Bologna, Italy
Bologna, Italy

The University of Bologna is a university in Bologna, Italy, founded in 1088. As of 2013 the University's crest carries the motto Alma mater studiorum and the date A.D. 1088. The University has about 85,000 students in its 23 schools. It has branch centres in Imola, Ravenna, Forlì, Cesena and Rimini and a branch center abroad in Buenos Aires. It also has a school of excellence named Collegio Superiore di Bologna. It is recognised as the oldest university in continuous operation, considering that it was the first to use the term universitas for the corporations of students and masters which came to define the institution.The publisher of the University of Bologna is Bononia University Press S.p.A . Wikipedia.


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Lee M.S.Y.,South Australian Museum | Lee M.S.Y.,University of Adelaide | Cau A.,Museo Geologico e Paleontologico Giovanni Capellini | Cau A.,University of Bologna | And 3 more authors.
Science | Year: 2014

Recent discoveries have highlighted the dramatic evolutionary transformation of massive, ground-dwelling theropod dinosaurs into light, volant birds.Here,we apply Bayesian approaches (originally developed for inferring geographic spread and rates of molecular evolution in viruses) in a different context: to infer size changes and rates of anatomical innovation (across up to 1549 skeletal characters) in fossils.These approaches identify two drivers underlying the dinosaur-bird transition.The theropod lineage directly ancestral to birds undergoes sustained miniaturization across 50 million years and at least 12 consecutive branches (internodes) and evolves skeletal adaptations four times faster than other dinosaurs.The distinct, prolonged phase of miniaturization along the bird stem would have facilitated the evolution of many novelties associated with small body size, such as reorientation of body mass, increased aerial ability, and paedomorphic skulls with reduced snouts but enlarged eyes and brains.


Druskin V.,Schlumberger | Simoncini V.,University of Bologna
Systems and Control Letters | Year: 2011

The rational Krylov space is recognized as a powerful tool within model order reduction techniques for linear dynamical systems. However, its success has been hindered by the lack of a parameter-free procedure, which would effectively generate the sequence of shifts used to build the space. In this paper we propose an adaptive computation of these shifts. The whole procedure only requires us to inject some initial rough estimate of the spectral region of the matrix, while further information is automatically generated during the process. The approach is a full generalization to the nonsymmetric case of the idea first proposed in Druskin et al. (2010) [18] and it is used for two important problems in control: the approximation of the transfer function and the numerical solution of large Lyapunov equations. The procedure can be naturally extended to other related problems, such as the solution of the Sylvester equation, and parametric or higher order systems. Several numerical experiments are proposed to assess the quality of the rational projection space over its most natural competitors. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Bianchi M.,University of Bologna | De Pascale A.,University of Bologna | Melino F.,CNR Institute of Materials for Electronics and Magnetism
Applied Energy | Year: 2013

The aim of this paper is the evaluation of the profitability of micro-CHP systems for residential application. An integrated CHP system composed of a prime mover, an Electric Energy Storage system, a thermal storage system and an auxiliary boiler has been considered. The study has been carried out taking into account a particular electrochemical storage system which requires also thermal energy, during its operation, for a better exploitation of the residual heat discharged by the prime mover. The prime mover could be a conventional Internal Combustion Engine or also an innovative system, such as fuel cell or organic Rankine cycle.An investigation of this integrated CHP system has been carried out, by means of an in-house developed calculation code, performing a thermo-economic analysis. This paper provides useful results, in order to define the optimum sizing of components of the integrated CHP system under investigation; the developed code allows also to evaluate the profitability and the primary energy saving with respect to the separate production of electricity and heat. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Nanni L.,University of Padua | Brahnam S.,Missouri State University | Lumini A.,University of Bologna
Bioinformatics | Year: 2012

Motivation: The microarray report measures the expressions of tens of thousands of genes, producing a feature vector that is high in dimensionality and that contains much irrelevant information. This dimensionality degrades classification performance. Moreover, datasets typically contain few samples for training, leading to the 'curse of dimensionality' problem. It is essential, therefore, to find good methods for reducing the size of the feature set. Results: In this article, we propose a method for gene microarray classification that combines different feature reduction approaches for improving classification performance. Using a support vector machine (SVM) as our classifier, we examine an SVM trained using a set of selected genes; an SVM trained using the feature set obtained by Neighborhood Preserving Embedding feature transform; a set of SVMs trained using a set of orthogonal wavelet coefficients of different wavelet mothers; a set of SVMs trained using texture descriptors extracted from the microarray, considering it as an image; and an ensemble that combines the best feature extraction methods listed above. The positive results reported offer confirmation that combining different features extraction methods greatly enhances system performance. The experiments were performed using several different datasets, and our results [expressed as both accuracy and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve] show the goodness of the proposed approach with respect to the state of the art. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.


Fioravanti D.,University of Bologna | Piscaglia S.,University of Bologna | Piscaglia S.,University of Porto
Physics Letters, Section B: Nuclear, Elementary Particle and High-Energy Physics | Year: 2014

By converting the asymptotic Bethe Ansatz (ABA) of N = 4 SYM into non-linear integral equations, we find 2D scattering amplitudes of excitations on top of the GKP vacuum. We prove that this is a suitable and powerful set-up for the understanding and computation of the whole S-matrix. We show that all the amplitudes depend on the fundamental scalar-scalar one. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.


Lenaz G.,University of Bologna
Molecular Syndromology | Year: 2014

Two alternative models of organization of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) have been alternatively favored or questioned by the accumulation evidences of different sources, the solid model or the random collision model. Both agree in the number of respiratory complexes (I-IV) that participate in the mETC, but while the random collision model proposes that Complexes I-IV do not interact physically and that electrons are transferred between them by coenzyme Q and cytochrome c, the solid model proposes that all complexes super-assemble in the so-called respirasome. Recently, the plasticity model has been developed to incorporate the solid and the random collision model as extreme situations of a dynamic organization, allowing super-assembly free movement of the respiratory complexes. In this review, we evaluate the supporting evidences of each model and the implications of the super-assembly in the physiological role of coenzyme Q. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: NOE | Phase: ICT-2009.3.1 | Award Amount: 3.53M | Year: 2010

The NANOFUNCTION Network of Excellence aims to integrate at the European level the excellent European research laboratories in order to strengthen scientific and technological excellence in the field of novel nanoelectronic materials, devices and circuits for developing new integrated functions and disseminate the results in a wide scientific and industrial community.\n\nThis proposal will focus on the convergence of Advanced More than Moore devices (Analog-RF-sensors-actuators-biochips-energy harvesters, etc.) for adding functionalities to ICs and Beyond-CMOS nanostructures (nanowires, nanostructured materials, etc.) which could be integrated on CMOS platforms. In particular, the interest of these nanodevices for the development of innovative applications with increased performance in the field of nanosensing, energy harvesting, nanocooling and RF will be thoroughly investigated.\n\nThis work will be carried out through a network of joint processing, characterisation and modelling platforms. The consortium will work closely with European industry and will feed back data and know-how on devices that deliver the required performance. This interaction will strengthen European integration in nanoelectronics, help in decision-making and ensure that Europe remains at the forefront of nanoelectronics for the next decades.\n\n\nFree keywords: -Beyond CMOS nanodevices -Advanced More than Moore technologies and applications -Innovative functionalities -Nanosensors -Energy harvesting -Nanocooling -Advanced RF materials and devices


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: SGA-RIA | Phase: FETFLAGSHIP | Award Amount: 89.00M | Year: 2016

This project is the second in the series of EC-financed parts of the Graphene Flagship. The Graphene Flagship is a 10 year research and innovation endeavour with a total project cost of 1,000,000,000 euros, funded jointly by the European Commission and member states and associated countries. The first part of the Flagship was a 30-month Collaborative Project, Coordination and Support Action (CP-CSA) under the 7th framework program (2013-2016), while this and the following parts are implemented as Core Projects under the Horizon 2020 framework. The mission of the Graphene Flagship is to take graphene and related layered materials from a state of raw potential to a point where they can revolutionise multiple industries. This will bring a new dimension to future technology a faster, thinner, stronger, flexible, and broadband revolution. Our program will put Europe firmly at the heart of the process, with a manifold return on the EU investment, both in terms of technological innovation and economic growth. To realise this vision, we have brought together a larger European consortium with about 150 partners in 23 countries. The partners represent academia, research institutes and industries, which work closely together in 15 technical work packages and five supporting work packages covering the entire value chain from materials to components and systems. As time progresses, the centre of gravity of the Flagship moves towards applications, which is reflected in the increasing importance of the higher - system - levels of the value chain. In this first core project the main focus is on components and initial system level tasks. The first core project is divided into 4 divisions, which in turn comprise 3 to 5 work packages on related topics. A fifth, external division acts as a link to the parts of the Flagship that are funded by the member states and associated countries, or by other funding sources. This creates a collaborative framework for the entire Flagship.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2007.7.1 | Award Amount: 2.87M | Year: 2008

Mobility means freedom, flexibility and autonomy for all citizens, including older persons. Aging is characterized by functional changes in the sensory, neurological and musculoskeletal systems, affecting motor tasks including gait and postural balance. Gait and balance disturbances in elderly are the main risk factor for falling. The SMILING project is planning to diminish age related impairments by interfering with mobility disability and improving carry-over into real life situations. Research undertaken in USA and Israel has shown strong indications that the vicious circle of muscle weakness and time delay of the Central Nervous System (CNS) that causes gait and balance impairment could be weakened by applying unexpected external motion perturbations. Elderly at risk of falling can be considered to be suffering from an involuntary and stereotyped motor behaviour that restricts their participation in society. One method to overcome such a situation is to break the stereotyped motion schema and activate a new learning process to better approach real life tasks. To pursue such a target, the SMILING project will use chaos theory and dynamic systems theory with applications in the training of the ageing populations. The SMILING solution, a wearable non-invasive computer-controlled system, is aimed to perform chaotic perturbations to lower extremities during active walking by small alterations of the height and slope of weight-bearing surfaces. SMILING will implement a systemic solution to re-model training sessions used prevalently in fitness clubs or home environments to facilitate and ameliorate walking schemas. It will not develop any assistive technology to cope with ageing related mobility limitations but will offer a reorganization of the rehabilitation process in ageing, through new training procedures and advanced technologies needed to deliver them.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: DRS-09-2015 | Award Amount: 8.81M | Year: 2016

Recent studies from the IPCC indicate that Europe is particularly prone to increased risks of river and coastal floods, droughts resulting in water restrictions and damages from extreme weather such as heat events and wildfires. Evaluations also show a huge potential to reduce these risks with novel adaptation strategies. Researchers, innovators and incubators develop innovative products and services to reduce the increased climate change risks. Many of these innovations however hardly arrive at the markets. BRIGAID BRIdges the GAp for Innovations in Disaster resilience. BRIGAIDs approach is supported by three pillars. (1) At first BRIGAID takes into account the geographical variability of climate-related hazards and their interaction with socio-economic changes, (2) BRIGAID establishes structural, on-going support for innovations that are ready for validation in field tests and real life demonstrations and (3) BRIGAID develops a framework that enables an independent, scientific judgement of the socio-technological effectiveness of an innovation. BRIGAIDs objective is ambitious but achievable with strong consortium partners in EU, two Associated Countries and support from Overseas Territories. BRIGAID (a) brings actively together innovators and end-users in Communities of Innovation, resulting in increased opportunities for market-uptake; (b) contributes to the development of a technological and performance standards for adaptation options by providing a Test and Implementation Framework (TIF) and test facilities throughout Europe; (c) Improves innovation capacity and the integration of new knowledge by establishing an innovators network and (d) strengthens the competitiveness and growth of companies with the support of a dedicated business team. Finally BRIGAID develops a business models and market outreach to launch innovations to the market and secure investments in innovations beyond BRIGAIDs lifetime.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: GC-SST.2010.7-9. | Award Amount: 5.22M | Year: 2011

The focus of the project is on the development of fluorinated electrolyte/separator and binders in combination with active electrodes (anode LiC6 and cathode: LiNixMn2-xO4 - 4,7V) for high performing, safe and durable Li batteries. The main deliverables of the project are the development of cell prototypes capacity > 10 A.h on which performance assessment will be conducted. The AMELIE prototype performances will be assessed towards the following objectives for EV and PHEV applications: high specific energy: cells >200 Wh/kg, improved life time: > 1000 cycles, 80% DOD for EV applications, High calendar life: > 10 years, high recyclability / recovery/ reuse: battery components 85% recycled and improved competitiveness: <500 /kWh on prototype paving the way for mass production cost <150/ kWh. The utilization of higher performing inactive organic materials (polymers and ionomers) will enable to reduce the amount of the same materials while increasing the energy and power densities of the battery, and consequently decreasing the cost per kWh of the final battery. In addition, the reuse of the components will contribute to the cost reduction of the battery. To this end a complete Life Cycle Analysis of the new battery components will be performed. To take up these challenges, academic and private organisations have partnered up in the AMELIE consortium. As the developments in this field are extremely interconnected, improved Lithium ion batteries for automotive sector can be manufactured only by the synergistic optimisation of all their components: active materials and binders for electrodes, gel polymers, lithium salts and solvents for the ionic conductors. Although innovative materials are a key lever of such improvements, the cell design will be essential for both improved performances and safety.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: ENV.2007.3.2.1.1. | Award Amount: 1.84M | Year: 2008

Historic structures are often of extraordinary architecture, design or material. The conservation of such structures for next European generations is one of the main future tasks. To conserve historic structures it is more and more required to understand the deterioration processes mainly caused by the environment. In certain cases continuous monitoring systems have been installed to obtain information about the deterioration processes. However, most of these monitoring systems were just weather or air pollution data acquisition systems and use only basic models for data analysis. The real influence of the environment to the structure or the structural material is often unaccounted for. That means that the structural resistance is just calculated from the measurements and not determined by sufficient sensors. Another aspect is the fact that most monitoring systems require cabling, which is neither aesthetically appealing nor in some cases applicable due to the needed fastening techniques. The proposed project aims at the development of competitive tools for practitioners which goes beyond the mere accumulation of data. Smart monitoring systems using wireless sensor networks, new miniature sensor technologies (e.g. MEMS) for minimally invasive installation as well as smart data processing will be developed. It will provide help in the sense of warnings (e.g. increase of damaging factors) and recommendations for action (e.g. ventilation or heating on/off, etc.) using data fusion and interpretation that is implemented within the monitoring system. The development will consist of small smart wireless and robust sensors and networks, with sensors for monitoring of e.g. temperature, humidity, air velocity, strain and crack opening, acoustic emissions, vibration, inclination, chemical attack, ambient and UV light, with built-in deterioration and material models, data pre-processing, and alarm functions to inform responsible persons about changes of the object status. Comparative tests will be conducted to validate the models as well as the monitoring data from several case studies. The results of the project will be summarized in a toolbox and a guideline, which will be disseminated at special trainings organized for restorers, owner of cultural heritage and public authorities.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: SPA-2007-2.2-02 | Award Amount: 4.87M | Year: 2008

The objective of the research program is to design, optimize and develop a space plasma thruster based on helicon-radio-frequency technology and its application to a nano-satellite for attitude and position control. Moreover a detailed feasibility study will be also conducted to evaluate the possibility of using the plasma thruster to heat and decompose a secondary propellant. The feasibility study will asses the possibility of building up a combined-two-mode-thruster able to operate in the low-thrust high-efficiency plasma-mode and high-thrust low-efficiency secondary-propellant-plasma-enhanced mode. Only the plasma thruster will be developed and fully tested during this study. The main characteristics of the thruster are: Power 50 W Weight within 1.5 kg Thrust >1.5 mN Specific Impulse (Isp) >1200 s The program will develop thought the following steps: a) Deep numerical-theoretical investigation through dedicated plasma-simulation tools. b) Extensive experimental campaign to validate codes, to investigate the physics phenomena involved and to proof thruster performance. c) The development of a thruster-prototype to be mounted on board of a mini-satellite to demonstrate technology feasibility, d)The study of all the critical issues related to the application to a mini-satellite e) the design and manufacturing of the mini-satellite mock up including all critical components f) analysis of scaling law to lower and higher power. As a final results of the project, a detailed analysis will be conducted in order to evaluate the possible application of the thruster in space missions requiring low thrust accurate attitude and position control.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2009-1-4-02 | Award Amount: 2.49M | Year: 2010

The aim of the SPARD project is to develop a modelling tool that will help policy-makers to understand the causal relationships between rural development measures and their results in a spatial dimension. Based on spatial-econometric analysis it will include ex-post evaluation options and the extension to ex-ante assessment with the purpose of giving support to the planning of targeted RD policies, programmes and measures. The project will compile a well-structured database, to organise both indicators from the Common Monitoring and Evaluation Framework (CMEF), distinguishing input, output, result, impact and baseline indicators, and other data specifically used by the RD management authorities in the Member States (MS), and extrapolate missing indicator values. This requires a procedure to standardize the utilisation of results amongst users at different levels. The emphasis of the project will be the development of an analytical framework that considers characteristics and needs of target areas and target groups. The key task of the project is to develop a quantitative model, using spatial econometric modelling. This will allow the identification of causal relationships of RD policy implementation. In this manner the cost-effectiveness of RDPs can be analysed in their spatial dimension. Evaluations/ assessments of selected policies and measures and their impacts will be made at the EU-27 scale. Furthermore it shall be demonstrated that the methodology is feasible at different scales of application and levels of data aggregation. Validation of the modelling framework will be carried out in 5 case study regions. The end product of SPARD will be a multiple-option and variable-scale DSS tool capable for use in horizontal and vertical evaluations. As a collaborative project, SPARD will make efforts to broaden the proved expertise of the consortium by integration of stakeholders, external experts and end-users in the overall process.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-07-2014 | Award Amount: 20.85M | Year: 2014

COMPARE aims to harness the rapid advances in molecular technology to improve identification and mitigation of emerging infectious diseases and foodborne outbreaks. To this purpose COMPARE will establish a One serves all analytical framework and data exchange platform that will allow real time analysis and interpretation of sequence-based pathogen data in combination with associated data (e.g. clinical, epidemiological data) in an integrated inter-sectorial, interdisciplinary, international, one health approach. The framework will link research, clinical and public health organisations active in human health, animal health, and food safety in Europe and beyond, to develop (i) integrated risk assessment and risk based collection of samples and data, (ii) harmonised workflows for generating comparable sequence and associated data, (iii) state-of-the-art analytical workflows and tools for generating actionable information for support of patient diagnosis, treatment, outbreak detection and -investigation and (iv) risk communication tools. The analytical workflows will be linked to a flexible, scalable and open-source data- and information platform supporting rapid sharing, interrogation and analysis of sequence-based pathogen data in combination with other associated data. The system will be linked to existing and future complementary systems, networks and databases such as those used by ECDC, NCBI and EFSA. The functionalities of the system will be tested and fine tuned through underpinning research studies on priority pathogens covering healthcare-associated infections, food-borne disease, and (zoonotic) (re-) emerging diseases with epidemic or pandemic potential. Throughout the project, extensive consultations with future users, studies into the barriers to open data sharing, dissemination and training activities and studies on the cost-effectiveness of the system will support future sustainable user uptake.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2008-1-3-01 | Award Amount: 3.97M | Year: 2009

Low input farming occurs under non-SPF (specific pathogen free) conditions. The European ban on in-feed antibiotics exposes the piglets to a higher microbial environmental pressure. The postnatal priming of piglets with a diverse microbiota may affect the development of the piglets host-defense and gut functionality. By reversal, the piglets developing host-defense may affect the development of the gastro-intestinal microbiota. Moreover, this intricate interplay between gut microbiota and its host during the early phases of life is expected to also affect animal health and performance later in life. The gut microbiome is an immensely diverse ecosystem that has co-evolved with its host. Recent research on microbe-host interactions has provided novel insights into the role of commensal intestinal microbes in several physiological processes, i.e., from epithelial barrier development to immune development as well as neurological aspects. Nevertheless, we only start to understand the molecular mechanisms of the host microbe cross-talk. Recent conceptual as well as technological advances have set the stage for the integrated application of a complementary set of high throughput approaches for the comprehensive profiling of GIT microbiota composition and functionality as well as the animals intestinal function. In a multidisciplinary consortium, comprising 11 public and private partners from across and beyond Europe with complementary expertise in gut microbiomics, immunology and physiology, and animal genomics and nutrition, INTERPLAY will apply an integrated approach to arrive at a sound understanding of the interaction of early colonization of the intestine and the development of gut function. This knowledge will be exploited for the identification of innovative management strategies that address host genotype as well as nutritional means to provide a framework for sustainable animal production at high food and consumer safety and improved animal health and welfare.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE.2011.3.5-01 | Award Amount: 7.78M | Year: 2011

The project aims at 1 providing baseline data on biodiversity in agro-ecosystems in the EU, 2 translating regional protection goals in measurable assessment endpoints, 3 defining lists of suitable bioindicators for various European regions, 4 improving knowledge on potential long term environmental effects of genetically modified plants (GMPs), 5 testing the efficacy of the EFSA Guidance Document (GD) for the Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) of GMPs, 6 exploring new strategies for post market monitoring, 7 estimating the compatibility of GMPs with the Integrated Pest Management (IPM) principles implemented in the EU, 8 providing a systematic analysis of economical aspects of GMPs cultivation in the EU, and 9 setting a training and communication plan addressing public concerns about GMPs. The consortium includes 22 partners (Research institutes, Universities, State Agencies and SMEs) located in 15 EU countries and. An ICPC country (Argentina) will contribute in validating the monitoring methodology in areas where GM crops are cultivated on larger scales. A cornerstone is the application of the EFSA ERA GD, which is the basis for the update of the regulatory process of GMPs in the EU. The GD has provided ecologically sound principles for ERA, triggering the need of practically testing them. Partners of the consortium participated to the preparation of GD and 3 of them are senior authors of relevant chapters. The scientific activities will consist of case studies of maize and potato, the two GM crops currently approved for cultivation in the EU, and surveys in non-GM agro-ecosystems. The final outcome will include a network of EU representative sites for pre-market risk assessment and long-term monitoring studies, a set of standardised testing methods and a geographical information system integrating relevant datasets, protocols and tools to help EU decision-makers. To be implemented in 4 years, the project estimated costs are 7779852.15 , requested grant 5997963 .


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: ICT-06-2014 | Award Amount: 550.24K | Year: 2014

The approach of the 5-Alive project will be to use an innovative mix of community and industrial support to produce the essential material and to perform an intensive communications programme. The project proposes to establish effective processes to capture, synopsise and present frequent news updates on the activities of the European 5G initiative and ensure their widespread dissemination. The project involves a number of key industrial players, who are active in lead roles in both the ETP and the Association, and are contributing manpower to the project activities at their own cost, to ensure the investment is shared between industry and the EC. Thus the funding model of this proposal is a true reflection of the stakeholder interests in and commitments to the European 5G-Infrastructure-PPP. The main 5-Alive project objectives are: Produce an updated roadmap for the holistic network perspective (including 5G) via the NetWorld2020 ETP, Actively promote and position the European 5G Initiatives as part of the leading global initiatives, Stimulate the involvement of the European ICT community and consumer sectors as drivers of evolution, Facilitate the 5G-Infrastructure-Association production of strategies for later phases of the 5G-PPP, Conduct a first exercise on mapping the 5G-PPP KPIs to the research challenges to determine which topics will directly contribute to obtaining the foreseen infrastructure performance/feature improvements. The project will run for one year to boost the 5G activities in the short-term in advance of the kick-off of 5G project related activities and to position the 5G PPP initiative as the European initiative in the 5G domain at global level.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ISIB-01-2014 | Award Amount: 2.99M | Year: 2015

The objective of the project is to provide a conceptual basis, evidence, tools and improved incentive and policy options to support the smart provision of public goods by the EU agriculture and forestry ecosystems, in the light of trade-offs and conflicts brought about by prospective intensification scenarios, using a transdisciplinary approach. PROVIDE will consider a wide range of public goods, including the scope for intensification to produce negative externalities, in relation with a wide set of legislations. It will address the issue in a multi-scale framework working both at the EU level and at case study level in thirteen Countries of the EU. The practical results of the project will be: a renewed (un-packed) conceptualization of the notion of public goods; an operational framework to support the smart provision of public goods; a toolbox putting together an inventory/mapping of options, operational means for valuation and evaluation, and a selection of evaluated policy/sector mechanisms; a consolidated and long-lasting community of knowledge and practice. The project will achieve the above results through a mapping and inventory of public goods and the mechanisms producing such goods, allowing to identify hotspots for mechanisms and policy development. Around these hotspots, the project will then value different public goods and explore value transferability across several regions and ecosystems. Next, to meet a smart production of public goods, consistent with the current needs of productivity, bioeconomy strategy and rural development, innovative policy tools and mechanisms will be comparatively assessed and evaluated. The outcomes of these activities will feed information into the framework and toolbox. All these processes will be co-developed with stakeholders, so that the framework and toolbox will be a co-constructed product allowing incremental development also beyond the lifetime of the project, maximizing PROVIDEs impact.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: ICT-14-2014 | Award Amount: 2.05M | Year: 2015

The primary objective of the Euro-5g project is to facilitate effective and efficient co-operation and integration between all projects of the 5G-PPP, the European Commission, The 5G-Infrastructure Association, Networld2020 ETP, related projects from EUREKA, and related national initiatives to maximize the European momentum towards, and benefits from, the future 5G integrated, ubiquitous and ultra-high capacity networks. The metrics for evaluating the success of 5G PPP will be based on the KPIs included in the 5G-PPP Contractual Arrangement signed by the 5G Infrastructure Association on behalf of the European ICT Sector and the European Commission in December 2013. This project is closely linked with the 5G-Infrastructure Association and will strive to ensure there is a seamless integration of the European industrial policies, as generated by the association, with the work plans of the projects under this program so the results will be the as useful and relevant as is possible. In its work, the Euro-5g project will actively support the 5G-PPP goal to maintain and enhance the competitiveness of the European ICT industry and to ensure that European society can enjoy the economic and societal benefits these future networks will bring in collaboration with the European commission, the 5G Infrastructure Association, the Networld2020 European Technology Platform and the projects of the 5G-PPP


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: WATER-1a-2014 | Award Amount: 4.25M | Year: 2015

The main objective of MOSES is to put in place and demonstrate at the real scale of application an information platform devoted to water procurement and management agencies (e.g. reclamation consortia, irrigation districts, etc.) to facilitate planning of irrigation water resources, with the aim of: saving water; improving services to farmers; reducing monetary and energy costs. To achieve these goals, the MOSES project combines in an innovative and integrated platform a wide range of data and technological resources: EO data, probabilistic seasonal forecasting and numerical weather prediction, crop water requirement and irrigation modelling and online GIS Decision Support System. Spatial scales of services range from river basin to sub-district; users access the system depending on their expertise and needs. Main system components are: 1. early-season irrigated crop mapping 2. seasonal weather forecasting and downscaling 3. in-season monitoring of evapotranspiration and water availability 4. seasonal and medium/short term irrigation forecasting Four Demonstration Areas will be set up in Italy, Spain, Romania and Morocco, plus an Indian organization acting as observer. Different water procurement and distribution scenarios will be considered, collecting data and user needs, interfacing with existing local services and contributing to service definition. Demonstrative and training sessions are foreseen for service exploitation in the Demonstration Areas. The proposed system is targeting EIP on Water thematic priorities related to increasing agriculture water use efficiency, water resource monitoring and flood and drought risk management; it will be compliant to INSPIRE. This SME-led project address to the irrigated agriculture users an integrated and innovative water management solution.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2007-2.3-1 | Award Amount: 11.09M | Year: 2008

The main driving idea of the project is the creation of conceptually new type of scaffolds able to be manipulated in situ by means of magnetic forces. This approach is expected to generate scaffolds with such characteristics as multiple use and possibly multipurpose delivery in order to repair large bone defects and ostheocondral lesions in the articular surface of the skeletal system. The major limitations of the scaffolds for bone and cartilage regeneration nowadays available in the market are related to the difficulties in controlling cell differentiation and angiogenesis processes and to obtain stable scaffold implantation in the pathological site. . . Several attempts have been performed over the last years in order to provide scaffolds for tissue engineering, but nowadays there is no way to grant that tissue regeneration take place in the pathological site. The provision in vivo of the scaffold with staminal cells or /and growth factors in order to drive the tissue differentiation process and parallel angiogenesis represents nowadays one of most challenging requests [Ref. Nanomedicine roadmap]. The Consortium aims to elaborate, investigate and fabricate new kind of scaffolds magnetic scaffolds (MagS) - characterized by strongly enhanced control and efficiency of the tissue regeneration and angiogenic processes. The magnetic moment of the scaffolds enables them with a fascinating possibility of being continuously controlled and reloaded from external supervising center with all needed scaffold materials and various active factors (AF). Such a magnetic scaffold can be imagined as a fixed station that offers a long-living assistance to the tissue engineering, providing thus a unique possibility to adjust the scaffold activity to the personal needs of the patient.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-SICA | Phase: ENV.2007.1.1.5.3. | Award Amount: 4.28M | Year: 2008

The CLARIS LPB Project aims at predicting the regional climate change impacts on La Plata Basin (LPB) in South America, and at designing adaptation strategies for land-use, agriculture, rural development, hydropower production, river transportation, water resources and ecological systems in wetlands. In order to reach such a goal, the project has been built on the following four major thrusts. First, improving the description and understanding of decadal climate variability is of prime importance for short-term regional climate change projections (2010-2040). Second, a sound approach requires an ensemble of coordinated regional climate scenarios in order to quantify the amplitude and sources of uncertainties in LPB future climate at two time horizons: 2010-2040 for adaptation strategies and 2070-2100 for assessment of long-range impacts. Such coordination will allow to critically improve the prediction capacity of climate change and its impacts in the region. Third, adaptation strategies to regional scenarios of climate change impacts require a multi-disciplinary approach where all the regional components (climate, hydrology, land use, land cover, agriculture and deforestation) are addressed in a collaborative way. Feedbacks between the regional climate groups and the land use and hydrology groups will ensure to draw a first-order feedback of future land use and hydrology scenarios onto the future regional climate change. Fourth, stakeholders must be integrated in the design of adaptation strategies, ensuring their dissemination to public, private and governmental policy-makers. Finally, in continuity with the FP6 CLARIS Project, our project will put a special emphasis in forming young scientists in European institutes and in strengthening the collaborations between European and South American partners. The project is coordinated with the objectives of LPB, an international project on La Plata Basin that has been endorsed by the CLIVAR and GEWEX Panels.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: ICT-15-2014 | Award Amount: 4.10M | Year: 2015

Contact centers (CC) are an important business for Europe: 35,000 contact centers generate 3.2 Million jobs (~1% of Europes active population). A typical CC produces a wealth of multilingual spoken data that is nowadays mined by humans (CC agents and supervisors) or by rudimentary technical means. BISON consortium plans to bring significant innovations in three areas: (1) basic speech data mining technologies (systems quickly adaptable to new languages, domains and CC campaigns), (2) business outcome mining from speech (translated into improvement of CCs Key Performance Indicators) and (3) CC support systems integrating both speech and business outcome mining in user-friendly way. The project will produce two prototypes: smallBison (end of the 1st year) will be a functioning system for real, though limited, deployment and user feedback collection. bigBison (end of the project) will include full range of capabilities and be fully integrated with CC hardware and software infrastructure. Generation of business outputs will be demonstrated on real data. Business indicators and values for the market were instrumental for the definition of the project and will be crucial for project execution. BISON consortium is composed of eight players with complementary skills. Two end users running large CC operations (EBOS, Atento) are generating user requirements and are ready to deploy the prototypes immediately in real scenarios. Phonexia (the coordinator), Brno University of Technology and Telefnica I\D are experts in speech data mining - from R&D, data processing to developing products placed on the market. Telefnica Mviles is an expert in business outcome mining and MyForce is a skilled Contact Center hardware and software integrator. CC data involve a number of legal issues, therefore, the University of Bologna (with significant experience in regulatory and legal aspects) complements the consortium.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2007.3.1 | Award Amount: 4.45M | Year: 2008

As miniaturization of the CMOS technology advances designers will have to deal with increased variability and changing performance of devices. Intrinsic variability of devices which begins to be visible in 65nm devices already will become much more significant in smaller technologies. Soon it will not be possible to design systems using current methods and techniques.\nScaling beyond the 32 nm technology node brings a number of problems whose impact on design has not been evaluated yet. Random intra-die process variability, reliability degradation mechanisms and their combined impact on the system level parametric quality metrics are becoming prominent issues.\n\nDealing with these new challenges will require an adaptation of the current design process: a combination of design time and runtime techniques and methods will be needed to guarantee the correct functioning of Systems on Chip (SoC) over the products lifetime, despite the fabrication in unreliable nano-scale technologies.\nThe objective of this project is to develop design techniques and methods for real-time guaranteed, energy-efficient, robust and self-adaptive SoCs.\nThe technological challenges to be tackled are:\n(a) Increased static variability and static fault rates of devices and interconnects;\n(b) Increased time-dependent dynamic variability and dynamic fault rates.\n(c) Build reliable systems out of unreliable technology while maintaining design productivity;\n(d) Deploy design techniques that allow technology scalable energy efficient SoC systems while guaranteeing real-time performance constraints.\n\nIn order to tackle these challenges we focus our effort along two main axes:\n(a) Analysis of the system in terms of performance, power and reliability of manufactured instances across a wide spectrum of operating conditions.\n(b) Solution techniques to mitigate impact of reliability issues of integrated circuits, at component, circuit, and architecture and system design.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: SESAR-RIA | Phase: Sesar-06-2015 | Award Amount: 1.07M | Year: 2016

The increasing interest in Synthetic Vision (SV) and Augmented Reality (AR) technologies has led various analysts to positively esteem the adoption of new tools enabling pilots and controllers to seamlessly operate under Visual Meteorological Conditions and Instrument Meteorological Conditions. The RETINA project will investigate the potential and applicability of SV tools and Virtual/Augmented Reality (V/AR) display techniques for the Air Traffic Control (ATC) service provision by the airport control tower. Within the project, several concepts and basic principles that have been observed in different areas (e.g. Remote Tower, Synthetic Vision Systems, AR, Information Technologies, etc.) will be brought to the level of maturity required for the Applied Research that will be conducted in SESAR V1-V3 (Applied Research, Industrial Research & Validation). To this end, a 3D airport model will be developed, along with V/AR based human-computer interfaces. The digital model will provide controllers with precise positioning for both aerial and terrestrial objects, drawing information from multiple, simulated, data sources, such as the System Wide Information Management (SWIM) network, Remote Towers sensing technologies and other well-established surveillance systems e.g. Airport Surveillance Radar (ASR) and the Surface Movement Radar (SMR). The interface design will be based on the Ecological Interface Design approach. Finally, the project will investigate the impact of the newly conceived tools on the control tower air traffic management procedures. On the whole, those tasks that are negatively affected by poor visibility conditions, such as bad weather, fog, smoke, dust or any other kind of environmental occlusion, will become weather-independent. The RETINA project primarily relates to SESAR ER-06-2015 - High Performing Airport Operations - Improved Visualisation and Awareness, but also has a secondary relationship to SESAR ER-03-2015 - Information Management in ATM.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 3.82M | Year: 2013

The expanding diversification and specialization of knowledge and the growing complexity of contemporary research in translational research warrant the creation of cooperative multi-disciplinary networks including both basic and medically oriented expertise. This notion is especially true for Mitochondrial Medicine which aims at understanding the physiopathological mechanisms sharing the features of mitochondrial biology and represents an ideal platform for the training of young investigators who will develop a broad view of biomedical sciences working in such a multifaceted area of research. The project will create a network of 10 basic and translational laboratories (among which 2 SMEs) and 2 associated partners who will provide well established professional tools for training and dissemination. MEET will train 11 ESRs and 3 ERs supervised in their research by 15 mentors and by their collaborators. In addition, the 14 trainees will attend at least 1 advanced course in the genetic field, 1 complementary training course about public and private financial sources for R&D and Innovation projects and 1 or 2 selected technical workshops organized by the 10 partner laboratories. The cohesion of the research and teaching activities will be guaranteed by: monthly telematic meetings of, an international scientific Symposium specifically addressed to associations and foundations of patients and patients families in order to exchange the most up-to-date knowledge advances.By creating the critical mass of scientific excellence documented by the track records of the individual investigators, most of whom have worked together in the FP6 EUMITOCOMBAT project, MEET will combine the efforts of leading clinicians with those of more basic oriented groups and will have important implications for the comprehension and treatment of mitochondria-related pathologies


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: EeB.NMP.2012-2 | Award Amount: 8.61M | Year: 2012

The proposed project will develop and demonstrate energy efficient new and innovative technologies and solutions for retrofitting and performance monitoring of a number of typical residential buildings in EU countries. Technologies envisaged for envelope retrofitting include various types of insulation materials. Energy efficient solutions will also be deployed including energy efficient lighting and HVAC, and renewable energy systems. The technologies and solutions will be affordable, durable, easy for installation and compatible with existing building functions and aesthetics as well as energy efficient. The types of building for retrofitting will include detached, semidetached and terrace houses, and flats of different ages. Methods for measurement of building performance before and after retrofitting will include leakage test and thermal imaging to determine the major areas of building envelope for improvement, in addition to smart energy metering for individual technologies and building as a whole. The buildings will be retrofitted to at least the latest national building standards for new buildings. The type and number of technology deployed will be optimised using life cycle energy analysis for each type of building. The work programme will involve development of computer models for optimising technologies and solutions, analysing dynamic energy demand of buildings and predicting microclimate indoors, development and testing of technologies and solutions under laboratory conditions, retrofitting and monitoring residential buildings in different climatic conditions, and a socio-economic analysis. The above outcomes will be delivered through innovative solutions developed by a Consortium comprising leading companies, universities and public institutions from 10 European countries.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA | Phase: ICT-2011.1.1 | Award Amount: 1.31M | Year: 2012

The strategic objective of the Networked Society project is to define the requirements for future networks that can seamlessly support the Networked Society of 2020. This will be achieved by enabling an informed dialogue and policy debate between the terrestrial, satellite and content delivery communities and the industrial and social application sectors. This project will create new and lasting relationships between the players in the various sectors and the ICT community which will enable a new set of rich cross sector collaborations.This work is timely as the exponential growth of traffic in networks and between devices of all types, as part of the emerging Network Society scenario, is already happening and likely to accelerate as M2M communications, augmented reality and many other bandwidth-hungry applications become commonplace. The lead-time needed to generate evolutions in infrastructure capability and capacity is much greater than the time needed to conceive and develop the new generations of amazingly powerful and communications rich services so action now will ensure the correct positioning of the ICT networks issues in Horizon2020.European ICT infrastructure evolution must not only keep pace with the complex applications and services of the networked society, but it must also understand and anticipate the emergence of sustainable business models in partnership with the sectors. This is important for the European society and economy and to maintain European competitiveness on a global scale.The objectives of the Networked Society Coordination Action will be achieved through the creation of agendas and position papers, the enhancement of these positions through a continuous dialogue between the sector specific actors and the ICT community, and a wide scale dissemination of the elaborated requirements. This cycle of creation, elaboration, and dissemination will be iteratively employed through the life of the project.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.1.1 | Award Amount: 4.06M | Year: 2012

The CoRaSat project aims at investigating, developing, and demonstrating cognitive radio techniques in satellite communication systems for spectrum sharing. Outcomes of the study will drive the definition of strategic roadmaps to be followed by industry stakeholders, European Institutions, and Governmental actors towards regulatory and standardization groups in order to ensure that the necessary actions are undertaken to open new business perspectives for SatCom through cognitive radio communications in support of the Digital Agenda for Europe.\nFlexible spectrum utilization is a surging trend for the optimized exploitation of spectrum resources, and the cognitive approach has already demonstrated its potential for terrestrial systems, but not yet in the SatCom domain. However, SatCom are fundamental to achieve the challenging objectives of fast broadband access for everyone by 2020: their inherent large coverage footprint makes them the most suitable access scheme to reach those areas where deployment of wired and wireless networks is not economically viable.\nCoRaSat puts together these two elements by considering Cognitive Radio approaches for coexistence scenarios in spectrum allocated to any SatCom service.\nFor the first time in SatCom research initiatives, CoRaSat will systematically and thoroughly approach the Cognitive Radio concept considering SatCom peculiarities and characteristics. CoRaSat will identify scenarios and use cases, focusing on broadband applications and considering other services, like interactive broadcasting, narrowband applications, etc., where cognitive radio can improve spectrum exploitation. Technology enablers for the identified scenarios will be developed and demonstrated for specific use cases through analysis, simulation, and testbed implementations.\nFlexible spectrum usage has potential benefits for SatCom as well as threats; CoRaSat aims at demonstrating that the benefits outnumber the threats and open up new business perspectives


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: SESAR-RIA | Phase: Sesar-01-2015 | Award Amount: 599.87K | Year: 2016

Automation effects on arousal could be predicted differently depending on the Attentional Theory. The classical Theory (Kahneman, 1973) considers the level of arousal reliant only on psychological factors (stress, fatigue and emotions). Automation would only affect the task complexity by allocating part of the cognitive processing to the system. Alternative theories such as Malleable Attentional Resources Theory (MART) (Young and Stanton, 2002) assumes that automation would also affect the level of arousal and be dependent on controllers expectations: when the ATCo expects that the task is easy in the near future, she/he will reduce the arousal levels and get bored or sleepy (overconfidence on automation). On the contrary, fears of automation failing would increase stress and also the level of arousal causing disorientation, overacting or erratic behaviour. Based on these theories, AUTOPACE proposes basic research on a Psychological Model to quantitatively predict how automation would impact on human performance based on cognitive resources modeling (demanded and available), tasks characteristics (automation), psychological factors modeling (fatigue, stress and emotions) and ATCo expectations (overconfidence vs fears of automation). A catalogue of training strategies to support the controller being in-the-loop will be explored. For the classical Theory, the strategies only for keeping attention on the main task avoiding out-of-the-loop effect. For the MART the coach will be also for coping with stress. A reviewed Curricula and ATCo Selection will be initiated. Expert Judgment from Psychologists, ATM Experts and Controllers Trainers supported by Literature Research will look at future competences and training strategies. The research on Psychological Modeling will be also sustained with Analytical Studies by using an existing prototype for demanded resources. AUTOPACE points at research paths suggested in Ergonomics in design Issue (Hancock et all, April 2013).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2008-1-2-01 | Award Amount: 3.92M | Year: 2009

Organic and low-input farming systems have been shown to benefit farmland biodiversity although a generic indicator system to assess these benefits at the European level is lacking. The BIOBIO project will therefore pursue the following objectives: 1. Conceptualization of criteria for a scientifically-based selection of biodiversity indicators for organic/low-input farming systems; 2. Assessment and validation of a set of candidate biodiversity indicators in representative case studies across Europe (and in ICPC countries); 3. Preparation of guidelines for the implementation of biodiversity indicators for organic/low-input farming systems for Europe and beyond. Existing indirect farm management indicators as well as direct indicators for genetic, species and habitat diversity will be assessed for their scientific soundness, practicality, geographic scope and usefulness for stakeholders. Candidate indicators will be tested in a standardised design in twelve case studies across Europe and later in three ICPC countries. Case study regions will include pannonian, alpine, boreal, Atlantic and Mediterranean grassland systems (both organic and/or low-input), rain fed organic farms under temperate and Mediterranean conditions, mixed organic farming, organic special crops and low-input tree/agroforestry systems. Plot, farm and regional scales (where applicable) will be addressed. The investigation will include new agricultural practices, e.g. soil conservation, crop rotation management, seed and crop mixtures and economic issues relating to the costs of indicator measurement and to benefits of biodiversity as perceived by different groups of the population. Stakeholders (farming communities, conservation NGOs, administrators) will be integrated at critical stages of the indicator selection process. A handbook with factsheets will be produced for validated indicators and a sampling design for biodiversity monitoring in organic and low-input farming systems across Europe.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA | Phase: ICT-2011.9.5 | Award Amount: 1.71M | Year: 2011

