Bolton, United Kingdom

University of Bolton

www.bolton.ac.uk
Bolton, United Kingdom

The University of Bolton is a public university in Bolton, Greater Manchester, England. It has approximately 14,000 students across all sites and courses, with 700 academic and professional staff. Around 70% of its students come from Bolton and the North West region.The Times newspaper profile states: ‘The university sees itself as a regional institution, with around three quarters of the students coming from the North West, many through partner colleges.’ Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.4.2 | Award Amount: 12.53M | Year: 2010

iTEC is a large-scale pilot involving up to 1,000 classrooms focused on Learning in the 21st Century and the design of the future classroom. Partners include 15 Ministries of Education, leading ICT vendors, innovative SMEs, TEL researchers, teacher educators and experts in school validations and pedagogical evaluation. The key aim is to develop engaging scenarios for learning in the future classroom that can be validated in large-scale pilots and subsequently taken to scale.\n\niTEC produces meaningful pedagogical scenarios (assisted by semantic web technology) for the future classroom and, from these, derives learning activities and new approaches to assessment that engage teachers, learners and stakeholders outside the school. These are then tested and evaluated in the largest pan-European validation with schools yet undertaken.\n\nThe iTEC technology approach will make the technical components, (people, tools, services and content) required by the scenarios, interoperable and discoverable, so that teachers can more easily select and combine relevant components tailored to the future classroom scenario of their choice. This is in line with current trends in which teachers can choose from a wide variety of loosely coupled tools and where interactive whiteboards and other interactive, multi-touch technologies may be acting as a gateway for teachers to start exploring the further use of digital technologies in their classrooms.\n\nCombined with this, iTEC will research the skills and competences needed by teachers in the future classroom and equip teachers, both within and beyond the project, with the pedagogical knowledge and skills needed to implement project scenarios.\n\nHaving identified scenarios with the maximum potential to have a transformative effect on the design of the future classroom, the project will implement a mainstreaming strategy designed to ensure that work carried out in the large-scale pilots contribute to the educational reform process.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-21-2014 | Award Amount: 9.00M | Year: 2015

The EU based industry for non-leisure games (applied games) is an emerging business. As such, its still fragmented and needs critical mass to compete globally. Nevertheless its growth potential is widely recognised and even suggested to exceed the growth potential of the leisure games market. RAGE will help to seize these opportunities by making available 1) an interoperable set of advanced technology assets tuned to applied gaming 2) proven practices of using asset-based applied games in various real-world contexts, 3) centralised access to a wide range of applied gaming software modules, services and resources, 4) an online social space (the RAGE Ecosystem) that arranges and facilitates collaboration that underlie progress and innovation, 5) workshops and online training opportunities for both developers and educators, 6) assets-based business cases that support the games industry at seizing new business opportunities, and 7) a business model and launch plan for exploiting the RAGE Ecosystem beyond the projects duration. Intermediary organisations and education providers anticipate a wider exploitation of RAGE results among their end-users, which add up to over 1 million, and through disseminating RAGE in their partner networks. The game companies in RAGE anticipate adding RAGE-based products to their portfolio, in order to improve their competitive advantage by opening a new product line for applied games and developing new revenue streams. Actual deployment of RAGE results will generate direct impact on the competitive positioning of the few thousand of European SMEs in the Applied Games market. Impacts from RAGE will be visible in terms of fulfilling new client needs by quicker and more challenging methods of skills acquisition, enabling new business models based on the usage of the assets repository and the Ecosystem, and in the strengthening collaboration across the entire Applied Games value chain.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA | Phase: ICT-2013.8.2 | Award Amount: 1.45M | Year: 2014

LACE partners are passionate about the opportunities afforded by current and future views of learning analytics (LA) and EDM but we are concerned about missed opportunities, undesirable consequences of mis-application, investment funding failing to realise value, market failure, etc. LACE is our response, a project proposal to reduce risk and to increase benefit through an approach that accounts for the necessary unity of research, policy and practice.LACE comprises a range of activities designed to actively and passively integrate communities that are conducting LA/EDM research, early practitioner adopters, and those who are building first-generation commercial or open-source software. This integration would be used to stimulate creativity and accelerate the identification of viable and effective solutions to real problems, and hence to drive both current research and technology transfer.LACE will create and curate a knowledge base of evidence. This will capture evidence for the effectiveness and the relative desirability of the outcomes resulting from use of various tools and techniques.LACE will actively participate in the exploration of plausible futures for learning analytics and EDM by combining the creation of imaginative scenarios with participatory workshops and structured methods including a Policy Delphi to assess differences of opinion about the feasibility and desirability of possible future states, thus informing future research and policy agendas.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: BBI-RIA | Phase: BBI.VC1.R1-2015 | Award Amount: 4.92M | Year: 2016

The use of carbon fiber (CF) based composites is of growing importance in many industrial applications with the current global market estimated at $28Bn [ref 9]. However, the current high cost, limited production capability in Europe and the use of petroleum-based polyacrylonitrile (PAN) as the precursor fiber (PF) from which the CF is ultimately derived, requires the development of innovative routes to industrial production. To achieve this, novel processes are needed which can utilise sustainable precursor materials to produce CF of adequate quality, reduce energy consumption during manufacture and make CF widely available and affordable across a range of different European industrial sectors. The aim of LIBRE is to use lignin rich side streams in order to develop a more resource-efficient and sustainable carbon fiber production, based on biopolymers for PF production and energy efficient processing technologies for conversion of PF to CF which will have performance levels matching or bettering current industrial standards.


