and adolescent mental health symptoms. CAPICE (Childhood and Adolescence Psychopathology: unravelling the complex etiology by a large Interdisciplinary Collaboration in Europe) will address this priority. This network will elaborate on the EArly Genetics and Lifecourse Epidemiology (EAGLE) consortium, a well-established collaboration of the many European birth and adolescent population based (twin and family) cohorts with unique longitudinal information on lifestyle, family environment, health, and emotional and behavioral problems. Phenotypic and genome-wide genotypic data are available for over 60,000 children, in addition to genome-wide genotypes for over 20,000 mothers and epigenome-wide data for over 6,000 children. Combined with the enormous progress in methodology, the results of the research performed in this network will greatly expand our knowledge regarding the etiology of mental health symptoms in children and adolescents and shed light on possible targets for prevention and intervention, e.g. by drug target validation. Moreover, it will provide Early Stage Researchers (ESRs) with an excellent training in the psychiatric genomics field given by a multidisciplinary team of eminent scientists from the academic and non-academic sector highly experienced in e.g., gene-environment interaction and covariation analyses, (epi)genome-wide association studies, Mendelian Randomization (MR) and polygenic analyses. With a focus on common and debilitating problems in childhood and adolescence, including depression, anxiety and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, CAPICE will contribute to improving later outcomes of young people in European countries with child and adolescent psychopathology.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-26-2016 | Award Amount: 3.99M | Year: 2017

Robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery (RAMIS) offers many advantages when compared to traditional MIS, including improved vision, precision and dexterity. While the popularity of RAMIS is steadily increasing, the potential for improving patient outcomes and penetrating into many procedures is not fully realised, largely because of serious limitations in the current instrumentation, control and feedback to the surgeon. Specifically, restricted access, lack of force feedback, and use of rigid tools in confined spaces filled with organs pose challenges to full adoption. We aim to develop novel technology to overcome barriers to expansion of RAMIS to more procedures, focusing on real-world surgical scenarios of urology, vascular surgery, and soft tissue orthopaedic surgery. A team of highly experienced clinical, academic, and industrial partners will collaborate to develop: i) dexterous anthropomorphic instruments with minimal cognitive demand ii) a range of bespoke end-effectors with embedded surgical tools using additive manufacturing methods for rapid prototyping and testing utilizing a user-centred approach, iii) wearable multi-sensory master for tele-operation to optimise perception and action and iv) wearable smart glasses for augmented reality guidance of the surgeon based on real-time 3D reconstruction of the surgical field, utilising dynamic active constraints and restricting the instruments to safe regions. The demonstration platform will be based on commercial robotic manipulators enhanced with the SMARTsurg advanced hardware and software features. Testing will be performed on laboratory phantoms with surgeons to bring the technology closer to exploitation and to validate acceptance by clinicians. The study will benefit patients, surgeons and health providers, by promoting safety and ergonomics as well as reducing costs. Furthermore, there is a potential to improve complex remote handling procedures in other domains beyond RAMIS.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-14-2014 | Award Amount: 7.23M | Year: 2015

Small Cells, Cloud-Radio Access Networks (C-RAN), Software Defined Networks (SDN) and Network Function Virtualization (NVF) are key enablers to address the demand for broadband connectivity with low cost and flexible implementations. Small Cells, in conjunction with C-RAN, SDN, NVF pose very stringent requirements on the transport network. Here flexible wireless solutions are required for dynamic backhaul and fronthaul architectures alongside very high capacity optical interconnects. However, there is no consensus on how both technologies can be most efficiently combined. 5G-XHaul proposes a converged optical and wireless network solution able to flexibly connect Small Cells to the core network. Exploiting user mobility, our solution allows the dynamic allocation of network resources to predicted and actual hotspots. To support these novel concepts, we will develop: 1) Dynamically programmable, high capacity, low latency, point-to-multipoint mm-Wave transceivers, cooperating with sub-6-GHz systems; 2) A Time Shared Optical Network offering elastic and fine granular bandwidth allocation, cooperating with advanced passive optical networks; 3) A software-defined cognitive control plane, able to forecast traffic demand in time and space, and the ability to reconfigure network components. The well balanced 5G-XHaul consortium of industrial and research partners with unique expertise and skills across the constituent domains of communication systems and networks will create impact through: a) Developing novel converged optical/wireless architectures and network management algorithms for mobile scenarios; b) Introduce advanced mm-Wave and optical transceivers and control functions; c) Support the development of international standards through technical and techno-economic contributions. 5G-XHaul technologies will be integrated in a city-wide testbed in Bristol (UK). This will uniquely support the evaluation of novel optical and wireless elements and end-to-end performance.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: DS-01-2014 | Award Amount: 4.54M | Year: 2015

Privacy Flag combines crowd sourcing, ICT technology and legal expertise to protect citizen privacy when visiting websites, using smart-phone applications, or living in a smart city. It will enable citizens to monitor and control their privacy with a user friendly solution provided as a smart phone application, a web browser add-on and a public website. It will: 1.Develop a highly scalable privacy monitoring and protection solution with: - Crowd sourcing mechanisms to identify, monitor and assess privacy-related risks; - Privacy monitoring agents to identify suspicious activities and applications; - Universal Privacy Risk Area Assessment Tool and methodology tailored on European norms on personal data protection; - Personal Data Valuation mechanism; - Privacy enablers against traffic monitoring and finger printing; - User friendly interface informing on the privacy risks when using an application or website. 2.Develop a global knowledge database of identified privacy risks, together with online services to support companies and other stakeholders in becoming privacy-friendly, including: - In-depth privacy risk analytical tool and services; - Voluntary legally binding mechanism for companies located outside Europe to align with and abide to European standards in terms of personal data protection; - Services for companies interested in being privacy friendly; - Labelling and certification process. 3.Collaborate with standardization bodies and actively disseminate towards the public and specialized communities, such as ICT lawyers, policy makers and academics. 11 European partners, including SMEs and a large telco operator, bring their complementary technical, legal, societal and business expertise; strong links with standardization bodies and international fora; and outcomes from over 20 related research projects. It will build a privacy defenders community and will establish a legal entity with a sound business plan to ensure longterm sustainability and growth.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: ERC-AG | Phase: ERC-AG-LS1 | Award Amount: 2.31M | Year: 2012

Self-assembly is a hallmark of Biology. We are far from a complete understanding of this natural assembly, which in turn limits our ability to mimic biological construction in the bioengineering of tuneable synthetic systems. This proposal addresses the major challenge of membrane protein folding. Here, I intend to make a step change to my pioneering biophysical studies and investigate co-translational membrane protein folding. A central feature will be the creation of synthetic systems to probe key events in co-translational folding, as the protein folds in the membrane whilst emerging from the ribosome. An ambitious target is to make these systems tuneable, which will provide a new tool for the fabrication of membrane proteins and artificial cells in Synthetic Biology. The assembly of a tuneable artificial module that affords control over membrane protein synthesis is unprecedented. I focus on the ubiquitous superfamily of major facilitator proteins, namely the best studied family member, lactose permease, LacY. This proposal has state of the art biophysical mechanistic studies at its core, which interleave into Cell and Synthetic Biology. There are two themes: Theme 1. Determination of fundamental membrane protein folding parameters: folding transition states and lipid control Phi-value analysis will be used to probe the folding transition state of LacY; the first such analysis of a multi-domain membrane protein. Lipid parameters that control LacY folding will be quantified, including bilayer asymmetry using novel droplet interface bilayer methods. Theme 2: construction of tuneable synthetic co-translational folding systems Engineered ribosomes and translocon insertion machinery will be incorporated and LacY folding will be controlled. Translation will be regulated or halted using mutant ribosomes, arrest sequences, altered codon usage and controlling tRNA addition. Trapped LacY folding intermediates will be studied using biophysical methods.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: ERC-ADG | Phase: ERC-ADG-2014 | Award Amount: 2.35M | Year: 2016