Guardian Angels (GA) are future zero-power, intelligent, autonomous systems-of-systems featuring sensing, computation, and communication beyond human aptitudes. GA will assist humans from their infancy to old age in complex life situations and environments. Zero-power reflects system-of-systems ability to scavenge energy in dynamic environments by disruptive harvesting techniques. The project prepares zero-power technologies based on future energy-efficient technologies, heterogeneous design, and disruptive energy scavengers.\nThree zero-power generations of GAs are foreseen: Physical Guardian Angels are zero-power, on-body networks or implantable devices that monitor vital health signals and take appropriate actions to preserve human health. Environmental Guardian Angels extend monitoring to dynamic environments, using disruptive scavengers, personalized data communication, and first thinking algorithms. They are personal assistants that protect their wearers from environment dangers. Emotional Guardian Angels are intelligent personal companions with disruptive zero-power, manmachine interfaces deployed at large scale. They sense and communicate using non-verbal languages playing an important role in health, education, and security worldwide. This project addresses the following scientific challenges for energy-efficient visionary Guardian Angel autonomous systems: (i) energy-efficient computing (down to E=10-100kT), (ii) and communication (approaching the limit of 1pJ/bit), (iii) low-power sensing, (iv) disruptive scavenging (bio-inspired, thermoelectric, etc, targeting energy densities of tens of mW/cm2), and (v) zero-power man-machine interfaces. A selection of emerging technologies based on energy efficiency is proposed. We will also develop design tools that integrate electrical, mechanical, optical, thermal, and chemical simulation tools over length and time scales currently not achievable.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 3.69M | Year: 2014

Neurogastroenterology is a new and emerging medical/scientific subspecialty that currently has no formal training opportunities in medicine and related disciplines. It includes basic science aspects (neurophysiology, neurobiology, neuropsychology, psychophysiology) and clinical aspects (gastroenterology, neurology, internal medicine, surgery, psychology, psychosomatic medicine) of the neural control of intestinal functions (motility, secretion, absorption, immunity, sensitivity) in health and disease. Functional disorders of the gastrointestinal tract are among the most frequent disorders in the general population, are associated with high psychiatric (depression, anxiety, chronic fatigue) and somatic comorbidities (back pain, headache), and account for substantial direct and indirect health care costs occurring throughout Europe. Functional disorders of the gastrointestinal tract are thought to be due to disorganized gut-brain interaction of either afferent or efferent or both pathways in control of intestinal functions. In addition, low-grade inflammation, nutritional challenges of the local immune system, and/or post-infectious neuroplastic changes of the enteric nervous system of the gut are believed to be common pathogenetic mechanisms. Genetic contributions have been established, and psychological modulators of its clinical expression have been shown to be effective; both contribute to the efficacy of therapeutic interventions. The standards of diagnosis of functional bowel disorders are still a matter of debate, and only a few effective treatment strategies are available. The NeuroGut network, consisting of experienced academic and industrial partners organized in the European Neurogastroenterology and Motility Society (ESNM), is therefore aimed at offering young researchers excellent training opportunities in neurogastroenterology and in complementary skills in order to generate a new generation of scientists dedicated to resolving open questions.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: WASTE-7-2015 | Award Amount: 7.82M | Year: 2016

NoAW : No Agro-Waste. Innovative approaches to turn agricultural waste into ecological and economic assets. Driven by a near zero-waste society requirement, the goal of NoAW project is to generate innovative efficient approaches to convert growing agricultural waste issues into eco-efficient bio-based products opportunities with direct benefits for both environment, economy and EU consumer. To achieve this goal, the NoAW concept relies on developing holistic life cycle thinking able to support environmentally responsible R&D innovations on agro-waste conversion at different TRLs, in the light of regional and seasonal specificities, not forgetting risks emerging from circular management of agro-wastes (e.g. contaminants accumulation). By involving all agriculture chain stakeholders in a territorial perspective, the project will: (1) develop innovative eco-design and hybrid assessment tools of circular agro-waste management strategies and address related gap of knowledge and data via extensive exchange through the Knowledge exchange Stakeholders Platform, (2) develop breakthrough knowledge on agro-waste molecular complexity and heterogeneity in order to upgrade the most widespread mature conversion technology (anaerobic digestion) and to synergistically eco-design robust cascading processes to fully convert agro-waste into a set of high added value bio-energy, bio-fertilizers and bio-chemicals and building blocks, able to substitute a significant range of non-renewable equivalents, with favourable air, water and soil impacts and (3) get insights of the complexity of potentially new, cross-sectors, business clusters in order to fast track NoAW strategies toward the field and develop new business concepts and stakeholders platform for cross-chain valorisation of agro-waste on a territorial and seasonal basis.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: INCO.2013-1.6 | Award Amount: 335.55K | Year: 2013

CASCADE aims to provide the foundation for a future INCONET programme targeting South Asian Countries, which will promote bi-regional coordination of Science &Technology (S&T) cooperation, including priority setting and definition of S&T cooperation policies. The objectives of CASCADE, as an 18-month supporting action, are to: compile a regional position paper that identifies global challenges and research priorities; map and develop an inventory of national and regional stakeholders related to global challenges; and, raise awareness on research & innovation priorities for fostering cooperation and towards building mutual understanding on how to address common global societal challenges. CASCADE targets & has the participation of all South Asian countries specified in the Call: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. The project comprises five work packages (WP). WP1 will, coordinate the delivery of project outputs, ensure achievement of anticipated outcomes, and develop and manage project infrastructure. WP2 will produce national (Afghanistan, Bangladesh,Bhutan, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka) and regional (Southern Asia) position papers providing a consensus on the key societal challenges in the region linked to Horizon2020. These papers will be used as the basis for WP3: the identification and mapping of key national and regional stakeholders that can influence and address these societal challenges. WP4 will engage these key stakeholders, raise awareness of the potential for EU-Southern Asia cooperation, and stimulate their participation in Horizon 2020. WP5 will use the position papers from WP2 and stakeholder maps from WP3 to compile a policy brief with recommendations to the European Commission on how to promote bi-lateral cooperation with Southern Asia with a view to tackling key societal challenges of mutual interest. WP5 will also promote Southern Asian contacts among major European stakeholders.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2011.2.2-01 | Award Amount: 7.85M | Year: 2012

The project goal is to support the development of functional food ingredients and products that are beneficial for the human gut & immune system and therefore of crucial importance for quality of life. The project will study the effects of specific non-digestible polysaccharides which have shown health potential in this field. The health effects of NPS will be focused around enhancing immune defence against pathogens, the reduction of infectious diseases like common cold and influenza of elderly and will make use of EFSA supported biomarkers that enable immune function claims and underpin the mechanism involved. The studied mechanisms are the innate and adaptive immune system and the possible involvement of the microbiota and microbiota-mediated products. To achieve this goal new and existing NPS will be studied for their health effects in a systematic way by developing a toolbox of dedicated assays and models that can be used by industry and authorities to study and approve food ingredients with a similar health focus. The project will: 1) perform biochemical analyses to study compounds, effect of processing and bioavailability, 2) develop standardized in vitro screening methods to be able to predict in vivo effects, 3) use dedicated in vivo and ex vivo analyses to study mechanisms of action and to validate biomarkers and 4) use and validate this knowledge in an intervention study. By combining the knowledge that will be gained from molecular, cellular and whole-organism studies, the goal will be to understand the bioactive mechanisms of these NPS and use this knowledge to design functional food products. SMEs make a very large contribution to the project, both as beneficiary of the products and as a technology service provider related to health research. This proposed project should provide the scientific basis for international nutritional organisations to recommend an immune-related functional health claim for some of the NPS studied.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2009-1-4-01 | Award Amount: 3.99M | Year: 2010

Detection methods are the first tools used by national plant protection organisations (NPPO) and inspection services in order to find incursions of quarantine plant pathogens or pests (Q-pests) across a border, a crucial step to implement Council Directive 2000/29/EC. This is often done visually in the first instance, with support from a laboratory for confirmatory testing and subsequent monitoring. Reliance on laboratory testing causes significant delays when action is only taken on the return of results from the laboratory to which the samples were sent. Thus, there is a real need for rapid, simple and robust detection methods that can be deployed by NPPOs in the field with inspection services to enable early detection of Q-pests. The Q-detect consortium aims to develop detection methods based on biochemical (detecting volatile organic compounds [VOC] and nucleic acid), acoustic (including resonance), remote imaging (incorporating spectral and automated data analysis) and pest trapping (insect pests and pathogen vectors) techniques. The careful selection of traded products (primarily potato and forestry/trees) ensures the methods will be developed on high priority targets for the EU such as the pine wood nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus), potato brown rot (Ralstonia solanacearum) and potato ring rot (Clavibacter michiganensis ssp. Sepedonicus), Asian longhorn beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) and a range of whitefly transmitted viruses. The diversity of targets enables the Q-detect consortium to work on suites of complementary techniques; this is of particular importance since the diverse range of targets listed in Directive 2000/29/EC means no single detection method will be suitable for all Q-pests. Critically, NPPOs and third country institutes are partners, which will enable testing, and validation of methods at real outbreak sites where these are absent in the EU. SME partners ensure access to technology and routes for exploitation after the project ends.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: BBI-IA-DEMO | Phase: BBI.VC3.D5-2015 | Award Amount: 15.54M | Year: 2016

Approximately one third of all food produced globally is wasted every year throughout the whole value chain-from farmers to consumers. To extract the significant amounts of valuable compounds contained in these wastes, AgriMax will combine affordable and flexible processing technologies (ultrasound assisted and solvent extraction, filtration, thermal and enzymatic treatments) for the valorization of side streams from the horticultural culture and food processing industry to be used in a cooperative approach by local stakeholders. Through the selection of case-scenarios previously developed to a pilot scale by the participating RTOs and their industrial transfer in new applications as food additives, packaging and agricultural materials among others, the project will disclose the holistic potential of four new agro-value chains (residues and by products from the culture and processing of tomato, cereals, olives, potato). Any by-product generated along the production cycle will be valorized in a cascade manner to reach over 40% of high value use of the waste. This will lead to additional production of active ingredients in lower concentration, but also fibres, biogas and fertilizers from the left biomass (the latter with the aim of being used in closed loop in the culture of the crops used in the project to prevent soil impoverishing). An LCA and LCC will also study the best approach to minimize the environmental impact of the new value chains without jeopardizing the cost effectiveness of the operations. The pilot multi-feedstock bio-refinery processes will be validated in two demonstration sites in Spain and Italy. Societal, ethical, safety, techno-feasibility and regulatory aspects will be studied. Last but not least, a business model and platform for communication between the potential raw materials suppliers will be set up to maximize the use of the cooperative treatment plants throughout the year.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: ENV.2010.2.1.2-1 | Award Amount: 4.46M | Year: 2011

Economic policy instruments (EPI) have received widespread attention over the last three decades, and have increasingly been implemented to achieve environmental policy objectives. However, whereas EPI have been successfully applied in some policy domains (such as climate, energy and air quality), their application to tackle water management issues (drought/water scarcity, floods, water quality control) are beset by many practical difficulties. EPI-Water sets to assess the effectiveness and the efficiency of Economic Policy Instruments in achieving water policy goals, and to identify the preconditions under which they complement or perform better than alternative (e.g. regulatory or voluntary) policy instruments. Using a common multi-dimensional assessment framework, the project will compare the performance of single economic instruments or their apposite combinations with the performance otherwise achievable with regulatory (command & control) interventions (such as water restriction/rationing, licensing or permitting), persuasive instruments or voluntary commitments. Furthermore the project will identify remaining research and methodological issues that need to be addressed, in particular with regards to the further development and use of national accounting, for supporting the design, implementation and evaluation of EPI in the field of water management.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2007.8.1 | Award Amount: 3.16M | Year: 2008

The semiconductor industry is a cornerstone of todays high-tech economy, supporting over 100,000 direct and even more indirect jobs in Europe. This position has been achieved through continued miniaturization in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology, which will only last for a maximum 10-15 more years. In line with its Lisbon Strategy, the EC has identified an urgent need to assess possible technology solutions for the Beyond CMOS era to meet the challenges of global competition.\n\nThe major ICT challenge is to find alternatives for information processing and storage beyond the limits of existing CMOS. Graphene, ultrathin layers of carbon, is particularly promising due its novel electronic properties. Initial data indicates that graphene is a prime candidate for Beyond CMOS switches and interconnects, and is, despite its revolutionary nature, complementary to conventional CMOS.\n\nThe key objective of the GRAND proposal is to verify and assess whether graphene can bring conventional semiconductor technology to the Beyond CMOS era. GRAND is thus positioned to act as a pathfinder for key ICT challenges.\n\nThe GRAND consortium will develop industry-compatible strategies for fabrication of 2D graphene nanostructures (widths down to the 5 nm scale) for switches and interconnects. Edge states, critical for transport at this scale, will be manipulated by functionalization methods. Device transport properties will be experimentally evaluated, complemented by a range of modelling techniques including simplified Monte Carlo models to describe scattering and hot phonon effects, as well as atomistic and ab-initio methods for band structure calculations. \n\nThe consortium includes internationally renowned experimental and theoretical groups from academia and industry, forming a comprehensive unit with capabilities far beyond those of the individual partners, and ensuring a tight focus on the exploitation of the project results for European industry.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2008-2-1-01 | Award Amount: 3.21M | Year: 2009

Obesity has been estimated to cost the EU some 70 annually through health care costs and lost productivity, and additionally over-consumption of salt, sugar and saturated fats and under-consumption of fruit and vegetables cause almost 70,000 premature deaths annually in the UK alone. Member States have initiated a variety of policy interventions to encourage healthy eating including prohibitions on advertising certain foods to children, promotion of fruit and vegetable consumption, nutrition labelling, dialogue with food industry to improve food product composition and regulation of school meals and public sector canteens to ensure healthy food offerings. Rarely have these been evaluated in a systematic manner. The EATWELL project will gather benchmark data on healthy eating interventions in Member States and review existing evaluations of the effectiveness of interventions using a 3 stage procedure: 1. The impact of the intervention on consumer attitudes, consumer behaviour and diets; 2. The impact of the change in diets on obesity and health; 3. The value attached by society to these changes, measured in life years gained, cost savings and QALYs. Where evaluations have been inadequate EATWELL will gather secondary data and analyse them using models mainly from the psychology and economics disciplines. Particular attention will be paid to lessons that can be learned from the private sector that are transferable to the healthy eating campaigns in the public sector. Through consumer surveys and workshops with other stakeholders, EATWELL will assess the acceptability of the range of potential interventions. Armed with scientific quantitative evaluations of policy interventions and their acceptability to stakeholders, EATWELL will recommend most appropriate interventions for Member States and the EU, provide a one-stop guide to methods and measures in intervention evaluation, and outline data collection priorities for the future.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: EeB.ENV.2010.3.2.4-1 | Award Amount: 6.70M | Year: 2010

The project 3ENCULT bridges the gap between conservation of historic buildings and climate protection, which is not an antagonism at all: historic buildings will only survive if maintained as living space. Energy efficient retrofit is useful for structural protection as well as for comfort reasons - comfort for users and comfort for heritage collections. The joint task of conservation and energy efficient retrofit is highly interdisciplinary. The 3ENCULT consortium consists of scientists and stakeholders, especially on the level of SMEs, from the fields of diagnostics, conservation, building physics, sustainability, architecture and lighting up to cybernetics, thus guaranteeing both, the development of sustainable solutions and the impact on European economy. Eight case studies will demonstrate and verify solutions that are applicable to the majority of European built heritage in urban areas. Building owners and local historic preservation agencies are integrated in local case study teams. 3ENCULT will demonstrate the feasibility of Factor 4 to Factor 10 reduction in energy demand, depending on the case and the heritage value. The main objectives are the development of passive and active solutions for conservation and energy efficient retrofit including available products as well as new developments by involved SMEs, the definition of diagnosis and monitoring instruments, the long term monitoring (also for IEQ controlling) and the planning and evaluation tools and concepts supporting the implementation, the quality assurance and control of success of the energy retrofit measures. Guidelines will be disseminated to the scientific and public community. Finally, position papers will be issued suggesting possible integrations and/or implementations of the present regulation framework for improving energy efficiency of historic buildings in urban areas and in particular EPBD and Environmental Impact Assessment as well as Aalborg Commitments and Leipzig Charter.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE-2007-2-4-05 | Award Amount: 6.75M | Year: 2009

Food Safety Objectives (FSO) and Performance Objectives (PO) are new criteria complementing the existing concepts of microbiological criteria and MRL for many chemical contaminants. However, to achieve these objectives it is critically important a harmonisation of food safety control procedures. BASELINE project intends to obtain the following objectives: 1) To review the sampling schemes currently available for food authorities and food producers to perform food safety quantitative risk assessment in a European level; 2) To assess the relevance and suitable limit values of POs and FSOs for biological and chemical risks; 3) To evaluate the need for new or adapted methods for sampling and testing of the risk factors identified. The selected protocols and methods should be able to produce suitable data for risk analysis; 4) To develop predictive mathematical models for biological risks and investigate and model sources and pathways of chemical contaminants to improve sampling schemes; 5) To validate and harmonise the sampling schemes developed in the project and alternative detection methods; 6) To share and disseminate the scientific knowledge deriving from the project to stakeholders. The BASELINE work plan has been divided in 9 work packages: WP1- management, WP2-WP6 sampling protocols for specific food matrixes, WP7-risk modelling, WP8-validation and harmonisation of sampling protocols, WP9-dissemination and training. The major output of the project is to generate new knowledge on sampling schemes for risk assessment by using a mathematical approach for different groups of food products as seafood, eggs and egg products, fresh meats, milk and dairy products and plant products. The project results will be translated in clear recommendations to the EC and end users and they will have a significant impact on protecting human and veterinary health.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-2.2.2-3 | Award Amount: 15.91M | Year: 2008

The rate of ageing in humans is not uniform, due to genetic heterogeneity and the influence of environmental factors. Age-related changes in body function or composition that could serve as a measure of biological age and predict the onset of age-related diseases and/or residual lifetime are termed biomarkers of ageing. Many candidate biomarkers have been proposed but in all cases their variability in cross-sectional studies is considerable, and therefore no single measurement has so far proven to yield a useful biomarker of ageing on its own, probably due to the multi-causal and multi-system nature of ageing. We propose to conduct a population study (3,300 probands) to identify a set biomarkers of ageing which, as a combination of parameters with appropriate weighting, would measure biological age better than any marker in isolation. Two large groups of subjects will be recruited, i.e. (1) randomly recruited age-stratified individuals from the general population covering the age range 35-74 years and (2) subjects born from a long-living parent belonging to a family with long living sibling(s) already recruited in the framework of the GEHA project. For genetic reasons such individuals (GEHA offspring) are expected to age at a slower rate. They will be recruited together with their spouses as controls, thus allowing initial validation of the biomarkers identified. (3) A small number of patients with progeroid syndromes will also be included in the study. A wide range of candidate biomarkers will be tested, including (a) classical ones for which data from several smaller studies have been published; (b) new ones, based on recent preliminary data, as well as (c) novel ones, based on recent research on mechanistic aspects of ageing, conducted by project participants. Bioinformatics will be used in order to extract a robust set of biomarkers of human ageing from the large amounts of data to be generated and to derive a model for healthy ageing.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP.2010.2.2-1 | Award Amount: 3.98M | Year: 2011

Functional organic molecules and metal and semiconductor nanocrystals represent attractive building blocks due to their composition-, size- and structure-dependent electronic properties, and the ability to design and manipulate these properties via low-cost and established chemical synthesis. Building from the pressing need of the European market to develop novel, scalable and cheaper technologies for sensing applications, the main objective of the HYSENS project is to exploit inexpensive organic functional molecules and inorganic nanocrystals as building blocks to synthesize novel high-knowledge materials for the development of sensors for Group I, II transition metal cations and anions (Cl-, NO3-). The hybrid material intelligence resulting from the engineered combination of individual units will allow the execution of logic functions able to reduce false sensing outputs towards the development of sensors with enhanced selectivity and sensitivity. Our goal is to elucidate the mechanisms governing the optical and electrical response of such engineered hybrid materials arising from the interaction between the organic functional molecule component and the inorganic nanocrystal core component. Establishment of component-function relationships will lead to disruptive new knowledge that will impact on optical and electrical sensors technologies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: AAT.2008.1.1.4.;AAT.2008.4.2.4. | Award Amount: 7.71M | Year: 2009

Fuel cells for power generation and additional purposes aboard aircraft have a promising potential to contribute to making aircraft greener and thus to greening of air transport which is a superior goal of European policy of climate change. GreenAir is addressing one of the key problems for fuel cell application aboard an aircraft - the generation of Hydrogen from Jet fuel (Kerosene) which will be the aeronautic fuel for the next decades also. While mainstream fuel processors (e.g. autothermal reforming) have been intensely investigated already, GreenAir is focusing on two novel and unconventional methods to overcome some hurdles of mainstream reforming technologies: - Microwave plasma assisted reforming (PAF), goal: development from TRL 3 to TRL 5 - Partial Dehydrogenation fuel processing (PDh), goal: development from TRL 2 to TRL 4 - Kerosene Fractionation will be investigated in addition. It shall extract fractions out of Kerosene favourable for reforming to facilitate the PAF and the PDh processes. The physical and chemical fundamentals of these methods will be elaborated. Furthermore, aircraft integration and safety concepts will be elaborated. For both methods, breadboard fuel processor systems will be built and tested for proof of concepts under standard and simulated flight conditions. Widespread dissemination via a website, publications and conference contributions and a special Forum will be ensured. Training and education of young scientists is foreseen. GreenAir combines 13 beneficiaries from 7 European countries which are from aircraft and fuel cell related industry as well as institutes and SMEs excelling in fuel cell and catalysis R&D. It will establish links to the JTIs (CLEANSKY and Fuel Cells and Hydrogen) to maximize synergies. The consortium of this 3 years project is well balanced in terms of the mix of 2 SMEs, 7 Academia and 4 industry partners as well as geographically.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: WASTE-2-2014 | Award Amount: 9.44M | Year: 2015

The overall aim of the REFRESH project is to contribute significantly towards the objective of reducing food waste across the EU by 30% by 2025 (which amounts to between 25 to 40 million tonnes of food not being wasted in 2025[1], worth tens of billions of Euros a year) and maximizing the value from unavoidable food waste and packaging materials. To achieve this ambitious goal, we will adopt a systemic approach and use cutting edge science to enable action by businesses, consumers and public authorities. A central ambition of the REFRESH project is to develop a Framework for Action model that is based on strategic agreements across all stages of the supply chain (backed by Governments), delivered through collaborative working and supported by evidence-based tools to allow targeted, cost effective interventions. Success will support transformation towards a more sustainable and secure EU food system, benefitting Europes economy, environment and society.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: ISIB-02-2015 | Award Amount: 1.84M | Year: 2016

The European Fruit Network (EUFRUIT) includes 12 countries focussed on 4 thematic areas of critical for the competiveness and innovation potential of the European Fruit sector: i) new cultivar development and evaluation; ii) minimise residues on fruit and the environment; iii) optimising storage and fruit quality; iv) sustainable production systems. EUFRUIT will coordinate and support innovation through developing a framework for relevant stakeholders and it will establish a systematic approach for knowledge gathering and dissemination. The systematic approach includes: i) scanning & synthesis via 4 expert groups who scan state-of-art knowledge, practises and technologies and synthesise the material to identify key areas of learning and best practise approaches at a European level. ii) showing & sharing will deliver outreach/dialogue at a national level through establishment of local operational groups. An online Knowledge Platform will hold all outreach material, outreach activities include; 100 industry publications, 90 technical bulletins, 25 flyers/newsletters, 60 seminars, 160 field based meetings, 25 conference plus 12 events aimed at the general public. iii) sustaining the network will occur through long-term integration of the assembled EUFRUIT network in future actions. The overall outcome of EUFRUIT will be establishment of a framework and a systematic approach that together builds a bridge across the valley of death. This bridge will secure a direct path for new knowledge in the future and reduce the likelihood of repetition of research at a national level. The European fruit sector will have ready access to up-to-date information to implement and value will be created both for the industry with respect to competitiveness, sustainability and efficiency and society through ensuring the security and safety of fruit; underpinning human health and wellbeing.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INT-03-2015 | Award Amount: 2.50M | Year: 2016

GLOBUS critically assesses the EUs impact on justice in a global system characterised by uncertainty, risk and ambiguity. GLOBUS defines a new research agenda for the study of the EUs global role. This agenda directs attention to underlying political and structural challenges to global justice that are prior to the distributive problem, as well as to the fact that what is just is contested both by theorists and policy makers. GLOBUS provides in depth knowledge of how the EU proceeds to promote justice within the specific fields of climate change, trade, development, asylum/migration and security while also speaking to the key horizontal issues of gender and human rights within each of these fields. Rather than focusing on a single dimension GLOBUS develops three different conceptions of justice. This nuanced conceptual scheme allows GLOBUS to address the multifaceted challenge of justice, and to specify the EUs real impact. GLOBUS takes heed of the reality of the foreign will through intense engagement with partners outside Europe. This provides a reality check of the limits and potential for the EUs future place in a multi-polar order. The three conceptions of justice as non-dominance, as impartiality and as mutual recognition all have limitations as they prioritise some challenges to global justice over others. These limitations are important in order to empirically discern inhibiting factors for global political justice such as power, unequal competences and the prevailing system of states as well as in order to specify how the EU contributes to justice. In order to develop a feasible model of justice promotion, we return to theory when data is collected and revise and amend the analytical model. We further factor in the viewpoints and experience of practitioners and stakeholders, GLOBUS provides policy-relevant recommendations that take into consideration ideal requirements while at the same time not losing sight of the realities of power.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRAIA-01-2016-2017 | Award Amount: 10.00M | Year: 2016

The SeaDataNet pan-European infrastructure has been developed by NODCs and major research institutes from 34 countries. Over 100 marine data centres are connected and provide discovery and access to data resources for all European researchers. Moreover, SeaDataNet is a key infrastructure driving several portals of the European Marine Observation and Data network (EMODnet), initiated by EU DG-MARE for Marine Knowledge, MSFD, and Blue Growth. SeaDataNet complements the Copernicus Marine Environmental Monitoring Service (CMEMS), coordinated by EU DG-GROW. However, more effective and convenient access is needed to better support European researchers. The standards, tools and services developed must be reviewed and upgraded to keep pace with demand, such as developments of new sensors, and international and IT standards. Also EMODnet and Copernicus pose extra challenges to boost performance and foster INSPIRE compliance. More data from more data providers must be made available, from European and international research projects and observing programmes. SeaDataCloud aims at considerably advancing SeaDataNet services and increasing their usage, adopting cloud and HPC technology for better performance. More users will be engaged and for longer sessions by including advanced services in a Virtual Research Environment. Researchers will be empowered with a collection of services and tools, tailored to their specific needs, supporting marine research and enabling generation of added-value products. Data concern the wide range of in situ observations and remote sensing data. To have access to the latest cloud technology and facilities, SeaDataNet will cooperate with EUDAT, a network of computing infrastructures that develop and operate a common framework for managing scientific data across Europe. SeaDataCloud will improve services to users and data providers, optimise connecting data centres and streams, and interoperate with other European and international networks.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: SFS-14b-2015 | Award Amount: 521.83K | Year: 2016

It is acknowledged that historically anti-food fraud capability within Europe has not been consolidated and lacks the coordination and support structures available to those working in food safety. There are various initiatives underway to redress this balance e.g. DGSants Food Fraud network, DG Researchs FoodIntegrity project, as well as numerous national programmes and industry initiatives. One pivotal area that still needs to be addressed is bringing together national research funding bodies to facilitate the development of transnational research programmes. AUTHENT-NET will address this need by mobilising and coordinating relevant research budget holders in order to facilitate the eventual development of a transnational European funding vehicle that will allow Members States (MS) to jointly fund anti-fraud research. Authent-Net comprises a core group of 19 participants from 10 MS, 1 NGO and the US, who are either National research funding bodies; experts in food authenticity, and/or experts in transnational funding mechanisms. AUTHENT-NET will: 1) Bring together relevant MS R&D budget holders to coordinate inter-disciplinary research effort and build a cohesive and sustainable network 2) Undertake stocktaking of existing national research and assess against the international landscape 3) Establish transnational mechanisms and instruments for collating and exchanging information on food authenticity research 4) Develop a high level research and innovation strategy for transnational research and a rationale for a potential ERANET on food authenticity The two year project will have the following expected impacts: improved coordination and communication between relevant MS research budget holders; enhanced cognisance of existing national research; joint strategy for food fraud R&D; agreed priorities and capability to deliver transnational European research on food fraud.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2015 | Award Amount: 1.26M | Year: 2016

The management of large repositories of norms, and the semantic access and reasoning to these norms are key challenges in Legal Informatics. The MIREL project will create an international and inter-sectorial network to define a formal framework and to develop tools for MIning and REasoning with Legal texts, with the aim of translating these legal texts into formal representations that can be used for querying norms, compliance checking, and decision support. The development of the MIREL framework and tools will be guided by the needs of three industrial partners, and validated by industrial case studies. MIREL promotes mobility and staff exchange between SMEs to academies in order to create an inter-continental interdisciplinary consortium in Law and Artificial Intelligence areas including Natural Language Processing, Computational Ontologies, Argumentation, and Logic & Reasoning. MIREL addresses both conceptual challenges, such as the role of legal interpretation in mining and reasoning, and computational challenges, such as the handling of big legal data, and the complexity of regulatory compliance. It bridges the gap between the community working on legal ontologies and NLP parsers and the community working on reasoning methods and formal logic. Moreover, it is the first project of its kind to involve industrial partners in the future development of innovative products and services in legal reasoning and their deployment in the market. The European MIREL partners are key players in the communities of Deontic, AI & Law, and the Semantic Web, communities that have traditionally been strong in Europe. The MIREL consortium brings these scientists together with researchers with expertise traditionally lacking in Europe, such as norm and argument mining (Argentina, Japan and China), description logic for reasoning about legal ontologies (South Africa), natural language semantics of deontic modals (US), and the complexity analysis of regulatory compliance (Australia).


Patent
Elettra - Sincrotrone Trieste and University of Bologna | Date: 2011-08-02

The present invention relates to organic semiconductors to be used as intrinsic, direct detectors for ionizing radiations, such as X and gamma rays, neutrons, and charged particles (alpha rays, electrons, positrons, and the like), and to a method for manufacturing such intrinsic, direct detectors for ionizing radiations. The invention further relates to instruments or complex devices provided with a detector based on, or somehow incorporating, the above detectors.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: AAT.2011.4.4-3. | Award Amount: 50.74M | Year: 2011

The project proposal concerns the challenges posed by the physical integration of smart intelligent structural concepts. It addresses aircraft weight and operational cost reductions as well as an improvement in the flight profile specific aerodynamic performance. This concerns material concepts enabling a conformal, controlled distortion of aerodynamically important surfaces, material concepts enabling an active or passive status assessment of specific airframe areas with respect to shape and potential damages and material concepts enabling further functionalities which to date have been unrealizable. Past research has shown the economic feasibility and system maturity of aerodynamic morphing. However, few projects concerned themselves with the challenges arising from the structural integration on commercial aircraft. In particular the skin material and its bonding to the substructure is challenging. It is the aim of this project proposal to demonstrate the structural realizability of individual morphing concepts concerning the leading edge, the trailing edge and the winglet on a full-size external wing by aerodynamic and structural testing. Operational requirements on morphing surfaces necessitate the implementation of an independent, integrated shape sensing system to ensure not only an optimal control of the aerodynamic surface but also failure tolerance and robustness. Developments made for structural health monitoring will be adapted to this task. Similar systems optimized for rapid in-service damage assessment have progressed to a maturity which allows their inclusion in the next generation of aircraft. However, the time consuming application of these sensor systems has to be further improved by integration at the component manufacturing level. The additional benefit of a utilization of these adapted systems for part manufacture process and quality control shall be assessed in SARISTU. Addressing the Nanotechnology aspect of the call, benefits regarding significant damage tolerance and electrical conductivity improvements shall be realized at sub-assembly level.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.3.1-1 | Award Amount: 3.90M | Year: 2011

New knowledge is not necessarily readily applied in medicine, even when there is evidence of its effectiveness. As a result of the gap between knowing and doing, policy makers, professional care providers, patients and their families have benefited too little from new developments. Implementation research has developed models for stepwise implementation but it is still unclear which strategies are effective for whom and which factors influence the effectiveness of implementation strategies. From the point of view of implementation sciences changing palliative care is a major challenge, since adequate organization of palliative care requires collaboration between a range of different professionals and healthcare organizations. Besides, as a consequence of the ageing population, the number of people in need for cancer and dementia palliative care will rise. Therefore we will focus on implementation strategies in palliative care. The overall aim of this project is to develop optimal implementation strategies for using quality indicators to improve the organization of palliative cancer and dementia care in Europe and to study factors influencing the effectiveness of the strategies. We will focus on the implementation process and concentrate the work packages on: the organization of palliative care, the development of a set of setting-specific implementation strategies including an interactive website and instruction by consultants, the evaluation of the use of selected strategies to improve the organization of palliative care and factors influencing the effectiveness of the implementation strategies. This information will be used to build a conceptual model that should be applicable across diverse healthcare settings and that allows rigorous assessment of the effectiveness of implementation strategies. Dissemination of the results will be enhanced by involving stakeholders, including two European networks related to the subject of this implementation process study.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CP-ARTEMIS | Phase: SP1-JTI-ARTEMIS-2008-3 | Award Amount: 36.29M | Year: 2009

The mission of the SOFIA project is to create a semantic interoperability platform and selected set of vertical applications to form an embedded system based smart environment. We vision smart environment application and services where all the information user wants, needs and should know from local place is easily available. A key factor in these smart environments will be a common, open way of accessing information of devices in any space. Connecting real physical world with information world enriches the user experience. Simple, local mash-up applications based are build on open data and devices. This is an Internet-like revolution in physical space. Main goal of the project is to make \embedded information\ in the physical world available for smart services - connecting physical world with information world. Common targets are to enable and maintains cross-industry interoperability, to foster innovation while maintaining value of existing legacy and to create new user interaction and interface concepts to enable users to benefit from smart environments. In particular, a major target is multi-vendor interoperability platform as platform for new services. The project addresses three application areas which represent different kind of spaces, in terms of scale and potential applications and services. Spanning from very local personal spaces, to smart housing and further to smart city the project captures the specific aspects of smart spaces and combines the requirements for common solutions. The key outcomes of the project relate to user interaction paradigms for interacting in smart environments, the common interpretability solution between many heterogeneous devices and embedded systems, and on the application development schemes that can mobilise new developers for smart environments.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH-2007-2.2-02 | Award Amount: 1.88M | Year: 2008

European rural areas are undergoing major changes, including the impacts of migration, changes in settlement patterns, demographic ageing, changes in the nature of rural-urban interactions, a decreasing role of agriculture in terms of income and employment, and changes in governance systems. The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) is the main expenditure chapter of the EU and is directly affecting the economy of rural areas. Assessing the impact of the CAP will help in re-addressing the CAP in the wider framework of EU policy objectives. The objective of the project CAP-IRE is to develop concepts and tools to support future CAP design, based on an improved understanding of long term socio-economic mechanisms of change in rural areas. Concepts and tools will be developed, shaped by state of art literature and a wide empirical testing. Coverage includes case study regions in 9 countries of the EU. The focus will be farm households as the reference agents in the connection between policy and socio-economic change, as well as between agriculture and other sectors of the economy. Account of the wider non-EU and non-rural scenarios will be taken. The first step of the project will be to devise concepts and tools able to fill the gaps in present knowledge on development in rural areas. In the second step, these concepts and tools will be applied in an empirical analysis of mechanisms of change in selected case study areas. In a third step, tools will be used to assess the impact of CAP in the selected areas. Expected results concern: an improved conceptual view of CAP relationships in the context of changing rural areas and a framework to assess reciprocal impacts between CAP and other drivers of change in a long term perspective; models and tools to assess changes in rural areas, with particular attention to the connection between CAP and other drivers; an assessment of present dynamics of change, including impacts of CAP in the selected case study areas.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2011.1.2-05 | Award Amount: 4.80M | Year: 2012

The overall goal of EURoot is to help farmers to face both climate change, which is expected to result in increasingly uneven rainfall, and meet the societal demand for sustainable agriculture with reduced use of water and fertilizers. EURoot objective is to enhance the cereal plant capability to acquire water and nutrients through their roots and maintain growth and performance under stress conditions. Making use of join phenotyping and modelling platforms, EURoot will conduct a suite of experiments designed to better understand and model: i. The genetic and functional bases of root traits involved in soil exploration and resource uptake, ii. The bio-geochemical properties of the soil, including beneficial association with mycorhizal fungi, influencing extraction of nutrient and water by the root system and iii. The plant signalling processes involved in soil environment sensing and responsible for adaptive root system response enhancing soil exploration and resource acquisition. The EURoot project is based on a tripod of interactive WPs addressing specific complementary questions i.e. WP1, genetics of root traits, WP2, root:soil interactions, WP3, root : shoot signalling-, and on two platforms WPs allowing to share innovative phenotyping methods relevant to field conditions and linked to crop performance (WP4) and multi scale modelling (WP5) aiming at integrating root architecture, resource dynamics in the soil and root uptake, and inner plant signalling processes, to design root ideotypes allowing enhanced resource acquisition under stress. Results will be readily translated into screening methods, models and tools (markers, biochemical signatures) to guide the challenging breeding for improved root traits allowing enhanced water and nutrient capture. It will allow the further development of novel cereal cultivars with higher resilience, tolerating erratic rainfalls and reduced fertilizer application, while achieving their yield potential.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH-2009-6.3.1. | Award Amount: 3.40M | Year: 2010

BLUE-ETS is a project on official business statistics and, specifically, on one of EU NSIs key challenges; that is, providing high quality and robust statistical information, for better policy and socio-economic research, and to support the renewed Lisbon Strategy, while: (1) reducing the response burden; (2) simplifying and setting priorities; (3) cutting costs on enterprises, that stem from red-tape, over-regulation and duplications; (4) modernizing and re-engineering the methods for the production of statistics; (5) making data collection less burdensome and providing more information . Along with the principles of subsidiarity and proportionality, BLUE-ETS key aim is to support and contribute to the success of the EU Commission Communications MEETS Decision including Better Regulation for Growth and Jobs in the European Union; Action Programme for Reducing Administrative Burdens in the European Union; and the Reduction of the response burden, simplification and priority setting in the field of Community statistics. Accordingly, BLUE-ETS is expected to contribute to the success of the EU MEETS Decision. Accordingly, the project is tailored on MEETS objectives, especially to better and more-cost-effective statistics, by (1) Distilling and spreading EU-wide frontier knowledge, stemming from different EU NSIs lessons from experience, on how to address common issues, which would allow to share problems, which are akin and involve applying knowledge in both collecting, producing and making available business statistics to governments and the public at large; (2) Learning from each other as to how chart best a common strategy and a road to cost-effectively and successfully address the MEETS challenges, without repeating mistakes; (3) Converging towards a coherent, common or compatible, cost-effective and efficient EU state of the art or best practice in Business Statistics.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE.2010.1.1-01 | Award Amount: 10.25M | Year: 2011

Fruit Breedomics has as its strategic goal to improve the efficiency of fruit breeding by bridging the gap between scientific genetics research and application in breeding. Fruit Breedomics takes a multidisciplinary approach, including genetics, genomics, ecophysiology and bioinformatics, to improve the efficiency apple and peach breeding programmes by: i) developing new and adapted tools, ii) studying a wide range of traits to enlarge the coverage of selection criteria, iii) analysing and exploiting the wide genetic diversity available, iv) making the research outputs (valuable traits, genetic markers and genes, innovative tools and methodologies, new plant material) directly applicable for the breeders, v) establishing a stakeholder network. Fruit Breedomics will provide the European fruit tree sector with cutting-edge breeding tools to improve selection efficiency as well as superior pre-breeding material to meet grower and consumer demands for healthy cultivars of high quality that can be grown in sustainable agriculture systems in the context of climate change. The project will develop tailored molecular and bioinformatics tools to extensively exploit the diversity present in European germplasm collections and breeding populations. This will lead to the selection of desired favourable genes needed for improvement of main horticultural traits. The collected data will provide precious genetic information on the pool of genitors and founders to be used in future breeding programmes. The project will focus primarily on apple and peach, two major fruits in Europe, but many tools and much knowledge gained will also be of benefit to other species of the Rosaceae family via the strong ancestral relatedness among these species.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: KBBE.2011.2.1-01 | Award Amount: 1.20M | Year: 2011

The objective of the CONNECT4ACTION project is to improve communication between consumers, consumer scientists, food technology developers, and other key players in the food technology development and commercialisation process. Focusing on communication and knowledge exchange between food technologists and consumer scientists, the results of the CONNECT4ACTION project will contribute to improvement of the multidisciplinary dialogue and to increase consumer acceptance of new food products, thereby lower the failure rate of new (food) technologies in Europe. A large group of stakeholders (food scientists and technologists from companies, universities and research institutes, together with consumer scientists, ethical experts, representatives of science media/journalist, and consumers) will be connected with the project and each other via the online CONNECT4ACTION community. This online community strengthens the project with input and feedback during various stages and serves as showcase of improved communication. Based on effective communication strategies identified in the relevant literatures and, subsequently, opinions of experts based on their daily practices and experiences, this project will deliver an improved communication framework, accompanied by tools and training materials that enable food technology developers and other key players to step-by-step improve their food technology development processes. This FP7 experienced consortium, consisting of a broad, multidisciplinary network of key players that are involved in food technology development and commercialisation, has the expertise and experience from the field to disseminate and successfully implement innovative communication strategies into daily life activities. Dissemination of project outcomes receives great attention, even after the project is finished. Finally, the networking effort of CONNECT4ACTION will result in a strengthened European cooperation between public and private stakeholders.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2008.2.1.2.1. | Award Amount: 9.17M | Year: 2009