Matsoukas I.G.,University of Bolton
Frontiers in Genetics | Year: 2014

The juvenile-to-adult and vegetative-to-reproductive phase transitions are major determinants of plant reproductive success and adaptation to the local environment. Understanding the intricate molecular genetic and physiological machinery by which environment regulates juvenility and floral signal transduction has significant scientific and economic implications. Sugars are recognized as important regulatory molecules that regulate cellular activity at multiple levels, from transcription and translation to protein stability and activity. Molecular genetic and physiological approaches have demonstrated different aspects of carbohydrate involvement and its interactions with other signal transduction pathways in regulation of the juvenile-to-adult and vegetative-to-reproductive phase transitions. Sugars regulate juvenility and floral signal transduction through their function as energy sources, osmotic regulators and signaling molecules. Interestingly, sugar signaling has been shown to involve extensive connections with phytohormone signaling. This includes interactions with phytohormones that are also important for the orchestration of developmental phase transitions, including gibberellins, abscisic acid, ethylene, and brassinosteroids. This article highlights the potential roles of sugar-hormone interactions in regulation of floral signal transduction, with particular emphasis on Arabidopsis thaliana mutant phenotypes, and suggests possible directions for future research. © 2014 Matsoukas.


Horrocks A.R.,University of Bolton
Polymer Degradation and Stability | Year: 2011

Almost 50 years ago, the 1950-1960 period witnessed the development of the chemistry underlying most of today's successful and durable flame retardant treatments for fibres and textiles. In today's more critical markets in terms of environmental sustainability, chemical toxicological acceptability, performance and cost, many of these are now being questioned. "Are there potential replacements for established, durable formaldehyde-based flame retardants such as those based on tetrakis (hydroxylmethyl) phosphonium salt and alkyl-substituted, N-methylol phosphonopropionamide chemistries for cellulosic textiles?" is an often-asked question. "Can we produce char-forming polyester flame retardants?" and "Can we really produce effective halogen-free replacements for coatings and back-coated textiles?" are others. These questions are addressed initially as a historical review of research undertaken in the second half of the twentieth century which is the basis of most currently available, commercialised flame retardant fibres and textiles. Research reported during the first decade of the twenty first century and which primarily addresses the current issues of environmental sustainability and the search for alternative flame retardant solutions, the need to increase char-forming character in synthetic fibres and the current interest in nanotechnology is critically discussed. The possible roles of micro- and nano-surface treatments of fibre surfaces and their development using techniques such as plasma technology are also reviewed. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 93.99K | Year: 2016

To develop smart fire protection products capable of sensing and reporting their local environment wirelessly


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 99.84K | Year: 2016

Injectable biomaterial scaffolds for tissue reconstruction are still not a clinical reality because many of the scaffold design parameters have not been fully optimized and controlled. New multifunctional scaffolds that both mimic the mechanical properties and structure of natural tissues and are able to promote cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation are now urgently needed. The aim of this project is to develop new hyper-branched poly(glycidol)/poly(caprolactam) (HBPG/PCL) based injectable gel scaffolds that have the potential to enable bone growth and the regeneration of cartilage in vivo, following application in a minimally invasive manner. They will thereby enable effective treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) without surgery. OA is characterized pathologically by localised loss of cartilage, remodeling of adjacent bone and associated inflammation. OA is one of the leading causes of pain and disability worldwide. New covalently-linked scaffolds that exhibit gradually increasing mechanical strength will be formed in vivo from physically cross-linked HBPG/PCL particles in a safe and effective way, in the absence of UV-radiation. They will feature tunable elastic modulus values and will undergo enzyme-triggered disassembly. The proposal will benefit the NHS by improving patients quality of life, reducing surgical costs and boost the UK economy by shortening patient recovery times and reducing productivity losses due to disability and/or illness. The proposal greatly extends Dr. Halachevas earlier studies on biomaterials scaffolds and will be conducted by a postdoctoral research associate (PDRA) and a University of Bolton funded Ph.D. student over a period of 15 months.


Patent
University of Bolton | Date: 2012-12-05

A polysaccharide fibre useful in biomedical applications such as wound management is made as a bicomponent fibre with alginate and psyllium polymers. An antimicrobial silver salt may be incorporated. The fibre may be made by extruding an aqueous mixture of alkaline-solubilised psyllium and sodium alginate into a calcium chloride bath.


Patent
University of Bolton | Date: 2013-10-16

A power conversion system for converting solar and mechanical energy into electrical energy comprises a piezoelectric-photovoltaic structure having a photovoltaic element and a piezoelectric element, a first circuit connected to the piezoelectric element, and a second circuit connected to the photovoltaic element. At least one of the first and second circuits is connected to a DC-DC converter.

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