Fifteen years ago it was widely believed that asthma was an allergic/atopic disease caused by allergen exposure in infancy; this produced atopic sensitization and continued exposure resulted in eosinophilic airways inflammation, bronchial hyper-responsiveness and reversible airflow obstruction. It is now clear that this model is at best incomplete. Less than one-half of asthma cases involve allergic (atopic) mechanisms, and most asthma in low-and-middle income countries is non-atopic. Westernization may be contributing to the global increases in asthma prevalence, but this process appears to involve changes in asthma susceptibility rather than increased exposure to established asthma risk factors. Understanding why these changes are occurring is essential in order to halt the growing global asthma epidemic.This will require a combination of epidemiological, clinical and basic science studies in a variety of environments. A key task is to reclassify asthma phenotypes. These are important to: (i) better understand the aetiological mechanisms of asthma; (ii) identify new causes; and (iii) identify new therapeutic measures. There are major opportunities to address these issues using new techniques for sample collection from the airways (sputum induction, nasal lavage), new methods of analysis (microbiome, epigenetics), and new bioinformatics methods for integrating data from multiple sources and levels. There is an unprecedented potential to go beyond the old atopic/non-atopic categorization of phenotypes. I will therefore conduct analyses to re-examine and reclassify asthma phenotypes. The key features are the inclusion of: (i) both high and low prevalence centres from both high income countries and low-and-middle income countries; (ii) much more detailed biomarker information than has been used for previous studies of asthma phenotypes; and (iii) new bioinformatics methods for integrating data from multiple sources and levels.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE.2013.2.2-01 | Award Amount: 11.79M | Year: 2014

Nudge-it engages internationally leading experts in the neurobiology of motivational behaviour, the neuroscience of reward pathways, the neuroendocrinology of homeostatic regulation of appetite, experimental psychology, functional brain imaging, behavioural economics, and computational modelling. They will work together to develop new tools and approaches that can provide the evidence needed to inform effective policies on healthy eating. Effort will be focussed in four areas of particular importance for policy: i) early life experience: how the choices we make as adults are influenced by stress and poor nutrition in early life. ii) habitual eating behaviour: the life-long learning process and how it is moderated by homeostatic mechanisms; iii) impulsive choice behaviour: the momentary choices we make to eat high energy or low energy foods, depending on hunger state and reward value, and upon price and availability; iv) the role of environmental context in decision-making processes: how day-to-day choices and preferences are affected by socio-economic status, stress, and mood. Development work will involve refinements of experimental approaches and tools in both human behavioural studies, neuroimaging, and translational animal studies. A focus will be on tools that provide bridges that link understanding at different levels and in different domains, and which contribute to building predictive models with strong explanatory power that can contribute to policy formulation. A powerful strategy for dissemination of outcomes to relevant groups, including by a massive open online course, will ensure impact.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA | Phase: INFRA-2012-3.3. | Award Amount: 1.68M | Year: 2012

The use of High Performance Computing (HPC) is commonly recognized a key strategic element both in research and industry for an improvement of the understanding of complex phenomena. The constant growth of generated data - Big Data - and computing capabilities of extreme systems lead to a new generation of computers composed of millions of heterogeneous cores which will provide Exaflop performances in 2020. Such hardware architectures lead to outstanding technological breakthrough possibilities in computations but also to outstanding software challenges. In front of this challenge, the international community has launched various programs and organizations. In US this has been done through some funding programs such as the Ubiquitous High Performance Computing program and the co-design centre call. The International Exascale Software Project (IESP) had the goal to built a US and international roadmap. In Europe the EU PRACE project which is preparing the tier-0 level of the European HPC ecosystem, has been implemented. The successful first European Exascale Software Initiative (EESI1) federated the European community, built a preliminary European cartography, vision and roadmap and stated as the European voice at international level. However, it is necessary to go one step further towards implementation, by establishing a European structure to gather the European community, by providing periodically cartography and roadmaps and dynamic synthesis and recommendations in (i) defining and following up concrete impacts of R&D projects, (ii) detecting disruptive technologies (iii) addressing cross cutting issues in numerical processing and software engineering, (iiii) developing gap analysis methodology towards Exascale roadmap implementation. Overall, to achieve Exascale targets, international collaboration need to be explored and a more dynamical structure must be implemented.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FETPROACT-01-2016 | Award Amount: 4.94M | Year: 2017

This consortium will pioneer disruptive technology for bio-electronic medicine to provide much needed therapies for cardiorespiratory and functional neurological disease. The technology implements small neural networks known as central pattern generators (CPG) to deliver fit-and-forget bio-electronic implants that respond to physiological feedback in real time, are safer, simpler, non-invasive, and have autonomy exceeding the patient lifespan. Multichannel neurons will be made to compete on analogue chips to obtain flexible motor sequences underpinned by a wide parameter space. By building large scale nonlinear optimization tools and using them to assimilate electrophysiological data, we will develop a method for automatically finding the network parameters that accurately reproduce biological motor sequences and their adaptation to multiple physiological inputs. In this way, we will have resolved the issue of programming analogue CPGs which has long been the obstacle to using neural chips in medicine. An adaptive pacemaker will be constructed, tested, validated and trialled on animal models of atrio-ventricular block and left bundle branch block to demonstrate the benefits of heart rate adaptation, beat-to-beat cardiac resynchronization and respiratory sinus arrhythmia. By providing novel therapy for arrhythmias, heart failure and their comorbidities such as sleep apnoea and hypertension, CResPace will extend patients life and increase quality of life.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Training Grant | Award Amount: 4.28M | Year: 2014

Condensed matter physics is a major underpinning area of science and technology. For example, the physics of electrons in solids underpins much of modern technology and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. We propose to create a Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT) which will address the national need to develop researchers equipped with the skill sets and perspective to make worldwide impact in this area. The research themes covered address some very fundamental questions in science such as the physics of superconductors, novel magnetic materials, single atomic layer crystals, plasmonic structures, and metamaterials, and also more applied topics in the power electronics, optoelectronics and sensor development fields. There are strong connections between fundamental and applied condensed matter physics. The goal of the Centre is to provide high calibre graduates with a focussed but comprehensive training programme in the most important physical aspects of these important materials, from intelligent design (first principles electronic structure calculations and modelling), via cutting-edge materials synthesis, characterisation and sophisticated instrumentation, through to identification and realisation of exciting new applications. In addition programme development will emphasise transferable skills including business & enterprise, outreach and communication. As stated in the impact section, physics-dependent businesses are of major importance to the UK economy.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: ERC-ADG | Phase: ERC-ADG-2014 | Award Amount: 1.58M | Year: 2015

The last few years have seen significant advances in the discovery and development of integrable models in probability, especially in the context of random polymers and the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) equation. Among these are the semi-discrete (OConnell-Yor) and log-gamma (Seppalainen) random polymer models. Both of these models can be understood via a remarkable connection between the geometric RSK correspondence (a geometric lifting, or de-tropicalization, of the classical RSK correspondence) and the quantum Toda lattice, the eigenfunctions of which are known as Whittaker functions. This connection was discovered by the PI and further developed in collaboration with Corwin, Seppalainen and Zygouras. In particular, we have recently introduced a powerful combinatorial framework which underpins this connection. I have also explored this connection from an integrable systems point of view, revealing a very precise relation between classical, quantum and stochastic integrability in the context of the Toda lattice and some other integrable systems. The main objectives of this proposal are (1) to further develop the combinatorial framework in several directions which, in particular, will yield a wider family of integrable models, (2) to clarify and extend the relation between classical, quantum and stochastic integrability to a wider setting, and (3) to study thermodynamic and KPZ scaling limits of Whittaker functions (and associated measures) and their applications. The proposed research, which lies at the interface of probability, integrable systems, random matrices, statistical physics, automorphic forms, algebraic combinatorics and representation theory, will make novel contributions in all of these areas.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE.2010.2.1-01 | Award Amount: 11.58M | Year: 2012