Groundwater resources are facing increasing pressure from consumptive uses (irrigation, water supply, industry) and contamination by diffuse loading (e.g. agriculture) and point sources (e.g. industry). This cause major threat and risks to our most valuable water resource and on ecosystems dependent on groundwater. New information is need on how to better protect groundwaters and groundwater dependent ecosystems (GDE) from intensive land-use and climate change. The impacts of land-use changes and climate changes are difficult to separate as they partly result in similar changes in the ecosystems affected. The effects are highly interwoven and complex. The EU groundwater directive (GWD) and the water framework directive (WFD) provide means to protect groundwater (GW) aquifers from pollution and deterioration. At present, the maximum limits for groundwater pollutant concentrations have been set for nitrate and various pesticides. Also, water of sufficient quality and quantity should be provided to ecosystems dependent on groundwater. The European aquifers differ by their geology, climate, and threats to aquifers. This must be considered when general guidelines for management of these systems are developed. The concept of the present proposal is to base the research on different relevant aquifer sites in various European countries to test scientific issues and find new results to important problems. Seven WP are foreseen: WP1 Case studies on impacts and threats to GWs and GDEs WP2 Groundwater dynamics, re-charge and water balance WP3 Leaching to groundwater aquifers from different land-uses WP4 Groundwater dependent ecosystems: groundwater-surface water interaction WP5 Modelling processes in groundwater systems WP6 Concepts, scenarios and risk assessment WP7 Co-ordination


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2010.3.1.1-1 | Award Amount: 9.27M | Year: 2011

The European project initiative TRUST will produce knowledge and guidance to support TRansitions to Urban Water Services of Tomorrow, enabling communities to achieve sustainable, low-carbon water futures without compromising service quality. We deliver this ambition through close collaboration with problem owners in ten participating pilot city regions under changing and challenging conditions in Europe and Africa. Our work provides research driven innovations in governance, modelling concepts, technologies, decision support tools, and novel approaches to integrated water, energy, and infrastructure asset management. An extended understanding of the performance of contemporary urban water services will allow detailed exploration of transition pathways. Urban water cycle analysis will include use of an innovative systems metabolism model, derivation of key performance indicators, risk assessment, as well as broad stakeholder involvement and an analysis of public perceptions and governance modes. A number of emerging technologies in water supply, waste and storm water treatment and disposal, in water demand management and in the exploitation of alternative water sources will be analysed in terms of their cost-effectiveness, performance, safety and sustainability. Cross-cutting issues include innovations in urban asset management and water-energy nexus strengthening. The most promising interventions will be demonstrated and legitimised in the urban water systems of the ten participating pilot city regions. TRUST outcomes will be incorporated into planning guidelines and decision support tools, will be subject to life-cycle assessment, and be shaped by regulatory considerations as well as potential environmental, economic and social impacts. Outputs from the project will catalyse transformatory change in both the form and management of urban water services and give utilities increased confidence to specify innovative solutions to a range of pressing challenges.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: KBBE.2012.2.5-02 | Award Amount: 5.05M | Year: 2012

FUSIONS (Food Use for Social Innovation by Optimising waste prevention Strategies) will contribute to achieving a Resource Efficient Europe by significantly reducing food waste. It will achieve this through a comprehensive and experienced European partnership covering all key actors across the food supply chain, including regulatory, business, NGOs and knowledge institutes, all with strong links to consumer organisations. FUSIONS will establish a tiered European multi-stakeholder Platform to generate a shared vision and strategy to prevent food loss and reduce food waste across the supply chain through social innovation: new ideas (products, services and models) that simultaneously meet social needs (more effectively than alternatives) and create new social relationships or collaborations. The overall aim of the project is to contribute significantly to the harmonisation of food waste monitoring, feasibility of social innovative measures for optimised food use in the food chain and the development of a Common Food Waste Policy for EU27. Utilising the policy and behavioural change recommendations from the delivery of the key objectives, the FUSIONS European multi-stakeholder platform will enable, encourage, engage and support key actors across Europe in delivering a 50% reduction in food waste and a 20% reduction in the food chains resource inputs by 2020.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2007.3.3 | Award Amount: 3.93M | Year: 2008

The project proposal is concerned with embedded systems that are characterized by efficiency requirements such as average-case performance, resource utilization, and power consumption on the one hand and worst-case constraints on the other. This combination of requirements typically occurs in application domains such as automotive, aeronautics, multi-media and industrial automation. Embedded systems with critical constraints need offline guarantees for the satisfaction of these constraints. Unfortunately, it can be observed that in computer system design the gap between average case and worst-case behaviour increases rapidly. This entails a decreasing precision of performance-analysis results, even for combination of the strongest analyses available. Therefore, a new research and design discipline is proposed that looks at predictability and efficiency in a synergistic manner and that involves all levels of abstraction and implementation in embedded-system design. This paradigm shift overcomes the tendency to either optimize efficiency only or predictability only in favour of an approach that takes into account the multi-objective nature of the problem. The proposed approach consists of a combination of several methods, i.e.(a)\tdesign-space exploration on the hardware architecture level to identify good designs offering combinations of strong performance with good predictability, (b)\ta synergistic development of models, design methods and matching analysis tools that extract precise system-behaviour properties, and (c)\ta transformation of the established separation-of-concerns abstraction principle into a new principle, resource-aware abstraction.Partners from the automotive and aeronautics domains pose design challenges based on experience in the design of time-critical embedded systems. These challenges will be taken up by the academic partners. Prototype architectures, design methods and analysis tools will be developed to solve the challenges


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: NOE | Phase: ICT-2007.3.1 | Award Amount: 5.46M | Year: 2008

NANOSIL Network of Excellence aims to integrate at the European level the excellent European research laboratories and capabilities in order to strengthen scientific and technological excellence in the field of nanoelectronic materials and devices for terascale integrated circuits (ICs) and disseminate the results in a wide scientific and industrial community.NANOSIL will explore and assess the science and technological aspects of nanodevices and operational regimes relevant to n\4 technology node and beyond. It will provide a forward-look for the industry, enabling informed decisions to be taken on technology development in order to speed up technological innovation. It will encompass flagship projects on nanoscale CMOS and post-CMOS. The activities will thus be centred on the More Moore and Beyond-CMOS domains but natural links will also been established with the other ENIAC areas. Within the Network there are all the critical facilities and expertise to occupy and transcend this space. We will propose innovative concepts, technologies and device architectures- with fabrication down to the finest features, and utilising a wide spectrum of advanced deposition and processing capabilities, extensive characterisation and world leading device modelling. This work will be carried out through a network of joint processing, characterisation and modelling platforms. The consortium will work closely with and take steering from European industry. It will feed back data and know-how on materials and devices that deliver the required performance. This critical interaction will strengthen European integration in nanoelectronics, help in decision-making by industry and ensure that Europe remains at the forefront of nanoelectronics for the next 2 3 decades.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: NOE | Phase: ICT-2007.1.1 | Award Amount: 4.75M | Year: 2008

The BONE-proposal builds on the foundations laid out by the ePhoton/ONe projects in the previous Framework Programme. This Network of Excellence has brought together over several years the research activities within Europe in the field of Optical Networks and the BONE-project intends to validate this effort by stimulating a more intensified collaboration, exchange of researchers and building on Virtual Centres of Excellence that can serve to European industry with education and training, research tools and testlabs and pave the way to new technologies and architectures.\nThe Network of the Future, which is the central theme of this Call, will have to cope with a wide variety of applications running on a wide variety of terminals and with an increasing number of connected devices and increasing speed and data-loads. The BONE-proposal does not look into issues as convergence between mobile and fixed networks, nor does it consider issues regarding the optimised broadband access in the last mile using a wide variety of technologies such as DSL, cable, WiMAX, WiFi, PLC,... The BONE-proposal looks further into the future and takes as the final Network of the Future:\n- a high capacity, flexible, reconfigurable and self-healing optical Core and Metro network which supports the transport of massive amounts of data\n- a FTTx solution in which the x is as close as possible to the home, at the home, or even in the home. From this point the user is connected using terminal-specific technologies (wireless to handheld devices, fiber to home cinema, wireless to laptop, fixed connection to desktop,...)\nBONE clearly identifies the existence of the current technologies and also recognizes the fact that users also require the mobility of wireless access, but this mobile connection ends at a gateway or access points and from there a fixed connection is required and this fixed connection will finally be an optical link.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.3.4 | Award Amount: 4.26M | Year: 2011

Embedded devices are pervasive in our everyday live and their complexity increases exponentially. Among them, heterogeneous multi-core processors and specific hardware accelerators allow the required computing power while exhibiting a good performance/watt ratio. The flexibility required by them is promoting an application-centric model, which makes future systems face new challenges: Openness (total decoupling from hardware to application software), security, programmability and performance.Virtualization, widely used in the general-purpose computing domain, allows an effective and clean way to isolate applications from hardware, so being suitable to cope with the challenges faced by heterogeneous multi-core embedded systems. However, virtualization on embedded systems is still in its infancy. Their real-time requirements, resource constraints and heterogeneous nature demand for an integral and different approach of the virtualization concept. The vIrtical project aims the vertical and full development of the virtualization concept addressing the specific requirements for effective embedded virtualization. A virtualization-ready SoC platform and the associated programming models will be developed, tackling all the system layers: applications, programming model, hypervisor and hardware. This unique integrated approach is able to address the evolution towards heterogeneous multi-cores and even many-cores in embedded systems by focusing not only on the well-known processor virtualization but on the hardware assisted virtualization for the overall SoC. Security and protection, real-time QoS guarantees, reliability, process variation, power savings, and memory coherency will be addressed and will influence the way the system is virtualized.The vIrtical consortium is formed by key European players in the embedded market (UNIBO,UPV,TEI,ST,THALES,ARM,SYSGO,VOSYS), so guaranteeing the right development of the different layers tackled in the virtualization-ready SoC platform


The provision of public goods (including landscape services) in rural areas is recognized as one of the key topics for the future of agriculture and rural policy. Agriculture plays a major role in landscape management through its complex interlinkages with landscape features. In turn, the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) remains an important driver of landscape management due to its importance as a determinant of farming activities in the EU. The main objective of the CLAIM project is to provide the knowledge base to support an effective CAP policy design in the direction of improved landscape management, particularly providing insights into the ability of landscape to contribute to the production of added value for society in rural areas. CLAIM is focused in particular on understanding and enhancing the contribution of landscapes management to socio-economic development and agricultural competitiveness in rural areas. This will be based on a pragmatic consideration of landscape services and their analysis through a mixed-method approach, taking into account the wider EU policy strategies (in particular related to innovation and the bioeconomy). The main expected result of the CLAIM project is an evidence-based policy support framework on the different and possible contributions of agriculture and the CAP to landscape management. The framework will be mainly developed and validated through a set of 9 case studies, a strong involvement of stakeholders at different territorial levels and a wide coverage of the perspectives of EU and candidate countries. The framework will finally take the practical form of a web-based manual to be implemented in accordance to stakeholders needs and indications.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: KBBE-2008-2-3-03 | Award Amount: 1.18M | Year: 2009

The food and drink industry is the single largest manufacturing sector in the EU and is mainly comprised by SMEs and microenterprises (99.1% of European food and drink businesses). The European food industry is in the lower part of the innovation performance ranking, and is losing relative importance in the global food market. This situation was a primary reason for the initiation of the ETP Food4 Life, which seeks to stimulate and underpin innovation in the agro-food chain. TRACK_FAST is drawn from all geographic points of Europe, and its main objective is the identification of the training and career requirements of future European food scientists and technologists (FST), and implementation of a European strategy to recruit the next generation FST leaders. TRACK_FAST will achieve this goal through: Identification and definition of personal skills requirements in food job market; Developments for the regulation of food science and technology professions in Europe; Establishment of a framework for continual professional training and career development for the FST professional; and Motivation of young people to enter and pursue of a career in food science and technology in Europe. The project will therefore coordinate a programme of information and experience gathering, discussions with employers and employees, and with those responsible for providing academic and other training deliver awareness and experience in career development activities. Moreover, young students will be motivated to pursue a career in food area, thus promoting a new generation of skilled, flexible and enthusiastic food scientists and technologists. TRACK_FST will provide main stakeholders with a forum within which their main needs will be considered. Moreover, TRACK_FAST focus on the key factors to identify needs and guide future works, as well as the development of specific and effective measures to prompt changes. The consortium and work plan are framed in a strong engagement between stakeholders, thus TRACK_FAST will contribute to a more innovative and competitive food and drink sector, which is a key area for job creation, global competition and societal benefit in Europe.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE-2007-1-2-02 | Award Amount: 7.52M | Year: 2008

For many years the size and complexity of the wheat, barley and rye genomes have hampered the development of genomics and its application to produce Triticeae crops with improved composition and characteristics. Recently, however, new and more efficient scientific capabilities and resources have been developed that allows robust genomic programs to be established for the Triticeae. TriticeaeGenome is designed to achieve significant progresses in Triticeae genomics and support efficient breeding of improved varieties for the European agriculture by: - Constructing and anchoring physical maps from the wheat and barley group 1 and 3 chromosomes that carry a large number of important agronomic traits (e.g. disease resistance, yield and quality) - Isolating genes and QTLs underlying disease resistance, yield and quality traits in wheat and barley - Identifying and exploiting new alleles for the isolated genes through the use of natural and mutant populations as well as wild germplasm - Supporting the development of new varieties that meet farmer and consumer needs through molecular breeding - Developing new bioinformatic tools to structure, relate and comprehensively analyse the large scale genomics data gathered within the project and - Leading, coordinating and integrating Triticeae genomics research Triticeaegenome is developed as a main contribution to the international consortia efforts in constructing physical maps of barley and hexaploid wheat for improving plant breeding, accelerating gene and QTL isolation and setting up the foundation for future genome sequencing. It will deliver novel information and tools to breeders and scientists for a better understanding of Triticeae genomes organization, evolution, and function thereby, providing a better understanding of the biology of these essential crops and enabling significant improvement of their composition and characteristics to satisfy the needs of consumers, processors and producers.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.3.5 | Award Amount: 3.00M | Year: 2010

The aftermath of too many dramatic events involving public structures and private buildings collapse makes imperative to ask ourselves whether anything can be done to mitigate their effects or avoid them and save the lives taken as a result of their occurrence. Wireless sensor network (WSN)-based systems for structural health monitoring could be the answer to this crucial question were they able to provide long lasting monitoring and robust and reliable data delivery as requested by increasing safety demands.This is unfortunately unavailable today.The GENESI project proposes research addressing all the critical barriers and challenges that prevent the application of WSNs for monitoring structures, buildings and spaces. In particular, by combining new hardware and software design, the GENESI will produce systems for structural health monitoring that are long lasting, pervasive and totally distributed and autonomous.New wireless sensor nodes will be build that are capable of achieving virtual infinite lifetime through a well-balanced combination of cutting edge technologies, such as energy harvesting from multiple sources, the first small factor fuel cells, low-cost radio triggering for minimizing idle energy consumption and algorithms for smart interference management.New software will complement the GENESI hardware in the quest of long lasting system lifetime by taking into account the when and how much of energy availability. At the same time, end user requirements will be met according to a newly defined application driven Quality of Service concept.Novel task allocation algorithms, cross-layer protocol stacks, situation awareness and context discovery mechanisms complete the definition of a system that addresses the major challenges of the ICT theme of FP7. Finally, involving end users directly into the research cycle as key players,GENESI is poised to address realistic\nsocietal needs while fostering technology transfer and market exploitation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: NOE | Phase: ICT-2007.3.3 | Award Amount: 5.77M | Year: 2008

The ArtistDesign NoE is the visible result of the ongoing integration of a community, that emerged through the Artist FP5 Accompanying Measure and that was organised through the Artist2 FP6 NoE.\nThe central objective for ArtistDesign is to build on existing structures and links forged in Artist2, to become a virtual Center of Excellence in Embedded Systems Design. This will be mainly achieved through tight integration between the central players of the European research community. Also, the consortium is smaller, and integrates several new partners. These teams have already established a long-term vision for embedded systems in Europe, which advances the emergence of Embedded Systems as a mature discipline.\nArtistDesign will become the main focal point for dissemination in Embedded Systems Design, leveraging on well-established infrastructure and links, such as a web portal and newsletter. It will extend its dissemination activities, including Education and Training, Industrial Applications, as well as International Collaboration. ArtistDesign will establish durable relationships with industry and SMEs in the area, especially through ARTEMISIA/ARTEMIS.\nArtistDesign will build on existing international visibility and recognition, to play a leading role in structuring the area.\nThe research effort aims to integrate topics, teams, and competencies, grouped into 4 Thematic Clusters: Modelling and Validation, Software Synthesis, Code Generation, and Timing Analysis, Operating Systems and Networks, Platforms and MPSoC. Transversal Integration covering both industrial applications and design issues aims for integration between clusters.\nArtistDesign has defined a four-year workprogramme, with a strong commitment to integration and sustainability. To achieve the aims, the estimated support from the EC is approximately 4.5 MEuros. This support is a very small proportion of the overall investment by the core partners.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: NMP-05-2014 | Award Amount: 8.01M | Year: 2015

Printed electronics (PE) is set to revolutionise the electronics industry over the next decade and can offer Europe the opportunity to regain lost market share. Printed electronics allows for the direct printing of a range of functional (conductive, resistive, capacitive and semi-conducting) nanomaterials formulations to enable a simpler, more cost-effective, high performance and high volume processing in comparison to traditional printed circuit board and semiconductor manufacturing techniques. It has been reported by Frost and Sullivan that the market for printed electronics will increase in revenues from $0.53Bn in 2010 to $5.04 Bn in 2016 at a compound annual growth rate of 32.5%. However, the migration towards low-cost, liquid-based, high resolution deposition and patterning using high throughput techniques, such as inkjet printing, requires that suitable functional nanomaterials formulations (e.g. inks) are available for end users in industrially relevant quantities. Presently, there are issues with industrial supply of nanomaterials which are low cost, high performance, environmentally friendly and tailored for high throughput systems. Therefore better collaboration is warranted between supply chain partners to ensure nanomaterial production and nanomaterial formulations are tailored for end use applications to meet this need. The INSPIRED project will address these fundamental issues within the printed electronics industry: Ensuring that suitable functional nanomaterials formulations (inks) are available for end users in industrial scale quantities. Production of these nanomaterial formulations on an industrial scale and then depositing them using cost-effective, high throughput printing technologies enables rapid production of printed electronic components, on a wide variety of substrates. Therefore, enabling new electronics applications, whilst overcoming the problems associated with traditional manufacturing.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE-2009-1-2-05 | Award Amount: 9.72M | Year: 2010

DROPS will develop novel methods and strategies aimed at yield maintenance under fluctuating water deficit and at enhanced plant water-use efficiency. We deal with high genotype x environment interaction in the field (any trait can have positive, negative or no effect depending on drought scenarios) with an approach combining Physiology, Genetics, field testing and Ecophysiological modelling. The project targets four traits : seed abortion, vegetative growth maintenance, root system architecture and transpiration efficiency. It deals with maize and durum wheat, plus bread wheat and sorghum for specific tasks. DROPS will: - Develop new screens for identifying drought tolerant genotypes, from phenotyping platforms to the field with indicators which are (i) stable characteristics of genotypes with high heritability in phenotyping platforms (ii) based on novel knowledge (e.g. combinations of metabolite concentrations, sensitivity parameters of models or hormonal balances) (iii) genetically related to target traits and able to predict genotype performance in the field via simulation and/or statistical models. - Explore the natural variation of the four target traits by (i) linking the target traits to physiological pathways, genes or genomic regions (ii) assessing the effects of a large allelic diversity for the four target traits via association genetics. - Support crop improvement strategies by developing methods for estimating the comparative advantages of relevant alleles and traits in fields with contrasting drought scenarios. This will be performed via field experiments and by developing a new generation of crop model able to estimate the effects of alleles on crop growth, yield and water-use efficiency Results and methods will be diffused (i) to breeders via the participation of seed companies and a partnership with a breeder association, (ii) to scientists and students via academic publications, and via practical courses and virtual courses in its website.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: OCEAN.2011-1 | Award Amount: 7.38M | Year: 2012

European oceans will be subject to massive development of marine infrastructure in the near future. The most obvious is the energy facilities e.g. offshore wind farms, exploitation of wave energy, expansion of electricity connections, and also further development and implementation of marine aquaculture. This will also lead to an increased need for marine infrastructure to support installation and the on-going operation of the facilities. However both economical costs and environmental impact have to be reduced in order to increase the feasibility of the use of ocean space. Marine structures for offshore wind farms and aquaculture have to be installed at various sites and on much larger scale than earlier implementation of offshore structures in order to fulfil EU strategies (1) for reduction of fossil-based energy and (2) to become a major player in sustainable aquaculture. However the feasibility is much more sensitive to the costs of structures and the installation of the structures than for instance Oil & Gas facilities. Novel innovative design concepts should address different physical conditions in order to make the best use of the ocean space. Going from deep water (north of Spain) to shallow water with high morphological activity (the Wadden sea) and further to inner waters like the inner Danish/Baltic areas and the Adriatic sea changes the focus from a strong physical aspect to environmental impact. This will make it possible to develop, test and integrate different technologies but also to address site specific challenges. Both for offshore renewables and for aquaculture a substantial part of the costs is variable cost related to operations and maintenance of the plants. It is obvious that optimization of the use of ocean space for different purposes might benefit from shared resources such staff allocation, transportation of staff and material from and to the platforms, use of forecasting systems, ships etc.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: CIRC-05-2016 | Award Amount: 3.38M | Year: 2017

RES URBIS aims at making it possible to convert several types of urban bio-waste into valuable bio-based products, in an integrated single biowaste biorefinery and by using one main technology chain. This goal will be pursued through: - collection and analysis of data on urban bio-waste production and present management systems in four territorial clusters that have been selected in different countries and have different characteristics. - well-targeted experimental activity to solve a number of open technical issues (both process- and product-related), by using the appropriate combination of innovative and catalogue-proven technologies. - market analysis whitin several economic scenarios and business models for full exploitation of bio-based products (including a path forward to fill regulatory gaps). Urban bio-waste include the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (from households, restaurants, caterers and retail premises), excess sludge from urban wastewater treatment, garden and parks waste, selected waste from food-processing (if better recycling options in the food chain are not available), other selected waste streams, i.e. baby nappies. Bio-based products include polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) and related PHA-based bioplastics as well as ancillary productions: biosolvents (to be used in PHA extraction) and fibers (to be used for PHA biocomposites). Territorial and economic analyses will be done either considering the ex-novo implementation of the biowaste biorefinery or its integration into existing wastewater treatment or anaerobic digestion plants, with reference to clusters and for different production size. The economic analysis will be based on a portfolio of PHA-based bioplastics, which will be produced at pilot scale and tested for applications: - Biodegradable commodity film - Packaging interlayer film - Speciality durables (such as electronics) - Premium slow C-release material for ground water remediation


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CP-ARTEMIS | Phase: SP1-JTI-ARTEMIS-2012-AIPP6;SP1-JTI-ARTEMIS-2012-AIPP4 | Award Amount: 67.54M | Year: 2013

Our society is facing both energy and competitiveness challenges. These challenges are tightly linked and require new dynamic interactions between energy producers and energy consumers, between machines, between systems, between people and systems, etc. Cooperative automation is the key for these dynamic interactions and is enabled by the technology developed around the Internet of Things and Service Oriented Architectures. The objective of the Arrowhead project is to address the technical and applicative challenges associated to cooperative automation: -Provide a technical framework adapted in terms of functions and performances, -Propose solutions for integration with legacy systems, -Implement and evaluate the cooperative automation through real experimentations in applicative domains: electro-mobility, smart buildings, infrastructures and smart cities, industrial production, energy production and energy virtual market, -Point out the accessible innovations thanks to new services, -Lead the way to further standardization work. The strategy adopted in the project has four major dimensions: -An innovation strategy based on business and technology gap analysis paired with a market implementation strategy based on end users priorities and long term technology strategies -Application pilots where technology demonstrations in real working environments will be made -A technology framework enabling collaborative automation and closing innovation critical technology gaps -An innovation coordination methodology for complex innovation orchestration Date of approval by the ECSEL JU: 23/07/2015


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: NOE | Phase: ICT-2011.1.6 | Award Amount: 5.99M | Year: 2011

The goal of EINS is coordinating and integrating European research aimed at achieving a deeper multidisciplinary understanding of the development of the Internet as a societal and technological artefact, whose evolution is increasingly interwined with that of human societies. Its main objective is to allow an open and productive dialogue between all the disciplines which study Internet systems under any technological or humanistic perspective, and which in turn are being transformed by the continuous advances in Internet functionalities and applications. EINS will bring together research institutions focusing on network engineering, computation, complexity, security, trust, mathematics, physics, sociology, game theory, economics, political sciences, humanities, law, energy, transport, artistic expression, and any other relevant social and life sciences.\nThis multidisciplinary bridging of the different disciplines may also be seen as the starting point for a new Internet Science, the theoretical and empirical foundation for an holistic understanding of the complex techno-social interactions related to the Internet. It is supposed to inform the future technological, social, political choices concerning Internet technologies, infrastructures and policies made by the various public and private stakeholders, for example as for the far-ended possible consequences of architectural choices on social, economic, environmental or political aspects, and ultimately on quality of life at large.\nThe individual contributing disciplines will themselves benefit from a more holistic understanding of the Internet principles and in particular of the network effect. The unprecedented connectivity offered by the Internet plays a role often underappreciated in most of them; whereas the Internet provides both an operational development platform and a concrete empirical and experimental model. These multi- and inter-disciplinary investigations will improve the design of elements of Future Internet, enhance the understanding of its evolving and emerging implications at societal level, and possibly identify universal principles for understanding the Internet-based world that will be fed back to the participating disciplines. EINS will:\nCoordinate the investigation, from a multi-disciplinary perspective, of specific topics at the intersection between humanistic and technological sciences, such as privacy & identity, reputation, virtual communities, security & resilience, network neutrality\nLay the foundations for an Internet Science, based i.a. on Network Science and Web Science, aiming at understanding the impact of the network effect on human societies & organisations, as for technological, economic, social & environmental aspects\nProvide concrete incentives for academic institutions and individual researchers to conduct studies across multiple disciplines, in the form of online journals, conferences, workshops, PhD courses, schools, contests, and open calls


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IAPP | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-IAPP | Award Amount: 1.36M | Year: 2013

The CLEVER project is a 4-years training and transfer of knowledge program between a highly innovative company working in advanced biomedical image processing and two renowned academic groups working in the field of liver diseases and ultrasound research. The scientific and industrial aim of CLEVER is to develop, validate and transfer to clinical practice a novel electronic-health system based on the analysis of liver dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound images to assess the severity of derangement of the intrahepatic vascular network in cirrhosis. This feature is closely related with portal hypertension and liver failure, which are the two most important complications of cirrhosis. The outputs of CLEVER will allow an objective prognostic stratification of patients with cirrhosis replacing current invasive and more expensive tools, such as measurement of portal pressure or biopsy. This goal is achievable within the project duration since all participating partners are highly committed: the academic partners are opinion leaders who have already contributed to improve the management of patients with cirrhosis, and will collaborate with an industrial partner who have already provided new e-health tools applied to medical imaging for risk stratification purposes. The project will be structured and developed to exploit at best the interdisciplinary approach, expertise and complementarities between the industrial and academic partners, in order to foster a creative intersectorial collaboration, accomplishment of its scientific aim, and provide high quality training for the participating researchers. This is expected to be of high benefit for their individual career development. CLEVER will permit to transfer the academic knowledge into an e-health product to be implemented in ultrasound equipments and used in clinical practice in hepatology. CLEVER will increase the visibility of UE in the sector of health technology, and will impact positively on UE citizens health.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.3.2-2 | Award Amount: 7.80M | Year: 2013

Persons with HIV on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) are at increased risk of the premature development of age-associated non-communicable comorbidities (AANCC), including cardiovascular, chronic kidney, liver and pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, non-AIDS associated malignancies, and neurocognitive impairment. It has therefore been hypothesised that such individuals, despite effective cART, may be prone to accelerated ageing. The underlying pathogenesis is likely to be multifactorial and include sustained immune activation, both systemically and within the central nervous system. By building on an established infrastructure for conducting longitudinal HIV cohort studies in Amsterdam and London, we will provide a detailed, prospective evaluation of AANCC among HIV-infected patients suppressed on cART and appropriately chosen and comparable non-infected controls. In this way, we will provide a robust estimate of the effect of treated HIV infection on the prevalence, incidence and age of onset of AANCC, thus clearly establishing a link between HIV and AANCC. Through the Human Immune System (HIS) mouse model, experimental studies will permit us to differentiate the effects of HIV and cART on metabolic outcomes when applied under controlled conditions, thereby further elucidating the causative nature of the link between HIV and AANCC. To further clarify potential pathogenic mechanisms underlying this causative link, including the possible induction of an inflammation-associated accelerated ageing phenotype, biomarkers which reflect each of these mechanisms will be investigated in biomaterial obtained from HIS mice and humans, and subsequently validated in patients with HIV on cART. The successful execution of the experimental and clinical research outlined in this proposal will be ensured through a strong interdisciplinary collaboration between clinical, basic and translational scientists bridging the fields of HIV, AANCC and ageing.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: Fission-2009-2.3.1 | Award Amount: 10.59M | Year: 2010

For the long-term development of nuclear power, innovative nuclear systems such as Gen-IV reactors and transmutation systems need to be developed for meeting future energy challenges. Thermal-hydraulics is recognized as a key scientific subject in the development of innovative reactor systems. This project is devoted to important crosscutting thermal-hydraulic issues encountered in various innovative nuclear systems, such as advanced reactor core thermal-hydraulics, single phase mixed convection and turbulence, specific multiphase flow, and code coupling and qualification. The main objectives of the project are: Generation of a data base for the development and validation of new models and codes describing the selected crosscutting thermal-hydraulic phenomena. This data base contains both experimental data and data from direct numerical simulations (DNS). Development of new physical models and modeling approaches for more accurate description of the crosscutting thermal-hydraulic phenomena such as heat transfer and flow mixing, turbulent flow modeling for a wide range of Prandtl numbers, and modeling of flows under strong influence of buoyancy. Improvement of the numerical engineering tools and establishment of a numerical platform for the design analysis of the innovative nuclear systems. This platform contains numerical codes of various classes of spatial scales, i.e. system analysis, sub-channel analysis and CFD codes, their coupling and the guidelines for their applications. The project will achieve optimum usage of available European resources in experimental facilities, numerical tools and expertise. It will establish a new common platform of research results and research infrastructure. The main outcomes of the project will be a synergized infrastructure for thermal-hydraulic research of innovative nuclear systems in Europe.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP.2012.3.0-2 | Award Amount: 4.21M | Year: 2013

Over the recent past the accumulation of major mishaps, crises and accidents have made it clear that organisations must still improve their capabilities to address safety not a stand-alone activity that is separate from the main activities and processes of the organization but as an integrated part of critical project management. Further it is critical also to understand how weaknesses not only in the technical but also in the organisational interfaces can contribute to significant losses and major industrial accidents. TOSCA (Total Operation Management for Safety Critical Activities) is concerned with the integration of industrial operations into a total performance management system so that concerns about safety, quality and productivity are addressed in an integrated way during life-cycle of a project or a product. The industrial domain of application regards process control industries (e.g., chemical industries, power generation, offshore oil & gas platforms, etc.) that may vary in size, regulatory and cultural aspects. TOSCA will examine vulnerabilities of the technical, human and organisational systems that may have an impact in safety, quality and productivity. Safety critical activities can be seen as projects or safety cases that must be examined from the perspectives of many stakeholders (e.g., different departments, subcontractors, regulatory authorities, etc) and decision-making at different organizational levels (e.g., top managers, supervisors and operators). A participative approach is required that should collect knowledge from the sharp-end operators and integrate it with formal descriptions of how the system works and how responses should be coordinated across the whole organisation. Furthermore, TOSCA should enhance the management of changes and provide a facility for testing out the effectiveness of the possible action plan devised.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH-2007-5.1-01 | Award Amount: 1.93M | Year: 2009

This project will examine the processes which influence democratic ownership and participation in eight European states. It will draw on the disciplines of Politics, Sociology, Social Policy, Psychology and Education to examine macro-level contextual factors (including historical, political, electoral, economic and policy factors), proximal social factors (including familial, educational and media factors) and psychological factors (including motivational, cognitive, attitudinal and identity factors) which facilitate and/or inhibit civic and political engagement and participation. The research will be ground-breaking in incorporating the psychology of the individual citizen within its scope, and it will be distinctive in addressing the psychological processes through which political, societal and social factors have their effects upon citizens civic and political engagement and participation. Young people, women, minorities and migrants will be examined as four specific groups at risk of political disengagement. The research will focus on the differences, as well as the overlap, between civic and political engagement, and on both direct and representative participation. An innovative multi-level process model of civic and political engagement and participation will be constructed, which will explain how and why different forms and interpretations of democratic ownership and participation develop or are hampered amongst citizens living in different European countries and contexts, with particular attention being paid to the relevant phenomena at regional, national and EU levels. Appropriate stakeholders at regional, national and EU levels will be involved in all stages of the work, to ensure that the research addresses issues of direct concern to these stakeholders, and to ensure that the policy implications and recommendations which emerge from the research meet the needs of these stakeholders and are disseminated appropriately to them.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: ENV.2008.3.2.1.2. | Award Amount: 1.26M | Year: 2009

The aim of the project is to set-up a system of the Cultural Heritage Identity Card (CHIC), which will introduce a systematic collection and storage of data on the immovable heritage objects across European and neighboring countries. The main objective is to develop and test the guidelines needed for the efficient compilation of the data pertinent to each monument under observation. The system of CHIC will support sustainable maintenance, preventive conservation and rehabilitation of historic sites and monuments. It will assist the application of newly developed strategies, which are designed to evaluate the efficiency and user-friendliness of the approach used for screening the time-varying alteration of heritage buildings caused by human interventions and environmental impacts. The partners of the project will promote and assist the introduction of the CHIC system in their countries and further facilitate its use in the neighbouring countries through their links with governmental authorities responsible for the cultural heritage protection and preservation. The development of the project will be achieved through the activities of four core work packages that will be supported by the coordinative and dissemination work packages. The main tasks of project will be to: review and document current methodologies and tools for data collection and assessment, develop criteria and indicators for risk assessment, develop guidelines for the future development of methods and tools for collection and storing of the data required for the evaluation of time-varying changes of heritage assets, and consolidate recommendations and strategies adjusted to the particular needs and heritage preservation strategies in different European and neighboring countries. The consortium will consist of 12 partners from 11 countries, which are Slovenia, Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Czech Republic, Germany, Greece, Israel, Italy, Poland, and Spain and it will coordinate the activities at the national and international levels. The Advisory Committee will lead the Advisory Network, which will assist the establishment and maintenance rapport with the local authorities responsible for safeguarding of CHIC and with other stakeholders involved in heritage protection. In the scope of this project we will create a web portal eu-chic.eu that will remain active at least until 2017.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-07a-2014 | Award Amount: 3.40M | Year: 2015

Research and development activities are proposed for the benefit of sustainable pork chains based on European local pig breeds and their production systems. Workprogramme is planned to respond to consumer demands for quality and healthiness of pork products with regional identity and societal demands for environment preservation and development of local agro-economy. Description and evaluation of local pig breeds, with an emphasis on untapped ones will be performed using novel genomic tools. Performance of local pig breeds will be evaluated in contrasted agro-geo-climatic conditions and production systems (indoor, outdoor, organic). Focus will be on pig feeding and management strategies and on the use of locally available feeding resources. Intrinsic quality of traditional and new regional high quality pork products and attitudes of consumers from various market areas will be assessed; in particular the motives for the choice and willingness to pay such products. Marketing strategies will be adressed in particular short chain distribution channels. All activities will be driven from the perspective of sustainability (environmental impact, animal welfare, product quality, consumer acceptability and market potential). The activities will engage innovative approaches to answer socio-economic demands of regional pork chains involving partners from different sectors. The ambition is to enhance existing and create new networks between academia and non-academia partners, within and between regions and to tackle the value chain for regional high quality pork products, focusing on diverse and so far untapped pig breeds, their production systems and pork products. Cross-fertilising interactions between research, local agriculture, businesses and end-users will be achieved with partners from these complementary sectors in all research and development activities.


INMARE stands for Industrial Applications of Marine Enzymes: Innovative screening and expression platforms to discover and use the functional protein diversity from the sea. It is a collaborative Innovation Action to streamline the pathways of discovery and industrial applications of new marine enzymes and bioactives for targeted production of fine chemicals, drugs and in environmental clean-up applications. The INMARE consortium will unify the multidisciplinary expertise and facilities of academic and industry partners. This will include integrating the following core activities: advanced technologies to access and sample unique marine biodiversity hot-spots; state-of-the art technologies for construction of metagenomic libraries; innovative enzyme screening assays and platforms; cutting-edge sequence annotation pipelines and bioinformatics resources; high-end activity screening technology; bioanalytical and bioprocess engineering facilities and expertise, nanoparticle-biocatalysts; high-quality protein crystallization and structural analysis facilities and experts in IP management for biotechnology. The companies involved in the project are market leaders in enzyme production and biocatalysis processes designed to efficiently deliver safer (pharmaceuticals) cheaper (agriculture) and biobased (biopolymers) products. They also have impressive track record in environmental clean-up technologies and are committed to promoting public understanding, awareness and dissemination of scientific research. The main emphasis will be focused on streamlining and shortening the pipelines for enzyme and bioactive compound discovery towards industrial applications through the establishing of marine enzyme collections with a high proportion of enzymes-allrounders. The project will also prioritize the identification of novel lead products and the delivery of improved prototypes for new biocatalytic processes.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: AAT.2011.6.2-1.;AAT.2011.6.3-1. | Award Amount: 5.07M | Year: 2011

The MAAT project aims to investigate aerial transportation possibility by airship based cruiser-feeder system. MAAT is composed by tree modules : - the cruiser, named PTAH, (acronym of Photovoltaic Transport Aerial High altitude system); - the feeder, named ATEN (Aerial Transport Elevator Network feeder), is a VTOL system (Vertical Take Off and Landing) which ensure the connection between the cruiser and the ground; - the vertical airport hub, named AHA (Airport Hub for Airship feeders). The feeder can lift up and down by the control of buoyancy force and displace horizontally to join to cruiser. The project aims to: 1. identify and design the best type of propulsion for the PTAH, a discoid innovative airship able to remain airborne for long periods and to travel great distances, in order to reduce the environmental impact against the present sys-tem, as fuel consumption is null, both cruiser and feeder are energetically autonomous by photovoltaic energy and innovative electric propulsion. 2. study the different possible ways of approaching and joining between ATEN and PTAH, and consequently, the re-lease of ATEN from PTAH. 3. design the best procedure of docking operations thus identified in order to obtain the minimum disruption to pas-sengers and the maximum safety for themselves and for goods 4. study the different architectures of PTAH and Athens, in such a way that : 5. the lift up capacity guaranteed by the buoyancy force, may be accompanied by the power of the engines; 6. effective and safe procedures for docking; 7. ATEN can land and take off from Airport Hubs named AHA located in major populated centres 8. PTAH satisfies the better possible aerodynamic performances possible for the dimensions and the operative mis-sion. To study the transfer operations between ATEN and PTAH of goods and people and vice versa, to: minimize distress conditions for passengers, maximize performances especially for goods; enhance safety of these operations to maximum possible level. The objectives described are congruent with each other and to achieve this the study of the system and components must be highly structured.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: ENERGY-2007-2.6-01 | Award Amount: 4.52M | Year: 2008

Wave Energy Convertors are at an early stage of development. First generation devices have been deployed at the shoreline and normally consist of Oscillating Water Column Systems. In order for these systems to progress towards full commercial realisation they must develop into suited to mass production. This project follows the successful FP6 funding round in which several fixed Oscillating Water Columns Wave Energy Convertors (OWC WECs) were funded at Demonstration level. These systems are now evolving from fixed to floating devices in deeper water, further offshore. This brings new challenges which this project aims to address. The project will concentrate on the development of new concepts and components for power-take-off, control, moorings, risers, data acquisition and instrumentation based on floating OWC systems. However, the components and concepts developed will have relevance to other floating device types. This project is proposed to run over 3 years. The project brings together a mix of RTD performers and SMEs selected from across the European Union for their track records, complementarity and relevant experience. The project has also enlisted the commitment of the Device Developers from the EU funded projects as Associate Partners to ensure that the project goals are both timely and relevant. The impacts of the project will be focused on reducing technical and non-technical risk in the marine environment as well as reducing the cost per kWh of generated energy. The new components and concepts will be tested on a floating OWC test platform at sea and these real, validated and verified results will be integrated into a holistic system model. This model will provide a Toolbox for wave to wire simulations of complete WEC systems.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2008-1.1.1 | Award Amount: 9.65M | Year: 2009

CHARISMA is an Integrated Infrastructure Initiative that brings together 22 leading European institutions developing research on artwork materials and their deterioration finalised to the conservation of cultural heritage. The consortium has the objective to optimise the use of infrastructures through a coordinated program of transnational access, joint research and networking activities. Transnational access offers applicants opportunities to exploit the services of three different and complementary groups of facilities, embedded in a multidisciplinary environment involving material science and artwork conservation/restoration. They are: i) a group of six archives containing a huge amount of analytical data, hosted by the most prestigious European museums and institutions developing safeguard and conservation of cultural heritage; ii) a set of advanced portable instrumentation for in-situ non-invasive measurements in the same site where the artworks are located or exhibited; iii) two platforms, one in France and one in Hungary, where large scale facilities are coupled to a set of medium scale instrumentations, open to users for the most advanced studies on artwork materials and their alterations. Research is devoted: i) to improve access to databases exploiting digitalisation of data and their harmonisation; ii) to design and set-up innovative instrumentations, for in-situ 2D and 3D examinations of artworks, and new cleaning techniques; iii) to develop new methodologies for the study of organic materials and their distribution in micro-samples or directly at the surface of the object. Through networking, the way infrastructures are working is improved, harmonising methodologies and best practices in analysis and conservation, pursuing the establishment of a multidisciplinary synergic working method, based on shared use of knowledge and resources.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: AAT.2008.2.3.2. | Award Amount: 47.23M | Year: 2009

ALICIA addresses the ACARE objective of increasing time efficiency within the future air transport system. The aim will be to develop a new and scalable cockpit application which can extend operations of aircraft in degraded conditions All Conditions Operations. A key objective will be to deliver an extensible application that can be applied to many aircraft types. This will necessarily entail a new cockpit infrastructure capable of delivering enhanced situation awareness to the crew whilst simultaneously reducing crew workload and improving overall aircraft safety. All Conditions Operations, other challenging applications and the desire for reduced crew will mean that the crew station interface will be challenged beyond the reach of the current state-of-the-art. Accordingly, a radical rethink is required to manage the escalating complexity whilst simultaneously enhancing safety and controlling through life cost. Thus, the next significant step in cockpit design will require a holistic integration of technologies allowing the crew to process and act on information concurrently and intuitively, using an optimum combination of their visual, tactile and audio senses. In the concept envisaged, use will be made of precision navigation, synthetic vision, high integrity data bases, sensor and sensor data and image fusion, obstacle warning systems, taxi autopilots, touch screens, large area displays, voice/audio and multimodal input/output devices to deliver an All Conditions Operations application integrated within an enhanced crew interface. A major objective will be to deliver a common, and open standard interface which can manage existing core applications across all aircraft types whilst simultaneously supporting the needs of challenging new applications. The ALICIA project is uniquely placed to deliver the capability necessary to facilitate the next big step in crew station design.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: BG-08-2014 | Award Amount: 20.65M | Year: 2015

The overarching objective of AtlantOS is to achieve a transition from a loosely-coordinated set of existing ocean observing activities to a sustainable, efficient, and fit-for-purpose Integrated Atlantic Ocean Observing System (IAOOS), by defining requirements and systems design, improving the readiness of observing networks and data systems, and engaging stakeholders around the Atlantic; and leaving a legacy and strengthened contribution to the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) and the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). AtlantOS will fill existing in-situ observing system gaps and will ensure that data are readily accessible and useable. AtlantOS will demonstrate the utility of integrating in-situ and Earth observing satellite based observations towards informing a wide range of sectors using the Copernicus Marine Monitoring Services and the European Marine Observation and Data Network and connect them with similar activities around the Atlantic. AtlantOS will support activities to share, integrate and standardize in-situ observations, reduce the cost by network optimization and deployment of new technologies, and increase the competitiveness of European industries, and particularly of the small and medium enterprises of the marine sector. AtlantOS will promote innovation, documentation and exploitation of innovative observing systems. All AtlantOS work packages will strengthen the trans-Atlantic collaboration, through close interaction with partner institutions from Canada, United States, and the South Atlantic region. AtlantOS will develop a results-oriented dialogue with key stakeholders communities to enable a meaningful exchange between the products and services that IAOOS can deliver and the demands and needs of the stakeholder communities. Finally, AtlantOS will establish a structured dialogue with funding bodies, including the European Commission, USA, Canada and other countries to ensure sustainability and adequate growth of IAOOS.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: PEOPLE-2007-1-1-ITN | Award Amount: 4.78M | Year: 2008

Indium nitride is a new narrow gap semiconductor (<0.7 eV), which alloys with GaN (3.5 eV) and AlN (6.2 eV) will allow the spectral range from telecom to hard UV wavelengths to be covered. This narrow band gap makes InN an exciting material from which to develop highest efficiency solar cells. Moreover, due to an electron mobility of around 4000 cm2/Vs and very high saturation velocities, InN is an ideal material for the development of high electron mobility devices capable of operating in the Terahertz range. To ensure the production of reliable commercial devices, rigorous fundamental research is required to understand the layer growth mechanisms and optimize material properties. In RAINBOW, academic and industrial consortium, the theoretical work will encompass modelling of the atomic structure and properties of the material from empirical potentials to ab initio techniques. Experiments will provide correlated structural, electronic, optical and chemical information from the nano to the macroscopic scale. In a closely concerted effort, we will determine the best conditions for the growth of highest quality InN and In rich (In,Ga,Al)N alloys by the main growth techniques (MOVPE, PAMBE,HVPE ). Under the supervision of world leading experts, numerous young researchers will directly benefit from this interdisciplinary and multisectorial research and training effort. The young researchers involved in this programme will also learn to manage research and industrial projects.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE.2010.2.3-01 | Award Amount: 4.24M | Year: 2011

EcoBioCAP will provide the EU food industry with customizable, ecoefficient, biodegradable packaging solutions with direct benefits both for the environment and EU consumers in terms of food quality and safety. This next-generation packaging will be developed using advanced composite structures based on constituents (biopolyesters, fibres, proteins, polyphenolic compounds, bioadhesives and high performance bio-additives) derived from food (oil, dairy, cereal and beer) industry by-products only and by applying innovative processing strategies to enable customisation of the packagings properties to fit the functional, cost, safety and environmental impact requirements of the targeted fresh perishable foods (fruit and vegetable, cheese and ready to eat meal). Demonstration activities with SMEs and industrial partners will enable the EcoBioCAP technology to be optimised in terms stability, safety, environmental impact and cost-effectiveness before full exploitation. The development of a decision support system for use by the whole packaging chain will make the EcoBioCAP technology is accessible to all stakeholders. Extensive outreach activities will not only disseminate the project results to the scientific community but also ensure that consumers and end-users are informed of the usage conditions and benefits of such bio-degradable packaging and how it should be disposed of.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2009-1-4-04 | Award Amount: 2.56M | Year: 2010

Well functioning factor markets are a crucial condition for the competitiveness and growth of agriculture and for rural development. At the same time, the functioning of the factor markets themselves are influenced by changes in agriculture and the rural economy, and in EU policies. Member state regulations and institutions affecting land, labour, and capital markets may cause important heterogeneity in the factor markets, which may have important effects on the functioning of the factor markets and on the interactions between factor markets and EU policies. The general objective of the Factor Markets project is to analyse the functioning of factor markets for agriculture in the EU-27, including the Candidate Countries. The Factor Markets project will compare the different markets, their institutional framework and their impact on agricultural development and structural change, as well as their impact on rural economies, for the Member States, Candidate Countries and the EU as a whole. The Factor Markets project will focus on capital, labour and land markets. The results of this study will contribute to a better understanding of the fundamental economic factors affecting EU agriculture, thus allowing better targeting of policies to improve the competitiveness of the sector.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: ENERGY-2007-3.2-03 | Award Amount: 4.09M | Year: 2008

The transport sector represents a growing share of the total fossil fuel usage in the world. In order to fulfil the commitment to the Kyoto Protocol, the world usage of fossil oil in transport sectors must be reduced. One important approach to achieving this goal is to increase the share of renewable sources such as feedstocks in conversion routes. These biomass conversion routes involve a number of difficulties that should be attended to first by a suitable process configuration to avoid catalyst poisoning in production of syngas. Second, a major problem in the production of syngas-derived fuel from renewable sources is the presence of contaminates in the product gas from biomass gasifiers. These impurities that cause catalytic poisoning should be completely removed prior to the entry in catalytic systems that utilize in upgrading steps. With the evolution of these advanced uses of biomass derived syngas, it becomes necessary to develop progressively more stringent gas cleaning systems. Therefore, the projects key goal is development of a novel gas cleanup in order to reduce impurities from the gasifiers product gas to limits required for upgrading to syngas using as a feedstock in production of vehicle fuels. To accomplish this target that biomass conversion should preserve high energy efficiency in the subsequent synthesis steps and prevent catalytic poisoning, an alternative product route and more efficient gas cleaning systems are required. Nevertheless, biomass conversion processes offer many economical and environmental benefits, but it is clear that conversion technology should be able to compete with other conversion routes, for example via methane. Therefore, this RTD programme combines European expertise in the field of gasification, different proficiencies in cleaning technologies, high ranking catalyst expertise, catalyst company, and two research companies with R&D activities in the fields to expedite the development and commercialization of research outcomes.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SEC-2011.1.4-2 | Award Amount: 4.84M | Year: 2013

Organized crime does an intensive use of non-cooperative vehicles (cars and motorboats mainly) for a variety of criminal activities, as they are transport of illegal immigrants or smuggling of goods (especially drugs). This generates a very large number of operations carried out by law enforcement agencies in order to intercept these vehicles. During the vehicle interception operations, non cooperative vehicles stop is usually carried out using means which are not always effective, and very often dangerous for the safety and security of vehicle occupants and law agents. The law enforcement agencies in charge of this operations acknowledge that new control and interception means and procedures are needed in order to increase their capabilities to track and intercept the suspicious vehicles, minimizing all kind of risks for vehicle occupants and agents, and using the lowest possible volume of highly trained human resources. The present project aims precisely, at increasing the capability of law enforcement authorities to remotely, safely and externally, control and stop non-cooperative vehicles in both land and sea scenarios, by means of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. For this, the UAV has to be equipped with some onboard system(s) providing the capability to intercept (slow and stop) the vehicles, and this is precisely the concept of the AEROCEPTOR system proposed in this project: AEROCEPTOR will be an unmanned aerial vehicle, supported by a Ground Control Station infrastructure, and equipped onboard with a set of several systems to perform the car/boats interception. AEROCEPTOR aims at offering a cost effective solution taking advantage of already existing systems and Components of the Self. This means that AEROCEPTOR will take advantage of the existing equipments and systems to adapt them to the project if possible. In those cases where the necessary subsystems do not exist or do not meet AEROCEPTOR needs, they will be developed.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-07a-2014 | Award Amount: 4.01M | Year: 2015

DIVERSIFOOD will evaluate and enrich the diversity of cultivated plants within diverse agroecosystems so as to increase their performance, resilience, quality and use through a multi-actor approach. By integrating existing experienced networks and using specific and relevant cases across Europe the project will strengthen food culture to improve economic viability of local chains resulting in a greater diversity of produce with a cultural identity. Thanks to the composition of its consortium, DIVERSIFOOD will cover the whole food chain from genetic resources to marketing, connecting and amplifying local existing actions. It will design specific concepts and methodologies for combining in situ experiments to ensure performance and quality. It will evaluate the genetic resources of a dozen underutilized and forgotten plant species for organic and low-input agriculture or marginal/specific conditions, including the association of various underutilized legumes with several cereals, and create new diversity by innovative breeding methods designed for more intra-crop variation. It will help to facilitate cooperation between participatory research networks and professional breeders as well as policy makers in connecting formal and informal seed systems in Europe in relation to international negotiations on Farmers rights with the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture. Key-lessons based on the diverse experiences in the project will be shared to support on-farm seed production networks to guarantee high quality seed. DIVERSIFOOD will demonstrate the socio-economic value of on-farm seed systems, help at local and wider policy levels to increase food and environmental awareness, and improve multi-actor approaches to embed healthy and tasty local products in regional food chains. Demonstration and dissemination will take place at all stages, in collaboration with network organizations for a greater impact.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2012.10.2.1 | Award Amount: 2.56M | Year: 2012

Wave energy has a great potential as renewable source of electricity. Studies have demonstrated that significant percentage of world electricity could be produced by Wave Energy Converters (WECs). However electricity generation from waves still lacks of spreading because the combination of harsh environment and form of energy makes the technical development of cost effective WECs particularly difficult. This Project introduces a new class of Polymeric WECs (PolyWECs), characterized by the employment of Electroactive Elastomer (EE) transducers. The goal is to introduce a radical change in the traditional architecture of WECs that usually includes three basic components: mechanical wave absorbers, a mechanical transmission and a power take-off system. Due to their nature, PolyWECs can be conceived in a way that such three components are integrated into a single deformable lightweight and low-cost polymeric element. EEs have been largely investigated in the form of actuators for robotics and ICT applications. Preliminary studies on energy generation through EEs demonstrated their great potential in terms of cost effectiveness, efficiency and reduced complexity. Due to their intrinsic low mass, flexibility and resilience, as well as their capacitive nature and high voltage operation, EE technology perfectly matches the requirements of WECs. The Project investigates on new concepts and mechanisms for wave energy harvesting that are based on EEs through a multidisciplinary approach that includes competencies on WEC design/tests, fluid dynamics simulation/test, control/mechatronics and material science. The aim of the Project is to develop new knowledge and new technologies aiming at:(1) optimizing EE materials for WEC applications,(2) conceiving new electro-mechanical configurations for PolyWECs,(3) studying the fluid-EE interaction through numerical simulations,(4) performing wave-tank tests of small scale prototypes, (5) providing economic and environmental assessment.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IRSES | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2009-IRSES | Award Amount: 64.80K | Year: 2010

The core of this project can be shortly (and roughly) described as project in Geometric Metric Theory and curvature equations in non-Euclidean structures. It is worthwhile from the very beginning to state clearly that, when we mention non-Euclidean structures, we refer to metric structures that are not Euclidean at any scale. Thus, the model we have in mind are not Riemannian manifolds, but better the so-called sub-Riemannian manifolds and fractals, or even fractals in sub-Riemannian spaces. In the last few years, sub-Riemannian structures have been largely studied in several respects, such as differential geometry, geometric measure theory, subelliptic differential equations, complex variables, optimal control theory, mathematical models in neurosciences, non-holonomic mechanics, robotics. Among all sub-Riemannian structures, a prominent position is taken by the so-called Carnot groups (simply connected Lie groups G with stratified nilpotent algebra), which play versus sub Riemannian spaces the role played by Euclidean spaces (considered as tangent spaces) versus Riemannian manifolds. The notion of dimension is crucial in our approach: the non-Euclidean character of the structures we are interested to study hides in the gap between the topological dimension of a group G and its metric dimension. Isoperimetric inequalities, analysis on fractal sets, quasiconformal and quasiregular maps are a typical manifestations of the metric dimension versus the topological dimension. In addition, dimension phenomena appear in a crucial way when dealing with intrinsic curvature in submanifolds of Carnot groups and in the curvature equations.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2009.2.1.3.1;ENV.2009.1.1.3.1 | Award Amount: 8.93M | Year: 2010

The GHG-Europe project aims to improve our understanding and capacity for predicting the European terrestrial carbon and greenhouse gas (GHG) budget by applying a systematic, comprehensive and integrative approach. GHG-Europe quantifies the annual to decadal variability of the carbon and GHG budgets of terrestrial ecosystems in EU27 plus Switzerland and in six data-rich European regions via data-model integration, diagnostic and predictive modelling. Models are calibrated by multi-site observations. Research includes CO2, CH4 and N2O in forests, croplands, grasslands, shrublands, peatlands and soils. Via an integrated approach, GHG Europe scales up consistently from local to regional and continental scale via scale dependent error propagation and systematic quantification of uncertainties, model validation at different scales and top-down verification by atmospheric inversion models. At regional and European scale lateral C transport by land use, trade and rivers are included. Variability in C and GHG budgets is attributed to natural (climate) and anthropogenic drivers (N deposition, land use, past and present management) by synthesis of past and emerging experiments, targeted observations in hot spots and hot moments and model sensitivity analyses. For this purpose, observations are extended to under-sampled regions and ecosystems with likely high importance for the European C budget: forests and land use change in Eastern Europe and Mediterranen shrublands. The future vulnerability of carbon pools and risks of positive feedbacks in the climate-carbon system are assessed by scenario analyses with biophysical models and by integrating feedbacks with socio-economic changes and EU climate and land use policies. GHG-Europe uses a bidirectional interaction with stakeholders to provide regular and timely scientific advice targeted to the emerging needs of the UNFCCC process and for implementing post-2012 climate commitments in Europe.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CP-ARTEMIS | Phase: SP1-JTI-ARTEMIS-2008-1 | Award Amount: 58.30M | Year: 2009

The embedded safety-critical systems design and development industry is facing increasing complexity and variety of systems and devices, coupled with increasing regulatory constraints while costs, performances and time to market are constantly challenged. This has led to a profusion of enablers (new processes, methods and tools), which are neither integrated nor interoperable because they have been developed more or less independently, addressing only a part of the complexity issue, such as safety. The absence of internationally recognized open standards is a limiting factor in terms of industrial performance when com-panies have to select among these enablers. CESAR will bring significant and conclusive innovations in the two most improvable systems engineering disciplines: - Requirements engineering in particular through formalization of multi viewpoint and multi criteria requirements, - Component based engineering applied to design space exploration comprising multi-view/multi-criteria architecture trade-offs. In addition CESAR intends to provide industrial companies with a breakthrough in system development by deploying a customizable systems engineering Reference Technology Plat-form (RTP) making it possible to integrate or interoperate existing or emerging available technologies. This will be a significant step forward in terms of industrial performance im-provement that will help to establish de-facto standards and contribute to the standardization effort from a European perspective. Relying on industrial use-cases and scenarios, CESAR is strongly industry driven. It will ad-dress societal safety, mobility and environmental demands from a multi-domain point of view, relying on high maturity inputs (TRL 4) and target high maturity outputs (TRL 6). Quantified objectives are defined in the proposal regarding integration aspects (RTP), processes and product- related aspects.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH-2009-5.2.2. | Award Amount: 3.31M | Year: 2010

National museums are authoritative spaces for display and negotiation of community and citizenship. Through collecting and creating repositories of scientific, historic and aesthetic objects choices are made that protect and narrate ideas of virtues, unicity and place in the wider world. Explicitly and implicitly territorial identities are negotiated and related both to ideas in the tradition of universalistic enlightenment and through its selection and narration presenting formative ideas of who belongs to what political and cultural entity, why and with what consequences. This is done by negotiating different claims on what citizenship means, the relationship with competing political projects on sub-national and supra-national levels, and by calling on universalistic values and virtues as basis of claimed unicity and value of community, belonging and pride. EuNaMus explore the creation and power of the heritage of European national museums to the world, Europe and its states as an unsurpassable institution in contemporary society. In order to shape cultural policy for an expanding European Union the understanding of one of its most enduring institutions for creating and contesting political identities is necessary. The focus is on understanding the conditions for using the past in negotiations that recreate citizenship, and on the understanding of layers of territorial belonging beyond the actual nation-state. The research is pursued through multi-disciplinary collaboration between eight leading institutions and a series of work packages studying institutional path dependencies, the handling of conflicts, modes of representation, cultural policy and visitors experiences in national museums. Understanding the cultural force of national museums will provide citizens, professionals and policy makers with reflexive tools to better communicate and create a common understanding of diversity and community in developing cultural underpinning for democratic governance.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-10a-2014 | Award Amount: 8.10M | Year: 2015

European aquaculture production provides direct employment to 80,000 people and a 3-billion annual turnover. Parasites cause severe disease outbreaks and high economic losses in finfish aquaculture. The overarching goal of ParaFishControl is to increase the sustainability and competitiveness of European Aquaculture by improving understanding of fish-parasite interactions and by developing innovative solutions and tools for the prevention, control and mitigation of the major parasites affecting Atlantic salmon, rainbow trout, common carp, European sea bass, gilthead sea bream and turbot. To achieve these objectives, ParaFishControl brings together a multidisciplinary consortium comprising 30 partners possessing world-leading, complementary, cross-cutting expertise and drawn from public and private research organisations, and the aquaculture industry. The consortium has access to excellent research facilities, diverse biological resources including host-parasite models, and state-of-the-art vaccinology, genomic, proteomic and transcriptomic technologies. The project will: 1) generate new scientific knowledge on key fish parasites, including genomics, life-cycle, invasion strategy and host-parasite interaction data, with special emphasis on host immunity, pathogen virulence and immunomodulation, providing a scientific basis for improved prophylaxis; 2) determine the transfer of parasites between farmed and wild host populations; 3) develop a wide range of novel prophylactic measures, including vaccines and functional feeds; 4) provide a range of advanced or alternative treatments for parasitic diseases; 5) develop cost-effective, specific and sensitive diagnostic tools for key parasitic diseases; 6) assess the risk factors involved in the emergence, transmission and pathogenesis of parasitic diseases; 7) map the zoonotic risks due to fish helminths and; 8) provide a catalogue of good husbandry practices to obtain safe and high-quality fish products.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: MG-3.4-2014 | Award Amount: 5.01M | Year: 2015

Cyclists suffer a disproportionate share of serious injuries and fatalities, and indeed in recent years that disadvantage has been growing. At the same time they often are not treated equally by traffic systems (e.g. traffic signals frequently fail to register their approach or presence). XCYCLE has the aim of developing the means to equalise the treatment of cyclists in traffic and thus both encourage cycling and make cycling safer. XCYCLE will develop: technologies aimed at improving active and passive detection of cyclists; systems informing both drivers and cyclists of a hazard at junctions; effective methods of presenting information in vehicles and on-site; cooperation systems aimed at reducing collisions with cyclists. Two relevant use cases would be bicycle interaction with large vehicles and cars at intersections and the provision of an immediate or extended green traffic light for cyclists approaching traffic signals. An in-vehicle detection system and a system of threat mitigation and risk avoidance by traffic signals will be developed. The components developed and built up will be systematically integrated, implemented and verified. A new large-scale research infrastructure in the city of Braunschweig (DE) and a second test mobile platform will be used as test site. A demo bicycle with a cooperative technology will be developed and tested as well. A user-centred approach will be adopted. Behavioural evaluation will part of the whole process: attentional responses using eye tracking data; evaluation of human-machine interface; acceptance and willingness to pay. In the Cost-Benefit Analysis behavioural changes will be translated into estimated crashes and casualties saved per system. The project will contribute to innovative and efficient advanced safety measures to reduce the number of accidents, often of high severity, involving cyclists in interaction with motorised vehicles.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.3.1-01 | Award Amount: 11.66M | Year: 2012

The goal of WATBIO is to use the power of next generation sequencing to develop an accelerated route for producing new germplasm with enhanced drought tolerance whilst maintaining biomass productivity and quality in water scarce, marginal environments unsuitable for food crops. This will be achieved for three non-food crops (Populus, Miscanthus and Arundo), suitable for growth on water scarce, marginal lands, through a 5-year translational research project. Populus and Miscanthus germplasm with increased drought tolerance will be produced within WATBIO whilst for Arundo its genetic diversity will be assessed and breeding tools developed. Twenty-two multidisciplinary partners (14 academics, and 7 SMEs) spanning the whole value chain for crop production will collectively achieve this innovation by 1) identifying key molecular, cellular and physiological traits for the maintenance of biomass production, lignocellulosic quality and water use efficiency in water-scarce environments; 2) linking these traits through modelling to underlying key genes, proteins and metabolite networks; 3) utilising a wide range of germplasm for screening in phenotyping platforms and field measurements at multiple sites to test importance of genotype x environment interactions in determining traits; 4) using sequence based gene expression data, identify 40 genes related to drought tolerance for testing proof of concept using GM approach; and 5) using sequence-based data for genome wide association and genetical genomic approaches, link physiology to traits of high heritability and to underlying genes. WATBIO will transfer knowledge of commercial significance using its industrial partners and stakeholders enabling the deployment of biotechnology to boost European competitiveness, without the necessity of GM. Through workshops, seminars and exchanges, WATBIO will train the next generation of multi-disciplinary professionals in the area of biomass crop production on marginal lands.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2013.1.2-04 | Award Amount: 8.53M | Year: 2014

The DROPSA consortium will create new knowledge and understanding of the damage and losses of fruit crops resulting from pests and pathogens, with a specific focus on the new and emerging threats due to Drosophila suzukii and quarantine pathogens Pseudomonas syringae, Xanthomonas fragariae and X. arboricola. The project will deliver a cost effective approach that can be widely implemented by the EU fruit industry. The aims and objectives are to: Determine the pathways of introduction and spread of D. suzukii and pathogens into the EU and develop preventative strategies and recommendations against the introduction of other dangerous fruit pests and pathogens. Determine the biology, ecology and interaction of these pests and diseases in different regions of Europe. This will involve a comprehensive evaluation of the life cycles, host ranges, capacities to disperse, the identification of natural enemies, plant-pathogen interactions as well as the semiochemicals involved in the behaviour of D. suzukii. The biology will provide the platform to develop practical solutions for sustainable pest control. Develop innovative and effective control options using approved chemicals, semiochemicals, novel antimicrobial compounds and biological control agents as well as cultural practices, sterile insect techniques and new mode of action compounds. The most reliable and effective control options will be combined to optimise an integrated pest management (IPM) strategy. Develop forecasting and decision support systems and risk mapping as a component of IPM. The economic viability of proposed strategies for fruit crop protection will be evaluated and used to support decision making in the implementation of IPM strategies to protect the EU fruit sector. To protect intellectual property (IP) and to undertake dissemination and exploitation actions to maximise the impact and up take of the recommended IPM by commercial fruit growers.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.2.2-01 | Award Amount: 7.65M | Year: 2012

The main objective of the BACCHUS project is to develop tools and resources that will facilitate the generation of robust and exploitable scientific evidence that can be used to support claims of a cause and effect relationship between consumption of bioactive peptides and polyphenols, and beneficial physiological effects related to cardiovascular health in humans. To achieve this, the BACCHUS consortium has assembled 12 leading Research & Technological centres and 16 SMEs (with ca 30% of the EC requested contribution allocated to the SMEs). BACCHUS thus contains SMEs directly involved in developing food products and pursuing health claims, experts in health claims legislation and the EFSA review process, and academic and industry partners who provide high quality food and health research that can underpin health claims. Existing SME-developed products that have clear potential for obtaining favourable opinions for health claims have been selected as test cases for study. These have been aligned with a series of work-packages each of which addresses key aspects of the EFSA health claim evaluation process (legislation and dossiers; product/bioactive characterisation; habitual intakes; bioavailability; mechanisms and biomarkers; clinical trials evidence of health benefit) that will deliver tools, processes and high quality original science. Scientific results and best practice guidelines will be made publically available and thus support future claims for industry. The scope and completeness of the existing bioactive database (eBASIS) that includes both compositional and biological effects data will be extended and developed as a sustainable tool with various training materials. All outcomes will be disseminated broadly by direct engagement with SMEs via an existing European SME association, with stakeholders via seminars, newsletters and press releases, as well as through traditional scientific routes (high quality publications, and conference presentations).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-SICA | Phase: HEALTH-2007-2.2.1-10 | Award Amount: 3.35M | Year: 2009

Mental retardation (MR) is a highly heterogeneous disorder and is of genetic origin in about 50% of the cases. Despite recent progress in research the causes and the pathophysiology of MR remains obscure. It is essential to investigate this in order to develop future diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The overall goal of this proposal is to establish an interdisciplinary Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA) consortium of experts with a joint programme of activities to generate knowledge about MR and the structure and dynamics of the brain as such. This project will be the first to study in depth the prevalence and incidence of MR in EECA . The objectives of the CHERISH project are to: - to develop a standardized approach for MR diagnosis through clinical workshops and courses - to create a large data-base of patients with clinically well defined MR, both syndromic and non-syndromic - identify cryptic genomic rearrangements through molecular cytogenetic analysis - sequence MR genes and analyse the molecular epidemiology of MR in Eastern European populations - develop diagnostic tools for recurrent/common mutations - identify new MR genes in X-linked and autosomal recessive forms of the disorder - increase awareness on the possible genetic origin of MR and implications for novel therapeutic strategies The project partners will join forces to create a large collection of samples and a database from MR patients which will be become the reference. All institutions involved are the referral centres for MR in their respective countries. The molecular studies will be performed in technologically-advanced genetic laboratories. A straightforward outcome of CHERISH will lay the basis for a significant improvement of clinical, educational and industrial developments. The project will contribute to improve the management of MR with the potential to reduce the high health care costs and to improve quality of life of the concerned population.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: KBBE.2013.1.2-06 | Award Amount: 597.34K | Year: 2013

International trade is increasing tremendously in recent years with a lot of import and export material going in and out of the European Union. Within this context there is also the increasing risk of importing unwanted organisms via this trade. Organisms include plant pests and pathogens, some of which may be on the quarantine list of the European Union. Also climate change may increase the ability of plant pests to survive regions other than those of their origin. Within the field of Plant Health a decline in taxonomic and phytosanitary experience has become eminent in the last decade; also relevant phytosanitary collections are under pressure. This will affect all members of the EU and other nations as well. To regulate and control plant pathogens there is an increasing need for efficient and reliable identification and detection tools. For their development and validation, good and well maintained collections containing relevant species are indispensable. A significant number of plant pest collections are still present within Europe but they are dispersed, widespread and of very variable quality. NPPOs, mandated laboratories, universities and research institutes all have their own collections related to their specific work and scope. Many of these collections are connected to a single specialist. Within Europe there is a need to improve the infrastructure supporting phytosanitary important collections so as to more efficiently use the available infrastructure and improve collaboration in the field of phytosanitary infrastructure with regard to means, knowledge, expertise on taxonomy, development of detection methods and collections of phytosanitary important organisms. The main outputs to be disseminated from the project will include an inventory on characteristics of phytosanitary important collections within Europe and guidelines to improve quality standards and access and to design and build sustainable networks of reference collections.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE.2010.2.2-02 | Award Amount: 11.95M | Year: 2011

NU-AGE is a large multidisciplinary consortium (30 partners, from 16 EU countries) involving nutritionists, biogerontologists, immunologists and molecular biologists from the most prestigious institutions in Europe, 5 large food industries, 8 traditional food companies and 1 biotech SME, SPES GEIE and FooDrinkEurope, covering the SME Food Industrial Associations of 13 European countries and the European Confederation the food and drink industry. NU-AGE aims are: 1. to counteract the physical/cognitive decline occurring in the elderly as a consequence of the progressive alteration of different organs/systems (immune and cardiovascular systems, bone, brain, muscle and intestine) by one year elderly-tailored whole diet intervention on 1250 healthy elderly men and women aged 65-79 years (half diet, half control) from 5 different EU regions; 2. to assess the effect of the newly designed food pyramid specific for 65\ EU citizens on the different organs/systems using a large set of biomarkers related to nutrition and ageing, with particular attention to the low grade, chronic, systemic inflammatory status named inflammageing, a major risk factor for common age-related diseases; 3. to perform in a subgroup of 120 subjects in depth studies and high throughput omics to identify cellular/molecular targets/mechanisms responsible for whole diet effect; 4. to perform genetic and epigenetic studies to assess the role of individual variability on the response to diet; 5. to adopt an integrative comprehensive approach (systems biology) to analyze the whole set of data. The results of dietary intervention will be used to develop elderly-tailored prototypes of functional foods and to improve traditional foods. The research activity will be accompanied and followed by a strong activity of dissemination and industrial exploitation to support EU strategies on nutritional recommendations, thus contributing to the implementation of legislation related to nutritional and health claims for elderly in Europe.


The GOETE project will analyse the role of school in re-conceptualising education in terms of lifelong learning by combining a life course and a governance perspective. In European knowledge societies adequacy of education means a balance of individual, social and economic aspects. This is operationalised by exploring how educational institutions conceptualise and organise individual educational trajectories. The study covers the period from transition into lower secondary education to transition into upper secondary education/vocational education and training, i.e. the age group between 10 and 16 years. Comparative analysis will focus on the regulation of access to education, of support measures for coping with education and of securing the relevance of education for social integration and the labour market. In 8 EU countries the mixed-method study involves surveys with students, parents and school principals; comparison of teacher training; case studies of local school spaces; discourse analysis; expert interviews with policy makers and stakeholders. On a scientific level, the comparison of the regulation of educational trajectories involves re-conceptualising the social aspects of learning and education under conditions of late modern knowledge societies. It reflects the need for formal education to be embedded in social life worlds, enabled by social support, and complemented by informal and non-formal learning. On a practice and policy level, it will provide information about alternative means of providing children and young people with access to education; of supporting them in coping with education and ensuring the relevance of education by communication and cooperation between school, labour market, other educational actors, students and parents. The communication of findings will include a dialogic model of educational policy planning at local level, training workshops with teachers, youth workers and policy makers, and a European policy seminar.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SEC-2012.3.4-2 | Award Amount: 4.25M | Year: 2013

The objective of INGRESS is to research, develop and validate innovative technology to take fingerprint images by looking at additional biometrics associated with the finger. The project will pave the way to the manufacturing of innovative fingerprint scanners capable of properly sensing fingerprints of intrinsic very-low quality and/or characterized by superficial skin disorders. The project focuses on capturing sub-surface fingerprint and delivering a high-quality image. The technology stream of the project focuses on medical imaging technique, such as ultrasound and Full Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FFOCT), to acquire the fingerprint matrix in the dermis. Furthermore, INGRESS studies the use of Printed Organic Electronics (POE) technologies and components, such as the passive matrix of Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLED) and Organic Photo Diodes (OPDs) to create a new generation of high resolution fingerprint sensors. We propose to evaluate the INGRESS mock-ups in laboratory to compare them with legacy sensors. Tests in the field will evaluate the technology performance, the usability and user acceptance of the solution. INGRESS exploits both standard approaches and novel metrics to evaluate the operational quality of fingerprint scanners. In parallel of the technology stream, the project will investigate the potential ethical, legal and societal issues for these novel technologies. The R&D process will integrate, all along the project, the results from this investigation, to guarantee that all end-products will be fully compatible/compliant with current trends in European and international privacy and data protection standards, following the internationally-endorsed foundational principles of Privacy by Design. INGRESS will both validate the developed technologies and propose a technology development roadmap for the purpose of using fingerprints from the identity document in border control and law enforcement applications.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2013.1.4-07 | Award Amount: 1.59M | Year: 2013

Sharka, caused by the Plum Pox Virus (PPV), is the most devastating disease affecting stone fruit trees in Europe. In order to respond to this critical situation, the FP7-funded SharCo project (2008-2012) devoted a significant part of its efforts on the development of first-generation PPV resistant plant materials, guidelines for new plantings, and molecular tools for the implementation of marker assisted selection (MAS) in apricot breeding programs. The first steps in establishing MAS were achieved in SharCo but presented some limitations that hampered the EU-wide implementation of a high throughput MAS approach. In this context, the current proposal, MARS (for Marker Assisted Resistance to Sharka), will boost the production of sharka resistant stone fruit cultivars by transferring the efficient and reliable procedures of MAS conceived in SharCo to SMEs. The SharCo molecular tools are continually being upgraded and these improvements will be transferred to SMEs as well; they will enable screening, at the seedling stage, thousands of apricot progenies in which several resistance genes where pyramided and/or sharka resistance was combined with locally adapted, high value varieties. It is expected that the translation of MAS to SMEs fill the need for high throughput selection of PPV resistant apricot cultivars adapted for cultivation all over Europe. Such an approach will contribute significantly to building efficient and durable resistance to sharka disease at the European level.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2008-1-4-01 | Award Amount: 4.14M | Year: 2009

Development of accurate identification tools for plant pathogens and pests is vital to support European Plant Health Policies. For this project Council Directive 2000/29/EC is important, listing some 275 organisms for which protective measures against introduction into and their spread within the Community needs to be taken. Those threats are now greater than ever because of the increases in the volumes, commodity types and origins of trade, the introduction of new crops, the continued expansion of the EU and the impact of climate change. Currently identifying pathogens (in particular new emerging diseases) requires a staff with specialised skills in all disciplines (mycology, bacteriology, etc.); which is only possible within big centralised laboratory facilities. Taxonomy, phytopathology and other fields which are vital for sustaining sound public policy on phytosanitary issues are threatened with extinction. Modern molecular identification/detection techniques may tackle the decline in skills since they often require much less specialist skills to perform, are more amenable for routine purposes and can be used for a whole range of different target organisms. Recently DNA barcoding has arisen as a robust and standardised approach to species identification. QBOL wants now to make DNA barcoding available for plant health diagnostics and to focus on strengthening the link between traditional and molecular taxonomy as a sustainable diagnostic resource. Within QBOL collections harbouring plantpathogenic Q-organisms will be made available. Informative genes from selected species on the EU Directive and EPPO lists will be DNA barcoded from vouchered specimens. The sequences, together with taxonomic features, will be included in a new internet-based database system. A validation procedure on developed protocols and the database will be undertaken across worldwide partners to ensure robustness of procedures for use in a distributed network of laboratories across Europe


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 3.19M | Year: 2011

The NEWGENPAK ITN is an interdisciplinary research training network of 8 European universities, 3 research institutes and 6 enterprises, three of which are Full partners. Its primary aim is to create a European training network designed to improve the career prospects of its 10 ESRs and 2 ERs in both the public and private sector. The network will deliver a joint multidisciplinary research training programme which will encourage and foster the growth of the researchers skills in scientific expertise, technological knowledge and professional aptitude. The key vehicle in this strategy is a supervised personal, original research project in a critical aspect of sustainable packaging. The network has been designed to achieve the following objectives (i) to conduct top-level research and training and devise innovative solutions for specific EU needs in the area of sustainable packaging, (ii) to advance the state-of-the-art in wood cellulose based sustainable packaging in three specific areas (a) next generation packaging composites, (b) cellulose-fibre based active packaging and (c) environmental, economic and societal aspects of packaging production, (iii) to educate the next generation of researchers inside a broad European research training network which includes universities, research centres and industry, thereby accelerating the researchers advancement to team leader status, (iv) to improve the career prospects of ERs and ESRs through complementary training such as; writing and presentation skills; language, effective communication and collaboration; project management and finance; project/product cycles; entrepreneurship; IPR, (v) to create an integrated, long-term sustainable packaging research and training base in the EU by bringing together universities, research institutes and industrial players active in key research disciplines.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: SPA.2009.1.1.01 | Award Amount: 4.08M | Year: 2010

The objective of SubCoast will be to develop a service for monitoring the extent and impact of subsidence in coastal lowlands and demonstrate its capability in various pilots for a variety of settings around Europe. The service will be designed to appropriately determine the effects of subsidence on current and future floodrisk in coastal lowlands, monitor the integrity of coastal barrier systems and infrastructure and assess the impact of subsidence due to natural or man-made causes (groundwater pumping and oil/gas production) on land use and hydrology. SubCoast will be built on the heritage of GMES Service Element Terrafirma and use the full capability of PS-InSAR as a earth observation technology for large scale subsidence mapping. Necessary R&D will be focused on possible augmentation of datasources and the improvement of retrieval algorithms. Subsequent validation efforts will make full use of the Terrafirma Validation Testsite and other current validation initiatives. A distributed data and information system will be set up which facilitates the accessibility and operability of EO-data, in-situ data (including geoscientific data) and model results for the selected areas. SubCoast will orient its services along existing guidelines established in previous GMES-projects, notably Terrafirma, and in line with relevant directives at European Level. End-user involvement will be realised by establishing a user federation which holds the most directly involved regional, national and European stakeholders.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2009.3.1.6.1 | Award Amount: 8.53M | Year: 2009

Coastal areas are vital economic hubs in terms of settlement, industry, agriculture, trade and tourism to mention some key sectors. There are already many coastal problems including erosion, flood risk and long-term habitat deterioration. As economies continue to develop the asset base at risk will grow, while accelerating climate change will increase the likelihood of damaging extreme events, as well as accelerate habitat decline. Existing coastal management and defence approaches are not well tuned to these challenges as they assume a static situation. THESEUS will develop a systematic approach to delivering both a low-risk coast for human use and healthy habitats for evolving coastal zones subject to multiple change factors. The innovative combined mitigation and adaptation technologies to be considered will include ecologically-based mitigation measures (such as restoration and/or creation of habitats), hydro-morphodynamic techniques (such as wave energy converters, sediment reservoirs, multi-purpose structures, overtop resistant dikes), actions to reduce the impact on society and economy (such as promotion of risk awareness or spatial planning) and GIS-based software to support defence planning. To integrate the best of these technical measures in a strategic policy context we will develop overarching THESEUS guidelines which will considers the environmental, social and economic issues raised in any coastal area. It is in this spirit that THESEUS will advance European and international experience in applying innovative technologies to reducing coastal risks. THESEUS activities will be carried out within a multidisciplinary framework using 8 study sites across Europe, with specific attention to the most vulnerable coastal environments such as deltas, estuaries and wetlands, where many large cities and industrial areas are located.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2011.2.3.3-1 | Award Amount: 15.16M | Year: 2011

The capacity of zoonotic RNA viruses to emerge as major agents of human disease can appear limitless. Current intervention strategies have demonstrated limited success. Rapid, innovative and effective solutions are needed to reduce the apparently accelerating process of zoonotic disease emergence. We will study the following zoonotic viruses with epidemic potential in Europe: influenza virus, hepatitis E virus, viruses of the Japanese encephalitis serocomplex and lyssaviruses. These diverse viruses arise from the main reservoirs and vectors of potentially emerging viral diseases and use the three major routes of transmission: respiratory, faecal-oral and vector borne. Inter-disciplinary studies will generate valuable data on patterns of crossing the species barrier, transmission and disease emergence, including ecological and anthropological factors which determine virus availability and opportunities for exposure and infection. We will unravel the complex biological interactions between the virus and the recipient hosts that drive the viral adaptation and elucidate the factors determining the ability of the viruses to spread to and between humans (including pandemic spread). Furthermore, immune mechanisms of protection and novel prevention strategies will be investigated. Data will be compiled in a unique and freely accessible data-sharing platform to build a framework for analysing the drivers of pathogen emergence. Modelling, building on the analysis of key data, will focus on the extent to which pathogen trajectories are predictable and will identify high-risk situations and environments. This will allow improvement of disease surveillance, control, preparedness and intervention. Training in leading European Universities, as well as exchanges of approaches and data sharing with national and international health organizations will strengthen European position in this global challenge.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.1.2 | Award Amount: 4.70M | Year: 2013

Software services are virtualized if they can adapt to the elasticity of cloud computing. To foster the industrial adoption of virtualized services, it is necessary to address two important problems: (1) the efficient analysis, dynamic composition and deployment of services with qualitative and quantitative service levels and (2) the dynamic control of resources such as storage and processing capacities according to the internal policies of the services. ENVISAGE plans to overcome these problems by leveraging service-level agreements (SLA) into software models and resource management into the early phases of service design.\n\nENVISAGE develops a semantic foundation for virtualization and SLA that goes beyond todays cloud technologies. This foundation makes it possible to efficiently develop SLA-aware and scalable services, supported by highly automated analysis tools using formal methods. SLA-aware services are able to control their own resource management and renegotiate SLA across the heterogeneous virtualized computing landscape.\n\nThe main outcome of the ENVISAGE project is a practical open-source framework for model-based development of virtualized services that includes (1) a behavioral specification language for describing resource-aware models; (2) a simulator with visualization facilities; and (3) tool support for automated resource analysis, validation of SLA, code generation, and runtime monitoring of SLA for deployed services.\n\nThe consortium has the complementary expertise required by this challenging research agenda, with leading researchers in formal methods, contract-based specification, service-oriented computing and resource analysis, and with industries in different business domains developing cutting edge ICT technologies based on virtualized services.\n\nThe methodology and tools developed in ENVISAGE will allow services to be delivered in a more effective, efficient, and reliable manner than today, accelerating the development cycle and lowering the operational costs for innovative networked services that make use of cloud computing. This has the potential to significantly improve the competitiveness of SMEs, and profoundly influence business ICT strategies in all sectors.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.5.6 | Award Amount: 3.27M | Year: 2011

The e-POLICY project presents a multi-disciplinary research effort whose goal is to support policy makers in their decision process across the engineering of a policy making life-cycle. The life-cycle integrates, in a unique way, global and individual perspectives on the decision process, bringing to the policy makers attention both global concerns (e.g., impacts, budget constraints and objectives), and individual concerns (i.e. opinions, reactions), giving guidance towards better policy implementation strategies. An innovative game theoretical approach guides the interaction and conflict management between these two levels. In addition, the e-POLICY project proposes the evaluation of the economical, societal and environmental impacts of policy at both the global and individual levels. Societal impacts are derived from data retrieved by e-participation and Web2.0 tools. Both policy maker and citizens are assisted in the decision-making and participation processes through visualization tools. From a technological perspective, leading-edge optimization and decision support techniques contribute to global policy making, while agent-based simulation tools will perform a social simulation at the individual level, with game theory being used to manage conflicts and regulate the interaction between the two levels. Subsidiary, but no less important, techniques will aid the decision-making process by using opinion-mining from e-participation derived data and advanced visualization tools.The project proof of concept will be an open source decision support system where the above components are implemented, integrated and evaluated with a realistic target: that of a real-world regional energy plan. One of the key barriers to the progress of renewable energy projects is recognized as the planning and consenting process. The e-POLICY project goes towards resolving this issue by aiding both processes.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-SICA | Phase: KBBE-2008-2-2-02 | Award Amount: 3.72M | Year: 2009