Nutrition-related diseases caused a loss of over 56 million years of healthy life of European citizens in 2000. I.Family will make a significant contribution to reduce this burden by studying the interplay and impact of the main drivers of dietary behaviour and food choice. It will take advantage of the unique opportunity to follow-up the large IDEFICS childrens cohort to not only provide added value by maintaining the existing cohort but also, exceptionally, assess the dynamic nature of causal factors over time and during transition into adolescence. The projects acronym indicates its focus on the individual and its family. By re-assessing children and their parents I.Family will compare families who developed or maintained a healthy diet with those whose diet developed in an unfavourable direction to study the impact of biological, behavioural, social and environmental factors on dietary behaviour over time. Focus will be on the family environment, socio-behavioural and genetic factors determining familial aggregation. Subgroups with contrasting dietary profiles will undergo an enhanced protocol including measurement of brain activation, expression of genes related to food choice, biological and genetic basis for taste thresholds, role of sleep, sedentary time, physical activity and impact of the built environment. I.Family will also link health outcomes like body composition and cardio-metabolic markers to diet and interacting factors to determine their prognostic value. Thus I.Family provides strength of methodology, breadth of coverage and depth of investigation across the ecological model. Guided by research on ethical implications I.Family will be deriving effective communication strategies to empower European consumers to induce behaviour changes, supported by novel web-based, interactive personalised feedback on dietary behaviour. By building on existing success I.Family will take the research on dietary behaviour to the next level in a short time frame.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2011.1.4-2 | Award Amount: 8.33M | Year: 2011

Despite significant achievements in the field of regenerative medicine and the enormous potential for engineered tissue products, significant hurdles have prevented cellular therapies from gaining wide-spread clinical adoption. Manufacturing related issues have been proposed as key challenges to be addressed for the translation of regenerative therapies to the clinic and the successful commercialization of engineered products. Similar to other biotechnology sectors (e.g., vaccines or recombinant protein production), bioreactor systems could play a central role in establishing engineered tissues in the clinic. In fact, by automating and streamlining manufacturing processes, they would allow to improve product reproducibility, safety, standardization and possibly reach cost-effectiveness. This project aims at the development, pre-clinical and clinical testing of a sensor-based bioreactor system for the production of functional, autologous engineered grafts with reproducible properties. The bioreactor-based manufacturing paradigm will be addressed in the specific context of cartilage repair. Innovative features of the proposed tissue engineering strategy will include: (i) an automated and controlled production system, (ii) bioreactor conforming to regulatory guidelines, (iii) simplified, streamlined, and scalable tissue engineering process, (iv) on-line monitoring of culture/quality parameters, and (v) data management systems for traceability. To achieve these goals, BIO-COMET brings together internationally renowned leaders in the field of regenerative medicine, from academic, clinical and industrial research institutions. Successful implementation of the project will be instrumental to extend use of bioreactor-based platforms beyond cartilage tissue engineering, with the ultimate goal to facilitate broad utilization and commercialization of cell-based grafts as therapeutic solutions.


Corfield A.P.,Royal Infirmary | Berry M.,University of Bristol
Trends in Biochemical Sciences | Year: 2015

In this review, we document the evolution of common glycan structures in the eukaryotes, and illustrate the considerable variety of oligosaccharides existing in these organisms. We focus on the families of N- and O-glycans, glycosphingolipids, glycosaminoglycans, glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors, sialic acids (Sias), and cytoplasmic and nuclear glycans. We also outline similar and divergent aspects of the glycans during evolution within the groups, which include inter- and intraspecies differences, molecular mimicry, viral glycosylation adaptations, glycosyltransferase specificity relating to function, and the natural dynamism powering these events. Finally, we present an overview of the patterns of glycosylation found within the groups comprising the Eukaryota, namely the Deuterostomia, Fungi, Viridiplantae, Nematoda, and Arthropoda. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.1.6 | Award Amount: 11.07M | Year: 2012

A federation of experimentation facilities will significantly accelerate Future Internet research. Fed4FIRE will deliver open and easily accessible facilities to the FIRE experimentation communities, which focus on fixed and wireless infrastructures, services and applications, and combinations thereof. The project will develop a demand-driven common federation framework, based on an open architecture and specification. It will be widely adopted by facilities and promoted internationally. This framework will provide simple, efficient, and cost effective experimental processes built around experimenters and facility owners requirements. Insight into technical and socio-economic metrics, and how the introduction of new technologies into Future Internet facilities influences them, will be provided by harmonized and comprehensive measurement techniques. Tools and services supporting dynamic federated identities, access control, and SLA management will increase the trustworthiness of the federation and its facilities. A FIRE portal will offer brokering, user access management and measurements. Professional technical staff will offer first-line and second-line support to make the federation simple to use. The project will use open calls to support innovative experiments from academia and industry and to adapt additional experimentation facilities for compliance with Fed4FIRE specifications. A federation authority will be established to approve facilities and to promote desirable operational policies that simplify federation. A Federation Standardization Task Force will prepare for sustainable standardization beyond the end of the project. The adoption of the Fed4FIRE common federation framework by the FIRE facilities, the widespread usage by both academic and industrial experimenters, and the strong links with other national and international initiatives such as the FI-PPP, will pave the way to sustainability towards Horizon 2020.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.1.6 | Award Amount: 1.96M | Year: 2012

ALIEN will deliver an innovative network abstraction mechanism targeting the control and management convergence and interoperability of heterogeneous network elements building strong foundations for Software Defined Networks.\nTo achieve this, ALIEN proposes to adopt the concept of Network Operating System (NOS), a distributed system running on top the hybrid, heterogeneous network infrastructure, which creates a global view of the network elements and their capability.\nThe NOS of ALIEN will be based on control and management framework of OFELIA FIRE facility. ALIEN will extend OpenFlow control framework of OFELIA and its architecture to support abstraction of network information of equipment that are alien to the OpenFlow technology such as optical network elements, legacy layer2 switches, network processors and programmable hardware (FPGA).\nBuilding on its novel NOS, ALIEN introduces the concept of the control program paradigm, which operates on the global view of the network. and support new network technologies in layer0, layer1 and layer 2 both in core and access.\nThe NOS of ALIEN utilizes a novel hardware description language as well as a functional abstraction mechanism for uniform representation of any type of network hardware and their capabilities/functionalities that doesnt support OpenFLow (i.e. alien hardware). The language will describe capabilities of hardware, input and output signal format, and topology information to describe the pipelining of actions on specific hardware. The abstraction mechanism will hide hardware complexity as well as technology and vendor specific features from OpenFlow control framework.\nALIEN project aims to experimentally verify its solution for describing network device capabilities and controlling its forwarding behaviour of all OpenFlow and non-OpenFlow capable hardware simultaneously.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2012.6.4-2 | Award Amount: 7.88M | Year: 2012

The main objectives of FUTUREVOLC are to establish an integrated volcanological monitoring procedure through European collaboration, develop new methods to evaluate volcanic crises, increase scientific understanding of magmatic processes and improve delivery of relevant information to civil protection and authorities. To reach these objectives the project combines broad European expertise in seismology, volcano deformation, volcanic gas and geochemistry, infrasound, eruption monitoring, physical volcanology, satellite studies of plumes, meteorology, ash dispersal forecasting, and civil defence. This European consortium leads the way for multi-national volcanological collaboration with the aim of mitigating the effects of major eruptions that pose cross-border hazards. Iceland is selected as a laboratory supersite area for demonstration because of (i) the relatively high rate of large eruptions with potential for long ranging effects, and (ii) Icelands capability to produce the near full spectrum of volcano processes at its many different volcano types. Based on present monitoring networks and ongoing research, the project will bridge gaps and combine efforts for a coherent close-to-real-time evaluation of the state of Icelandic volcanoes and their unrest. The project will provide timely information on magma movements from combined interpretation of earthquake sources relocated in three-dimensional velocity models, magma sources inferred from ground and space geodetic data, and measurements of volcanic volatiles. For better response during eruptions, the project will develop operational models of magma discharge rate, contributing directly to improved forecasts of ash dispersion. They will help to minimise economic disruption on a European scale during eruptions. By integrating a Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre and a civil protection unit into the project, European citizens will benefit directly from the scientific work of FUTUREVOLC.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.1.4 | Award Amount: 5.20M | Year: 2013

RERUM will develop, evaluate, and trial an architectural framework for dependable, reliable, and secure networks of heterogeneous smart objects supporting innovative Smart City applications. The framework will be based on the concept of security and privacy by design, addressing the most critical factors for the success of Smart City applications.The technical approach aims to enable tighter integration of Internet of Things (IoT) technology in the Smart City domain. The ultimate target is to provide innovative applications that will improve the citizens quality of life. RERUM will design mechanisms to manage resources in an efficient and effective manner, ensuring confidentiality, authenticity, integrity, and availability of data gathered by IoT objects. The RERUM approach is scenario-independent, hence applicable to the entire gamut of future Smart City applications.To achieve these goals RERUM will: analyse industrial and Smart City application requirements for steering the overall system design, develop a new, technically innovative framework to interconnect a large number of heterogeneous software and hardware smart objects, using novel approaches, e.g. based on virtualization and cognitive radio, increase the energy efficiency of IoT to provide sustainable infrastructures in the economic and ecologic sense, model the trustworthiness of the IoT and enable secure and reliable exchange of trusted information, enable secure bootstrapping and self-monitoring of networks to detect and mitigate security events, perform proof-of-concept experiments and real-world trials in two Smart City environments to assess the project results with respect to technical feasibility and user acceptance, and assess the portability and its scenario-agnostic characteristics by cross-evaluating the trials results.To vertically address these aspects RERUM unites a consortium of complementary stakeholders covering all areas of the IoT-based Smart Cities paradigm.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: AAT.2013.4-4.;AAT.2013.1-2. | Award Amount: 3.78M | Year: 2013

A composite aero-structure with self-repair capabilities will offer durability, extend its service life and prolong maintenance protocols leading to lower aircraft operational costs. Despite the extensive research activities in the area of self-healing resins applied to composite materials, the research for aeronautical applications is currently very limited. To this end, the main objective of HIPOCRATES is the development of self-repair composite materials by transforming widely used resins within aeronautical industry to self-healing materials, facilitating this way the subsequent certification and its related cost. Taking into account the current technological maturity of self-repair, secondary structural composites shall be targeted. The transformation will be done through the epoxy enrichment with appropriate chemical agents, following three main strategies: a) The nano-encapsulation strategy that involves incorporation of nano-encapsulated healing agents and a dispersed catalyst within a polymer matrix, b) The reversible polymers strategy where remediable polymer matrices follow the Diels-Alder chemical reaction rendering damage repairable through triggered reversible cross-linking. c) A combination for the first time of a) and b). For all strategies the current progress of nano-technology will be utilized towards either better facilitation of self-healing process (e.g. nano-carriers) or enhancement of the self-healing performance or integration of other functionalities (e.g. monitoring of the self-healing performance, activation of DA reaction). Impact, fracture and fatigue mechanical tests are envisioned to assess the self-healing efficiency. Manufacturing challenges that arise from incorporating such self-healing thermosetting systems into fibrous composites (pre-preg, infusion/RTM) shall be closely investigated at the early stages of development to ensure the effective transfer of the desired properties to the large scale as required by the industry.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2010-1.1.33 | Award Amount: 26.09M | Year: 2011

AIDA (http://cern.ch/aida) addresses the upgrade, improvement and integration of key research infrastructures in Europe, developing advanced detector technologies for future particle accelerators, as well as transnational access to facilities that provide these research infrastructures. In line with the European Strategy for Particle Physics, AIDA targets the infrastructures needed for R&D, prototyping and qualification of detector systems for the major particle physics experiments currently being planned at future accelerators. By focusing on common development and use of such infrastructure, the project integrates the entire detector development community, encouraging cross-fertilization of ideas and results, and providing a coherent framework for the main technical developments of detector R&D. This project includes a large consortium of 37 beneficiaries, covering much of the detector R&D for particle physics in Europe. This collaboration allows Europe to remain at the forefront of particle physics research and take advantage of the world-class infrastructures existing in Europe for the advancement of research into detectors for future accelerator facilities. The infrastructures covered by the AIDA project are key facilities required for an efficient development of future particle physics experiments, such as: test beam infrastructures (at CERN, DESY and LNF), specialised equipment, irradiation facilities (in several European countries), common software tools, common microelectronics and system integration tools and establishment of technology development roadmaps with a wide range of industrial partners.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: OCEAN 2013.3 | Award Amount: 11.27M | Year: 2014

Marine biofouling, the unwanted colonization of marine organisms on surfaces immersed in seawater has a huge economic and environmental impact in terms of maintenance requirements for marine structures, increased vessel fuel consumption, operating costs, greenhouse gas emissions and spread of non-indigenous species. The SEAFRONT project will aim to significantly advance the control of biofouling and reduce hydrodynamic drag by integrating multiple technology concepts such as surface structure, surface chemistry and bio-active/bio-based fouling control methodologies into one environmentally benign and drag-reducing solution for mobile and stationary maritime applications. In parallel, a combination of laboratory-based performance benchmarking and end-user field trials will be undertaken in order to develop an enhanced fundamental/mechanistic understanding of the coating-biofouling interaction, the impact of this on hydrodynamic drag and to inform technology development and down-selection of promising fouling control solutions. This project aims to facilitate a leap forward in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from marine transport and the conservation of the marine ecosystem by adopting a multidisciplinary and synergistic approach to fouling control.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: HEALTH.2013.4.1-4 | Award Amount: 554.66K | Year: 2013

Diabetes, Cardiovascular and Chronic kidney (DCC) -diseases are relentlessly increasing globally, causing enormous human suffering, premature deaths and unsustainable costs. Leading European research has indisputably pointed that the kidney filtration barrier and its epithelial cell, the podocyte, is a common denominator for the DCC-diseases. However, European excellence and expertise have remained uncoordinated in separate pockets and, consequently, underutilised for full societal benefits and capacity creation to combat the challenges of diabetic, hypertensive and primary kidney diseases. Notably, these diseases are of major healthcare interest and of key importance for discovery intensive biopharma industry. KidneyConnect brings together teams of excellence to underpin nationally funded programs under a) Discovery and Future Technologies b) New Research Platforms c) Translational and d) Clinical Podocyte Research to create connected capacities, access to well trained talents and to optimize strategies for industry-academia cowork. In addition to resource maps, KidneyConnect supports international congresses, training courses, talent coaching, special seminars and builds systematically relations to key stakeholders. Due to the limited funds available, main aims are to provide roadmaps for future efforts, outlines for shared data -and sample repositories, targeted training, societal outreach and, as a result, competitive European funded programs. Our events are arranged as satellites of established meetings and supported by in-kind contribution from partners. The goal is to establish faster translation from discovery to clinical practices by creating dynamic networks, sustainable capacities and outlines for improved kidney disease management. High cohesion and shared resources together with the most prominent European authorities included will guarantee optimized resource usage. Substantial benefits and competitiveness in the huge global markets are to be expected


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 3.04M | Year: 2013

Nanomedicine offers capability to significantly change the course of treatment for life-threatening diseases. Many of the most significant current therapeutic targets, to be viable in practice, require the efficient crossing of at least one biological barrier. However, the efficient and controlled crossing of the undamaged barrier is difficult. The range of small molecules that can successfully do so (via diffusive or other non-specific processes) is limited in size and physiochemical properties, greatly restricting the therapeutic strategies that may be applied. In practice, after several decades of limited success, there is a broad consensus that new multi-disciplinary, multi-sectoral strategies are required. Key needs include detailed design and understanding of the bionano-interafce, re-assessment of in vitro models used to assess transport across barriers, and building regulatory considerations into the design phase of nanocarriers. The overarching premises of the PathChooser ITN are that (i) significant advances can only be made by a more detailed mechanistic understanding of key fundamental endocytotic, transcytotic, and other cellular processes, especially biological barrier crossing; (ii) elucidating the Mode of Action / mechanism of successful delivery systems (beyond current level) will ensure more rapid regulatory and general acceptance of such medicines. Paramount in this is the design and characterization of the in situ interface between the carrier system and the uptake and signalling machinery. (iii) inter-disciplinary knowledge from a range of scientific disciplines is required to launch a genuine attack on the therapeutic challenge. The PathChooser ITN program of research and training will equip the next generation of translational scientists with the tools to develop therapies for a range of currently intractable (e.g. hidden in the brain) and economically unviable diseases (e.g. orphan diseases affecting a limited population).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.1.5 | Award Amount: 10.47M | Year: 2013