BaSeFood aims to promote sustainable development and exploitation of Traditional Foods containing emerging bioactive compounds with putative health effects in the Black Sea Region (BSR). The Consortium includes 13 partners covering the BSR, EuroFIR partners with experience on traditional foods and bioactive compounds at the pan-European level, and one representing 11 European Food and Drink Federations. The objectives of BaSeFood are: (1) To investigate the knowledge base of traditional foods of the BSR in order to identify those foods to be collected and analysed. (WP1). (2) To define, characterise and collect nutrient and bioactive data for a subset of about 30 prioritised traditional foods using previously developed and validated EuroFIR guidelines and bioactive databases, with appropriate analyses (WP2). (3) To carry out case human intervention studies (priority: cardiovascular disease protection), supported by intensive in vitro and in vivo laboratory tests, to address the requirement for supporting evidence in nutrition and health claims (WP3). (4) To accurately map and describe the flow charts of BSR traditional foods preparation and processing, and determine bioactive retention at both laboratory and pilot plant scale in close collaboration with industry partners (WP4). (5) To evaluate attitudes of processors and consumers in order to optimise and enhance the whole food chain for improved availability and health benefits of BSR traditional foods (WP5). (6) To widely disseminate results and findings in order to enhance awareness and sustainable development of traditional foods of the BSR for improved health (WP6). The project objectives are entirely congruent with those of the call, and will serve to (a) make a significant contribution to the substantiation of nutrition/health claims for traditional foods (b) enhance the cooperation between researchers and stakeholders, and (c) promote sustainable economic development for European SMEs and the BSR


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2013.3.7.1 | Award Amount: 5.16M | Year: 2013

The main aim of this project is to support the sustainable delivery of non-food biomass feedstock at local, regional and pan European level through developing strategies, and roadmaps that will be informed by a computerized and easy to use toolset (and respective databases) with update harmonized datasets at local, regional, national and pan European level for EU27, western Balkans, Turkey and Ukraine. It will do so by comparing and making use of the most recent relevant information from recent and ongoing EU projects by a set of carefully selected validation case studies and in concise collaboration with key stakeholders from policy, industry and markets.The project fits under the overall umbrella of the Europe 2020 strategy for the building of a bioeconomy, as well as the targets for deployment of renewable energies and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.The project will build up a concise knowledge base both for the sustainable supply and logistics of nonfood biomass (quantities, costs, technological pathway options for 2020 and beyond), for the development of technology and market strategies to support the development of a resource efficient Bioeconomy for Europe. This includes industrial processes (i.e. bio-based industries) for manufacturing biomass-derived goods/products as well as energy conversion, both for large scale and small scale units.The research work will be organized in three individual but strongly interrelated Themes: Theme 1 will focus on methodological approaches, data collection and estimation of sustainable biomass potentials, resource efficient pathways and optimal logistical supply routes as well as will develop the computerized toolset. Theme 2 will make use of the findings of Theme 1 and develop a Vision, Strategies and an R&D roadmap for the sustainable delivery of non-food biomass feedstock at local, regional and pan European level. Theme 3 will validate the findings from Themes 1 and 2 and ensure the project outreach


IRRESISTIBLE In the project IRRISITIBLE partners work together to make young people more aware about Responsible Research and Innovation issues. Universities and science centres will cooperate in the project using the expertise they have in linking formal land informal learning. For a long term effect the project focusses on teacher training. Each partner will form a Community of Learners in which teachers work together with formal education experts and informal education experts. The topics they will work on are derived from cutting edge research taking place at the partners university. Researchers and people from industry will complement the Community of Learners. The Community of Learners will develop material to be used both in the classroom as well as in the science centres. During the first part content knowledge about the research will be introduced using the well established IBSE methodology. In the second part students will discuss and work on Responsible Research and Innovation issues regarding the research they have studied. Each partner will develop one module to be used in the classroom During the module students will be developing exhibits about the RRI issues that they have studied. These exhibits will be presented in the science centres.The best exhibits from each partner will be brought together during the yearly conferences of the project. By using new techniques like digital fabrication (ie. 3D printing) the exchange of exhibits will be easy between partners. In the second round of the project the teachers from the first Community of Learners will work in a new Community with 4 to 5 new teachers. They will help these teachers introduce the developed modules in their own classroom. This way the number of teachers involved grows. After receiving feedback from the first two rounds the 10 modules will be published and disseminated using www.scientix.eu and through workshops at local and (inter)national conferences


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE.2013.2.2-02 | Award Amount: 13.01M | Year: 2013

Emerging evidence indicates that the gut microbiome contributes to our ability to extract energy from the diet and influences development and function of the immune, endocrine and nervous systems, which regulate energy balance and behaviour. This has led to hypothesize that developing microbiome-based dietary interventions can be cost-effective measures to prevent diet-related and behavioural disorders. Yet this approach is restricted in practice by a lack of understanding of the specific species that contribute to these disorders and their interactions with host and lifestyle determinants. To progress beyond the state of the art, the MyNewGut proposal aims to: (1) shed light on the contribution of the human microbiome to nutrient metabolism and energy expenditure; (2) identify microbiome-related features that contribute to or predict obesity and associated disorders in human epidemiological studies; (3) understand how the microbiome is influenced by environmental factors and its role in brain and immune development and function in humans; and (4) provide proof-of-concept of the disease risk-reduction potential of dietary intervention with new foods/ingredients targeting the gut microbiome in humans. To this end, a translational multidisciplinary research strategy will be developed, combining experts in omic-technologies and all other scientific disciplines required. Consequently, the MyNewGut proposal will contribute to developing new approaches to prevent diet-related diseases (metabolic syndrome and obesity) and behavioural disorders through lifestyle changes, intake of pro- and prebiotics and semi-personalised and innovative food products. This will ultimately contribute to increasing the competitiveness of the European food industry and provide consumers with reliable claims on foods. Results will also help inform new strategies on public health, support EU legislation and improve the position of the EU in the field of food-related disease prevention.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.3.5-03 | Award Amount: 7.70M | Year: 2012

Water4Crops provides a combination of technical improvements in the field of bio-treatment and agricultural water use within a transdisciplinary identification of novel agri-business opportunities. Water4Crops aims at: a) developing innovative biotechnological wastewater treatments for improved water recycling, b) initiating the co-creation of alternative combinations of bio-treatment, recycling of high value elements, and combinations for bioproducts leading to a better commercialization of biotechnology and agricultural products in Europe and India, c)improving water use efficiency at field level through agronomics, plant breeding and locally adapted new irrigation technologies and accurate crop water requirement measurements techniques. Water4Crops will boost bio-based economy by applying a double track approach. First a comprehensive set of key Green-Economy technologies for: 1) valorization of volatile fatty acids; 2) obtaining: natural antioxidants (polyphenols), biopolymers (PHAs), energy (biomethane); 3) new substances for selective recovery of valuable products from wastewater; 4) tailoring effluent properties from decentralized innovative bioreactors; 5) low bio-sludge production by SBBG Reactors; 6) removal of organopollutants by nanobiocatalysts; 7) reduced clogging of wetlands; 8) virus monitoring detection assays; 9) suitable precision irrigation systems for reclaimed water; 10) new monitoring for increase crop water productivity; 11) understanding the genetic mechanisms regulating drought-adaptive traits across maize, sorghum, millet and tomato; 12) optimized waste water related combinations of species/genotypes x environment x management. Second, new product market combinations will be identified. The co-creation process will be organized by two Mirror cases (Emilia Romagna area in Italy and Hyderabad region in India) within a specific Science-Practice Interface (INNOVA platforms). Developing the new applications and business opportunities with regional enterprises and stakeholder will move India and Europe towards a Green Economy.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2007.8.6 | Award Amount: 6.89M | Year: 2009

Software systems are central for the infrastructure of modern society. To justify the huge investments such systems need to live for decades. This requires software which is highly adaptable. Software systems must support a high degree of (spatial) variability to accommodate a range of requirements and operating conditions, and temporal evolvability to allow these parameters to change over time. Current approaches to reusability and maintenance are inadequate to cope with the dynamics and longevity of future software applications and infrastructures, e.g. for e-commerce, e-health and e-government. At the same time, we rely increasingly on systems that provide a high degree of trustworthiness. Thus, the major challenge facing software construction in the next decades is high adaptability combined with trustworthiness. A severe limitation of current development practices is the missing rigour of models and property specifications. Without a formal notation of distributed, component-based systems it is impossible to achieve automation for consistency checking, enforcement of security, generation of trustworthy code, etc. Furthermore, it does not suffice to simply extend current formal approaches. We propose to take an empirically successful, yet informal software development paradigm and put it on a formal basis. Specifically, we will turn software product family (SWPF) development into a rigorous approach. The technical core of the project is an Abstract Behavioural Specification language which will allow precise description of SWPF features and components and their instances. The main project outcome is a methodological and tool framework achieving not merely far-reaching automation in maintaining dynamically evolving software, but an unprecedented level of trust while informal processes are replaced with rigorous analyses based on formal semantics. This includes the perspective of designing self-adapting software systems.


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome to John F. Josephson, MD, Orthopedic Surgeon to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. Josephson is an orthopedic surgeon with 36 years of experience in and an extensive expertise in all facets of his work, especially hip and knee replacement, as well as pelvic reconstruction. Dr. Josephson is currently serving patients at the Tulsa Bone & Joint Associates in Tulsa, Oklahoma and is also affiliated with St. Francis Hospital and St John’s Hospital. Dr. Josephson’s career in medicine began in 1975 when he graduated with his Medical Degree from the University of Bologna in Bologna. Prior to his medical degree,  Dr. Josephson earned is Bachelor of Science from Manhattan College in 1969. He went on to undertake his internship at the Hospital for Joint Diseases, followed by his residency at the Catholic Medical Center-Brooklyn. Dr. Josephson is certified by the American Board of Orthopedic Surgery, and keeps up to date with the latest advances in his field through his professional memberships with the Tulsa Orthopedic Society, the Oklahoma State Medical Association, the Mid-Central States Orthopaedic Society, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the American College of Surgeons, the American Medical Association, and the University of Bologna Alumni Association. For his excellence, Dr. Josephson is the recipient of a Patient’s Choice Award for Compassionate Doctor Recognition in 2014-2015. Dr. Josephson attributes his great success to his unwavering dedication to help his patients. He worked hard for everything he achieved and his work ethic was a determining factor in his success, in addition to his eagerness to continue learning. In his free time, Dr. Josephson enjoys hunting, cooking, and spending time with his children and grandchildren. Learn more about Dr. Josephson by reading his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics. Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review. Findatopdoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise. A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life. For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit: http://www.findatopdoc.com


News Article | January 21, 2016
Site: motherboard.vice.com

Matteo Cerri is a hibernation researcher at the University of Bologna, Italy. He is currently consulting for the European Space Agency about ways to make humans hibernate during long space missions. Hibernating mammals are able to actively suppress their metabolism, meaning they can tell their body to use less energy. Hibernation is a marvelous physiological and molecular event, and it’s still a mystery how the behavior is activated and regulated. One of the most curious mysteries about hibernation that I and my fellow hibernation researchers are trying to answer is why hibernating animals are so tired when they wake up. There are several types of hibernation, which can last an entire season or just a part of a day (this is called “torpor”), and can even happen when the ambient temperature is high (which is called “aestivation”). For sure, the brain plays a key role in starting the entire chain of events, but how and which part is still unknown. Among the many unexpected facets of hibernation, one is incredibly surprising. Traditionally, hibernation is commonly seen as a “big sleep,” a way for animals to stave winter off when no food is around. But it’s actually not. Hibernation is a state characterized by the active inhibition of metabolism, and in this state, the activity of the brain differs substantially from sleep and may in fact be closer to wakefulness than many people realize. Hibernators are known to wake up periodically from their “cold sleep,” and most people would think “it’s to eat, of course!” But that is not the case. Hibernators don’t eat during hibernation season (and, for what it’s worth, they also don’t drink or produce any urine). So, why are they waking up? To check out the weather? Electroencephalographic recordings of the brain of hibernators give a surprising answer: They wake up to sleep. And it's not like they shift from hibernating to a nap. These animals wake up and pass out like they're exhausted. Delta brainwave readings, which can be used to measure the deepness or intensity of sleep, show that animals that have just woken up from hibernation are indeed sleeping intensely. This observation has been confirmed both in seasonal hibernators, such as golden-mantled ground squirrels and European ground squirrels, and in animals that perform torpor, such as the Djungarian hamster. Why this is the case is the subject of great debate among hibernation researchers, and it matters because my team and others around the world are working on research that could lead to the possibility of human hibernation. We'd like to know as much about the process as possible. There are two main hypotheses. The first one suggests that sleep is such a deep and necessary process for the brain—that it serves such a vital role that the brain itself has to command the body out of hibernation to recover the sleep it’s lost during hibernation. In fact, the idea that hibernation is more similar to wakefulness than it is to sleep is the subject of a recent study conducted by me and some of my colleagues at the University of Bologna in Italy. This hypothesis has been tested with an interesting experiment. If a scientist disturbed a hibernator of this “recovery sleep” for a few hours after it wakes up, then it stands to reason that after that the animal would make up for this time when it actually does fall asleep (it would sleep for the same total length of time as hibernating animals that weren’t deprived of sleep immediately after they woke up). if that sleep was so important, it would be recovered at the end of the deprivation period. In other words, if the animal had a sleep debt, that debt would have to paid, sooner or later. The second hypothesis takes a different view of the whole process. Brain activity is strongly affected by hibernation, and the brain itself goes through some intense changes during hibernation. For instance, during hibernation, there is a process of disconnection of neurons. Many synapses are in fact re­absorbed by the brain in what is very similar to a transitory state of Alzheimer’s disease. This disconnection is quickly reversed after an animal wakes up, rewiring the brain in the same way it was before, which brings back all the information that was stored in the neurons. During the re­connection process, which happens in the first few hours after an animal comes out of hibernation, the brain is in a highly plastic state. Therefore, it’s thought that the EEG activity that we see during these stages is not real “sleep,” but just a nonspecific pattern of neuronal reactivation. If this is the case, in the experiment described before, we should not see any recovery sleep after the sleep deprivation, which would suggest there’s not sleep debt in first place. In other words, hibernation wouldn’t actually be making the animals tired, they would simply sleep to reform these neural connections. The experiment I’ve suggested has actually been performed, more than once. But the results are conflicting. A team at the University of Zürich, Switzerland, found evidence of sleep debt in hibernating animals. They even went as far as testing different durations of sleep deprivation, and showed that, during torpor, sleep debt accumulates 2.75 times slower than during wakefulness. A separate experiment by a team at Berkeley and Stanford reported that no rebound was observed after sleep deprivation, and so did teams from the University of Alaska and the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. How can we explain the conflicting results? They looked at different animals. The Zurich group looked at the Djungarian hamster, while the Berkeley group looked at the ground squirrel. The main difference between the two species is that hamsters undergo daily torpor (hibernation that lasts less than 24 hours), while ground squirrels are seasonal hibernators. So, the answer to our initial question is that we still don’t know why animals fall asleep immediately after they wake up from hibernating. No more experiments on the topic have been conducted since the ones I described. But, my own work at the University of Bologna in Italy has supported the idea that brain activity during torpor or hibernation is more similar to wakefulness than it is to sleep. In this experiment, a torpor-­like state was induced for the first time in a rat, a non-­hibernator (our goal is to eventually open the way to human hibernation in the not-so-near future). Brain activity recordings in this kind of suspended animation state did indeed resemble activity during wakefulness, but the activity became slower and slower as body temperature decreased, as if the frames of a movie were being projected slower and slower as the movie progressed. No one knows what it’s like to be in a state of hibernation, and we don’t know if hibernators are still somewhat conscious. Perhaps if we can teach ourselves to hibernate, we’ll learn the answer. In the meantime, I’m hoping that research on this topic will flourish again. You’ll Sleep When You’re Dead is Motherboard’s exploration of the future of sleep. Read more stories.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SST.2008.1.1.3. | Award Amount: 2.59M | Year: 2009

Noise Reducing Devices (barriers, claddings, covers and added devices following EN14388) play an important role in noise reduction: optimizing their global performance is of major concern towards Sustainable Surface Transport. QUIESST will merge, for the very first time and within a true holistic approach, true intrinsic products characteristics, whatever their materials and shapes, together with their extrinsic ones, in order to assess their actual global capacities to reduce the amount of people exposed to noise (END target). It will address 5 main topics: NEAR / FAR FIELD RELATIONSHIP: linking the intrinsic characteristics to the corresponding extrinsic far field effect; IN-SITU MEASUREMENT METHODS: developing methods relevant of the actual intended use, allowing long term performances control; COMPARING NRDs PERFORMANCES with different test methods: building a database comparing both existing and new tests results and providing the relevant relationship; OPTIMIZING NRDs GLOBAL PERFORMANCE through a HOLISTIC APPROACH: considering acoustic, non acoustic and global impact optimization, multicriteria optimization strategies, and possible global performance indicators; SUSTAINABILITY: defining the relevant generic criteria and developing the first existing NRDs overall sustainability assessment method. The final verifiable result will be the ACTUAL USE of the Guidebook to NRD optimisation as a reference tool for noise mitigation. QUIESST addresses the call as it concerns surface transport noise abatement (road AND rail), considers cost benefit analysis and addresses the END objectives, covers true holistic noise abatement solutions through wave propagation and systems for passive compensation. Its team, made of 14 partners from 9 countries integrates the relevant stakeholders: Infrastructures, Industry, Universities, Research Institutes and SME. It addresses important environmental and economic concerns and will contribute to promote EU NRDs industry.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2007-3.1-3 | Award Amount: 19.08M | Year: 2008

iNTeg-Risk is a large-scale integrating project aimed at improving the management of emerging risks in the innovative industry. This will be achieved by building a new risk management paradigm for emerging risks, which is a set of principles supported by a common language, commonly agreed tools & methods and Key Performance Indicators integrated into a single framework. As main impact, it will reduce time-to-market for the lead market EU technologies and promote safety, security, environmental friendliness and social responsibility as a trade-mark of the advanced EU technologies. The project will improve early recognition and monitoring of emerging risks, seek to reduce accidents caused by them (estimated 75 B/year EU27) and decrease reaction times if major accidents involving emerging risks happen. iNTeg-risk will reach its goals by promoting a EU-wide cross-sectorial life-cycle-based integration across all major disciplines, methods and tools as well as through integration of all relevant stakeholders. The project will be initiated from an empirical basis of 17 individual emerging risk issues (Emerging Risk Representative industrial Applications), and generalize their solutions addressing new technologies, products/materials, production and policies. The solutions will be validated in a second application cycle, and the overall solution made available to stakeholders in the form of the iNTeg-Risk platform: a one-stop shop for EU solutions addressing emerging risks. It will feature issues of early recognition and monitoring of emerging risks, communication, governance, pre-standardization, education & training, dissemination, as well as new tools such as Safetypedia, Atlas of Emerging Risks, Reference Library... The project has a solid industry leadership and involves the leading EU R&D institutions. It is coordinated by the European Virtual Institute for Integrated Risk Management, the EEIG guaranteeing the sustainability of the results after the project.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC5-04-2015 | Award Amount: 5.85M | Year: 2016

The iSCAPE project aims to integrate and advance the control of air quality and carbon emissions in European cities in the context of climate change through the development of sustainable and passive air pollution remediation strategies, policy interventions and behavioural change initiatives. It will tackle the problem of reducing air pollution at target receptors with an innovative SME-led approach, focusing on the use of Passive Control Systems in urban spaces. Improvements in air quality, microclimate and behavioural aspects of urban dwellers will be achieved by applying real-world physical interventions on the urban tissue to alter ventilation rates and dispersion patterns in the selected cities assessed for future climate change scenarios and representative of different cultural&life styles in Europe. Through the approach of Living Labs the team will deploy a network of air quality and meteorological sensors (both stationary and mobile) and evaluate through analysis and a suite of up-to-date numerical modelling the benefits expected from the interventions on a neighbourhood and city-wide scale for several aspects ranging from quantification of pollutant concentration to exposure. iSCAPE encapsulates the concept of smart cities by promoting the use of low-cost sensors, engaging citizens in the use of alternative solution processes to environmental problems. iSCAPE will support sustainable urban development by promoting the sharing of results with policy-makers and planners using local test-cases, and providing scientific evidence ready-to-use solutions potentially leading to real-time operational interventions. This integrated approach will include the development and assessment of a framework aimed at changing the mobility behaviour of people by studying processes and dynamics that lead to more resilient, healthy, and sustainable cities, by bringing together theory from urban planning, public policy, urban and environmental sociology and urban geography.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: KBBE.2013.2.3-02 | Award Amount: 4.41M | Year: 2013

In the European Union, Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) of the food sector are increasingly under pressure due to developing open markets, increasing demand of standardized and price competitive food products by the consumers, rising importance of large retailers and challenges in obeying governmental regulations. This raises the risk of losing many traditional foods as well as traditional processing techniques which are applied by SMEs using regional raw materials and often have a role in the cultural identity of regions. In urban centers in Europe, groups of consumers are increasingly demanding traditional, local and/or organic food productions as food poisoning cases and the dispute on GMO undermined public confidence on industrial food producing systems. To reach these markets, SMEs of traditional foods must extend their skills in modern as well as competitive marketing and production techniques to comply with existing European regulations and to promote the aspects of their products related to nutrition and health. To support these traditional SMEs, a knowledge transfer network shall be established with the focus on different food product sectors: Grains, fishes, fruits, vegetables and mushrooms. These food sectors are traditional, healthy foodstuffs which are essential for a balanced nutrition. To support traditional SMEs in these food sectors, a European network will interlink researchers, knowledge transfer organizations and associations of SMEs on European, national and region levels. The network will act as a mediator of information about innovations in production and marketing of traditional food, will foster entrepreneurship in the sector of traditional food producers and researchers as well as will develop strategic research and innovation agendas for the traditional food sectors to be competitive on future markets.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.2.2-01 | Award Amount: 7.92M | Year: 2013

Scientific understanding of the role and mechanisms of bioactives is fragmented. Research often addresses the theoretical possibility of health improvement effects rather than their real, practical use for everyday diets. Bioactives cannot be considered as discrete chemical compounds and research must focus on bioactive-enriched foods (BEF), if consumer demands for foods delivering appropriate health and wellbeing benefits are to be fulfilled. PATHWAY, a pan-European interdisciplinary team of 16 life/social scientists and 10 high tech/ food processing SMEs, uniquely addresses the role and mechanisms of action of 3 bioactives (docosahexaenoic acid, -glucan, anthocyanins, chosen for known/claimed effectiveness in reducing some risk factors of Metabolic Syndrome (MS), enriching 3 different widely-consumed food matrices (dairy-, bakery-, egg products). Critical evaluation of bioactive-food matrix interactions and determining the extent of synergies between the 3 bioactives are key elements of PATHWAY. PATHWAY will determine the impact of BEF on physiologically-relevant MS (a risk factor for many diseases) endpoints and deliver a better understanding of the role and mechanisms of action of the 3 bioactives and BEF. Parallel in vitro/in vivo studies will enable selection of robust biomarkers by advanced omics techniques. Deliverables will include BEF and generic protocols, best practices and guidelines for planning dietary interventions, and guidance to SMEs for producing health-promoting BEF and for submitting convincing health claim dossiers to EFSA; the latter will be greatly facilitated by one SME partner who has submitted 3 successful dossiers. PATHWAY guidelines will be generic and will apply to a wide range of bioactives and BEF. Impact will be optimised across Europe by targeted dissemination to industry (especially SME), consumer and S&T stakeholders. Young people will be trained in a stimulating interdisciplinary, trans-sectoral environment.


Chronic aortic aneurysms are permanent and localized dilations of the aorta that remain asymptomatic for long periods of time but continue to increase in diameter before they eventually rupture. Left untreated, the patients prognosis is dismal, since the internal bleeding of the rupture brings about sudden death. Although successful treatment cures the disease, the risky procedures can result in paraplegia from spinal cord ischaemia or even death, particularly for aneurysms extending from the thoracic to the abdominal aorta and thus involving many segmental arteries to the spinal cord, i.e. thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms of Crawford type II. Although various strategies have achieved a remarkable decrease in the incidence of paraplegia, it is still no less than 10 to 20%. However, it has been found that the deliberate occlusion of the segmental arteries to the paraspinous collateral network finally supplying the spinal cord does not increase rates of permanent paraplegia. A therapeutic option, minimally invasive segmental artery coil embolization has been devised which proceeds in a staged way to occlude groups of arteries under highly controlled conditions after which time must be allowed for arteriogenesis to build a robust collateral blood supply. PAPA-ARTiS is a phase II trial to demonstrate that a staged treatment approach can reduce paraplegia and mortality dramatically. It can be expected to have both a dramatic impact on the individual patients quality of life if saved from a wheelchair, and also upon financial systems through savings in; 1) lower costs in EU health care; 2) lower pay-outs in disability insurance (est. at 500k in Year 1), and; 3) loss of economic output from unemployment. Approx. 2500 patients a year in Europe undergo these high risk operations with a cumulative paraplegia rate of over 15%; therefore >100M per year in costs can be avoided and significantly more considering the expected elimination of type II endoleaks.


News Article | October 27, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Washington, DC -- Men can take birth control shots to prevent pregnancy in their female partners, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Researchers are still working to perfect the combination of hormonal contraceptives to reduce the risk of mild to moderate side effects, including depression and other mood disorders. While women can choose from a number of birth control methods, men have few options to control their own fertility. Available methods for men include condoms, vasectomies and withdrawal. Better birth control options are needed for men. In 2012, 40 percent of all pregnancies worldwide were unintended, according to the Guttmacher Institute. "The study found it is possible to have a hormonal contraceptive for men that reduces the risk of unplanned pregnancies in the partners of men who use it," said one of the study's authors, Mario Philip Reyes Festin, MD, of the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland. "Our findings confirmed the efficacy of this contraceptive method previously seen in small studies." The prospective Phase II single arm, multi-center study tested the safety and effectiveness of injectable contraceptives in 320 healthy men ages 18 to 45. The participants had all been in monogamous relationships with female partners between the ages of 18 and 38 for at least a year. The men underwent testing to ensure they had a normal sperm count at the start of the study. The men received injections of 200 milligrams of a long-acting progestogen called norethisterone enanthate (NET-EN) and 1,000 milligrams of a long-acting androgen called testosterone undecanoate (TU) for up to 26 weeks to suppress their sperm counts. Healthcare professionals gave the men two injections every eight weeks. Participants initially provided semen samples after eight and 12 weeks in the suppression phase and then every 2 weeks until they met the criteria for the next phase. During this time, the couples were instructed to use other non-hormonal birth control methods. Once a participant's sperm count was lowered to less than 1 million/ml in two consecutive tests, the couple was asked to rely on the injections for birth control. During this period known as the efficacy phase of the study, the men continued to receive injections every eight weeks for up to 56 weeks. Participants provided semen samples every eight weeks to ensure their sperm counts stayed low. Once the participants stopped receiving the injections, they were monitored to see how quickly their sperm counts recovered. The hormones were effective in reducing the sperm count to 1 million/ml or less within 24 weeks in 274 of the participants. The contraceptive method was effective in nearly 96 percent of continuing users. Only four pregnancies occurred among the men's partners during the efficacy phase of the study. Researchers stopped enrolling new participants in the study in 2011 due to the rate of adverse events, particularly depression and other mood disorders, reported by the participants. The men reported side effects including injection site pain, muscle pain, increased libido and acne. Twenty men dropped out of the study due to side effects. Despite the adverse effects, more than 75 percent of participants reported being willing to use this method of contraception at the conclusion of the trial. Of the 1,491 reported adverse events, nearly 39 percent were found to be unrelated to the contraceptive injections. These included one death by suicide which was assessed not to be related to the use of the drug. Serious adverse events that were assessed as probably or possibly related to the study included one case of depression, one intentional overdose of acetaminophen, and a man who experienced an abnormally fast and irregular heartbeat after he stopped receiving the injections. "More research is needed to advance this concept to the point that it can be made widely available to men as a method of contraception," Festin said. "Although the injections were effective in reducing the rate of pregnancy, the combination of hormones needs to be studied more to consider a good balance between efficacy and safety." The study, "Efficacy and Safety of an Injectable Combination Hormonal Contraceptive for Men," will be published online at http://press. , ahead of print. Other authors of the study include: Hermann M. Behre of Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg in Halle, Germany; Michael Zitzmann of the University of Münster in Münster, Germany; Richard A. Anderson of The University of Edinburgh in Edinburgh, United Kingdom; David J. Handelsman of the University of Sydney and Concord Hospital in Sydney, Australia; Silvia W. Lestari of the University of Indonesia in Jakarta, Indonesia; Robert I. McLachlan of Monash Medical Centre in Melbourne, Australia; M. Cristina Meriggiola of the University of Bologna in Bologna, Italy; Man Mohan Misro of the National Institute of Health & Family Welfare in New Dehli, India; Gabriela Noe of the Instituto Chileno de Medicina Reproductiva in Santiago, Chile; Frederick C. W. Wu of Manchester Royal Infirmary in Manchester, U.K.; Ndema A. Habib and Kirsten M. Vogelsong of the World Health Organization of Geneva, Switzerland; and Marianne M. Callahan, Kim A. Linton and Doug S. Colvard of CONRAD, East Virginia Medical School, a reproductive health organization based in Arlington, VA. The research was co-sponsored and funded by UNDP/UNFPA/UNICEF/WHO/World Bank Special Program of Research, Development, and Research Training in Human Reproduction in Geneva, Switzerland, and CONRAD (using funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the U.S. Agency for International Development). The injectable hormones were provided by Schering AG, which has since merged with Bayer Pharma AG. For more information on men's health, visit the Endocrine Society's centennial website. Endocrinologists are at the core of solving the most pressing health problems of our time, from diabetes and obesity to infertility, bone health, and hormone-related cancers. The Endocrine Society is the world's oldest and largest organization of scientists devoted to hormone research and physicians who care for people with hormone-related conditions. The Society, which is celebrating its centennial in 2016, has more than 18,000 members, including scientists, physicians, educators, nurses and students in 122 countries. To learn more about the Society and the field of endocrinology, visit our site at http://www. . Follow us on Twitter at @TheEndoSociety and @EndoMedia.


Muratori L.,University of Bologna | Longhi M.S.,King's College London
Journal of Autoimmunity | Year: 2013

Autoimmune hepatitis is an immuno-mediated inflammatory liver disorder of unknown etiology and is characterized by hypergammaglobulinaemia, circulating autoantibodies and interface hepatitis. The disease may often present as an acute icteric hepatitis, or run an insidious and progressive course, and in most of the cases it is expected to evolve towardliver cirrhosis and end-stage liver failure, without prompt and appropriate treatment with steroids and other immunosuppressive drugs. Nonetheless, several patients are non-responsive or become non-tolerant to conventional therapy with prednisone/prednisolone with or without azathioprine. Recent findings highlight the role of the interplay between CD4. +. CD25+ regulatory T cells and Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis. A numerical and functional imbalance between regulatory and effector cells in favor of the latter appears to be pivotal in the progression of the disease. In addition, the intra-hepatic microenvironment of autoimmune hepatitis is particularly rich in pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, IL-17, IL-23, IL-1β which play a crucial role in perpetuating and expanding effector cells and subsequent liver damage, whereas regulatory T cells are greatly disadvantaged and inhibited in such polarized habitat. Novel therapeutic interventions should aim at modulating the intra-hepatic pro-inflammatory milieu while favoring the expansion of regulatory T cells. Liver autoantigen-specific regulatory T cells generated and expanded invitro from patients' own cells might offer a potentially curative approach to autoimmune hepatitis by inhibiting effector cells of the same specificity without inducing pan-immunosuppression. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Cavaglia A.,University of Turin | Fioravanti D.,University of Bologna | Gromov N.,King's College London | Tateo R.,University of Turin
Physical Review Letters | Year: 2014

Recently, it was shown that the spectrum of anomalous dimensions and other important observables in planar N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory are encoded into a simple nonlinear Riemann-Hilbert problem: the Pμ system or quantum spectral curve. In this Letter, we extend this formulation to the N=6 supersymmetric Chern-Simons theory introduced by Aharony, Bergman, Jafferis, and Maldacena. This may be an important step towards the exact determination of the interpolating function h(λ) characterizing the integrability of this model. We also discuss a surprising relation between the quantum spectral curves for the N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory and the N=6 supersymmetric Chern-Simons theory considered here. © 2014 American Physical Society.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2007.2.2.1.4. | Award Amount: 8.58M | Year: 2008

MEECE is a scientific research project which aims to use a combination of data synthesis, numerical simulation and targeted experimentation to further our knowledge of how marine ecosystems will respond to combinations of multiple climate change and anthropogenic drivers. With an emphasis on the European Marine Strategy (EMS), MEECE will improve the decision support tools to provide a structured link between management questions and the knowledge base that can help to address those questions. A strong knowledge transfer element will provide an effective means of communication between end-users and scientists.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: YOUNG-5a-2014 | Award Amount: 2.58M | Year: 2015

Existing research suggests that political participation and European orientation of young people depend on how they experience influence and involvement at local level. This reflects that individuals need the experience of self-efficacy to engage in wider communities. Research also reveals that only few young people engage in formalised participation (parties, trade unions, or youth councils) as these are not flexible enough for individualised concerns, biographies and life styles and they reflect patterns of social inequality. The project Spaces and Styles of Participation (PARTISPACE) starts from the assumption that all young people do participate while not all participation is recognised as such. The study asks for the different ways in which young people participate in decisions which concern them and, in general, the life of their communities. How do 15- and 30-year-olds engage with the public in formal, non-formal and informal settings and how is this supported or inhibited by local youth policies and youth work? The countries involved Bulgaria, France, Germany, Italy, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey and the UK secure contrasting contexts of young peoples growing up as well as differing orientations towards Europe. The design of PARTISPACE includes: National research literature reviews and policy analysis; Analysis of European Social Survey data on young peoples participatory orientations; Local case studies in one major city per country including expert interviews, focus groups discussions, city walks and biographical interviews with young people, ethnographic case studies of formal, non-formal, and informal participatory spaces. Activating and supporting participatory action research by young people themselves. The analysis relates local constellations with national and European patterns and discourses of youth participation. Findings are constantly discussed with representatives of the youth sector at local and European level.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.8.1 | Award Amount: 3.54M | Year: 2013

Current ICT technology provides new capabilities to measure the functional activity of the brain and to compute in real-time stimuli that can be applied to the brain itself in order to train and modify its activity. This new frontier of research is made possible by a dramatic increase in cheap computing power, novel design methodologies for high-performance software, integrated circuits and systems for sensors and actuators, and algorithms and software environments for collaborative interaction of people cooperating on solving a specific problem. This project will explore the consequences of exploiting these novel technologies in a deliberate attempt to improve a higher-order task such as creativity.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.2.1 | Award Amount: 4.27M | Year: 2010

TRIDENT proposes a new methodology for multipurpose underwater intervention tasks with diverse potential applications like underwater archaeology, oceanography and offshore industries, going beyond present-day methods typically based on manned and / or purpose built systems.A team of two cooperative heterogeneous robots with complementary skills, an Autonomous Surface Craft (ASC) and an Intervention Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (I-AUV) endowed with a dexterous manipulator, will be used to perform underwater manipulation tasks.The proposed methodology is based on two steps.During the first step, the I-AUV is deployed from the ASC to perform a cooperative path following survey, where it gathers optical/acoustic data from the seafloor whilst the ASC provides geo-referenced navigation data as well as communication with the end user. During this phase of the mission the I-AUV will be doing accurate path following and terrain tracking, to maximize bottom coverage and data quality. The motion of the ASC will be coordinated with that of the I-AUV to achieve precise USBL (Ultra Short Base Line) positioning and reliable acoustic communications. After the survey, the I-AUV docks with the ASC and sends the data back to a ground station where a map is set up and a target object is identified by the end user.At the second step, the ASC navigates towards a waypoint near the intervention area where the I-AUV is launched to search for the object. When the object (i.e. the target of the intervention) has been found, the I-AUV switches to free floating navigation mode. The manipulation of the object takes place through a dexterous hand attached to a redundant robot arm and assisted with proper perception. Particular emphasis will be put on the research of the vehicles intelligent control architecture to provide the embedded knowledge representation framework and the high-level reasoning agents required to enable a high degree of autonomy and on-board decision making of the platform. The new methodology will allow the user to specify an intervention task, among a set of predefined ones, to be undertaken with regards to a particular target object selected by the end user by means of the map previously built. Hence the intervention task is seen as a semi-automatic process where the target is manually selected but then it is automatically recognized and manipulated by the robot in a complete autonomous way. The TRIDENT project brings together research skills specific to marine environments in navigation and mapping for underwater robotics, multi-sensory perception and a range of control techniques relating to intelligent control architectures, vehicle-manipulator systems and dexterous manipulation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: GC.SST.2013-2. | Award Amount: 3.76M | Year: 2013

SyrNemo is an innovative synchronous reluctance machine (SYRM) with higher power density and higher driving cycle efficiency at lower cost than state of the art permanent magnet (PM) synchronous machines. The mass and volume specific power densities are increased by approximately 5%. This is achieved through an innovative magnetic reluctance rotor design with optional ferrites. Bar windings are used to reduce the required winding space. An integrated liquid cooling circuit is used to cool both the power electronics and the motor to further reduce total mass and volume. The dependency on rare earth PMs is eliminated by using either no permanent magnets or optional ferrites. The proposed rotor design allows for use of future magnet materials with high energy density once they are available on the market. The proposed SYRM is easy to manufacture, dismantle, and recycle. This way manufacturing cost can be reduced by 20% and more compared to PM synchronous machines (PMSMs). Eco-design throughout the projects duration will ensure minimum environmental and social impact and hidden cost. Due to the simple rotor design the machine is very robust. The insulation system will be designed for a total lifetime of 10 years and 10,000 operating hours to reduce cost. The proposed SYRM has a high efficiency over a wide range of speed and torque. Therefore, the overall driving cycle efficiency of SYRM can be improved by 515% compared to PMSMs. The control of the drive will be implemented to achieve the maximum possible efficiency in each operating point incorporating the stator winding temperature. The successful industrialization of a synchronous reluctance machine has recently been demonstrated for industrial applications. The proposed synchronous reluctance machine is thus the most promising candidate for being the next generation electric motor of full electric vehicles.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP.2011.1.4-4 | Award Amount: 5.09M | Year: 2012

The vision of iONE-FP7 is to exploit for the first time flexible organic electronics for the development and testing of Active Multifunctional Implantable Devices (AMIDs) to treat Spinal Cord Injury (SCI). The devices will (a) have long-term stability associated to high biocompatibility and safety, (b) have reduced risk of a host versus graft immune response, (c) mimic the local microenvironment for stem/precursor cell recruitment and differentiation, (d) monitor locally the functionality of the regenerated nerve cells to intervene with loco-regional therapies (e) perform local stimulation with tunable electric fields, (f) deliver locally growth factors, neurotransmitters, and drugs. The use of flexible organic electronics devices (ultra-thin film organic field effect transistor (FET), organic electro-chemical transistor, nanoparticle organic memory FET) will advance the state-of-the-art of implantable devices for SCI from passive to active layouts that will promote nerve regeneration by a combination of local stimuli delivered on demand, will sense inflammation, and will control the immune-inflammatory response. The biomedical impact of the project will be demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, the neural therapeutic plasticity induced by the iONE-FP7 device will be evaluated on stem cells, which will be differentiated to neural progenitor cells, and then to neural cells. In vivo, the study of neural plasticity will be transferred to endogeneous stem cells by implanting the iONE-FP7 device into a contusion SCI animal model. iONE-FP7 will acquire the knowledge and the technology required to regenerate the nerve in the niche of the injury.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 3.66M | Year: 2014

The scientific objective of the project is to develop new and highly sophisticated instruments of metric analysis with applications to the large spectrum of emergent technological fields from human to computer vision, to traffic dynamics. New European Doctoral Programme will be devoted to the training of young researchers on this new frontier of mathematics and its applications. Metric analysis, allows to reconsider differential problems, in rich geometrical setting, non isotropic or non regular. Totally non isotropic geometrical settings, arise while describing the motion of a system in which some directions are not allowed by a constraint, as models of the visual cortex, robotics, and will be studied with instruments of differential subriemannian analysis. They non regular counter part, as rectifiable objects can be studied with instruments of metric measure, mass transportation, and singular integrals. Long standing open problems in mathematics, which cannot be solved a single instrument of differential, metric or of measure theory, will be afforded with this unitary theory. At the same time these results will open the possibility of affording challenging technological problems. Geometric analysis in Lie groups provides an elegant tool for modelling the modular structure of the visual cortex. New Brain-inspired models of computer vision allow to efficiently handle medical images and MRI data. A mathematical theory can model with the same instruments transport of the visual signal and in a road net. Hence we propose a new training through research programme within a consrtium of 9 Academic partners and 3 private. The aspects of the program are Individual Research program with structured courses Network-wide multidisciplinary training events with private sector participation, Secondments through other research centres or private companies, The training program can open a large spectrum of opportunities of career development, in academic and private world


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.53M | Year: 2015

The continuous increase of the share of renewable energy sources is redefining the electrical networks. In future infrastructures, an important number of agents (sources, storage devices and consumers) will have intelligent interfaces allowing the regulation of the injection and extraction of power into the grid. This context will create multiple alternatives to increase the efficiency in electricity generation and consumption, to reduce energy costs and to provide a more reliable operation of electrical grids. These future networks will be only possible with suitable control algorithms. INCITE is a multi-sectoral consortium gathering experts on control and power systems, from academia and industry with the purpose of providing innovative control solutions for the future electrical networks.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2011.2.4-01 | Award Amount: 3.76M | Year: 2012

Food business operators must make daily decisions about food safety and quality, often based on limited scientific data, or full knowledge of the consequences of deviations for the consumer, due to the limited capacity to carry out analyses and risk assessments. This project will develop the necessary tools based on scientific evidence and predictive and probabilistic models to enable food operators estimate the quality and safety level in their products (ready-to-eat foods) if alternative ingredients, process and storage conditions are applied. Pathogens to be studied include:Listeria. monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enterica, Bacillus cereus, Verotoxinproducing E.coli (VTEC) and Clostridium spp, as well as Staphylococcus toxins. High pressure treatment, dielectric heating, biopreservation and packing technologies will be investigated. Food quality factors will also be assessed. The project focuses in particular on vulnerable consumers where increased quality and safety levels are needed, e.g. patients at nursing homes, hospitals, old and sick people living at home. The project will run for three years and involves eight participants, of which five are SMEs. Producers of convenience and RTE products will be actively involved in the project as well as experts in food microbiology, food chemistry, food process technology, information technology and modelling, laboratory analytical methods, cost-benefit analysis and risk assessment. The decision making tool to be developed will enable the SME operator to quantify and manage spoilage and pathogen risks in a way which is not currently possible. A cost-benefit module will be included in the tool, allowing the food providers to compare quality, safety and costs of their actions, or any abuse conditions along the food supply chain. A prototype of the tool will be tested and validated during the project.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.3.1 | Award Amount: 6.11M | Year: 2010