The traditional computing paradigm is experiencing a fundamental shift: organizations no longer completely control their own data, but instead hand it to external untrusted parties - cloud service providers, for processing and storage. There currently exist no satisfactory approach to protect data during computation from cloud providers and from other users of the cloud.\n\nPRACTICE has assembled the key experts throughout Europe and will provide privacy and confidentiality for computations in the cloud. PRACTICE will create a secure cloud framework that allows the realization of advanced and practical cryptographic technologies providing sophisticated security and privacy guarantees for all parties in cloud-computing scenarios. With PRACTICE users no longer need to trust their cloud providers for data confidentiality and integrity: Due to its computation on encrypted data, even insiders can no longer disclose secrets or disrupt the service. This opens new markets, increases their market share, and may allow conquering foreign markets where reach has been limited due to confidentiality and privacy concerns. PRACTICE enables European customers to safe cost by globally outsourcing to the cheapest providers while still maintaining guaranteed security and legal compliance.\n\nPRACTICE will deliver a Secure Platform for Enterprise Applications and Services (SPEAR) providing application servers and automatic tools enabling privacy-sensitive applications on the cloud. SPEAR protects user data from cloud providers and other users, supporting cloud-aided secure computations by mutually distrusting parties and will support the entire software product lifecycle. One goal of SPEAR is to support users in selecting the right approach and mechanisms to address their specific security needs. Our flexible architecture and tools that allow seamless migration from execution on unchanged clouds today towards new platforms while gradually adding levels of protection.\n\nPRACTICE is strongly industry-driven and will demonstrate its results on two end-user defined use cases in statistics and collaborative supply chain management. PRACTICE is based on real-life use cases underpinning the business interest of the partners. Our focus is on near-term and large-scale commercial exploitation of cutting-edge technology where project results are quickly transferred into novel products. PRACTICE is the first project to mitigate insider threats and data leakage for computations in the cloud while maintaining economies of scale. This goes beyond current approaches that can only protect data at rest within storage clouds once insiders may misbehave. Moreover, it will investigate economical and legal frameworks, quantify the economic aspects and return on security investment for SMC deployment as well as evaluate its legal aspects regarding private data processing and outsourcing.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: AAT.2012.3.3-2.;AAT.2012.3.4-1. | Award Amount: 5.64M | Year: 2013

Commercial aircraft fault tolerant control (FTC) strategies in the flight control system (FCS) are based on fail-safe approaches whereby a nominal control law is switched first to a robust solution and then if necessary to a direct law controlling the actuators surfaces. Each component of the control law set is designed off-line and has a different level of robustness and performance. The reasons for this conservative FTC approach are: 1. Lack of demonstrated maturity of reconfigurable guidance and control (G&C) methods for commercial aircraft. 2. Lack of research in the practical interaction limitations between reconfigurable G&C systems and estimation / diagnostic systems. 3. A definite gap on the clearance problem for such G&C systems. The goal of RECONFIGURE is to investigate and develop aircraft G&C technologies that facilitate the automated handling of off-nominal events and optimize the aircraft status and flight while maintaining, or even improving, its safety level. These technologies will extend the operation of the current G&C functionalities that assist the pilot and optimize the aircraft performance. Thus, the aim is to provoke a change in aircraft transport towards: Full-time, all-event availability of performance-enhancement electrical fly-by-wire This will be achieved by developing: - Advanced parameter and fault estimation/diagnosis approaches. - Reconfigurable G&C approaches. - Integration and integrated approaches for estimation, diagnosis and G&C. - Advanced clearance approaches for such systems. The investigation will focus on off-nominal/abnormal event scenarios directly affecting the aircraft flight control system. The techniques will offer the capability to adjust and adapt to the abnormal event during flight.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.4.2-2 | Award Amount: 8.19M | Year: 2011

Current interventional treatment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) focused on re-establishing cardiac reperfusion has significantly improved clinical outcome by reducing infarct size and mortality due to cardiac ischemia.It is now recognized that events triggered at reperfusion also result in cell death and may account for as much as 50% of the infarct volume, this being termed ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). Mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening appears to be a responsible for IRI and a recent small clinical trial with cyclosporine A shows that it is a feasible target for the development of new therapies to treat it. Since total infarct size is a major determinant of a patients risk to develop heart failure, treating IRI is expected to further reduce morbidity, mortality and the need for regenerative medicine following cardiac ischemia. By harnessing a multi-disciplinary consortium of clinical and basic scientists along with four SMEs, MitoCare brings state-of-the art expertise together to 1) better understand IRI pathophysiology and factors directly or indirectly influencing patients recovery or response to treatment; 2) investigate the translational usefulness of preclinical models; and 3) compare selected treatments. These objectives will be reached through the following work plan: A) a medium-scale phase II clinical study will evaluate the efficacy of a novel complementary therapy to PCI, the new mPTP modulator TRO40303, while at the same time 1) perform extensive sampling from subjects in the study for analysis of standard and emerging biomarkers; 2) identify confounding factors influencing patients outcomes. B) Parallel investigations in preclinical in vitro and in vivo AMI models. C) Statistical analysis of data from clinical and preclinical studies, to identify better diagnostic and prognostic endpoints in man and assess predictive utility of preclinical models.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2010.1.1.3-1 | Award Amount: 9.56M | Year: 2011

CARBOCHANGE will provide the best possible process-based quantification of net ocean carbon uptake under changing climate conditions using past and present ocean carbon cycle changes for a better prediction of future ocean carbon uptake. We will improve the quantitative understanding of key biogeochemical and physical processes through a combination of observations and models. We will upscale new process understanding to large-scale integrative feedbacks of the ocean carbon cycle to climate change and rising carbon dioxide concentrations. We will quantify the vulnerability of the ocean carbon sources and sinks in a probabilistic sense using cutting edge coupled Earth system models under a spectrum of emission scenarios including climate stabilisation scenarios as required for the 5th IPCC assessment report. The drivers for the vulnerabilities will be identified. The most actual observations of the changing ocean carbon sink will be systematically integrated with the newest ocean carbon models, a coupled land-ocean model, an Earth system model of intermediate complexity, and fully fledged Earth system models through a spectrum of data assimilation methods as well as advanced performance assessment tools. Results will be optimal process descriptions and most realistic error margins for future ocean carbon uptake quantifications with models under the presently available observational evidence. The project will deliver calibrated future evolutions of ocean pH and carbonate saturation as required by the research community on ocean acidification in the EU project EPOCA and further projects in this field. The time history of atmosphere-ocean carbon fluxes past, present, and future will be synthesised globally as well as regionally for the transcontinental RECCAP project. Observations and model results will merge into GEOSS/GEO through links with the European coordination action COCOS and will prepare the marine branch of the European Research Infrastructure ICOS.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.80M | Year: 2015

Since the 1930s, the unique endemic aquatic biota of the Caspian-Black Sea region is facing a biodiversity crisis as it is severely affected by anthropogenic activities such as habitat destruction, invasive species and pollution. Understanding long-term natural biotic and abiotic drivers of lake system change and biotic response to perturbations in the past 2 Ma i.e. gradual, rapid and/or threshold responses is absolutely necessary to assess the current response of Pontocaspian biota to rising natural- and human-induced perturbations. The Pontocaspian example mirrors the complex global ecological and biodiversity challenge due to Global Change. This challenge can only be addressed through an integrated cross-disciplinary research involving climate, earth- and bio-sciences. PRIDE (Pontocaspian biodiversity RIse and DEmise) is a fully integrated academia-industry training network of scientists with complementary cutting-edge competences. PRIDE focuses on the evolution of Pontocaspian biota over the past 2 million years. The extraordinary endemic biodiversity, coupled with a high-amplitude record of palaeoenvironmental change, makes it an ideal system to study drivers of past and current biodiversity crises. By linking Pontocaspian palaeoenvironmental and biodiversity changes we will reconstruct biological resilience to environmental change and apply this knowledge to the current Pontocaspian biodiversity crisis to model future diversity shifts under different Global Change scenarios. PRIDE will provide outstanding interdisciplinary technical training, new skills acquisition and career development for 15 early stage researchers. An innovative outreach plan will deliver our results to stakeholders and the public. PRIDE results from existing, successful collaborative relationships and will expand to include 17 first-class private and academic geological and biological institutions allowing Europe to remain world-leading in integrated studies of biodiversity change.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.1.3-2 | Award Amount: 7.79M | Year: 2014

Immune system response is the most complex barrier to long-term success of tissue transplants/implants from allogeneic and bio-artificial sources. While newly developed tissue transplant procedures are not yet performed frequently enough for robust analysis of adverse immune responses in humans, corneal transplantation (CT) is a well-established allogeneic tissue transplant with >100,000 full- and partial-thickness procedures performed annually. Adverse immune responses occur in up to 30% of CT recipients causing rejection and failure. The high levels of CT clinical activity and immune complications create an ideal opportunity to comprehensively profile immune responses associated with adverse tissue transplant outcomes and to develop new approaches for their prevention or early diagnosis. VISICORT is a multi-disciplinary project with expertise in basic immunology, bio-sampling, systems biology/immune profiling, bioinformatics, clinical tissue transplantation and cell therapy. It will complete the first systematic immune profiling of biological samples from animal and human CT recipients with diverse outcomes. Clinical data and bio-specimens from over 700 CT recipients at 5 leading transplant centres will be centrally collated and distributed to cutting-edge university- and SME-based laboratories for multi-platform profiling and integrated bioinformatics analyses. Profiling data will generate better understanding of adverse immune reactions to tissue transplants. This knowledge will be used to develop novel biomarker-based surveillance strategies and, coupled with SME-based expertise in cell product development, will also inform the design and initiation of an optimised clinical trial strategy of immunomodulatory stromal stem cell therapy in high-risk human CT recipients. VISICORT research will strongly impact multiple EU research/scientific communities, patient cohorts and SMEs and will have high commercialisation value for the biopharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.66M | Year: 2015

The CREEP Innovative Training Network is a training and career development platform for early stage researchers (ESRs) in Geodynamics, Mineral Physics, Seismology, Fluid Mechanics, and Materials Sciences. It aims to structure the collaboration in research and doctoral training between 10 leading academic centers in Earth Sciences in Europe: the CNRS (FR), represented by Geosciences Montpellier and the FAST Orsay, the universities of Bristol, Durham and UCL (UK), Munster and Mainz (DE), Roma TRE (IT) and Utrecht (NL), and as a partner organization: ETH (CH), and 11 partner organizations whose activity encompasses a variety of industrial applications of rheology: oil (Baker Hughes, Schlumberger) and chemical industries (AkzoNobel), glass (Schott) and steel (APERAM) producers, and high-technology SMEs (Rockfield, IGEM, GMuG, MP Strumenti, Geospatial Research, Reykjavik Geothermal). CREEP will provide training to 16 early stage researchers (among which 2 will be self-funded by partner ETH) via a structured program of cross-disciplinary collaborative research, specialized short courses, and workshops. This experience-based training is centered on research projects leading to a PhD that focus on the complex mechanical behavior of Earth materials and its implications for geodynamic and industrial processes. These research projects cover a large spectra of applications from the study of the deformation of the Earth surface (earthquakes) and deep layers to geothermal and petroleum exploration and industrial processes. Through them, the ESRs will acquire skills in experimentation, modelling of deformation at various space and time scales, and seismology. CREEP will also provide the ESRs: (1) essential career-management skills via courses and practical activities aimed to develop their organizational, management and networking skills and (2) experience and understanding of the impact of research for the private sector via secondments in the industrial partners.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SEAC-1-2014 | Award Amount: 2.00M | Year: 2015

The PERFORM consortium aims to investigate the effects of the use of innovative science education methods based on performing arts in fostering young peoples motivations and engagement with science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in selected secondary schools in France, Spain and the United Kingdom. A considerable percentage of young people in Europe is not interested in STEM careers mainly because they perceive that they lack the skills to deal with such topics. Such negative perceptions discourage adolescents from investing time in learning about science and undervalue the role of science in society. Addressing the challenge of engaging young people in STEM has never been more urgent in Europe in order to avoid loss of scientific talent and to ensure future innovation capability, excellence and competitiveness. PERFORM takes action to overcome the remaining distance between young people and science and to break the unidirectional model of scientific knowledge transfer. PERFORM will explore a creative, participatory educational process on STEM through the use of scenic arts with secondary school students, their teachers and early career researchers, who will get actively involved in experiencing science. They will also reflect on their own role in the interaction between science and society, and the values embedded in Responsible Research and Innovation. PERFORM will analyse how such human-centred, science-arts educational approach contributes to foster girls and boys motivations towards science learning and strengthen the transversal competences they will need for STEM careers and jobs. The education and communication skills required for teachers and researchers to further replicate the educational process will be explored and addressed in specific training toolkits. The project dissemination will be fulfilled by ensuring strong science-policy links and by linking PERFORM with Scientix.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 2.54M | Year: 2017

The EN-ACTI2NG program (European Network on Anti-Cancer Immuno-Therapy Improvement by modification of CAR and TCR Interactions and Nanoscale Geometry) emanates from the recent clinical evidence that T cells expressing engineered tumor-specific immune receptors can eradicate certain tumors that do not respond to conventional treatment. To obtain T cells with reactivity to a wider array of tumors and to improve efficiency and on- and off-target toxicity are current challenges Therefore the EN-ACTI2NG program aims 1) to train PhD students with expertise in development of new and improved T cell-mediated cancer immuno-therapies; 2) to endow the PhD students with the ability to establish efficient communication between the academic and industrial research environments and between scientists and the general public; 3) to improve T cell mediated anti-cancer immuno-therapy by the identification and development of new cancer-specific immune receptors and enhancing their function by identifying and modifying their molecular mechanism of action. To reach these objectives we have designed individual research projects ranging from biophysical analysis of immune receptors, via molecular modification of their structure and testing their tumor killing capacity in cell-based and pre-clinical assays to product development. Secondments will assure that each PhD student will be exposed to these complementary approaches and that there will be synergic feedback between the projects, producing innovative results that could otherwise not be achieved. Extensive training in research-specific skills, career development and a continuous training in communication skills will allow the PhD students to become facilitators of the process of transformation of scientific innovation into products with social and economic value. As such, the EN-ACTI2NG program should contribute to overcoming the more general challenge of converting the European Community into an innovation-driven society.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.10M | Year: 2017

The European Training Network DNAREPAIRMAN aims to train a new generation of innovative young scientists in cutting edge biophysical research methodology to address central questions in biology concerning the mode of action of critical molecular machines with relevance for human health. The Network consists of a highly collaborative consortium consisting of 12 participants coming from academia, industry, and the creative sector. Participating laboratories in the Network are part of established research schools within renowned research organizations and Universities, with supervisors who are experts within their respective research field, publish regularly in high-impact journals and have received EURYI and ERC awards. This environment of excellence offers a multidisciplinary PhD program to 12 young researchers (ESRs), through training in the analysis of basic chemical and physical principles that underlie the correct timing and localization of events during DNA repair. In addition training will center around method development using methodology, equipment, software and experience provided first-hand by four small technology-driven companies. Individual research projects as well as personal training plans will be implemented for each ESR, incorporating a local training program, multiple rotations within partner laboratories, exposure to the non-academic sector and Network meetings. ESRs will follow scientific workshops, courses in transferable skills, career development and entrepreneurship, and will disseminate and communicate their projects to a diverse audience in close collaboration with the creative sector. DNAREPAIRMAN will result in a new generation of mature and innovative European scientists with a thorough understanding of fundamental quantitative principles underlying biology, with experience in technique development, and affinity for the academic as well as the non-academic research setting, providing a broad and promising career perspective.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 151.51K | Year: 2013

To acquire knowledge and capability to support engineering companies in becoming more sophisticated customers and supporters in the area of engineering educational engagement throughout the UK.