STEEPER addresses the development of Beyond CMOS energy-efficient steep subthreshold slope transistors based on quantum mechanical band-to-band tunnelling (tunnel FETs), with the aim of reducing the operation voltage of nanoelectronic circuits to sub-0.5V, and their power consumption by one order of magnitude.\nSTEEPER focuses on two technology tracks, united by same device principle, shared performance boosters, and compatibility with silicon CMOS. These are (i) Ultra-Thin-Body Silicon-On-Insulator technology for planar, tri-gate and nanowire tunnel FETs featuring ultra-low standby power and smartly exploiting additive boosters: high-k dielectrics, SiGe source, strain, and improved electrostatic design, and (ii) a III-V nanowire platform on silicon, as unique material to control staggered or broken bandgap boosters and devise a high performance (high-Ion, steep slope) implementation of tunnel FETs. Platform (i) will enable a hybrid platform combining high performance (HP) CMOS and low standby power (LSTP), low voltage tunnel FETs, supporting energy efficient hybrid CMOS/Tunnel-FET digital and analog/RF circuit design. In line with ITRS, STEEPER will evaluate in platform (ii) the physical and practical limits of boosting the performance of tunnel FETs with III-V nanowires on silicon, and resulting advantages for HP digital circuits.\nThe development of the two technology platforms are interactive and collaborative in terms of performance boosters, and will benefit from simulation and modelling support by the academic partners, and from investigation of the potentially critical variability and sensitivity of tunnel FETs. Industrial benchmarking is proposed at device and circuit levels by the key involved industries, and the figures of merit of hybrid CMOS/tunnel FET digital and analog circuit design will be investigated.\nThe project targets energy efficient nanoelectronic technology for high volume markets covering digital, analog/RF and mixed mode applications.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: INSO-5-2015 | Award Amount: 2.99M | Year: 2016

Developing an enabling environment for social innovation that links actions across the whole field and supports the full exploitation of their potential is vital to addressing societal challenges both in Europe and globally. While there is increasing interest for social innovation as a means of addressing societal challenges, there is also considerable variation in the extent to which different countries and regions have embraced social innovation. There are many research and policy projects and incubation and acceleration programmes with valuable outcomes but these are still largely disconnected. Thus, the overarching aim of this project is to create a network of networks of social innovation actors. This Social Innovation Community (SIC) will identify, engage and connect actors including researchers, social innovators, citizens, policy-makers, as well as intermediaries, businesses, civil society organisations and public sector employees. Through our cross-cutting Work Packages, we will deliver engagement, research, experimentation, learning and policy activities that engage with and support each of the networks. We will ensure that our cross-cutting activities are complementary and build on each others work, rather than operating in silos. As such, this SIC aims to deepen and strengthen existing networks, forge new connections between networks, and create new links to actors and networks which hitherto have not been included in the field of social innovation. The aims of such a community are to generate new social innovations, develop and scale up successful ideas to share and spread knowledge more effectively in order to improve research, practice and policy-making. By creating an enabling environment for social innovation, the project will improve the overall framework conditions for social innovation in Europe. This in turn will support the creation of opportunities for growth and for overcoming the current social and economic crisis affecting much of Europe.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH-2009-2.2.1-2 | Award Amount: 15.03M | Year: 2010

The aim of EU-GEI is to identify the interactive genetic, clinical and environmental determinants involved in the development, severity and outcome of schizophrenia (EU-GEI, Schiz. Res. 2008; 102: 21-6). In order to identify these interactive determinants, EU-GEI will employ family-based, multidisciplinary research paradigms, which allow for the efficient assessment of gene-environment interactions. In order to go beyond old findings from historical convenience cohorts with crude measures of environmental factors and clinical outcomes, the focus in EU-GEI will be on recruitment of new, family-based clinical samples with state-of-the-art assessments of environmental, clinical and genetic determinants as well as their underlying neural and behavioural mechanisms. New statistical tools will be developed to combine the latest multilevel epidemiological with the latest genome-wide genetic approaches to analysis. Translation of results to clinical practice will be facilitated by additional experimental research and risk assessment bioinformatics approaches. This will result in the identification of modifiable biological and cognitive mechanisms underlying gene-environment interactions and the construction of Risk Assessment Charts and Momentary Assessment Technology tools which can be used for (i) early prediction of transition to psychotic disorder in help-seeking individuals with an at-risk mental state and (ii) early prediction of course and outcome after illness onset. In order to reach these goals, EU-GEI has assembled a multidisciplinary team of top schizophrenia researchers who have the range of skills required to deliver a program of research that meets all the calls requirements and who have access to / will collect a number of unique European samples. The partners in EU-GEI represent the nationally funded schizophrenia / mental health networks of the UK, Netherlands, France, Spain, Turkey and Germany as well as other partners.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: KBBE.2012.3.1-03 | Award Amount: 1.24M | Year: 2012

The FIBRA network has as main target to link the research and development activities for fibre crop innovations carried out by universities and institutions in both EU and China. This proposal is set up to promote the communication between experts about the key issues of fibre crop production, processing and application, while attention towards quality and efficiency improvement, and product diversification will result in improved markets and enhanced economic scope for sustainable fibre crop production in EU and China. The creation of opportunities for networking and cooperation between experts from different disciplines from China and EU will result in a better exchange of know-how and is expected to bring the state of the art of fibre crop utilization to a higher level on both sides. The FIBRA network is set up to optimize the information exchange on specialized topics for fibre crop productivity, and innovation. The FIBRA network is to provide the basis for common R&D activities between Chinese and European partners. The FIBRA network will provide a long term vision on future common research activities on fibre crops that will contribute to the international policies of the EU and will improve researchers training opportunities.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SEC-2012.4.2-1 | Award Amount: 4.61M | Year: 2013

Motivated by the opportunity to develop industry pull applications and services for the European EGNOS and GALILEO satellite systems, SPARTACUS will design, realise, test and validate in simulated and real world scenarios GALILEO-ready tracking/positioning solutions for critical asset tracking and crisis management. Integrating, adapting, and improving hardware, software, communication, and tracking algorithm areas of expertise from consortium members strategically committed to GNSS business expansion, SPARTACUS will develop services dedicated to three application areas. They are 1) to track, trace, and localise critical transport assets especially in times of crisis and in case of major failure of existing networks, 2) to track the flow of relief support goods from the sending side to the receiving/end place, and 3) to support and ensure the safety of first responders in crisis management operations. The project will employ a deliberate methodology that leads progression through Identification, Development, Implementation and Exploitation. SPARTACUS innovation areas include hardware adaptations, algorithms for precision improvement, integration of the receivers with inertial platforms to provide dead reckoning functionalities, and communication availability in emergency by restoring local existing network over satellite backhauling. In addition, modular and scalable platforms will be made appropriate for each application area. Consortium networks, marketing channels, and end users from the rail, disaster relief, and first responder sectors will prepare these new EU-specific services for market uptake.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SEC-2013.2.5-3 | Award Amount: 13.20M | Year: 2014

The protection of critical infrastructures increasingly demands solutions which support incident detection and management at the levels of individual CI, across CIs which are depending on each other, and across borders. An approach is required which really integrates functionalities across all these levels. Cooperation of privately operated CIs and public bodies (governments and EU) is difficult but mandatory. After about 10 years of analysis and research on partial effects in CIP and for individual infrastructure sectors, ECOSSIAN is supposed to be the first attempt to develop this holistic system in the sense portrayed above. A prototype system will be developed which facilitates preventive functions like threat monitoring, early indicator and real threat detection, alerting, support of threat mitigation and disaster management. In the technical architecture with an operations centre and the interfaces to legacy systems (e.g., SCADA), advanced technologies need to be integrated, including fast data aggregation and fusion, visualization of the situation, planning and decision support, and flexible networks for information sharing and coordination support, and the connection of local operations centres. This system will only be successful, if the technical solutions will be complemented by an effective and agreed organizational concept and the implementation of novel rules and regulations. And finally, the large spectrum of economically intangible factors will have significant influence on the quality and acceptance of the system. These factors of societal perception and appreciation, the existing and required legal framework, questions of information security and implications on privacy will be analyzed, assessed and regarded in the concept. The system will be tested, demonstrated and evaluated in realistic use cases. They will be developed with the community of stakeholders and cover the sectors energy, transportation and finance, and the ubiquitous sector of ICT.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.5.4 | Award Amount: 4.59M | Year: 2012

Healthy independent living is a major challenge for the ageing European population. Promotion of stimulating physical activity and prevention of falls are two key factors. Smart ICT offers unique proactive opportunities to support older people in their own homes. The FARSEEING project aims to provide groundbreaking results for health promotion, fall prevention and technical development. Falls in older persons are common, often leading to institutionalisation and loss of independence. FARSEEING aims to promote better prediction, prevention and support of older persons, by long-term analysis of behavioural and physiological data collected using Smartphones, wearable and environmental sensors: leading to self-adaptive responses. FARSEEING aims to build the worlds largest fall repository. This will include samples of both high functioning community-dwelling elders and high-risk groups of fallers. The architecture of the database will facilitate collection, analysis and processing of data related to falls, daily activity and physiological factors. The inclusion of a longstanding cohort study ensures a representative population sample, which is urgently needed to translate technological advance into real world service provision. Telemedicine service models using open technological platforms, independent of sensor systems, will be developed for detection of falls and exchange of information between the older person, family, caregivers and health-care personnel. Novel exercise regimens will be developed that increase adaptability and stimulate motor learning, and cognitive and emotional well being. The exercise model will focus on capacity to manage a complex challenging environment. User acceptability is central to FARSEEING. Psychological and gerontological expertise is a core activity, including ethical, privacy and e-inclusion dimensions. Data protection will be paramount to build and validate realistic business models and service provision.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH-2007-2.2-01;SSH-2007-4.1-02 | Award Amount: 1.43M | Year: 2009

The project interrogates the impact of development paths on the livelihoods and life projects of citizens. Starting from the premise that the analysis of (dominant or alternative) development paths must be situated within the complexities of historically unfolding links and realtionships, we shall explore how they are practiced in specific environments. Central questions address: 1) How development models interact with specific socio-economic contexts 2) The effects of these interactions on transmissions and innovation of knowledge/skills 3) How specific development paths affect livelihood strategies. An interdisciplinary approach combines qualitative research and comparative methodologies with modelling to explore the dynamic effects of development models as they are implemented in specific contexts, at micro and macro levels. We hypothesise that: a) There is a lack of fit between the formal design of development models and their concrete applications. b) The transmission of knowledge/skills is central to effective development. c) Knowledge/skills (both tacit and explicit) are transmitted through formal and informal mechanisms, for example between gender and generations in families and neighbourhoods. d) Political and economic disruptions constitute situations of crisis in this transmission but at the same time afford opportunities for innovation. Focusing on connections between skills, work and unemployment in relation to heavy industry, the research will identify critical points in the shifts in demand for knowledge across generations, regions and economic spheres. An ethnographic approach enables a detailed account of social networks (encompassing those of solidarity and support) within and beyond work places, including strategic friendship, kinship and neighbourhood relations. The project will thus contribute to the comparative analysis of development models, and will generate recommendations for more complex and context-sensitive approaches.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SEC-2011.3.4-1 | Award Amount: 18.18M | Year: 2012

Significant efforts have been invested to strengthen border ID checks with biometrics Travel Documents embedding electronic chips (ePassport). However, problems appeared regarding fraud in the ePassport issuing process, citizen losing control on their personal data, difficulties in certificates management, and shortcomings in convenience, speed, and efficiency of ID checks, including the access to various remote data bases. FIDELITY is a multi-disciplinary initiative which will analyse shortcomings and vulnerabilities in the whole ePassports life cycle and develop technical solutions and recommendations to overcome them. FIDELITY will demonstrate privacy enhanced solutions to: -Secure issuing processes: authentication of documents, preventing impersonation fraud -Improve ePassport security and usability: authentication processes, ID check speed, accuracy of biometrics, management of certificates, access to remote data bases, convenience of biometric sensors and inspection devices -Better manage lost and stolen passports -Strengthen privacy: privacy-by-design applied to all phases of the ePassport life cycle, systematic anomysation of data and separation of data streams, using novel privacy-enhancing-technologies FIDELITY will strengthen trust and confidence of stakeholders and citizens in ePassports, provide more reliable ID checks, hence hinder criminal movements, and ease implementation of E/E records providing better analysis of migration flows. FIDELITY solutions will be designed for backwards compatibility to be deployed progressively in the existing infrastructure. The FIDELITY consortium is composed of market-leading companies, innovative SME, renowned academia, ethical-sociological-legal experts, and end-users, which will help to define requirements and recommendations and assess results. They will, with the other partners actively promote the project results towards stakeholders and international working groups that elaborate future ePassport standards.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: HEALTH.2011.2.4.3-4 | Award Amount: 4.32M | Year: 2012

MEDIGENE project will study genetic and environmental (G x E) determinants of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in recent immigrants in Europe by a novel approach integrating ancestry of Mediterranean populations in epidemiology, locus refining and Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). West Mediterranean shores are place of pre-historical termini of population expansion from Southern Europe and North Africa. Archaeogenetic studies in Europe indicated that Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA patterns or Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs) revealed a close relationship between genetic and geographic distances able to locate an individual DNA within few hundred kilometers. The project will use this information in mapping the genetic basis of insulin resistance, cardiovascular and metabolic complications in immigrants (Albanians, Romanians, Turkish, Tunisians, Algerians and Morocco) in host countries France, Spain, Italy and Greece. Ancestry markers and studies on ancient DNA from Roman historical migration in Catalonia will help to give a better picture of the genetic landscape of Europe and North Africa. Genes for MetS will be studied in existing samples from host and home countries by GWAS, locus refining by next-generation sequencing and haplotype mapping. Informative filtered SNPs will be then used in epidemiology and novel DNA samples to reveal G x E interactions and specificities of the pathogenesis of MetS. Genetic findings will be replicated in home countries (Anatolia and North Africa) in the goal to develop markers ethnic specific and significant at a clinical scale. Major impact is expected from dissemination of our findings to prevent the occurrence of MetS and obesity in children and adolescents or in descendants of modern immigration, understanding variability clinical manifestations of MetS in the context of malnutrition and from the novel approach of GWAS strategies by ameliorating the association signal and bursting R&D activities of SMEs.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2010-4.0-1 | Award Amount: 13.81M | Year: 2011

SaveMe project will address current urgent needs for pancreatic cancer diagnosis and treatment by exploiting partners expertise and most recent research achievements for the design and development of novel modular nanosystems platform integrating new functionalized nano-core particles and active agents. The modular platform will enable the design of diverse active nanosystems per diagnostic or therapeutic application as defined by their active agent compositions. For diagnostics, superior tracers will be developed for molecular MR/PET and gamma camera imaging, enabling efficient diagnosis and guided surgery respectively. Novel functionalized nano-core systems will be conjugated with semi-confluent active shell layer. Three types of shell layers will be design: (1) novel iron oxide nanoparticles as advanced MRI contrast agents and/or (2) DOTA complexes for MRI (with Gd3\), or PET (with Ga-68), or gamma camera (with Ga-69); (3) Integrating within one tracer both iron oxide nanoparticles and DOTA-Ga-68 complexes for a sequential or simultaneous MR/PET imaging. For therapeutics, active nanosystems will be developed to deliver (1) therapeutic siRNAs or (2) anti-MP-inhibitory-scFVs. These non-classic anti-tumor drugs will be designed based on an extensive tumor degradome analysis for combining blockage of selective matrix MPs, thus preventing basic invasive and metastasis steps, with siRNA based neutralization of secondary molecular effects induced by the specific protease inhibition. Individualized degradome analysis will be developed for potential profiling of anti-MP and siRNAs based therapy per patient. To facilitate the above diagnostics and therapeutic effects, advanced tumor targeting and penetration active agents will be linked to nano-core functionalized groups, including a biocompatible PEG layer linked to tumor selective MMP substrate molecules and highly safe and potent novel somatostatin analogue peptides targeting SSTR overexpression.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.2.1.1-1 | Award Amount: 16.16M | Year: 2013

Recently intense research identified around 4,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with human age related diseases such as metabolic disorders. Despite their highly significant association to pathology, the functional role of these genetic variants is, in most cases, yet to be elucidated. The evolutionary distance of most animal models from humans represents a major limitation for the functional validation of these SNPs. To overcome these difficulties, HUMAN will generate mouse models carrying human hepatocytes or pancreatic cells from either primary cells (hepatocytes) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). This innovative approach offers the unique possibility of studying function of genetic risk variants associated with metabolic diseases in an integrated living system (the mouse body), but within human-derived organs, i.e. liver and pancreas. iPSCs used to generate hepatocytes and cells will derive from extreme phenotypes, i.e. patients affected by severe metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes (T2D) or subjects selected for exceptional healthy longevity (subjects over 105 years and offspring of nonagenarian sibships) all fully clinically and metabolically characterised and genotyped; they will be selected according to the best combination of risk and protective alleles. We will test the effect of different nutritional regimes (e.g. high fat diet, caloric restriction), to disentangle the complex molecular mechanisms and circuitry across organs (e.g. hypothalamus-liver axis) which lead to pathology. HUMAN associates a core of outstanding basic research institutions to leading European biotech SMEs, and has the capability to produce at least 500 humanised mice. HUMAN will generate iPSCs biobanks and comprehensively manage all associated information. HUMAN is uniquely situated to drive innovation towards a better knowledge of the genetic basis of human metabolic diseases, thereby contributing to healthier aging of European citizens.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: Fission-2009-2.2.1 | Award Amount: 5.70M | Year: 2010

The LEADER proposal deals with the development to a conceptual level of a Lead Fast Reactor Industrial size plant and of a scaled demonstrator of the LFR technology. The proposal is based on previous achievements obtained during the 6th FP of the EU in the ELSY project but takes into account the indications emerged from the European Strategic Research Agenda as well as the main goals of the European Industrial Initiative on Fission. As a consequence the project is strongly committed to the conceptual design of a scaled/pilot plant to be constructed in the relatively short term. The focus of the first part of activity will be the resolutions of the key issues emerged in the frame of the ELSY project to reach a new reference reactor configuration. This updated reactor configuration of an industrial size LFR will be used to design a low cost and fully representative scaled down prototype of a suitable size. The project foresee an important involvement of End-Users and Safety Authorities from the beginning of the design process to help the plant conception and to assure high safety standards. Education and Training activities are included in a specific work package where European Universities are directly involved with the aim to grow-up the future nuclear energy designer. The LEADER projects takes strongly into account the others already proposed or on-going EU projects. All projects dedicated to R&D and material developments, projects dedicated to the development of ADS systems for transmutation or related to the development of fast reactors (VELLA, CDT, CP-ESFR, GETMAT, FAIRFUELS, ACSEPT, EUFRAT, F-BRIDGE, ACSEPT, ACTINET-I3, THINS) have strong synergies with LEADER toward the development of a Lead cooled fast reactor system. The project Partners are convinced that fostering the European efforts towards a LFR demonstration/pilot plant realization would be very beneficial, will speed up the development needed and establish Europe as a leader in this field.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.3.1 | Award Amount: 6.22M | Year: 2013

E2SWITCH focuses on Tunnel FET (TFETs) as most promising energy efficient device candidates able to reduce the voltage supply of integrated circuits (ICs) below 0.25V and make them significantly more energy efficient by exploiting strained SiGe/Ge and III-V platforms, with CMOS technological compatibility. A full optimization and DC/AC benchmarking for complementary n- and p-type TFETs, integrated on the same fabrication platform, is proposed. Compact models are developed and implemented in Verilog A, for portability, to support the design of low power ICs with CMOS architectural compatibility for: (i) digital and (ii) analog/RF. The device scalability, operational reliability and the operation from room to high temperature, as required by ITRS metrics, are priorities of our investigations. In order to push even more the III-V and SiGe/Ge TFET performance we propose to study, optimize and experimentally validate new device concepts such as a Density-Of-State (DOS) switch exploiting the effect of dimensionality. The DOS switch will deliver deep subthermal switching (subthreshold swing less than 10mV/decade, for at least four decades of current).An advanced TCAD simulation platform is developed for the selected material systems, able to capture quantum effects and to accurately predict the influence of dimensionality. TCAD will also support the optimization of TFETs on the two proposed material platforms, with emphasis on the role of strain and on the alignment between the tunneling path and the electric field.A full set of characterization techniques including DC, AC, low frequency noise, RF measurements (S-parameters) and large range of temperature is foreseen to support the device optimization, parameter extraction and the calibration of the compact models.We will deliver very first full digital and analog circuit demonstrators and will benchmark their operational performance, reliability and robustness compared to equivalent CMOS technology nodes.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.4.2 | Award Amount: 3.48M | Year: 2010

The MIROR Project deals with the development of an innovative adaptive system for music learning and teaching based on the reflexive interaction paradigm. The platform will be developed in the context of early childhood music education. It will act as an advanced cognitive tutor, designed to promote specific cognitive abilities in the field of music improvisation, both in formal learning contexts (kindergartens, primary schools, music schools) and informal ones (at home, kinder centres, etc.). The reflexive interaction paradigm is based on the idea of letting users manipulate virtual copies of themselves, through specifically designed machine-learning software referred to as interactive reflexive musical systems (IRMS). By definition IRMS are able to learn and configure themselves according to their understanding of learners behaviour. We propose to extend the IRMS paradigm with the analysis and synthesis of multisensory expressive gesture to increase its impact on the musical pedagogy of young children, by developing new multimodal interface. The project will be based on a novel spiral design approach involving coupled interactions between the technical partners and the psycho-pedagogical ones. The project will integrate both psychological case-study experiments, aiming to experiment cognitive hypothesis concerning the mirroring behaviour and the learning efficacy of the platform, and validation studies aiming at developing the software in concrete educational settings. The project will contribute to promoting the reflexive interaction paradigm not only in the field of music learning but more generally as a new paradigm for establishing a synergy between learning and cognition in the context of child/machine interaction.\nThe project mostly addresses target c) concerning the development of adaptive and innovative learning systems. However, objectives of target d) are also pursued through the development of a novel music learning appliance.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2013.6.4-3 | Award Amount: 7.88M | Year: 2013

The NEAM (North East Atlantic, Mediterranean and Adjacent Seas) region of IOC/UNESCO is known to be exposed to tsunamis and, like other regions of the world, faces increasing levels of risk due to i) continuous development of coastal areas with critical infrastructure, and ii) year-round presence of millions of tourists. In recent years, European researchers have greatly advanced knowledge of tsunami hazards and implementation of operational infrastructure, such as creation of a regional system of candidate tsunami-watch providers (CTWP) and national tsunami warning centers (NTWC). However, significant gaps remain and more effort is needed. ASTARTE (Assessment STrategy And Risk for Tsunami in Europe) aims to develop a comprehensive strategy to mitigate tsunami impact in this region. To achieve this goal, an interdisciplinary consortium has been assembled. It includes all CTWPs of NEAM and expert institutions across Europe and worldwide. ASTARTE will improve i) basic knowledge of tsunami generation and recurrence going beyond simple catalogues, with novel empirical data and new statistical analyses for assessing long-term recurrence and hazards of large events in sensitive areas of NEAM, ii) numerical techniques for tsunami simulation, with focus on real-time codes and novel statistical emulation approaches, and iii) methods for assessment of hazard, vulnerability, and risk. ASTARTE will also provide i) guidelines for tsunami Eurocodes,ii) better tools for forecast and warning for CTWPs and NTWCs, and iii) guidelines for decision makers to increase sustainability and resilience of coastal communities. In summary, ASTARTE will develop basic scientific and technical elements allowing for a significant enhancement of the Tsunami Warning System in the NEAM region in terms of monitoring, early warning and forecast, governance and resilience. Overall, this will lead to the goal of the European/NEAM Horizon 2020 strategy: to foster tsunami resilient communities.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 2.91M | Year: 2012

The Initial Training Network for Monitoring Mediterranean Marine Protected Areas (MMMPA) aims to train the next generation of MPA scientists and managers, equipping them with a flexible set of skills essential within a wide range of professional environments, including public administration, local authorities, industry and academia. They will focus on the most important aspects that need adequate conservation. In particular, researchers will maturate the experience to: identify species listed in the Barcelona Convention (Protocol ASPIM, Annex II); monitor their distribution and health state; follow adequate experimental designs; evidence spill-over effects; develop fishery management at the local level, develop management guidelines, engage with stakeholders and the society at large. These experiences will stem from a highly interdisciplinary network, leading in taxonomy, ecology, biology conservation, bio-cartography, and socio-economy. Furthermore, they will be trained in a range of soft skills including science communication/outreach, as it is essential at the delicate interface between science, the management of natural assets and the public at large. Training and hands-on experiences will be delivered by a strong network of world-class experts in MPA management which will provide a highly focused learning environment. The consortium includes 7 Full (5 Universities, 1 Research centre, 1 SME) and 6 Associated partners (4MPAs, 2 SMEs), and will recruit 10 ESRs (360pm) and 4 ERs (24pm). Both Full and Associated partners have strong collaborative links with other (MPAs) scientists, professionals and managers and are, therefore, well placed to deliver a comprehensive training network. The planned rotation will expose ESR/ERs to each partner, enhancing intersectoral exchanges and strengthening the Mediterranean Research Area by developing an exciting programme that is attractive to the global research community.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE-2009-2-2-01 | Award Amount: 7.98M | Year: 2010

NeuroFAST is a multidisciplinary project, involving ten teams from seven countries, to explore the neurobiology of addiction and eating behaviour and the complex socio-psychological forces that can lead to its dysregulation. These forces include dietary components (including highly palatable foods and alcohol), some of which may have addictive properties, but also cultural and social pressures, everyday stressors, and family-genetic influences on these. The project will provide new data from human studies, including human nutritional studies, that is needed to inform health policy initiatives. This will be underpinned by state-of-the art mechanistic research to establish a solid scientific basis for this advice. The European added value lies in building up the necessary critical mass in several fields of expertise: psychology, epidemiology, human genetics related to eating disorders, human nutrition, eating and addictive behaviour disorders, endocrinology, human brain imaging, together with studies of the basic mechanisms of eating behaviour and addiction, (neuro)endocrine regulators, stress, opiate dependence, and cannabinoid actions. To provide scientific support for European public health policies, a focus will be on a socio-psychological analysis of determinants of food addiction and substance abuse, and of how risk factors like stress in the workplace are driving addictive behaviour. We will establish an evidence base for inter-relationships, linking eating disorder research with obesity research, stress research and addiction research, and involving studies of selected individual food components using novel designed foods with controlled components. In summary, we will use a synergistic combination of controlled laboratory studies, characterization of patient groups, and examination of real-world scenarios based on epidemiological community samples that will be relevant to policy development.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: KBBE-2008-3-1-03 | Award Amount: 1.40M | Year: 2009

The ultimate objective is to explore the potential of non-food crops, which can be domestically grown in EU27 context, for selected industrial applications, namely oils, fibers, resins, pharmaceuticals and other specialty products and outline and prioritise crops-to-products schemes, suitable for the different Member States, which will support sustainable, economic viable and competitive European bio-based industry and agriculture. The proposed project will be carried in 8WPs. WP1 will report on non-food crops for selected industrial applications. Information will refer to main physical traits, cultivation areas, inputs, supply and logistics, yields, quality issues. WP2 will identify current molecular genetics technologies and suggest their potential applications in a crop-specific manner to address a wide range of breeding constraints. Improvement of non-food crops will entail breeding for agronomically important traits i.e yield and tolerance to abiotic and biotic conditions. WP3 will explore the potential and feasibility of the European industry to make high-value biobased products from non-food crosp and biotechnological routes. WP4 will perform supply chain cost analysis, identify best business opportunities, and assess the socio-economic impacts of selected crop-to-product schemes at EU-27, regional and country levels. WP5 will assess selected production and environmental impacts and identify a core list of standards and criteria for the environmental and socio-economic sustainability of selected crops-to-product schemes in a global and country-specific perspective. WP6 will perform an integrated technical, environmental, and economic assessment to help selecting and prioritising non-food crops. WP7 will address dissemination issues. The expected output is to identify whether and under which terms Europe has the potential and the technical competence to develop a competitive bio-industry fed by a sustainable agriculture.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP-2008-2.5-2 | Award Amount: 4.13M | Year: 2009

The growing fields of organic electronics and spin-based electronics rely on the use of organic conjugated molecules and polymers as active components in multi-layer device applications such as light-emitting displays, solar cells, field-effect transistors, (bio)chemical sensors and storage devices. Since all organic-based devices are made by deposition of successive layers (metal, oxide, insulating or semiconducting layers), many key electronic processes (such as charge injection from metallic electrodes, charge recombination into light or light conversion into charges, spin injection, etc.) occur at interfaces. Although a large body of knowledge has been accumulated on the characterization of such interfaces (especially morphological issues), a detailed and unified understanding of the electronic processes occurring at these interfaces is currently missing and there is no consensus on the materials and device strategies that need to be developed in order to achieve these objectives. The main goal of this proposal is to bring together complementary expertises in order to assess the electronic processes occurring at interfaces via theoretical modelling tools supported by surface-sensitive characterization techniques. MINOTOR gathers leading groups in the modelling of electronic processes at interfaces (organic/organic, metal/organic, and inorganic/organic) typically encountered in organic-based electronic devices. The main goal of MINOTOR is to develop a multiscale theoretical approach ranging from the atomistic to mesoscopic scale to model in the most realistic way such interfaces and provide a unified view of the electronic phenomena taking place at these interfaces. The theoretical predictions will be compared to experimental investigations performed in the consortium, thereby allowing a direct feedback between theory and experiment.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.2.1 | Award Amount: 11.27M | Year: 2013

The goal of SHERPA is to develop a mixed ground and aerial robotic platform to support search and rescue activities in a real-world hostile environment like the alpine scenario. The technological platform and the alpine rescuing scenario are the occasion to address a number of research topics about cognition and control pertinent to the call.\nWhat makes the project potentially very rich from a scientific viewpoint is the heterogeneity and the capabilities to be owned by the different actors of the SHERPA system: the human rescuer is the busy genius, working in team with the ground vehicle, as the intelligent donkey, and with the aerial platforms, i.e. the trained wasps and patrolling hawks. Indeed, the research activity focuses on how the busy genius and the SHERPA animals interact and collaborate with each other, with their own features and capabilities, toward the achievement of a common goal.\nA mix of advanced control and cognitive capabilities characterize the SHERPA system, aiming to support the rescuer by improving his awareness of the rescue scene even in tough environments and with the genius often busy in the rescuing activity (and thus unable to supervise the platform). Thus emphasis is placed on robust autonomy of the platform, acquisition of cognitive capabilities, collaboration strategies, natural and implicit interaction between the genius and the SHERPA animals, which motivate the research activity.\nFive benchmarks, inspired by real-world scenarios, drive the research and motivate demonstration activities on realistic testing sites planned during the project.\nSeven top academic groups, two SMEs, and the Italian Association of Alpine Rescuers with the role of end-user and evaluator of the project outcomes for the specific application of search and rescuing in the alpine scenario compose the consortium.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.1.1-03 | Award Amount: 8.04M | Year: 2012

The objective of the FIGARO project is to significantly reduce the use of fresh water on farm level through developing a cost-effective, precision irrigation management platform. The platform will be structured for data acquisition from monitoring devices and forecasting tools, data interpretation, system control, and evaluation mechanisms enabling full decision support for end users at farm scale. These tools will be integrated with multiple state-of-the-art irrigation technologies and strategies as well as newly adapted devices leading to further increased water productivity. The flexibility, cost-effectiveness, ease of use, minimal maintenance of the system and often, increases in crop yield, will boost its acceptance and up-take by the end-users (the farmers, extension workers). In addition, as added value the system will enable reduction of fertilizer use, further supporting sustainable use of natural resources and adaptation of agricultural practice to climate change. To achieve this, the FIGARO project will develop a holistic and structured precision irrigation platform which will offer farmers flexible, crop-tailored irrigation scheduling protocols for their specific fields taking into account spatial variability management.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2011.2.3-03 | Award Amount: 4.04M | Year: 2012

SUCCIPACK aims to support European industry efforts to introduce biobased polybutylene succinate (PBS) as a new material on the food packaging market. Its main advantage is that it has complementary properties compared to other biobased polymers like polylactic acid. PBS is synthesized by polycondensation of succinic acid and butanediol, both identified as key building blocks from renewable resources which will be produced on a large scale in the coming years. The aim of SUCCIPACK is to develop sustainable, active, and intelligent food packaging materials based on green PBS that can be flexibly used by packaging and food industries. A first aspect is the optimization of the synthesis and compounding of polymer and copolymer grades for industrial plastic transformation processes to obtain films, trays and pouches. Tailored packaging functionalities will be obtained by flexible in-line surface treatments to control gas barrier properties and to introduce antimicrobial activity. The performance and safety of the novel packaging materials will be assessed for selected food products, representative of different food categories and preservation technologies. Special efforts will be put to explore PBS recycling routes, including chemical recycling by monomerization. An original intelligent labeling function will be added to monitor material degradation and recondensation, during shelf life and recycling. Life cycle assessment (LCA) and life cycle cost analysis (LCC) will be applied to guide the material development and to assess the sustainability of the whole packaging concept. SUCCIPACK will help European industry, especially SMEs, to strengthen their competitive advantage over the currently fast growing green PBS developments in the US and Asia. The cooperation between 7 research organizations, 1 large industrial player and 10 SMEs will facilitate an effective uptake of the results by the food and packaging industry.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-19-2014 | Award Amount: 4.86M | Year: 2015

A good functioning of the European food system is key to deliver food and nutrition security for all Europeans. However, that system faces many economic, environmental and social challenges as well as opportunities following socio-economic and technological developments, that are not equally distributed throughout the EU. Future policymaking aiming at healthy and resilient systems needs to take into account this differentiation and diversity of approaches, which necessitate foresight activities that take into account both the development of important driving forces as well as the social and spatial diversity. Primary productionthat is agriculture, fisheries and aquacultureforms the foundation of the food system. Its structure and performance is influenced by various conditions shaped by both the public and the private sector. As economic agents, primary producers aim at generating a sufficient amount of income, but their financial conditions are highly dependent on public and private actors, such as government regulators (including the EUs agricultural and fisheries policies), the financial sector, suppliers, the food industry, retailers, etc. In other words, the web of policy requirements as well as input and output market imperfections greatly shape farmers and fishermens livelihoods. Knowledge on the conditions of primary producers and the driving forces influencing these conditions exists, but in a fragmented way: not all primary producers and regions are covered, not all driving forces have been investigated, cross-linkages between them have been insufficiently analysed, future opportunities are not well integrated, etc. The purpose of SUFISA is to identify sustainable practices and policies in the agricultural, fish and food sectors that support the sustainability of primary producers in a context of multi-dimensionsal policy requirements, market uncertainties and globalisation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: SFS-17-2014 | Award Amount: 2.42M | Year: 2015

The EcoPROLIVE project proposes an innovative processing for the full exploitation of high valuable constituents in the olive into novel products that are healthy and greener. The proposed process is very different from the current approaches of olive oil industrial production, and waste revalorization alternatives, as it follows a zero waste approach and all resulting products have commercial value. Part of the process is based on the patent WO2013030426 with further developments for quality and environmental improvements, such as the use of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with CO2 instead of n-hexane extraction, and including pulsed electric field (PEF) technology to improve the drying performance and the oil extraction yields. EcoPROLIVE project goals are: demonstration of the technical and economical feasibility of the processing and its environmental study; ensuring the market uptake of the technology and novel products, fully characterized (nutritional, functional, toxicological) to avoid market barriers; design of the optimal process, and scale-up from lab/pilot plant to preindustrial application (TRL6); validation at an operational environment (TRL7); monetizing the technology and developed process (patents) into scalable markets and replication in different scales and countries, starting with the main olive oil producers represented in the consortium (Spain, Italy, Greece, Portugal). Replication is expected in a total of 504 olive oil mills, that will deliver 37,000 tn olive oil, 3,700 tn functional oil (hydroxytyrosol, tyrosol, oleocanthal, oleuropein, others), and 44,400 tn phenol-rich fibre ingredient with intended use in bakery products (biscuit, bread). The global estimated profit is high (63 Mll) as well as the environmental benefit associated to waste reduction (126,100 tn waste water). Conclusively EcoPROLIVE processing is presented as an economically and environmentally sustainable innovation that will promote the sector competitiveness.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CP-ARTEMIS | Phase: SP1-JTI-ARTEMIS-2010-2 | Award Amount: 17.11M | Year: 2011

HIGH PROFILE combines industrial and clinical driven R&D activities dealing with image diagnostic platforms for the central nervous system. The projects approach is to progress state-of-the-art by integrating imaging equipment for diagnostics including algorithms, equipment and infrastructure for massive image processing and simulation to support combinations of images from different medical equipment modalities (MRI, MRS, fMRI, NIRS, EIT and EEG) and comparison/fusion of images with physiological models of central nervous systems. HIGH PROFILE aims to develop multi-scale, adaptive algorithms to merge information about the actual behavior of the brain, originating from (f)MRI, MRS, NIRS, EIT and EEG. These algorithms allow a physician to follow the status of the patient during his/her evolution, and be supported by a suitable content management platform and a data infrastructure capable of handling the massive quantities of data produced by these technologies, delivering them to their point of use. Better imaging of the central nervous system and the head/neck area will improve diagnosis treatment of neurological diseases like insomnia, depression, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy, as well as brain and head/neck cancer. The approach developed by HIGH PROFILE for these conditions should also be extendable to the whole field of advanced medical imaging. For deployment it is necessary to address the challenge of the increasing complexity of real time image processing. The necessary image processing components will be deployed on standard hardware to perform the necessary processing tasks. Image processing is a performance intensive task and system integrators will deploy it on emerging standard hardware platforms running (configurations of) multi-core processors. As this deployment is not only relevant for healthcare only, and a generic platform improves the possibilities to integrate external software, other domains are involved in the deployment of image processing chains. APPROVED BY ARTEMIS-JU 24/06/2014


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH-2007-2.2-01 | Award Amount: 1.58M | Year: 2009

The FRIDA (Fostering Regional Innovation and Development through Anchors and Networks) project aims to improve regional policy making within the EU, by advancing state of the art understanding of the importance of anchor firms to regional development and cohesion. Anchor firms are known to be increasingly important to regional development as highly entrepreneurial, multi-national firms restructure and relocate in response to the pressures of globalisation. However, there is currently a substantial gap in our understanding of the reasons for their qualitatively different impacts on different regions, how and why they assist the development of networks and capabilities in regions, and what local policies make particular regions attractive, and influence anchor firms to contribute towards more cohesion and even development. By addressing these questions, the FRIDA project aims to both improve understanding and contribute towards the effectiveness of policy making. The outputs of the project are designed to directly help regional policy-making to better anticipate and respond to economic restructuring by helping create regional governance systems that ensure less developed regions level-up to the most developed regions, rather than more developed regions levelling-down in response to the increasing freedom of movement of capital, production and knowledge. In doing so, the project aims to directly address the main points in the call and improve development throughout Europe in a way that is more sustainable, even and socially cohesive.


According to 2007 Eurostat statistics, there is a robust need to better understanding the nutritional existing barriers to healthy nutrition of 79 million EU-27 citizens at-risk-of-poverty. These European subclusters and ethnic populations have in common low purchasing power, limited education and the highest risk of diet-related diseases due to sub-optimal nutrition. CHANCE project will i) define an innovative strategy based on a socio-economic study of the composition of the most significant EU populations at-risk-of-poverty and ii) verify the relative existing nutritional deficiency via a holistic approach ensured by metabonomics investigations correlating the non-healthy diet to real metabolism alterations. CHANCE intends to adopt a new multidisciplinary approach, leading to nutritional strategies for the prevention of malnutrition in population groups at risk of poverty. CHANCE aims at considering a new health value-added diet as a whole by developing food products which could act in concert. The synergic collaboration of nutritionists, food chemists, economists and technologists allow a robust strategy to by pass all barriers to healthy nutrition by the lab-scale development of affordable but nutritionally-rich food products, new packaging and portioning. The R&D activities planned in the enlarged European Union will facilitate a proactive collaboration among food research centers and food processing and packaging SMEs that will be further transferred with the generated foreground. During the processing of food products, nutrient content and stability will be assessed, then the whole technology process will get the influential support of a CEN Workshop Agreement, drafted within CEN (the European Committee for Standardization) in order to help ensuring consumers with a controlled quality. CHANCE nutritional and educational strategies will produce guidelines for European Public Health policy dealing with the prevention of malnutrition in such population groups. The European Food Information Council will ensure that the progress and results from CHANCE will be communicated and disseminated widely.


According to the EU-India Science and Technology Cooperation Agreement, there is a converging Indian and European interest in finding promising valorization routes and markets for fruit and cereal processing by-products and wastes. NAMASTE will develop innovative, comprehensive and industry-relevant approaches for the valorization of citrus, mango and pomegranates by-products and wastes as well as of wheat and rice bran, thought the environmentally and economically sustainable conversion of these by-products/wastes into healthy food ingredients, foods and feeds. NAMASTE-EU will particularly focus on citrus and wheat bran processing, and will develop and assess laboratory-scale experimental protocols to convert by-products/wastes into food ingredients and new foods with improved nutritional properties (e.g. fruit paste, citrus filled snacks, citrus-based snacks, fruit enriched breakfast cereals, citrus paste-based self-stable fillers for bakery products, a new citrus/mango based feed for aquaculture). NAMASTE-India will adopt complementary/synergic strategies, technologies and processes for turning by-products/wastes of mango/pomegranate processing and rice bran in similar ingredients, new foods and feeds. A proactive EU-India cooperation effort will be adopted to enhance mutual benefits, in terms of both knowledge generation and market expansion for the global food and drink industry. NAMASTE joint consortia will strictly collaborate on common by-products and shared food technologies as well as on activities aimed at investigating the nutritional quality, chemical and microbial safety of the resulting foods/feeds, and the environmental benefits and economic opportunities associated to industrial production. The direct involvement of strongly committed EU and Indian industries (and of an external Industrial Platform) will provide the high added value of guaranteeing the validation of developed processes and products, thus ensuring fast and effective industrial uptake


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE.2010.3.5-01 | Award Amount: 3.91M | Year: 2011

MINOTAURUS will deliver innovative bio-processes (bioaugmentation, enzyme technology, rhizoremediation with halophytes, and bioelectrochemical remediation), which are all based on the concept of IMMOBILIZATION OF BIOCATALYSTS (microorganisms and enzymes), to eliminate emerging and classic organic pollutants. The immobilization-based technologies will be applied to engineered (ex-situ) and natural systems (in situ) for the bioremediation of groundwater, wastewater, and soil. The selection and adaptation of modern physico-chemical, biological, and ecotoxicological monitoring tools combined to a rational understanding of engineering and enzymology/microbial physiology aspects is a pertinent approach to open the black-box of the our technologies. The reliable process-monitoring will constitute a solid basis to develop and refine our biodegradation kinetics models, which will be the mean to improve the predictability of performances to be achieved with our technologies. A key strength of MINOTAURUS is the possibility of direct implementation of our technologies at five EU reference sites that are confronted with pollutants (two technologies will be tested on-site during the first year). We will deliver not only a set of tools, techniques and processes which will enhance the ability of our communities to respond to the challenges of organic pollutants but also frameworks for structuring and making evidence-based decisions for the most sustainable and appropriate bioremediation measures. MINOTAURUS consortium consists of fifteen partners from eight European and Europe-associated countries. Eight research & education institutions, five SMEs covering the whole chain of our bioremediation approaches (production/monitoring of biocatalysts, bioremediation, and engineering), one large end-user installing wastewater treatment plants, and one environmental agency will work together with the support of an advisory board mainly consisting of environmental decision-makers


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA | Phase: ICT-2007.3.7 | Award Amount: 1.10M | Year: 2008

The SHARE project aims to facilitate open source software code sharing and utilization within the embedded system domain, creating a nurturing environment for applications and solutions to be developed on OSS middleware, and paving the way for new business models and services. The focus of the project will be on: - Middleware for mission critical applications - Middleware for nomadic networks applications - Middleware for e-health applications The SHARE initiative will then broaden its scope to other sectors that could benefit of the usage of OSS middleware in the embedded system domain, providing the following functionalities/services: - The SHARE Web Based platform where OSS code will be uploaded and shared, together with any relevant information facilitating the usage and dissemination of such software - An Open Source knowledge framework which will act both as a knowledge collection methodology and a benchmarking tool. Adequate templates and benchmarking methodologies will be created by means of focused studies that will collect relevant assessment methodologies based on key parameters such as quality, security, interoperability, use of Open Standards and maintainability - Networking and awareness creation actions towards developers as well as end users in the embedded system community, including the organization of two International Dissemination Workshops that will serve as meeting events where stakeholders will be able to make networking, as well as present their concerns and achievements. The overall action will be industry driven, as far as the SHARE Consortium includes worldwide recognized industry leaders, as well as universities and leading technology transfer organizations. The strong link of the SHARE consortium with the OSS developer and user communities will assure the achievement of the expected impact of the project, and clear measures to evaluate and transfer the generated knowledge.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2009-4.2-2 | Award Amount: 3.62M | Year: 2010

The ability of some compounds to prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram and to precipitate Torsade de Pointes (TdP, a potentially fatal arrhythmia) has caused several regulatory interventions, including drug withdrawals. Specific guidelines have been implemented to detect QT liability of new compounds as early as possible. However there is growing evidence that an increase in the QT interval does not necessarily lead to TdP which further increased the regulatory and clinical difficulties. This proposal will assess the arrhythmogenic potential of antipsychotics, antihistamines and anti-infectives (> 250 compounds). It will fulfill this aim by: reviewing the literature on in-vitro and in-vivo preclinical evidence; conducting in-silico modeling to predict the arrhythmic potential through target profiling and docking molecules in existing atomistic models and predicting the effects on hERG K\, Na\, Ca\\ channels; analyzing the information in national and international pharmacovigilance DBs of spontaneous reports; conducting prospective case control surveillance on symptomatic QT prolongation; conducting cohort studies in psychiatric and hematology patients; analyzing information from existing studies to assess the association between drug use and various arrhythmia outcomes; and collecting blood samples from cases and drug-matched controls to investigate potential effect modification by candidate genes and a hypothesis generating approach including more than 2000 genes. Healthcare DBs on 27 million persons in 5 countries will be used to calculate rates and relative risks of arrhythmic events during drug use. Predictions on arrhythmic potential will be compared with actual postmarketing risk to assess the predictive value of preclinical markers. All information will be integrated to allow for ranking the arrhythmic potential of all the 250 study drugs and creation of risk charts that will allow for more informed treatment and decision making.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ISIB-05-2014 | Award Amount: 10.81M | Year: 2015

The COSMOS proposal aims to reduce Europes dependence on imported coconut and palm kernel oils and fatty acids and castor oil as sources for medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA, C10C14) and medium-chain polymer building blocks. These are needed by the oleochemical industry for the production of plastics, surfactants, detergents, lubricants, plasticisers and other products. In COSMOS, camelina and crambe will be turned into profitable, sustainable, multipurpose, non-GMO European oil crops for the production of oleochemicals. Seed properties will be screened and optimised through genetic techniques aiming at high yield, low resource inputs, optimization of the value generated from vegetative tissues and fatty acid profiles adapted to industrial needs. Large-scale field trials will be performed at different locations in Europe to assess the potential of the crops in terms of cultivation practices, seed yield, oil content, ease of harvesting, and resource inputs. Extracted oils will be fractionated into various fatty acid types (monounsaturated versus polyunsaturated) by selective enzyme technologies and extraction processes. The monounsaturated long-chain fatty acids so obtained will be converted to MCFA and high-value building blocks for bio-plastics and flavour and fragrance ingredients through chemical and enzymatic chain cleavage processes. The 3-rich PUFA fraction will be purified for use in food and feed ingredients. Vegetative tissues such as straw, leaves and press cake will be fed to insects producing high-value proteins, chitin and fats. Insect fats and proteins will be isolated and prepared for use in food and feed products. The overall economic, social and environmental sustainability as well as life cycle of the whole value chain will be assessed. The impact of the project for Europe will be assessed in terms of value chain potentials for value creation and number of jobs that can be created.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: GALILEO-2007-3.1-01 | Award Amount: 2.86M | Year: 2009

The objective of the project is to develop a new 2 frequency GALILEO/EGNOS/GPS satellite navigation receiver concept for automotive applications and to push the state-ofthe-art of GNSS receivers by elaboration of relevant core technologies. The project will consider the FP6 achievements in the developement of single frequency mass market receivers and expand and explore these on new features such as the use of MBOC for the open signal, OS authentication and dual frequency reception of L1- and E5/L5 band for the use in automotive applications like driver assistance systems.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME | Phase: SME-2013-1 | Award Amount: 1.31M | Year: 2013

Nutritional iron deficiency (ID) is estimated to affect 1.52 billion people worldwide. In the Western society, consumers are increasingly adopting a preventive dietary strategy to reduce food intake or the consumption of specific foods, thus leading to the decrease of micronutrient intake correlated to ID. BAKE4FUN responds to the needs of food SMEs of innovating food formulations and technologies to overcome the negative effect of iron fortification of bakery products on their sensorial characteristics in order to produce bakery foods with an improved nutritional profile and health-promoting effects. In particular, BAKE4FUN aims to provide design, validate and develop innovative health-promoting bakery products based on a new iron microencapsulation technology and on the use of non-conventional high-added value whole grain flours, able to obtain healthy, sustainable and ethically correct products, to increase antioxidant intake and to improve the gut microflora. Research activities to be carried out within BAKE4FUN will be focused on i) the bioavailability of microencapsulated iron in fortified breads, their effects on the iron status, on biomarkers of oxidation and inflammation; ii) the effect of bread obtained by the sourdough fermentation of non-conventional grains on the gut microbiota, the glycaemic load, and the inflammatory and oxidative status. The BAKE4FUN project brings together 7 partners from 3 EU Member States: 3 RTD Performers will make their multidisciplinary and complementary expertise in the areas of food technology, microbiology and in vitro/in vivo analyses available to 4 SMEs operating in the food market. The project results are expected to have a significant impact on the competitiveness of SME Participants that will be able to expand their business by adding to their product range new food formulations and healthy bakery products, obtained through a combination of non conventional grains and innovative bread-making processes.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: KBBE-2008-2-5-03 | Award Amount: 1.17M | Year: 2009

AgriFoodResults intends to answer the need for a better dissemination of food results. The vision is to improve the cost effectiveness of agri-food research activities by enhancing the transfer of the results to the end-users. The project combines capacity building with the creation of sustainable services for dissemination managers. Theses services include web-sites, innovative approach to communicate scientific results and guidelines for project and dissemination managers. The scope of AgriFoodResults is food science with an emphasis on food safety, food processing technology and nutrition & health. The focus is primary on SMEs and small research projects. AgriFoodResults has three main objectives: 1) To offer innovative and sustainable services for dissemination 2) To raise skills of European food scientists on dissemination practices 3) To successfully disseminate recent results from agri-food research projects. The consortium includes seven leading research organisations in food science, five organisations involved in knowledge transfer, management and communication of research projects, one company specialised in web development, an association of food enterprises and a European organisation specialised in food science communication.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: KBBE-2007-1-3-01 | Award Amount: 1.26M | Year: 2008

As different sectors food, feed, fiber, and fuels compete for land, the yielding potential of the future non-food crops has to be as efficient as possible in order to minimize the competition for land. The main objective of the proposed 4F CROPS is to survey and analyse all the parameters that will play an important role in successful non-food cropping systems in the agriculture of EU27 alongside the existing food crop systems. The work will start (WP1) with the prediction of the future land use in short term (2020) and long term (2030), taking under consideration restrict factors for agriculture and the market demand for non-food crops. The cropping possibilities (WP2) based on regional potential levels, ecology and climate will be determined. This group of non-food crops will be then subjected to a comparative cost analysis with conventional crops (WP3) for the same time framework. Socio-economic impacts, like farmers income, rural development, public development, and public acceptance will analyse. Then environmental implications will be assessed compared to their respective conventional products (fossil energy, conversional materials) (WP4). Several environmental impacts will be assessed like soil quality and soil erosion, air quality and climate change, water issues, biodiversity and landscape by using LCA and EIE methods. The regulatory framework of the non-food crops will be considered including existing policies, co-existence and safety measures when the crops used for both food and non-food crops (WP5). The work from WP1 WP5 will be used for the formation of scenarios for successful non-food cropping alongside food cropping systems (WP6) answering whether a completive bioeconomy is a viable option for EU27. The dissemination (WP7) will be done though the web-site (intranet), the four project workshops and other articles, leaflet, conferences, fact sheets, and links. WP8 aims at the coordination, management and reporting of the project.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH-2007-3.3-01 | Award Amount: 1.31M | Year: 2008

Ge.M.IC will study Cultural Interactions in a European Perspective through a tripartite conceptual and methodological approach, whose aim will be to identify links between migration, gender and intercultural interaction, as it is in the meeting place of these three dimensions that some of the most important cultural developments in Europe take place. Ge.M.IC will approach these questions from a critical perspective emphasizing in particular the impact of migrant mobility and cultural diversity on gender relation in host, transit and sending societies. Research will be of an interdisciplinary nature in accordance with the broad range of expertise of the researchers collaborating in the project. The organization of work will reflect the inter-ethnic and interdisciplinary character of the consortium focusing both fieldwork and analysis on six thematic areas of study, rather than on national case studies: representations of national identity and the media, education, urban social spaces and movements, religion, violence, and the family. Ge.M.IC will generate new and important insights in these thematic areas, taking advantage of the diverse areas of expertise of different researchers and their mutual commitment to studying gender and addressing issues of gender equality as a central aspect of research.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: GC.SST.2013-3. | Award Amount: 3.55M | Year: 2013

Ultra Light Vehicles (ULV) intrinsically have a better efficiency due to their improved transport capability per vehicle mass. Additionally improved driving dynamics performance can more easily be achieved because of the reduced mass. However, the design of ULV sharing the same road with heavier cars represents a complex technical challenge for achieving acceptable safety levels. Furthermore, at present the additional purchase costs of a pure battery electric vehicle one as compared with a gasoline is more than 15000 Euros. Consumers buy a new vehicle because many and diverse reasons, including purchase price (one of the main concerns of the majority of buyers when approaching to purchase a new vehicle), depreciation rate, styling, performance and handling, brand preference and social image. However, car owners tend to underestimate the costs of running a vehicle. Although they are very well aware of fuel costs, road tax and insurance, they do not always account for servicing, repair and cost of depreciation. Therefore, if one is interested in comparing the cost of EV with other competing vehicle technologies the parameter of interest should be the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO). The project proposal AMBER-ULV aims to develop and integrate several innovative concepts, resulting from successfully completed R&D projects, giving a socially acceptable answer to safety concerns but not penalising the driving experience.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME-AG | Phase: SME-2 | Award Amount: 2.65M | Year: 2009

Distributors and promoters of organic food claim their products are superior in taste compared to conventional alternatives. This argument, however, is still the subject of heated debate and thus deserves greater scientific examination. Since repurchase intentions are dependent on the overall liking of a product, and sensory experiences may have an important impact on this, knowledge about these factors is crucial if producers and marketers of organic food are to offer products which meet consumer expectations. The main purpose of this project is to develop the first Organic Sensory Information System (OSIS), a multilingual and centrally based data folder for data deposition along with an interface scheme that serves as a basis for data exchange for the benefit of the organic food market (organic associations, producers, processors, retailers, wholesalers and also consumers). To this end, a multidisciplinary and international research approach is needed which comprises sensory and consumer research linked to standards requirements in different European countries. The extendable data folder will contain descriptions of the sensory properties of specific products in six product categories. It will also contain information about underlying production methods, explaining the sensory differences between organic and conventional methods, and discussing consumer expectations. The comprehensive sensory evaluations will further feed into a preference mapping of sensory quality. The impact of EU legislation and of organic farming association standards will also be elaborated for OSIS. Qualitative and quantitative consumer research will be carried out to develop segment-specific marketing strategies based on OSIS for all stakeholders. Comprehensive dissemination and training activities, including the preparation of training materials for all stakeholder groups as well as for sales staff, will ensure the entire organic food market has ready access to reliable information.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2007.3.4 | Award Amount: 2.79M | Year: 2008

The objective of the GENESYS project is to develop a cross-domain reference architecture for embedded systems that can be instantiated for different application domains to meet the requirements and constraints documented in the ARTEMIS strategic research agenda. These requirements are composability, networking, security, robustness, diagnosis, integrated resource management and evolvability. The reference architecture will address common issues, such as complexity management, separation of communication and computation, support for different levels of quality of service, security, model-based design, heterogeneity of subsystems, legacy integration, optimal power usage, and diagnosis. It will provide domain-independent services that can be customized to the needs of a particular application domain. Domain-specific platform services will be converged such that components from different application domains can be consistently integrated while preserving relevant properties. The project will result in a conceptualization of the cross-domain architecture, a specification of cross-domain core services and optional services for the selected application domains, and four exploratory prototypes that will demonstrate and help to evaluate the feasibility of selected central architectural concepts in the different application domains. The expected impact of GENESYS is a reduction of development costs and a speed-up of the time-to-market of embedded system development in different application domains, thereby strengthening the European presence in the competitive world-wide embedded systems markets. The support for cross-domain reuse of components is of particular relevance to innovative European SMEs that plan to enter those markets with high-tech products under increasing time pressure. The consortium consists of many major European embedded system suppliers and OEMs encompassing a broad range of application domains, supported by leading research and academic organizations.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.3.5-01 | Award Amount: 12.44M | Year: 2013

KillSpill delivers innovative (bio)technologies, which can be integrated to the real sequences of state-of-the-art actions used currently to cleanup oil spills. The catalogue of KillSpill products & technologies is based on a review of technology & knowledge gaps in approaches of oil spill disasters and brings appropriate tools for 1st response, follow-up, and longer-term actions, specifically tailored to the versatility of oil spills. KillSpill develops chemicals & biochemicals to be used for 1st response actions to disperse/emulsify oil and materials enabling the containment and sorption of oil, preparing the field for the follow-up actions. KillSpill develops (Bio)technologies aiming at intensified biodegradation processes by bioaugmentation/biostimulation as follow-up and longer term actions in aerobic/slight anoxic compartments. KillSpill develops (bio)technologies adapted for the remediation of anoxic/anaerobic fresh & chronically polluted sediments. KillSpill compiles knowledge on dispersion/sorption and biodegradation processes to produce multifunctional products, which are suited for follow-up and longer term actions. The multifunctional products address the necessity for integrated bioremediation (bioavailability, metabolic requirements, etc.) and are efficient along the whole redox gradient from surface water to sediments. The products/technologies are field-tested in open sea oil spills and large mesocosms to unravel the champions products & technologies. The (bio)tools are benchmarked with existing solutions using cutting-edge analytics, biosensors, and omics and checked for eco-efficiency to merit green label. KillSpill consortium is multidisciplinary and gathers 33 partners from 12 EU and EU-associated countries and USA; 18 research & academic institutions, 14 SMEs, and 1 association of oil spill companies work together with the support of a high level advisory board to cover the whole chain of oil spill (bio)remediation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH-2009-5.2.3. | Award Amount: 1.82M | Year: 2010

The project will explore two interrelated sociocultural dynamics that impactthe future of European integration and have a profound effect on the development of a common European culture by challenging established ethnic, class, linguistic and gendered divisions. These are: a.the rise in migrant mobility and the establishment of transnational migrant networks that enable the construction and negotiation of new forms of hybrid identity and a sense of multiple belonging based on the experiences of cultural diversity and intercultural communication, and b. thespread of transnational digital networks that transcend state boundaries and exclusive national identities and give users the potential to participate directly in processes of cultural production, exchange and consumption particularly through the use of new media technologies. More specifically the project will address the question of participation of migrant individuals and groups in transnational digital networks by employing innovative methodologies combining online and offline research. Emphasis will be placed on the ability of migrants to access and produce diverse digital spaces and use them to promote their own needs and demands, but also in the possibilitiesfor the promotion of intercultural dialogue and cooperationthat open through the development of new interactive media. Gender will be mainstreamed and treated as an integral aspect of the research design and analysis throughout the project. In particular, the project will explore theways in which changing gender power relations shape identities and performativities in transnational digital and migrant networks. In order to disseminate information and put the findings of the research into practice, the project will develop a transnational migrant digital platform and an interactive digital game.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.3.9 | Award Amount: 9.64M | Year: 2010

The WiserBAN project will create an ultra-miniature and ultra low-power RF microsystem for wireless Body Area Networks (BAN) targeting primarily wearable and implanted devices for healthcare, biomedical and lifestyle applications.The proposed research concerns the extreme miniaturization of the BAN with primarily the areas of ultra low-power radio SoC (System on Chip), RF and Low-frequency MEMS, miniature reconfigurable antennas, miniaturized SiP (System in Package), sensor signal processing and flexible communication protocols.The WiserBAN microsystem will be 50 times smaller than todays radio modules for Personal Area Networks (PAN) solutions, e.g. Bluetooth, that can simply not be embedded in a variety of tiny implants and wearable applications. WiserBAN will thus enable significant take up by the European SMEs and industries in healthcare, bio-medical and lifestyle.WiserBAN will also create a major impact on the quality of life of the European Citizens, in particular for improving the comfort and access to ICT for impaired and disabled people of all ages carrying implants or wearing medical devices, hence reducing the risk of social exclusion.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: GERI-4-2014 | Award Amount: 2.30M | Year: 2016

The overall objective of PLOTINA is to enable the development, implementation and assessment of self-tailored Gender Equality Plans (GEPs) with innovative and sustainable strategies for the Research Performing Organizations (RPOs) involved. This objective will be achieved by: i) Stimulating a gender-aware culture change; ii) Promoting career-development of both female and male researchers to prevent the waste of talent, particularly for women; iii) Ensuring diversification of views and methodologies (in this case by taking into account the gender/sex dimension and analysis) in research and teaching. PLOTINA is a partnership of RPOs, Professional Associations and Partners with specific expertise in monitoring the progress of the project and in the dissemination. The consortium represents the diversity of European RPOs as well as the diversity of European social and cultural environments. The workplan will proceed in four overall stages: i) Assess the current situation in all Partner RPOs; ii) Design GEPs for each RPO, iii) Design, implement and evaluate Actions in the Partner RPOs to address the targets of the GEPs, iv) Create a platform of resources that can be used by RPOs across Europe to implement their own GEPs suited to their own situations. The GEPs Actions will support systemic and sustainable changes at the institutional and departmental of the PLOTINAs RPOs. The end results will be a set of modular and adaptable resources for other RPOs at the starting stage in the setting up of GEPs, in particular: Tools, GEPs Library of Actions, research and teaching Case Studies and Good Practices. Strongly aligned with a European Research Area (ERA) objectives on gender equality, PLOTINA will contribute to increase the number of female researcher, promote their careers and integrate of the gender dimension into the design, evaluation and implementation of research, to enhance its quality and relevance foster excellence and the social value of innovations.


Puzzarini C.,University of Bologna | Stanton J.F.,University of Texas at Austin | Gauss J.,University Mainz
International Reviews in Physical Chemistry | Year: 2010

This review provides a computational chemist's perspective of rotational spectroscopy and discusses the theoretical background and application of state-of-the-art quantum-chemical methods for the accurate determination of the relevant spectroscopic parameters. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 2.87M | Year: 2016

Life expectancy is increasing dramatically, but the period of good health (healthspan) enjoyed by most is not keeping pace, with implications for health, social care, and pensions resulting in estimated costs more than doubling by 2050. Thus, understanding the many factors that contribute to healthy ageing versus frailty, and validating interventions and influencing policy to promote healthy ageing is a cross-cutting research priority in Europe. Given the considerable impact of lifestyle factors on healthy ageing and disease, there is a surprising lack of innovative multi-disciplinary training and research examining the influence of physical activity and nutrition on age-related changes at gene to societal level. PANINI will address this gap by coordinating research laboratories across Europe to focus on cutting-edge ageing and health research through training 11 ESRs across scientific disciplines to create a holistic approach to the challenge of ageing in the 21st Century. PANINI is a European Training Network with 8 world-leading beneficiaries working on Healthy Ageing and 10 non-academic partners carefully selected for quality and range of sectors. These vary in size including 1 large nutrition company, 5 SMEs, 2 charities, 1 healthcare partnership and 1 EU Joint Research Centre. PANINIs vision is to implement multidisciplinary cross-sectoral research and training of a new cohort of researchers taking a radically innovative approach to overcome the challenge of unhealthy ageing. The main goals of PANINI are to: integrate expertise from basic biomedical science and technology to applied clinical practice; standardise measurements across the network to create a toolkit and shared dataset; provide multidisciplinary training secondments to expose ESRs to healthcare and industry research settings and other laboratories; disseminate widely the shared and individual project findings; and use these to develop a policy document to promote healthy ageing in Europe.


Climate change and population growth are expected to exacerbate the water crisis of Mediterranean African Countries (MACs), where agriculture accounts for 80-85% of freshwater consumption. The aim of MADFORWATER is to develop a set of integrated technological and management solutions to enhance wastewater treatment, reuse for irrigation and water efficiency in agriculture in three MACs (Tunisia, Morocco and Egypt). MADFORWATER will develop and adapt to three main hydrological basins in the selected MACs technologies for the production of irrigation-quality water from drainage canals, municipal, agro-industrial and industrial wastewaters, and technologies for water efficiency and reuse in agriculture, initially validated at laboratory scale. Selected technologies will be further adapted and validated in four field pilot plants of integrated wastewater treatment/reuse. Integrated strategies for wastewater treatment and reuse targeted to the selected basins will be developed, and guidelines for the development of integrated water management strategies in other basins of the three target MACs will be produced, considering climate change, population increase and economic growth scenarios. The social and technical suitability of the developed technologies and non-technological instruments in relation to the local context will be evaluated with the participation of MAC stakeholders and partners. Guidelines on economic instruments and policies for the effective implementation of the proposed water management solutions in the target MACs will be developed. The project will lead to a relevant long-term impact in Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia in terms of increased wastewater treatment, wastewater reuse, food production and income in the agricultural and water treatment sectors, and decreased groundwater exploitation, water pollution and food contamination. The MADFORWATER consortium consists of 18 partners, 5 of which from the 3 MACs and 1 from China.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: REFLECTIVE-3-2015 | Award Amount: 2.50M | Year: 2016

The PERCEIVE (Perception and Evaluation of Regional and Cohesion policies by Europeans and Identification with the Values of Europe) project aims at both mapping and explaining inter- and intra-regional variations in: a) the experiences and results of cohesion policy implementation, b) citizens awareness and appreciation of EU efforts for delivering cohesion and c) European identities and citizens identification with the EU. In doing so, PERCEIVE will develop a comprehensive theory of cohesion in diversity, and use this theory to create a better understanding of the channels through which European policies contribute to create both different local understandings of the EU and different levels of European identification across profoundly different European regions. In addressing the aim of the project, PERCEIVE contrasts two different perspectives: a rational choice perspective stressing mainly the idea of institutions as rules of the game and the calculative rationality of actors as determinants of European identities and identification, and a social constructivist perspective stressing mainly the idea that European identities and identification emerge from a process of social learning associated with different institutional discourses. PERCEIVE relies on a multidisciplinary portfolio of competences bridging socio-political, regional-economic and public-administrative backgrounds. It integrates the use of both qualitative and quantitative analytical methods such as surveys, focus groups, case studies and econometric modelling. In addition, it uses particularly innovative methods such as quantitative discourse analysis to elicit meaning structures in public discourse about the EU, its regional policy and being European. Finally, PERCEIVE will produce a computer simulation environment and embed it into a virtual platform that cohesion policy stakeholders will be able to use and produce what-if analysis and long-term scenario analysis of the effects of policies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: ERC-ADG | Phase: ERC-ADG-2015 | Award Amount: 2.49M | Year: 2016

Contemporary organizations face three interrelated, but analytically distinguishable, challenges. First, they should be alert to mistakes that could be catastrophic. Second, they need to allocate attention, especially to correct past mistakes and to make accurate predictions about future developments. Third, they should be innovative, able to stand out from existing categories while being recognized as outstanding. This project investigates these cognitive challenges with the aim of developing a comprehensive sociological approach to study the social properties of cognition. Research on error detection, attention allocation, and recognizant innovation will be conducted in three distinct settings strategically chosen so the scale and complexity of the performance challenges increases across the cases. The research question that cuts across the socio-cognitive challenges asks whether and how diversity contributes to performance. 1) We first test whether social context, understood at the most basic level as the composition of a small collectivity, affects the cognitive activity of pricing. To do so, I use experimental market methods to test whether ethnic and gender diversity deflate price bubbles by disrupting herding behaviour. 2) The second study tests how the social structure of attention affects valuation. The activities involve error correction and accuracy of prediction in estimates by securities analysts; the method is two-mode network analysis; and the timing, intensity, and diversity of attention networks are the effects to be tested. 3) Whereas my first two tests examine relations among competitors, my third examines relations within and across collaborative teams. In studying the network properties of creativity, the challenge is recognizant innovation, the activity involves recording sessions in the field of music, the method is cultural network analysis, and the effects to be tested are the combined effects of stylistic diversity and social structure.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: BBI-CSA | Phase: BBI.S2-2015 | Award Amount: 965.75K | Year: 2016

With the five broad application areas of the BBI JU Scientific Innovation and Research Agenda, which defines the key areas around which projects should be developed, at its core, the BIOCOM action will develop excellent promotional and educational materials and design and implement pubic engagement activities, based on this material. These activities will be focused on promoting bio-based industries and the huge potential of their products. BIOCOM intends to meet the need for better communication of bio-based products and applications and the benefits they bring. In order to attain this ambitious challenge, the BIOCOM Consortium proposes providing a wide range of integrated, high-level activities and tools with recognised added value for communication programmes, having EU Citizens as their main target. Tools being developed to achieve this include an innovative online collaboration platform and social network, an accessible library of bio-based products, the development of training materials, social hack days, co-creation workshops, an eConference, BarCamps and thematic Charettes.


Kato M.,University of Bologna | Kato M.,Kansai Medical University | Serretti A.,University of Bologna
Molecular Psychiatry | Year: 2010

This systematic review summarizes pharmacogenetic studies on antidepressant response and side effects. Out of the 17 genes we reviewed, 8 genes were entered into the meta-analysis (SLC6A4, HTR1A, HTR2A, TPH1, gene encoding the Β-3 subunit, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), HTR3A and HTR3B). TPH1 218C/C genotype (7 studies, 754 subjects) was significantly associated with a better response (odds ratio, OR1.62; P0.005) with no heterogeneity between ethnicities. A better response was also observed in subjects with the Met variant within the BDNF 66Val/Met polymorphism (4 studies, 490 subjects; OR1.63, P0.02). Variable number of tandem repeats polymorphism within intron 2 (STin2) 12/12 genotype showed a trend toward a better response in Asians (STin2: 5 studies, 686 subjects; OR3.89, P0.03). As for side effects, pooled ORs of serotonin transporter gene promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) l (9 studies, 2642 subjects) and HTR2A 1438G/G (7 studies, 801 subjects) were associated with a significant risk modulation (OR0.64, P0.0005) and (OR1.91, P0.0006), respectively. Interestingly, this significance became more robust when analyzed with side effect induced by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors only (5-HTTLPR: P0.0001, HTR2A: P0.0001). No significant result could be observed for the other variants. These results were not corrected for multiple testing in each variant, phenotype and subcategory. This would have required a Bonferroni significance level of P0.0023. Although some heterogeneity was present across studies, our finding suggests that 5-HTTLPR, STin2, HTR1A, HTR2A, TPH1 and BDNF may modulate antidepressant response. © 2010 Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2007.1.1 | Award Amount: 16.47M | Year: 2008

The ALPHA project addresses the challenges of building the future access and all types of in-building networks for home and office environments. The proposal supports the evolution towards a cognitive network by dynamically utilising the resources of an optical network infrastructure to support a heterogeneous environment of wired and wireless technologies.\nThe project investigates innovative architectural and transmission solutions based on the manifold of optical fibres (single-, multi-mode and plastic) as well as wireless technology to support both wired and wireless services in a converged network infrastructure. The focus is on using the newest physical layer achievements and adequate management and control algorithms to reach a yet unprecedented end-to-end provisioned capacity for access and in-building networks at a fraction of the price of todays technologies and to simultaneously include the transport of existing 2G/3G and Beyond 3G (B3G) signals whether they are Internet Protocol (IP) or non-IP-based.\n\nThe project starts with analysing the potential future bandwidth and quality-of-service (QoS) requirements which can be posed by future services in the scope of access and in-building networks such as Ultra HD Video, Local Storage Area Network, remote medical applications and others, and mapping those requirements into network specifications. The questions on the best applicable media, necessity for optical layer dynamics, compatibility of network types at the physical layer, foundations for better QoS provisioning and embedding of 2G/3G and B3G signals into the networks are then addressed within the project.\n\nThe project pursues experimental validations of close-to-maturity technologies in laboratory tests and field trials by intensively exploiting the three project testbeds. The project also includes long-term research activities targeting to improve the existing technologies, and follows an intensive dissemination and standardisation strategy.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC1-PM-09-2016 | Award Amount: 6.00M | Year: 2017

Liver cirrhosis is a very common chronic disease and one of the leading causes of death in European. Moreover, cirrhosis has a marked impact in patients quality of life and represents a major burden for health systems. Treatment of cirrhosis is currently based on symptomatic management of complications and has not changed substantially in the last 20 years. There is an unmet need for therapies that target the pathobiology of cirrhosis. The objective of LIVERHOPE project is to evaluate a novel therapeutic strategy for patients with cirrhosis based on a combination of rifaximin and simvastatin, targeting the main pathophysiological mechanisms of disease progression , namely the impairment in the gut-liver axis and the persistent hepatic and systemic inflammatory response. This dual therapeutic approach is supported by preclinical data showing excellent and very promising results. We will perform two randomized double-blind trials to investigate safety, tolerability and efficacy of combination of simvastatin plus rifaximin in patients with decompensated cirrhosis in 5 EU countries (285 patients will be enrolled in two trials in DE, ES, FR, IT, UK). The expected impact is to halt progression to acute-on-chronic liver failure, the main cause of death, to decrease complications of the disease, to reduce hospital readmissions, to improve cost-effectiveness of therapy. Our final aim is to improve patients quality-of-life and increase survival as patients care is the core of LIVERHOPE. Within the project we will also investigate biomarkers of response to treatment and disease progression that can be useful in clinical practice for improving the treatment of patients. We will invest our effort also in communication and dissemination activities for increasing awareness about chronic liver diseases in European countries so that preventive measures can be established to decrease the burden of cirrhosis and reduce social stigmatization of patients with chronic liver diseases.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2007-1-2-14 | Award Amount: 3.90M | Year: 2008

Although exploited fishes have traditionally been managed on a geographic basis, for conservation purposes they should be managed at the population level: the extent and dynamics of population structuring underlies resilience and sustainability. More effective enforcement and conservation demands a focus on identification and monitoring of wild fish populations and traceability of products. FishPopTrace brings together expertise in fish traceability projects (Fish and Chips, FishTrace, FISH-BOL) to: 1.Integrate data from European fish species traceability projects, and to generate a single compatible database and tissue archive managed by the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission. 2. Examine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and otolith microchemistry and morphometrics in widely distributed populations of cod, hake, herring and sole. Outputs will comprise population-level signatures associated with fish origins in early life and representative spawning groups. 3. Undertake validation of traceability tools in relation to end-user technology. 4. Develop a population monitoring system based on genetic and otolith data that will assess population stability in a temporal and spatial framework. 5. Test the utility of additional novel traceability systems (fatty acid profiles, proteomics, gene expression, microarray platform for SNP genotyping). 6. Facilitate technology transfer in relation to enforcement and conservation policies of the EU Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) and associated socio-economic consequences. Outputs from FishPopTrace will improve the traceability of fish and fish products and protection of consumer interests through enhanced understanding of the dynamics, temporal stability and distribution of major populations of four key exploited fish species. Central elements of the output will be the development and evaluation of end-user tools, a Cost Benefit Analysis and a final report setting FishPopTrace in the context of the CFP.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

New Rochelle, NY, Feb. 9, 2017 -- A comprehensive collection of articles describing the broad scope and current status of this global effort is published in a special issue of AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The third annual Special Issue on HIV Cure Research is available free on the AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses website. Leonardo Calza and coauthors from University of Bologna (Italy), have shown that statins, which are commonly prescribed to lower blood lipid levels, can also significantly reduce the concentration of D-dimer, a marker of coagulation, and of two markers of inflammation known as interleukins (IL-8 and IL-10) in HIV-infected individuals. The anti-inflammatory properties of statins and their potential effects on blood clot formation could help reduce HIV-associated comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease. The researchers present their findings in the article entitled "Significant Decrease in Plasma Levels of D-Dimer, Interleukin-8, and Interleukin-12 After a 12-Month Treatment with Rosuvastatin in HIV-Infected Patients Under Antiretroviral Therapy." In the article "Lower Frailty Is Associated with Successful Cognitive Aging Among Older Adults with HIV," Lindsay Wallace and coauthors from Dalhousie University (Halifax, Canada), University of Modena and Reggio Emilia (Modena, Italy), and University of California San Diego, identified factors associated with better cognitive function among HIV-infected individuals 50 years of age or older being treated with combination antiretroviral therapy. The researchers found that study participants who scored lower on a frailty index were less likely to have neurocognitive impairment. Heather Grome and colleagues from Vanderbilt University Medical Center (Nashville, TN), report on the role that persistent T-cell and macrophage activation in HIV-infected adults on combination antiretroviral therapy may have on the function of arterial blood vessels. The effects of HIV-related chronic immune activation on the arterial lining and vascular smooth muscle may promote the development of atherosclerosis and plaque formation that can lead to cardiovascular disease. The researchers present measures of blood-based inflammatory and immune activation markers and the results of brachial artery flow-mediated dilation on ultrasound in the article entitled "Association of T Cell and Macrophage Activation with Arterial Vascular Health in HIV." "It is becoming clear that although HIV-infected individuals can control the amount of virus in their system with antiviral treatments, there are still negative health consequences that look like premature aging, including cardiovascular disease and cognitive impairment," says Thomas Hope, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses and Professor of Cell and Molecular Biology at Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine (Chicago, IL). "These three papers and others in the Cure issue seek a better understanding of the cause of this accelerated aging. The Calza article suggests that taking statins, which reduce lipid levels, may be an effective treatment to reduce damaging inflammation in HIV-infected individuals taking appropriate antiviral therapy," Research reported by Grome et al. was supported by the National Institutes of Health under Award Numbers K23 100700, K24 AI65298, UL1 RR024975-01, and P30 AI110527. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, published monthly online with open access options and in print, presents papers, reviews, and case studies documenting the latest developments and research advances in the molecular biology of HIV and SIV and innovative approaches to HIV vaccine and therapeutic drug research, including the development of antiretroviral agents and immune-restorative therapies. Content also explores the molecular and cellular basis of HIV pathogenesis and HIV/HTLV epidemiology. The Journal features rapid publication of emerging sequence information, reports on clinical trials of emerging HIV therapies, and images in HIV research. Tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses website. Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including AIDS Patient Care and STDs, Viral Immunology, and Journal of Interferon and Cytokine Research. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.


News Article | December 19, 2016
Site: marketersmedia.com

Luxo Italia, a group of luxury travel advisors specializing in Italian luxury holidays, launched a complete range of luxury travel services for a variety of tourist resort throughout Italy, including Milan, Rome, and the famous seaside resorts along the Mediterranean. More information is available at http://luxoitalia.com. Italy has always been one of the worldwide favorite luxury travel destination. Its rich history, culture and beautiful natural scenery make it a top holiday destination for tourists throughout the world. Luxo Italia launched complete luxury holidays services for clients looking to visit Italy, with fully customized itinerary planning, as well as booking and transport services. The luxury holiday agency offers personalized assistance from pre-booking through to the trip back home, in an effort to provide competitive luxury holiday services in Italy. The heart of the Roman Empire, Italy is rich in architectural and urban centers showcasing some of Europe’s most renowned historical attractions. Famous cities such as Rome, Milan and Bologna are famous for their unique architecture and historical monuments, such as the famous Coliseum, the University of Bologna, the world’s oldest university, or the Tower of Pisa. Luxo Italia offers tailor-suited luxury holiday plans for all these historical centers. The most popular time to visit Italy is spring and summer, as the mild Mediterranean weather provides an oasis of comfort. Seaside resorts offer impressive views of exotic mountains merging with the pristine blue sea, and the lush islands of Sicily and Sardinia have something for everyone, from hiking enthusiasts to history fans. The luxury travel advisors at Luxo Italia can secure holiday deals for both spring and summer holidays in many Italian destinations such as Milan and Rome. The Italian culture is famous for its cuisine and exquisite wines. However, most of the best places are relatively unknown to tourists, being inaccessible without inside guidance. Luxo Italia provides complete 24/7 personal assistance, meet and greet services on the day of arrival, access to exclusive places and activities otherwise unavailable and more additional benefits. What makes Luxo Italia really special is the personal touch. Paul and Andrea, the two young entrepreneurs who founded it are always in touch with the clients. They not only offer their full knowledge and connections to create life time experiences visiting the truly authentic side of Italy but they go the extra mile; they personally welcome the guests to Italy offering a level of assistance nobody on the market is able to offer. With Luxo Italia travelers come to Italy as a guest but leave as a friends. Interested parties can find more information by visiting the above-mentioned link. For more information, please visit http://www.luxoitalia.com


News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.nature.com

Jiri Lukas' research centre was at a crossroads four years ago. Bankrolled by the Novo Nordisk Foundation, the organization was facing a mid-term evaluation, and its funding was at risk. Lukas, executive director of the Center for Protein Research at the University of Copenhagen, wanted to apply for a grant extension, but was worried that his efforts would be wasted. It was rare at the time for foundations that award grants for biomedical research to further their support beyond one-time, limited-term funding. A colleague told Lukas that the science in his application was strong, but that the application itself didn't make the best case for the societal impact and unique nature of the centre. The colleague advised Lukas to consult with scientific-communication specialists at Elevate Scientific in Malmö, Sweden. “The rest was kind of a fairy tale,” Lukas says. With help from Elevate, the centre won the extension. When it comes to seeking either government or private funding, grant writers and editors are a useful resource for scientists in both academia and industry. Scientists call on them for a variety of reasons. Some simply don't have time to do it themselves. Others know that they aren't good writers, or lack a sufficient command of English. Some are struggling to get funding. Grant writers can help with finding the right organizations to fund a project, as well as with writing the application. They can hone and focus the message, ensure consistency between sections drafted by different authors and assure adherence to strict page limits. Grant writers and editors help with everything that isn't the science, yet can still significantly affect a proposal's chance of success. Many researchers still go it alone in preparing grant applications, but the funding landscape has changed, and scientists are now less hesitant to ask for help, says Sheila Cherry, president of Fresh Eyes Editing in Dayton, Ohio. Many funders expect applicants to seek assistance. The written guidelines from the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), for example, make that clear: “If writing is not your forte, seek help!” There should be no shame in asking for guidance, says Anders Tunlid, a microbial ecologist at Lund University in Sweden who has reviewed grants for the European Research Council. “We need to accept that this is the way we all do it,” he says. “I don't think that everyone has written their proposals themselves.” Colleagues may be willing to review an application's scientific content — but they are typically too busy to spare the hours needed for fine-tuning. “Everyone needs a little bit of help, if only to find typos,” points out David O'Keefe, senior grant writer at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California. The Salk offers the service for free to its researchers, but external help comes at a price: basic editing services can run from US$500 to thousands of dollars, depending on the application. “It's an investment, for sure,” says Stefano Goffredo, a marine ecologist at the University of Bologna in Italy. But after spending months on a proposal, he thinks it's worth opening his wallet to get a professional polish. Without that polish, it's all too easy for reviewers to quickly discount an application, says Laura Hales, principal of the Isis Group, a scientific consulting and communications service in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She has served as a reviewer herself and can attest to the fact that first impressions count for everything. “You have,” she says, “one chance.” Independent data are essentially non-existent on how professional grant-writing services affect success rates. Companies' claims for success range from more than three times the average rate for NIH grants to six times the average rate for the European Union's Horizon 2020 grants. But the companies themselves concede that they can offer no guarantees. “Just because I know the formula doesn't mean I'm going to get every one,” says Hales. Institutions might pay for support for a junior scientist's first few grants, says Susan Marriott, president of BioScience Writers in Houston, Texas, but the support can be useful for mid- to later-stage-career researchers, too. Working with Elevate Scientific was a “humbling” experience, says Lukas, even as a senior scientist. The editors identified unclear sections, improved graphics and strengthened the logic in the proposal to communicate the message more effectively. Senior researchers in a collaboration may also use a grant editor as a project manager to ensure that all the pieces come together in a neat package by the submission deadline. It was just such a multi-investigator project that led Bruce Johnson to call in Fresh Eyes Editing. Every author tends to use their own formatting for elements such as headings and references, he notes, and editors can give the document a consistent style. “It makes it look so much more professional,” says Johnson, chief clinical research officer at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. Editors also catch inconsistencies and redundancies in the content. For example, a large document on lung cancer does not need to repeat in every author's section that it's the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. And one scientist might cite a statistic that 15% of people with lung cancer have a certain mutation, whereas another might write 25%. That inconsistency could cause reviewers to think that the collaborators aren't talking to one another, Johnson says, which would not inspire a sense of confidence that the team could carry out the project together. Grant helpers vary in the assistance they provide, and at different stages of the proposal process. Some get involved at the very start, strategizing about where to apply for funding. “It's not only about how you write an application,” says Ram May-Ron, managing partner with the FreeMind Group in Boston. “The search starts with identifying which funding opportunity is the best one for a particular part of a research project.” Scientists may have heard of big funding initiatives, such as Horizon 2020, but there might be other opportunities they should consider, says Eran Har-Paz, vice-president for sales at Sunrise Projects in Rosh Ha'Ayin, Israel. “We try to build a strategy, a few alternatives to submit to,” he says. “Don't put all your eggs in one basket.” At this level, grant helpers may reach out to programme officers, says May-Ron. For example, they might ask whether an agency has funded similar research recently, and whether they're at all interested in doing so again. “If you go to the right place, you're already in a better position,” he points out. This full-scale service comes at a price, of course. Har-Paz estimates that the simplest proposal might cost a few thousand euros, with the cost escalating to €20,000 (US$21,414) or more for elaborate applications. That includes not only the strategizing, but also writing the majority of the application. Some scientists already hand off much of the writing to others. Cath Ennis, a project manager and grant writer in Vancouver, Canada, might contribute an abstract, literature review, impact statement or budget, depending on the scientists' needs — but never the research plan itself. “Our role is to take all the jobs that we can from the principal investigator, so they can focus more on the research,” she says. Other grant professionals stick to editing — but that's more than just dotting i's and crossing t's. Grant editors consider content, clarity, logic and flow. Grant professionals can be found in a variety of places: some work for a company and others as freelancers whereas some institutions have in-house specialists (see 'How to become a grant writer'). “Start talking early,” advises Marriott, who is also a virologist at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. “Even if you don't have a grant ready yet, even if you don't know what you're going to write.” It's beneficial to get on an editor's calendar as early as possible, because by the time the deadline rolls around, they could have many scientists clamouring for their attention. Later on, editors may be still able to help, but in a more limited fashion, she says. Scientists tend to look for someone with a PhD and the right technical expertise. But the match doesn't have to be exact. “I've edited grants about nuclear physics,” says Ennis, whose background is in cancer biology. “I can still catch a typo when someone's put 'proton' instead of 'photon'.” Equally important, Ennis says, is to look for editors who specialize in the kind of grant one's after — say, NIH, Horizon 2020 or foundation grants. Every programme has its own requirements, and the professional should know those inside out. With candidates in mind, the next step is to get to know them. Ask a potential editor or writer about their process, and the services they do and don't provide, advises Cherry. “It's a lot more than just, 'What's your fee and how soon can you get this done?'” she says. Timing and costs are, nonetheless, key questions. It's best to get an estimate in advance to avoid a surprise charge later. One should also ask for a confidentiality clause in the contract. Then, be prepared for plenty of back-and-forth. “Remember that it's a collaborative process,” says Cherry. “Don't be afraid to bring up concerns and make sure you're really collaborating.”