Benton M.J.,University of Bristol | Newell A.J.,British Geological Survey
Gondwana Research | Year: 2014

Geologists and palaeontologists have expressed mixed views about the effects of the end-Permian mass extinction on continental habitats and on terrestrial life. Current work suggests that the effects on land were substantial, with massive erosion following the stripping of vegetation, associated with long-term aridification and short-term bursts of warming and acid rain. Wildfires at the Permo-Triassic boundary contributed to the removal of forests and the prolonged absence of forests from the Earth's surface for up to 10. Myr. These physical crises on land impinged on the oceans, suggesting tight interlocking of terrestrial and marine crises. Levels of extinction on land may well have been as high as in the sea, and this is certainly the case for tetrapods. The mass extinction seems to have been less profound for plants and insects, but it is hard at present to disentangle issues of data quality from reductions in abundance and diversity. Several killing agents have been proposed, and of these tetrapods may have succumbed primarily to acid rain, mass wasting, and aridification. Plants may have been more affected by the sudden effects of heating and wildfires, and the crisis for insects has yet to be explored. © 2012 International Association for Gondwana Research.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-30-2015 | Award Amount: 5.00M | Year: 2016

Valvular Heart Disease currently affects 2.5% of the population, but is overwhelmingly a disease of the elderly and consequently on the rise. It is dominated by two conditions, Aortic Stenosis and Mitral Regurgitation, both of which are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, yet which pose a truly demanding challenge for treatment optimisation. By combining multiple complex modelling components developed in recent EC-funded research projects, a comprehensive, clinically-compliant decision-support system will be developed to meet this challenge, by quantifying individualised disease severity and patient impairment, predicting disease progression, ranking the effectiveness of alternative candidate procedures, and optimising the patient-specific intervention plan. This algorithmically-driven process will dramatically improve outcomes and consistency across Europe in this fast-growing patient group, maximising individual, societal and economic outcomes.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 2.27M | Year: 2014

This proposal seeks funding to acquire a stepper and associated wafer coater, tools to enable photolithographic patterning of semiconductor wafers for device and circuit fabrication. The stepper will be located at Southampton University in the recent £120m cleanroom complex. It will relieve the bottleneck within the cleanroom, an electron beam lithography tool, which is a slower alternative patterning tool. This will increase capacity within the cleanroom complex and facilitate and underpin a wealth of world class research. Not only will research at Southampton be enhanced, but Southampton (SOU), Glasgow (GLA), and Surrey (SUR) universities will pool resources to establish a Silicon Photonics Fabrication Capability within the UK, to facilitate an increasing demand for the fabrication of Silicon Photonics devices from the UKs premier researchers. This will encourage wider usage of world class equipment within the UK, in line with EPSRC policy. We seek funding for both the equipment and 3.5 RAs across the 3 institutions, over a 4 year period, to establish and deliver the Capability. Access to a very significant inventory of additional equipment at these 3 universities will be facilitated. The Capability is extremely timely, as silicon foundry services around the world are moving towards a model in which standard platforms and devices will be offered, making it more difficult for researchers to carry out innovative work at the device level, or in non-standard platforms. The proposal is supported by 36 members of academic staff at Southampton, with a total current research portfolio of projects valued in excess of £88m. Furthermore we have 10 project partners who will take part in the use and assessment of the silicon photonics capability by designing and subsequently testing fabricated devices. Their total in-kind contribution is valued at £793,300. These partners have expressed an interest in using the capability after the project has been completed. In addition have contacted a few example potential users from within the industrial sector (SMEs), and from around the world who have also provided letters of support indicating that they would use the capability after the project is complete. Taking this net proposed usage, it is clear that the equipment will be sustained beyond the period of the funded project. The Southampton users alone need only generate a tiny fraction (0.2%) of their research portfolio to cover running costs and depreciation. Consumables will increase with usage, but clearly, the silicon photonics capability will generate paying users, to further sustain the capability beyond the project, which will, in turn, allow UK researchers to compete effectively on the world stage in the buoyant field of silicon photonics. Beyond the 4 year project, the Silicon Photonics Capability will be operated by the commercial arms of the 3 partner universities, all of whom have provided letters of support confirming their ongoing participation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC1-PM-22-2016 | Award Amount: 6.92M | Year: 2016

ZIKAction proposes to set up a multidisciplinary research network across Latin America with a focus on maternal and child health to coordinate and implement urgent research against the current ZIKV outbreak and lay the foundation for a preparedness research network against future emerging severe infectious threats in these vulnerable populations. Our Consortium brings together Latin American and European leaders in paediatric infectious disease research, including virologists, epidemiologists, immunologists and obstetric, neonatal and paediatric practitioners, all with a wealth of experience in vertical transmission (VT) studies, a group uniquely placed to evaluate the potentially causative relationship between ZIKV and severe reported complications. ZIKAction will collect data from prospective cohorts of pregnant women and infants to assess ZIKV complications with the necessary level of evidence which is currently lacking. Complementary work in virology will take advantage of repeated biological samples from these cohorts, while pathogenesis studies on animal models will elucidate risk factors and mechanisms of VT. Partners experience in conducting trials among pregnant women and children and close contact with other relevant researchers will allow rapid launch of additional interventional studies, including the addition of sites and partners, to address remaining research gaps against ZIKV. Recognizing the breadth and complexity of the research questions presented by the current ZIKV epidemic and the potential for future severe emerging infectious threats, ZIKAction will actively seek out collaborations with relevant initiatives already existing or under development to maximize synergy and avoid duplication of efforts. Our focus on vertical transmission and maternal and child health would nicely complement a range of other activities including clinical and laboratory studies in the general population, surveillance, and work in public health and prevention.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-14-2014 | Award Amount: 8.17M | Year: 2015

The mmMAGIC (Millimetre-Wave Based Mobile Radio Access Network for Fifth Generation Integrated Communications) project will develop and design new concepts for mobile radio access technology (RAT) for mm-wave band deployment. This is envisaged as a key component in the 5G multi-RAT ecosystem and will be used as a foundation for global standardization. The project will thus enable ultrafast mobile broadband services for mobile users, supporting UHD/3D streaming, immersive applications and ultra-responsive cloud services. The consortium brings together major infrastructure vendors (Samsung, Ericsson, Alcatel-Lucent, Huawei, Intel, Nokia), major European operators (Orange, Telefonica), leading research institutes and universities (Fraunhofer HHI Institute, CEA-LETI, IMDEA Networks, Universities Aalto, Bristol, Chalmers and Dresden), measurement equipment vendors (Keysight Technologies, Rohde & Schwarz) and one SME (Qamcom). To complement its strong industry leadership and academic excellence, the project has an Advisory Board drawn from major European telecommunications regulators in Germany, France, Finland, Sweden and the UK. A new radio interface, including novel network management functions and architecture components will be proposed, taking as guidance 5G PPPs KPI and exploiting the use of novel adaptive and cooperative beam-forming and tracking techniques to address the specific challenges of mm-wave mobile propagation. The project will undertake extensive radio channel measurements in the 6-100 GHz range, and will develop and validate advanced channel models that will be used for rigorous validation and feasibility analysis of the proposed concepts and system, as well as for usage in regulatory and standards fora. The ambition of the project is to pave the way for a European head start in 5G standards, including 3GPP, and to secure essential IPRs to European industry, strengthening European competitiveness.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: MG-1.1-2014 | Award Amount: 6.69M | Year: 2015

The FLEXOP project is about developing multidisciplinary aircraft design capabilities for Europe that will increase competitiveness with emerging markets -particularly in terms of aircraft development costs. A closer coupling of wing aeroelasticity and flight control systems in the design process opens new opportunities to explore previously unviable designs. Common methods and tools across the disciplines also provide a way to rapidly adapt existing designs into derivative aircraft, at a reduced technological risk (e.g. using control to solve a flutter problem discovered during development). The goal will be achieved by: (a) improving efficiency of currently existing wing, by increased span at no excess structural weight, while establishing modifications by aeroelastic tailoring to carry the redesigned derivative wing; (b) developing methods and tools for very accurate flutter modeling and flutter control synthesis, to enable improved flutter management during development, certification, and operation, enabling to fly with the stretched wing at same airspeed as the baseline aircraft; (c) validating the accuracy of developed tools and methods on an affordable experimental platform, followed by a scale-up study, demonstrating the interdisciplinary development cycle. Manufacturers will gain cost efficient methods, tools and demonstrators for enhancing aircraft performance by integrated development of flutter control and aeroelastic tailoring. These inter-disciplinary capabilities will improve the design cycle and the Verification& Validation process of both derivative and new aircraft. Better control of development and certification costs can be achieved if these capabilities are used to address problems early in the design process. Flight test data will be posted on the project website to provide a benchmark for the EU aerospace community. The projects results will serve as a preliminary outlining of certification standards for future EU flexible transport aircraft.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: MG-1.1-2014 | Award Amount: 4.29M | Year: 2015

Encounters with atmospheric turbulence are a vitally important in the design and certification of many manmade structures such as aircraft and wind turbines. Gusts cause rapid changes in the flow about the structures which leads to rigid and flexible unsteady responses. Knowledge of aircraft/gust interactions is therefore vital for loads estimation during aircraft design as it impacts on control systems and often defines the maximum loads that these structures will experience in service. At present industry typically uses the linear doublet lattice method with static loads corrections from expensive wind tunnel data. The wind tunnel data is created using the final aerodynamic surface in the predicted cruise shape. This means that gust loads come relatively late when the design options have been narrowed. Increased competition and environmental concerns are likely to lead to the adoption of more flexible materials and the consideration of novel configurations, in which case the linear assumptions of the current gust loads process will become unacceptable. To introduce non-linearity into the gust loads process without significantly increasing the cost and time, this project has three main objectives: to carry out investigations using CFD so that the non-linearities in gust interactions are understood; to create a gust loads process that does not require wind tunnel data and hence reduces the need for wind tunnel testing; to develop updated reduced order models for gust prediction that account for non-linearity at an acceptable cost. These investigations will reduce the need for expensive wind tunnel testing and hence lead to time and cost savings at the design stage therefore ensuring that the European aerospace and defence industry remain competitive in the future. The wind turbine industry has similar concerns, with gusts and wind shear restricting the locations available for wind farms. The project will also address these issues using common methodology.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.9.1 | Award Amount: 3.13M | Year: 2012

The goal of this project is the development of a suite of nanophotonic devices that interface with spins, for application in quantum information and quantum-enabled classical communi-cation technologies. Our technologies will be based on electron and nuclear spins in semi-conductor quantum dots (QDs) embedded in nanophotonic devices. We will combine knowledge of the physics of semiconductor spins, photonics and cavity quantum electro-dynamics, with quantum information and optical communication technology.\n\nIn this FET-Open project, we anticipate that a wealth of novel devices and fundamental un-derstanding will result from the solution to one key problem. What is the best form for a hybrid spin-photon quantum memory, how does one transfer quanta of angular momentum from it to a single photon, and how will this angular momentum be encoded? This is an issue that is inadequately addressed so far, and we take highly novel approaches towards it.\n\nWe address this question on several fronts. From the photonics side, polarization engineering in photonic nanostructures will be investigated, moving beyond linear polarization to exploit the full light angular momentum states. In terms of quantum memories, we will create the technology for long-lived (>1s) nuclear spin memories, long enough to achieve entanglement over large distances. These might one day be used over 1000s km and via satellites to po-tentially anywhere on the globe.\n\nPhotonic crystal structures will be used for integrated quantum-optical circuit technology and plasmonic nanoantennas will enable a spin-dependent near-to-far field coupling, and ultra-fast control of the electron spin. One may use this spin-photon interface to entangle very large numbers of photons, with the memory allowing time for measurement operations of a quantum algorithm. The compatibility of these QD technologies means that the components may be combined, paving the way towards an entirely QD-based quantum internet.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2013.6.5-3 | Award Amount: 7.73M | Year: 2013

The project SWITCH-ON addresses water concerns to thoroughly explore and exploit the significant and currently untapped potential of open data. Water information is highly sought after by many kinds of end-users, both within government and business as well as within civil society. Water touches virtually all societal and environmental domains and the knowledge domain is largely multidisciplinary. New water information and knowledge can thus lead to more efficient use of environmental services and better handling of environmental problems, including those induced by climate and environmental change. SWITCH-ON will show the benefits achieved through the whole process chain by re-purposing (re-using under different context) open data products into more dedicated and refined water products, which have high value and a broad impact on society. The vision is to improve public services, and to foster business opportunities and growth, by establishing new forms of water research and facilitating the development of new products and services based on principles of sharing. The SWITCH-ON objectives are to use open data for implementing: 1) an innovative spatial information platform with open data tailored for direct water assessments, 2) an entirely new form of collaborative research for water-related sciences, 3) fourteen new operational products and services dedicated to appointed end-users, 4) new business and knowledge to inform individual and collective decisions in line with the Europes smart growth and environmental objectives. While focusing on water, the project is expected to inspire a much broader environmental and societal knowledge domain and many different end-users. The SWITCH-ON project will be one trigger in a contemporary global movement to better address environmental and societal challenges through openness and collaboration.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SPA.2012.2.2-01 | Award Amount: 3.09M | Year: 2012

The availability of suitable laser sources is one of the key issues for the development of active optical instruments in future earth observation missions. The main objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility of a semiconductor based laser source to be used as a laser transmitter in a Differential- Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) system for the observation and monitoring of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The basic building block of the project is a monolithic Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) consisting of a frequency stabilized Distributed Feedback (DFB) Master Oscillator (MO) and a multi-section tapered semiconductor Power Amplifier (PA). The required on-, off-line laser wavelengths will be generated in the DFB section and amplified and modulated in the PA section. The device will be fabricated, mounted in a module with the beam forming optics and completed with the stabilization and control electronics. The entire laser source will be designed so that it can be used as the transmitter unit of a Random Modulated CW LIDAR system enabling measurements of the atmospheric CO2 concentration by Integrated-Path Differential-Absorption (IPDA) LIDAR with no signal ambiguity over a distance of 30 km and accuracy in distance determination better than 10 m. As a proof of concept, the CO2 concentration along a 2-3 km test path will be measured on ground and compared with the results provided by an existing DIAL system. For the DIAL test, the receiver unit will be developed in addition. The achievement of the project objectives should provide a substantial progress in the availability of compact, and highly efficient laser sources for the detection and monitoring of greenhouse gases in future earth observation missions and therefore to improve the position of Europe in this field. In a more general context the project will pave the way of using high brightness semiconductor lasers in space applications requiring simultaneously high power, beam quality


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.9.1 | Award Amount: 2.23M | Year: 2013

Photonic technologies enable today to generate, manipulate and detect photons by means of miniaturized devices integrated onto the same optical chip. However, compared to electronics, photonics still lacks essential tools enabling the aggregation of hundreds of functionalities into large scale circuits, this hindering its full exploitation in many applicative domains. The BBOI project aims to break this limitation, boosting the complexity of photonic architectures well beyond the state of the art, but without increasing power consumption in proportion.\n\nA full-optioned multifunctional silicon photonic platform will be developed integrating on board novel sensor and actuator technologies for a reliable real-time monitoring, tuning and reconfiguration of the circuit behaviour. Lighpaths will be inspected in strategic points of the circuit through novel non-perturbative probes capable to sense the light inside optical waveguides without wasting any single photon. Photon routing will be achieved by using power-saving actuators exploiting resistive switching materials used in electronic non-volatile memories, but never explored in the optical domain. The vast technology equipment of the BBOI platform will be harnessed and controlled by a never conceptualized algorithmic intelligence, enabling a multitude of devices to be concurrently steered to the desired working point.\n\nBBOI success will make photonics to penetrate deeply in various ICT areas where conventional technologies are approaching their performance limits. For instance, the huge scaling of information transmitted and routed through data centres and super computing architectures is pushing multi-core electronic parallelization to collide against unsustainable power consumption. Large scale photonic circuits will also enable demonstrations of quantum processors, solving an important class of problems that are more efficiently solved using quantum processors than even the fastest class of modern supercomputer.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 3.89M | Year: 2012

The aim of the present Marie Curie project proposal is the development of self-healing materials, the market implementation for the most promising material concepts and developments as well as the training of young scientists and their knowledge transfer in mutual interaction programs due to the distinct interdisciplinary shape of the project. The partners intend to address both actual fundamental research in material development as well as the complementary aspects of conceptual process chain analysis from a more industrial perspective. We have chosen to restrict our research to self healing material concepts with an existing sizeable academic development base and a sufficient number of positive findings to ensure a significant possibility of successful conversion to industrial application. If we succeed in bridging the gaps in knowledge and understanding for these promising materials, industrial development of these concepts and technologies is to be expected. This can only be achieved if specific interdisciplinary training is provided to young researchers, to master the concepts, know how to quantify healing, and how to position these materials in the application fields. Finally, it should be made clear that, notwithstanding the industrial oriented approach in this proposal, the work to be undertaken will always be of the highest scientific/academic character and aims to set a new standard in the development of novel material concepts. The objects of the proposal are -training and education for junior researchers and a strong support for the interdisciplinarity of the project to ensure technology transfer from laboratory research to industrial application -promote actual self-healing strategies an concepts that address current materials or engineering limitations to application -exploit the existing scientific and technological leadership of the partners to deliver viable and advanced solutions for the commercial exploitation of self-healing materials.

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