BEVERLY, Mass., Feb. 22, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Cellceutix Corporation, (OTCQB:CTIX) (“the Company”), a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company developing innovative therapies with dermatology, oncology, anti-inflammatory, and antibiotic applications, today announced progression of its ongoing Phase 2 clinical trial of Brilacidin to the third cohort (highest dose) for induction of remission of mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis after satisfactory safety of prior cohorts was reported by the study’s Safety Committee.  Patients included those with Ulcerative Proctitis/Ulcerative Proctosigmoiditis (UP/UPS), two types of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). The ongoing Phase 2, open-label, proof-of-concept trial comprises three sequential cohorts (6 patients per cohort), with progressive dose escalation by cohort—50 mg, 100 mg, and 200 mg, respectively. Treatment with Brilacidin by daily enema administration is performed for 42 days. Patients continued to tolerate the treatment well in Cohort B, echoing comments from patients in Cohort A by reporting improvements in quality of life.  Even with the dose doubling from the first cohort (50 mg) to 100 mg, drug concentrations in plasma remained in a favorable range, averaging 200 ng/mL maximum concentrations across the six patients in Cohort B. Efficacy data are currently being analyzed and patients for Cohort C (200 mg group) are now being enrolled. Alerts: Sign-up for Cellceutix email alerts is available at: www.cellceutix.com/email-alerts Brilacidin is Cellceutix’s lead drug candidate in its defensin mimetic franchise. Modeled after Host Defense Proteins (HDPs), the “front-line” of defense in the immune system, it is a small, non-peptidic, synthetic molecule that kills pathogens swiftly and thoroughly. Just as importantly, Brilacidin also functions in a robust immunomodulatory capacity, lessening inflammation and promoting healing. Due to its unique properties, Cellceutix is studying Brilacidin’s effect on oral mucositis (under Fast Track designation) and on ulcerative proctitis/proctosigmoiditis (UP/UPS) in Phase 2 trials. Additional trials of Brilacidin are planned in other conditions, including: hidradenitis suppurativa and acne. Brilacidin is also being developed under FDA’s Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP) designation as an antibacterial product for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections (ABSSSI)—qualifying it for Fast Track and possible Priority FDA Review and an extra 5 years of United States market exclusivity upon drug approval. Ulcerative proctitis (UP), a limited type of ulcerative colitis (UC), is a mucosal inflammatory disease of unknown cause involving only the rectum. When it involves both the rectum and the distal colon, it is called Ulcerative Proctosigmoiditis (UPS). It is characterized by inflammation, redness, and ulcerations of the mucosa. The course of the disease is variable and ranges from complete resolution to easily maintained remission to chronic relapses or refractory disease. Diagnosis can occur at any point in life, with approximately 30-50 percent of patients developing more extensive UC. There is currently no cure. According to estimates provided by GlobalData, the worldwide UC market, which includes products for UP/UPS, is expected to increase at a compound annual growth rate of 4.7 percent, from $4.2 billion in 2012 to approximately $6.6 billion by 2022. This trial is being conducted in an overseas hospital/clinic setting with Brilacidin being administered with water in an enema. A foam formulation of Brilacidin for use in future studies is planned and would be expected to improve patient convenience and study results. The primary objective of Cellceutix’s Proof-of-Concept (PoC) trial is to assess the frequency of clinical remission (defined using Modified Mayo Disease Activity Index [MMDAI] scoring) with Brilacidin administered per rectum by enema in patients with active UP or UPS after 6 weeks of treatment. Secondary objectives include: evaluation of safety and tolerability of Brilacidin when administered per rectum; assessment of systemic exposure and/or pharmacokinetics of Brilacidin when administered per rectum; assessment of the efficacy of Brilacidin by change in MMDAI at Day 42/Week 6 and Partial MMDAI during treatment and by biomarker evaluation (from serum, feces, and rectum/sigmoid biopsy samples); evaluation of change in patient-reported quality of life (by the Short Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire); and estimation of statistical power for subsequent trial(s) in UP and UPS. The PoC trial will include 18 patients divided evenly into three cohorts. Cohort A is receiving 50 milligrams (mg) of Brilacidin once daily administered per rectum as a retention enema for 42 days. Dosing will be increased to 100 mg and 200 mg once daily for 42 days for Cohort B and Cohort C, respectively. Endoscopic evaluation of the rectum and mucosa up to 40 cm from the anal verge will be performed at screening and at the end of treatment/Day 42 (± 3 days). Per protocol, a Safety Committee will review safety and retention data (clinical laboratory findings, vital signs, adverse events, retention times) after 21 days of therapy for all six patients in each cohort before proceeding with initiating enrollment into the subsequent cohort. About Cellceutix Headquartered in Beverly, Massachusetts, Cellceutix is a publicly-traded company under the symbol “CTIX”. Cellceutix is a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company developing innovative therapies in multiple diseases. Cellceutix believes it has a world-class portfolio of first-in-class lead drug candidates and is now advancing them toward market approval, while actively seeking strategic partnerships. Cellceutix’s psoriasis drug candidate Prurisol completed a Phase 2 trial and Cellceutix recently launched a Phase 2b study. Prurisol is a small molecule that acts through immune modulation and PRINS reduction. Cellceutix’s anti-cancer drug Kevetrin successfully concluded a Phase 1 clinical trial at Harvard Cancer Centers’ Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and Cellceutix has commenced a Phase 2 study. In the laboratory, Kevetrin has shown to induce activation of p53, often referred to as the “Guardian Angel Gene” due to its crucial role in controlling cell mutations. Cellceutix is in a Phase 2 clinical trial with its novel compound Brilacidin-OM for the prevention of oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer. Brilacidin-OM, a defensin mimetic compound, has shown in an animal model to reduce the occurrence of severe ulcerative oral mucositis by more than 94% compared to placebo. Cellceutix’s lead antibiotic, Brilacidin, has completed a Phase 2b trial for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infection, or ABSSSI. Top-line data have shown a single dose of Brilacidin to deliver comparable clinical outcomes to the FDA-approved seven-day dosing regimen of daptomycin. Brilacidin has the potential to be a single-dose therapy for certain multi-drug resistant bacteria (“superbugs”). In an ongoing Phase 2 open label Proof-of-Concept trial, favorable interim results have been observed in the first cohort of patients treated with Brilacidin for Ulcerative Proctitis/Ulcerative Proctosigmoiditis (UP/UPS), two types of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).  Cellceutix has formed research collaborations with world-renowned research institutions in the United States and Europe, including MD Anderson Cancer Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and the University of Bologna. More information is available on the Cellceutix web site at www.cellceutix.com. Forward-Looking Statements: This press release contains forward-looking statements made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 including statements concerning projected timelines for the initiation and completion of clinical trials, our future drug development plans, other statements regarding future product developments, including with respect to specific indications, and any other statements which are other than statements of historical fact. These statements involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions that could cause Cellceutix’s actual results and experience to differ materially from anticipated results and expectations expressed in these forward-looking statements. Cellceutix has in some cases identified forward-looking statements by using words such as “anticipates,” “believes,” “hopes,” “estimates,” “looks,” “expects,” “plans,” “intends,” “goal,” “potential,” “may,” “suggest,” and similar expressions. Among other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in forward-looking statements are Cellceutix’s need for, and the availability of, substantial capital in the future to fund its operations and research and development; including the amount and timing of the sale of shares of common stock to Aspire Capital; the fact that Cellceutix’s compounds may not successfully complete pre-clinical or clinical testing, or be granted regulatory approval to be sold and marketed in the United States or elsewhere. A more complete description of these risk factors is included in Cellceutix’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. You should not place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements. Cellceutix undertakes no obligation to release publicly the results of any revisions to any such forward-looking statements that may be made to reflect events or circumstances after the date of this press release or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events, except as required by applicable law or regulation.


BEVERLY, Mass., Dec. 07, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Cellceutix Corporation, (OTCQB:CTIX) (“the Company”), a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company developing innovative therapies with dermatology, oncology, anti-inflammatory, and antibiotic applications, is pleased to announce today initiation of the second cohort of patients treated with Brilacidin for Ulcerative Proctitis/Ulcerative Proctosigmoiditis (UP/UPS), two types of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Review of safety data from the first cohort revealed that Brilacidin, administered for 6 weeks as a retention enema, at 50 mg once daily, appeared well-tolerated, with no measurable systemic absorption detected. This drug profile, at the lowest dose, allowed the approval of dose escalation to the second cohort (100 mg, once daily). Clinically meaningful improvements in symptoms of UP/UPS were also demonstrated in the first cohort, as measured by physician assessments and patient reported outcomes, further supported with endoscopic evaluation of disease activity. The ongoing Phase 2, open-label, proof-of-concept clinical trial is evaluating Brilacidin for induction of remission, not merely maintenance, in patients suffering from mild-to-moderate UP/UPS.  The trial comprises three sequential cohorts (6 patients per cohort), with progressive dose escalation by cohort—50 mg, 100 mg, and 200 mg Brilacidin, respectively. Treatment with Brilacidin by daily enema administration is performed consecutively for 42 days. “We remain extremely encouraged by the results that continue to emerge from this trial. In addition, the clinical sites at which the study is being performed are now even more enthusiastic about recruiting additional patients to the trial. Such enthusiasm is a good indicator of Brilacidin’s potential in treating ulcerative colitis and other inflammatory bowel diseases. We look forward to seeing data from the next cohorts,” said Arthur P. Bertolino, MD, PhD, MBA, Cellceutix President and Chief Medical Officer. Sign-up for Cellceutix email alerts is available at: Brilacidin is Cellceutix’s lead drug candidate in its defensin mimetic franchise. Modeled after Host Defense Proteins (HDPs), the “front-line” of defense in the immune system, it is a small, non-peptidic, synthetic molecule that kills pathogens swiftly and thoroughly. Just as importantly, Brilacidin also functions in a robust immunomodulatory capacity, lessening inflammation and promoting healing. Due to its unique properties, Cellceutix is studying Brilacidin’s effect on oral mucositis (under Fast Track designation) and on ulcerative proctitis/proctosigmoiditis (UP/UPS) in Phase 2 trials. Additional trials of Brilacidin are planned in other conditions, including: hidradenitis suppurativa and acne. Brilacidin is also being developed under FDA’s Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP) designation as an antibacterial product for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections (ABSSSI)—qualifying it for Fast Track and possible Priority FDA Review and an extra 5 years of United States market exclusivity upon drug approval. Ulcerative proctitis (UP), a limited type of ulcerative colitis (UC), is a mucosal inflammatory disease of unknown cause involving only the rectum. When it involves both the rectum and the distal colon, it is called Ulcerative Proctosigmoiditis (UPS). It is characterized by inflammation, redness, and ulcerations of the mucosa. The course of the disease is variable and ranges from complete resolution to easily maintained remission to chronic relapses or refractory disease. Diagnosis can occur at any point in life, with approximately 30-50 percent of patients developing more extensive UC. There is currently no cure. According to estimates provided by GlobalData, the worldwide UC market, which includes products for UP/UPS, is expected to increase at a compound annual growth rate of 4.7 percent, from $4.2 billion in 2012 to approximately $6.6 billion by 2022. This trial is being conducted in an overseas hospital/clinic setting with Brilacidin being administered with water in an enema. A foam formulation of Brilacidin for use in future studies is planned and would be expected to improve patient convenience and study results. The primary objective of Cellceutix’s Proof-of-Concept (PoC) trial is to assess the frequency of clinical remission (defined using Modified Mayo Disease Activity Index [MMDAI] scoring) with Brilacidin administered per rectum by enema in patients with active UP or UPS after 6 weeks of treatment. Additional objectives include: evaluation of safety and tolerability of Brilacidin when administered per rectum; assessment of systemic exposure and/or pharmacokinetics of Brilacidin when administered per rectum; assessment of the efficacy of Brilacidin by change in MMDAI at Day 42/Week 6 and Partial MMDAI during treatment and by biomarker evaluation (from serum, feces, and rectum/sigmoid biopsy samples); evaluation of change in patient-reported quality of life (by the Short Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire); and estimation of statistical power for subsequent trial(s) in UP and UPS. The PoC trial will include 18 patients divided evenly into three cohorts. Cohort A has received 50 milligrams (mg) of Brilacidin once daily administered per rectum as a retention enema for 42 days. Dosing increases to 100 mg and 200 mg once daily for 42 days for Cohort B and Cohort C, respectively. Endoscopic evaluation of the rectum and mucosa up to 40 cm from the anal verge will be performed at screening and at the end of treatment/Day 42 (± 3 days). Per protocol, a safety committee will review safety and retention data (clinical laboratory findings, physical examination findings, vital signs, adverse events, use of concomitant medications, retention times) after 21 days of therapy for all six patients in each cohort before proceeding with initiating enrollment (dosing) into the subsequent cohort. Headquartered in Beverly, Massachusetts, Cellceutix is a publicly-traded company under the symbol “CTIX”. Cellceutix is a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company developing innovative therapies in multiple diseases. Cellceutix believes it has a world-class portfolio of first-in-class lead drug candidates and is now advancing them toward market approval, while actively seeking strategic partnerships. Cellceutix’s psoriasis drug candidate Prurisol completed a Phase 2 trial and Cellceutix recently launched a Phase 2b study. Prurisol is a small molecule that acts through immune modulation and PRINS reduction. Cellceutix’s anti-cancer drug Kevetrin successfully concluded a Phase 1 clinical trial at Harvard Cancer Centers’ Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and Cellceutix is preparing for a Phase 2 study. In the laboratory, Kevetrin has shown to induce activation of p53, often referred to as the “Guardian Angel Gene” due to its crucial role in controlling cell mutations. Cellceutix is in a Phase 2 clinical trial with its novel compound Brilacidin-OM for the prevention of oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer. Brilacidin-OM, a defensin mimetic compound, has shown in an animal model to reduce the occurrence of severe ulcerative oral mucositis by more than 94% compared to placebo. Cellceutix’s lead antibiotic, Brilacidin, has completed a Phase 2b trial for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections, or ABSSSI. Top-line data have shown a single dose of Brilacidin to deliver comparable clinical outcomes to the FDA-approved seven-day dosing regimen of daptomycin. Brilacidin has the potential to be a single-dose therapy for certain multi-drug resistant bacteria (“superbugs”). In an ongoing Phase 2 open label Proof-of-Concept trial, favorable interim results have been observed in the first cohort of patients treated with Brilacidin for Ulcerative Proctitis/Ulcerative Proctosigmoiditis (UP/UPS), two types of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).  Cellceutix has formed research collaborations with world-renowned research institutions in the United States and Europe, including MD Anderson Cancer Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and the University of Bologna. More information is available on the Cellceutix web site at www.cellceutix.com. Forward-Looking Statements: This press release contains forward-looking statements made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 including statements concerning projected timelines for the initiation and completion of clinical trials, our future drug development plans, other statements regarding future product developments, including with respect to specific indications, and any other statements which are other than statements of historical fact. These statements involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions that could cause Cellceutix’s actual results and experience to differ materially from anticipated results and expectations expressed in these forward looking statements. Cellceutix has in some cases identified forward-looking statements by using words such as “anticipates,” “believes,” “hopes,” “estimates,” “looks,” “expects,” “plans,” “intends,” “goal,” “potential,” “may,” “suggest,” and similar expressions. Among other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in forward-looking statements are Cellceutix’s need for, and the availability of, substantial capital in the future to fund its operations and research and development; including the amount and timing of the sale of shares of common stock to Aspire Capital; the fact that Cellceutix’s compounds may not successfully complete pre-clinical or clinical testing, or be granted regulatory approval to be sold and marketed in the United States or elsewhere. A more complete description of these risk factors is included in Cellceutix’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. You should not place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements. Cellceutix undertakes no obligation to release publicly the results of any revisions to any such forward-looking statements that may be made to reflect events or circumstances after the date of this press release or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events, except as required by applicable law or regulation.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: phys.org

European regulation tells us that these benefits only become tangible starting with a 20 g olive oil intake every day, and that they can be claimed only for when this daily intake contains at least 5 mg of hydroxytyrosol and its derivatives. But verifying compliance with this requirement is not as easy it could seem. 'There are sophisticated chromatographic techniques, such as the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to ultraviolet-visible or mass spectrometry detector that are used to evaluate the phenolic content of virgin olive oils,' Giuseppe Di Lecce from the University of Bologna explains. 'However, these systems require very expensive analytical tools and qualified technicians.' Together with a group of researchers from the Universities of Bologna and Vigo, Di Lecce devised a simple analytical method to quantify the phenolic content of extra virgin olive oils. The results of their preliminary study, which was funded under the OLEUM project, are promising. 'The results show that the simple and cheap colorimetric assay based on the use of the Folin-Ciocalteu (FC) reagent can be also efficiently applied to verify the compliance to the polyphenols health claim introduced by the EU Regulation,' Lecce underlines. The FC method is a well-known colorimetric assay that can be executed in any laboratory, and tests carried out by statistical software and focussing on hydroxytyrosol found its data to be fully comparable with those obtained, after hydrolysis, with the HPLC-UV method using hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol. The next step for the team will consist in analysing a large number of samples to draw final conclusions. Still, these early results raise hope that small labs and producers will soon benefit from rapid and innovative instrumental approaches to evaluate the quality and authenticity of olive oils. OLEUM Is a EUR 5 million worth project funded under Horizon 2020. Its overall objective is to assure the quality and authenticity of olive oils at a global scale. Further breakthroughs, including the setup of a reliable protocol for the determination of phenolic compounds in virgin olive oils according to the EU health claim, are expected before its completion in 2020. Explore further: Olive oil is good for you—in more ways than one


Campo E.,University of Barcelona | Swerdlow S.H.,University of Pittsburgh | Harris N.L.,Massachusetts General Hospital | Pileri S.,University of Bologna | And 2 more authors.
Blood | Year: 2011

The World Health Organization classification of lymphoid neoplasms updated in 2008 represents a worldwide consensus on the diagnosis of these tumors and is based on the recognition of distinct diseases, using a multidisciplinary approach. The updated classification refined the definitions of well-recognized diseases, identified new entities and variants, and incorporated emerging concepts in the understanding of lymphoid neoplasms. However, some questions were unresolved, such as the extent to which specific genetic or molecular alterations define certain tumors, and the status of provisional entities, categories for which the World Health Organization working groups felt there was insufficient evidence to recognize as distinct diseases at this time. In addition, since its publication, new findings and ideas have been generated. This review summarizes the scientific rationale for the classification, emphasizing changes that have had an effect on practice guidelines. The authors address the criteria and significance of early or precursor lesions and the identification of certain lymphoid neoplasms largely associated with particular age groups, such as children and the elderly. The issue of borderline categories having overlapping features with large B-cell lymphomas, as well as several provisional entities, is reviewed. These new observations chart a course for future research in the field.


De Giorgio R.,University of Bologna | Volta U.,University of Bologna | Gibson P.R.,Monash University
Gut | Year: 2016

IBS is one of the most common types of functional bowel disorder. Increasing attention has been paid to the causative role of food in IBS. Food ingestion precipitates or exacerbates symptoms, such as abdominal pain and bloating in patients with IBS through different hypothesised mechanisms including immune and mast cell activation, mechanoreceptor stimulation and chemosensory activation. Wheat is regarded as one of the most relevant IBS triggers, although which component(s) of this cereal is/are involved remain(s) unknown. Gluten, other wheat proteins, for example, amylase-trypsin inhibitors, and fructans (the latter belonging to fermentable oligo-di-mono-saccharides and polyols (FODMAPs)), have been identified as possible factors for symptom generation/exacerbation. This uncertainty on the true culprit(s) opened a scenario of semantic definitions favoured by the discordant results of double-blind placebo-controlled trials, which have generated various terms ranging from non-coeliac gluten sensitivity to the broader one of non-coeliac wheat or wheat protein sensitivity or, even, FODMAP sensitivity. The role of FODMAPs in eliciting the clinical picture of IBS goes further since these short-chain carbohydrates are found in many other dietary components, including vegetables and fruits. In this review, we assessed current literature in order to unravel whether gluten/wheat/FODMAP sensitivity represent 'facts' and not 'fiction' in IBS symptoms. This knowledge is expected to promote standardisation in dietary strategies (gluten/wheat-free and low FODMAP) as effective measures for the management of IBS symptoms. © 2016, BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved.


Ozyilmaz E.,Cukurova University | Ugurlu A.O.,Baskent University | Nava S.,University of Bologna
BMC Pulmonary Medicine | Year: 2014

Background: Identifying the predictors of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) failure has attracted significant interest because of the strong link between failure and poor outcomes. However, very little attention has been paid to the timing of the failure. This narrative review focuses on the causes of NIV failure and risk factors and potential remedies for NIV failure, based on the timing factor.Results: The possible causes of immediate failure (within minutes to <1 h) are a weak cough reflex, excessive secretions, hypercapnic encephalopathy, intolerance, agitation, and patient-ventilator asynchrony. The major potential interventions include chest physiotherapeutic techniques, early fiberoptic bronchoscopy, changing ventilator settings, and judicious sedation. The risk factors for early failure (within 1 to 48 h) may differ for hypercapnic and hypoxemic respiratory failure. However, most cases of early failure are due to poor arterial blood gas (ABGs) and an inability to promptly correct them, increased severity of illness, and the persistence of a high respiratory rate. Despite a satisfactory initial response, late failure (48 h after NIV) can occur and may be related to sleep disturbance.Conclusions: Every clinician dealing with NIV should be aware of these risk factors and the predicted parameters of NIV failure that may change during the application of NIV. Close monitoring is required to detect early and late signs of deterioration, thereby preventing unavoidable delays in intubation. © 2014 Ozyilmaz et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Poli D.,Thrombosis Center | Palareti G.,University of Bologna
Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine | Year: 2013

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a chronic disease, associated with a significant rate of recurrence, lower in patients with events provoked by transient risk factors and higher in unprovoked cases. Short-term treatment is indicated for provoked VTE, long-term treatment should be considered for unprovoked. The aim of this review is to evaluate the risk factors for recurrence and the decisional algorithms available to guide patients' management. RECENT FINDINGS: To identify patients who carry a high recurrent risk and require long-term treatment, three algorithms have been proposed: the HERDOO2, the Vienna prediction model, and the DASH score. All identify male sex and elevated D-dimer levels as important risk factors for recurrence. However, important differences among the models should be outlined: in the HERDOO2 model, D-dimer levels are measured during anticoagulation and not after its withdrawal; furthermore, it indicates age greater than 65 as a risk factor for recurrence, whereas the DASH score attributes a higher risk to age less than 50. The Vienna model is complex for routine use. SUMMARY: Further studies are needed to clarify these discrepancies. A management study based on D-dimer levels after anticoagulation withdrawal is ongoing and could indicate a simple way to safely manage these patients. © 2013 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Campoccia D.,Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute | Montanaro L.,Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute | Montanaro L.,University of Bologna | Arciola C.R.,Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute | Arciola C.R.,University of Bologna
Biomaterials | Year: 2013

Anti-infective biomaterials need to be tailored according to the specific clinical application. All their properties have to be tuned to achieve the best anti-infective performance together with safe biocompatibility and appropriate tissue interactions. Innovative technologies are developing new biomaterials and surfaces endowed with anti-infective properties, relying either on antifouling, or bactericidal, or antibiofilm activities. This review aims at thoroughly surveying the numerous classes of antibacterial biomaterials and the underlying strategies behind them. Bacteria repelling and antiadhesive surfaces, materials with intrinsic antibacterial properties, antibacterial coatings, nanostructured materials, and molecules interfering with bacterial biofilm are considered. Among the new strategies, the use of phages or of antisense peptide nucleic acids are discussed, as well as the possibility to modulate the local immune response by active cytokines. Overall, there is a wealth of technical solutions to contrast the establishment of an implant infection. Many of them exhibit a great potential in preclinical models. The lack of well-structured prospective multicenter clinical trials hinders the achievement of conclusive data on the efficacy and comparative performance of anti-infective biomaterials. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Castellucci P.,University of Bologna | Picchio M.,San Raffaele Scientific Institute
European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging | Year: 2013

The role of PET/CTwith radiolabelled 18F-choline or 11C-choline in patients with prostate cancer after primary treatment has not been established yet and there are no guidelines on the appropriate use of this emerging modality. According to the literature, choline PET/CT may have a role in restaging the disease in patients with biochemical relapse for the detection of local and/or lymph node and/or distant recurrence. The aim of this brief review is to summarize the results of the most relevant published studies with particular focus on the relationship between prostate-specific antigen levels and kinetics and the sensitivity of choline PET/CT for optimizing the selection of patients who may benefit the most from this diagnostic procedure, especially early after biochemical recurrence. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Louta M.,University of Western Macedonia | Bellavista P.,University of Bologna
IEEE Communications Magazine | Year: 2013

"Always best connectivity," which constitutes a key challenge in the context of 4G systems, solicits service access and provisioning through the most appropriate access network any time, any place. In this relatively well investigated area, the problem of dynamically selecting the most suitable network for a specific service, referred to as access network selection (ANS), has recently received considerable attention. However, the several ANS proposals in the literature, which have explored relevant ANS criteria, methodologies, and techniques, point out that some related technical issues are still open challenges to be resolved. The aim of this article is to identify and discuss critical aspects and research challenges involved in the design of ANS decision schemes. At the same time, current research efforts are revisited, and potential enabling technologies/solutions are highlighted, in particular the ones associated with cognition and advanced learning capabilities. © 1979-2012 IEEE.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 1.07M | Year: 2017

Space is the foundational characteristic of visual perception and we generally perceive it as continuous and uniform. Behavioural measurements and the properties of our sensory systems however, demonstrate that this is an illusory situation and our percept is constructed by the brain. One example is our lack of awareness of the blind spot that exists in each eye. Space is non-uniformly represented in the visual brain and this representation is dynamically influenced by motor behaviour, in particular by eye movements. The PLATYPUS consortium will investigate the dynamic nature of spatial sensation and perception, focussing on the continuous mutual interaction of motor behaviour and perception. Our research objectives integrate human behavioural and cutting edge non-human primate electrophysiological research techniques and focus on translation of basic into applied research. Focussing on the adaptive nature of vision and action, strategies to perturb and probe perceptual space and geometry will allow measurement of spatial and geometrical perception in humans and the representation of such in non-human primates. This research will extend to applications for people wearing progressive lenses which distort action and space perception, patients with a blind area in their visual field and for virtual reality technology development. PLATYPUS researchers will grow existing and establish new collaborative teams, sharing research techniques, knowledge and mentoring between established and with upcoming researchers in academia and industry. Individuals will benefit from intense scientific and career development training while institutions will benefit from the exchange of state-of-the-art techniques. The ultimate outcome will be increased understanding of the continuously updating neural construction of space and the production of assistive technologies for people needing corrective lenses, with ocular or visual discontinuity and for the growing virtual reality industry.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: REFLECTIVE-2-2015 | Award Amount: 2.50M | Year: 2016

CoHERE explores the ways in which identities in Europe are constructed through heritage representations and performances that connect to ideas of place, history, tradition and belonging. The research identifies existing heritage practices and discourses in Europe. It also identifies means to sustain and transmit European heritages that are likely to contribute to the evolution of inclusive, communitarian identities and counteract disaffection with, and division within, the EU. A number of modes of representation and performance are explored in the project, from cultural policy, museum display, heritage interpretation, school curricula and political discourse to music and dance performances, food and cuisine, rituals and protest. Across an experienced, multidisciplinary consortium we take various theoretical and methodological approaches to these. Relevance to the work programme is ensured through key approaches, which are: 1) the relational study of productions and experiences of heritage at institutional, social and personal levels, including research into peoples activities and attitudes; 2) research by practice and the provision of public-facing dissemination activities; and 3) the critically-informed development of instruments (e.g. models for policy, curricula, museum and heritage practice) intended to promote reflection on and valorisation of European heritages and to engender socially-inclusive attitudes. The project is multidisciplinary, including museum, heritage and memory studies, cultural history, education, musicology, ethnology, political science, archaeology, ethnolinguistics and digital interaction design. The consortium comprises 12 partners over 9 countries, including universities, an SME, two museums and a cultural network. The research covers diverse European territories and realities comparatively and in depth.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA | Phase: ICT-2013.9.1 | Award Amount: 1.34M | Year: 2013

Young researchers working in future and emerging technologies (FET) are critical to the success of strategically important areas of science and technology in Europe. However, to realise their full potential as individuals and as a collective resource, they need to optimise their capacity and capability to generate and realise breakthrough ideas and research. The aim of the EYE project is to build a lasting European community of high potential young researchers (YRs) that are able to generate radical new ideas and build research collaborations in interdisciplinary areas, EYE will help them to develop their research potential and their ability to develop new curricula for FET. Specifically, EYE focuses on (a) S&T ideas of higher risk nature that can be generated through ideation and brainstorming and (b) collaboration between YRs across various disciplines and from different parts of Europe, and (c) on the YRs themselves, by developing their leadership potential through networking and training in the specific methods used in European collaborative projects.\nEYE will achieve its goal by implementing an integrated programme of complementary regional and European events:\n(a) Lab Surfing workshops in 6 regions of Europe that inform YRs about the most advanced FET research across various disciplines, brainstorm future paradigms and enhance YRs scientific administration skills;\n(b) Europe-wide Blue Sky Conferences for YRs in 38 countries in Europe (EU members states and selected countries associated with FP7) to enable further consolidation of ideas at a European level and wider networking with academia, industry and policy makers;\n(c) Science Incubator Summer Schools to assist selected YRs in bringing their ideas to a position where they might form the basis of future FET project proposals.\nEYE will conduct two rounds of these events over 2 years in order to reach a wider group of YRs in Europe and to ensure the sustainability of the EYE action after the end of the project. The EYE activities are supported with an online platform (NOVA-Networking for Outstanding Visionaries & Academics) which serves as an operational tool to prepare the events and as a professional platform for ideation, networking, collaboration and discussion amongst YRs.\nThe projects thematic scope is broadly defined by 9 multidisciplinary research areas identified in the recent public consultation on future FET, as well as Horizon 2020 societal challenges. In particular, EYE will seek areas where Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) can bring new interdisciplinary research opportunities and will support both curiosity- and agenda-driven research. The project brings together a broad representation of the multidisciplinary research community in Europe with 11 participants from 9 countries including 7 universities, 2 strong research institutions, and 2 SMEs.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.5.1 | Award Amount: 3.50M | Year: 2011

People with Parkinsons disease (PD) suffer from motor and cognitive impairments that severely impact mobility, fall risk, and multiple key aspects of functional independence. Until recently, treatment goals focused almost exclusively on symptom relief, but exciting recent work by CuPiD partners and others has demonstrated that motor learning and rehabilitation principles can be effective even in the presence of PD.\nIt is critical to make these rehab-like therapies accessible to patients in their home-setting since they need continoues training, as PD is a cronic neurodegenerative disease. Optimal rehabilitation of a neurodegenerative disease like PD requires personalized training paradigms that patients can integrate into their everyday routine in their own homes and use for many years. Ongoing, long-term treatment in a clinical setting is not feasible, cost effective, or likely something that patients can comply with year after year.\nCuPiD is designed to meet this challenge. We will develop an ICT-enabled solution to the rehabilitation of patients with PD in their home setting, tailoring the solution to target mobility, cognitive function and debilitating PD symptoms such as freezing of gait. Key components of the CuPiD solution are: 1) a home-based rehabilitation system (based on unobtrusive wearable sensors, on-board intelligence for real-time biofeedback, virtual reality, and modular, multi-modal restitution interfaces); and 2) an intelligent telemedicine infrastructure for remote monitoring and supervision of the rehabilitation program by a clinician.\nThe integrated, easy-to-use system will have a huge, beneficial impact on the therapeutic treatment of PD, empowering patients to improve their health-related quality of life in the comforts of their own home. At the same time, we envision that the ultimate costs of treatment will be reduced and the health-care burden dramatically lowered when the unique CuPiD system becomes available.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2007.2.1 | Award Amount: 8.12M | Year: 2008

The DEXMART project is focused on artificial systems reproducing smart sensory-motor human skills, which operate in unstructured real-world environments. The emphasis is on manipulation capabilities achieved by dexterous and autonomous, and also human aware dual-arm/hand robotic systems. The goal is to allow a dual-arm robot including two multi-fingered redundant hands to grasp and manipulate the same objects used by human beings. The objects shall be allowed to have different shape, dimension and weight. The manipulation will take place in an unsupervised, robust and dependable manner so as to allow the robot to safely cooperate with humans for the execution of given tasks. The robotic system has to possess the ability to autonomously decide between different manipulation options. It has to properly and quickly react to unexpected situations and events as well as understand changes in the behaviour of humans cooperating with it. Moreover, in order to act in a changing scenario, the robot should be able to acquire knowledge by learning new action sequences so as to create a consistent and comprehensive manipulation knowledge base through an actual reasoning process. The possibility to exploit the high power-to-weight ratio of smart materials and structures will be explored aimed at the design of new hand components (finger, thumb, wrist) and sensors that will pave the way for the next generation of dexterous robotic hands.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-14a-2014 | Award Amount: 5.35M | Year: 2016

The OLEUM project will generate innovative, more effective and harmonized analytical solutions to detect and fight the most common and emerging frauds and to verify the overall quality of olive oils (OOs). By a core group of 20 partners from 15 countries OLEUM will undertake RESEARCH ACTIVITIES based on the development of IMPROVED and NEW ANALYTICAL METHODS by targeted and omics approaches with the aim: i) to detect new markers of the soft deodorization process; ii) to discover illegal blends between OOs and other vegetable oils; iii) to control OO quality (e.g. freshness); iv) to improve the organoleptic assessment with a Quantitative Panel Test, based on current official methods, and supported by tailored reference materials for better calibration of the sensory panels coupled with rapid screening tools to facilitate the work of the panelists. The most promising OLEUM solutions will be subjected to VALIDATION in conformity with internationally agreed standards by peer laboratories. OLEUM will recreate a realistic deodorization scenario by producing tailored, soft deodorized OOs by lab-scale and up-scaled pilot plants to apply analytical solutions to known samples. Substantial KNOWLEDGE and TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER activities will be envisaged to aid in implementation of: a) a web-based easily-accessible, scalable and constantly updated OLEUM DATABANK, containing all the information from OLEUM research and other reliable international sources, will be available for download data and spectra and to help achieve satisfactory harmonization of analytical approaches among control laboratories; b) the OLEUM NETWORK of relevant OOs stakeholders to maximize the impact of proposed analytical solutions. Finally, a robust dissemination strategy by the OLEUM project aimed at effectively sharing results with all stakeholders in the OO supply chain has the potential to improve consumer and market confidence, and preserve the image of OOs on a global scale.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: CBTT-1-2014 | Award Amount: 2.33M | Year: 2015

Innovation is at the heart of Europes growth strategy. However, Europe lags behind its international competitors in converting investment in Public Research Organisation PRO research into commercial returns via innovation. The solution lies in improving the transfer of technology from PROs to industry but there are many barriers to effective technology transfer, including: Most Technology Transfer Offices (TTOs) in PROs are small, underfunded and under-skilled; a small investor pool and long timescales make it difficult to secure finance and; there is poor understanding between IP creators, exploiters, funders and end-users. To address these barriers, PROGRESS-TT will transfer the expertise of Europes leading PROs to those with the greatest potential to grow. We will gather best practice from leading PROs and thought leaders and formulate it into Europes most definitive TT tools, methods and insight. We will then begin a programme of knowledge transfer tailored to the audiences level of readiness to grow. This will include: Training, workshops, boot camps and e-learning delivered to emerging PROs and TT funds to develop their core skills Intensive coaching and mentoring for high potential PROs to accelerate their TT activity. We will form teams comprising experienced TTO performers, industry, funds and high potential PROs to develop capability, capacity, opportunity, desire, and to build a supportive TT environment. Improving access to finance by bringing established and emerging funds together to share best practice and identify cross-border opportunities We will continuously improve best practice based on our trial activities, in order to create a validated legacy programme to continue supporting PROs across Europe beyond project end. Through this support, we estimate a typical high potential PRO will improve its performance by 500% in the five years following intensive support, delivering at least 6 million to the European economy per PRO supported


SMEs play a key role in European economies; they constitute the largest business block and provide the bulk of employment. They generate most of the innovative ideas for ICT and CPS-enabled IoT products, two areas which represent an inflection point for innovators and industry in Europe. EuroCPS is an ambitious project that aims to arm Europe with a network of design centres that will boost and initiate synergies between SMEs, major CPS-platforms, and CPS-competency providers, to capture the emerging markets for IoT products. EuroCPS will 1. Leverage the existing regional ecosystem across the full value chain (from micro-electronics, smart systems, and CPS, to high value added products and services) and range of expertise and competencies to provide innovators from any sector with an easy path to build innovative CPS-enabled systems. 2. Act as a one-stop-shop that provides a critical mass of technologies and competencies by facilitating user-supplier partnerships across value-chains and regions. Hence the typical development time of innovative for CPS applications will be significantly decreased through the ease of access to the platforms, and coaching by the competence partners within EuroCPS. 3. Link software, system and nano-electronic industries along the full CPS value chain to demonstrate a new cooperation model evidenced by experiments initiated and led by innovators that translate the rich pool of ideas from end users into implementation of CPS applications made in Europe. EuroCPS gathers major European system suppliers and world class research centres and technology providers, all rooted in the top European regional ecosystems. Based on strong foundations in European and national initiatives, EuroCPS will, through pan European collaboration and knowledge exchange and access to the strong value chain in this strategic sector, significantly reduce development time and certification efforts, thus putting Europe at the cutting edge of CPS development and implementation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA | Phase: ICT-2009.1.1 | Award Amount: 648.47K | Year: 2010

Merit to their inherent properties of ubiquitous coverage and dependability, Satellite communication (SatCom) solutions by now play a significant role for the delivery of telecommunication services to European citizens and institutions in entertainment, digital divide, private networks, disaster management and security domains.\nEmerging SatCom architectures featuring increased capacity and flexibility conform with Future Internet requirements, shall make available disruptive performances and service capabilities. These emerging architectures will contribute to EU policy objectives (European Council resolution 10500/09) for Institutional telecommunication service needs in Security, Transport and Energy and for the Universal Service.\nThe FISI project aims at supporting\n* the Integral SatCom Initiative (Technology Platform) in defining a strategic vision on research and development priorities to reinforce the competitiveness of the European SatCom industry in the evolving ICT context.\n* the upcoming SatCom architectures in response to EU policy objectives;\n\nTo achieve this goal, the FISI project will:\n* Highlight the added value of emerging SatCom architectures in support of private communication requirements in the Universal Service and Future Internet domains;\n* Coordinate the definition of a consistent SatCom R&D and standardization road map for the timely development of emerging SatCom solutions;\n* Foster the transition of the ISICOM concept (global SatCom infrastructure to serve institutional telecommunication needs) towards a flagship initiative as long term framework for the development of enabling technologies for emerging SatCom architectures;\n* Promote emerging SatCom architectures towards European and international end-users and stakeholders;\n* Maintain ISI as key Platform and Support the ISI operations;\n\nThe FISI consortium is formed by key actors of ISI, highly involved in its operations.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: NMP-20-2014 | Award Amount: 5.00M | Year: 2015

EXTMOS main objective is to create a materials model and the related user friendly code that will focus on charge transport in doped organic semiconductors. Its aims are (i) to reduce the time to market of (a) multilayer organic light emitting devices, OLEDs, with predictable efficiencies and long lifetimes (b) organic thin film transistors and circuits with fast operation. (ii) to reduce production costs of organic devices by enabling a fully solution processed technology. Development costs and times will be lowered by identifying dopants that provide good device performance, reducing the number of dopant molecules that need to be synthesized and the materials required for trial devices. (iii) to reduce design costs at circuit level through an integrated model linking molecular design to circuit operation. Screening imposes the following requirements from the model 1. An improved understanding of dopant/host interactions at the molecular level. Doping efficiencies need to be increased to give better conducting materials. For OLEDs, dopants should not absorb visible light that lowers output nor ultraviolet light that can cause degradation. 2. An ability to interpret experimental measurements used to identify the best dopants. 3. The possibility of designing dopants that are cheap and (photo)chemically robust and whose synthesis results in fewer unwanted impurities, and that are less prone to clustering. The EXTMOS model is at the discrete mesoscopic level with embedded microscopic electronic structure and molecular packing calculations. Modules at the continuum and circuit levels are an integral part of the model. It will be validated by measurements on single and multiple layer devices and circuits and exploited by 2 industrial end users and 2 software vendors. US input is provided by an advisory council of 3 groups whose expertise complements that of the partners.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 468.00K | Year: 2017

Additive manufacturing (AM) belongs to key enabling technologies where Europe has the leading research role. The AM technologies put considerably fewer limits on shape of the manufactured objects than conventional technologies, and offer unparalleled freedom to industrial and mechanical designers. Since the AM technologies are insensitive to production scale, they put in focus knowledge and creativity of designers instead of low prices of mass production, paving the way to development of new business models. The AM technologies, therefore, represent a technology platform that may best serve Europe in its intent to develop knowledge-based economy, driven by innovation. However, the industrial deployment of AM technologies is hindered by a gap that exists between the excellent research and its exploitation in industry. The research knowledge about the AM technologies is published in scientific journals and in conference proceedings, in form suitable for researchers. On the other hand, industrial and mechanical designers use sets of design rules, which represent condensed and comprehensive form of the research findings that are easy to follow. The lack of sets of design rules for AM technologies is one of important reasons why engineers often prefer conventional technologies to AM. The proposed project intends to use the research capacities and partnerships developed in previous EU funded projects to carry out systematic studies of dynamic mechanical properties (fatigue, fracture mechanics and impact resistance) of products manufactured by AM with the goal to establish the proper rule sets for design of products. Since the aim of the project is to translate the research findings into engineering rules, the consortium consists of two universities and three SMEs that use AM technologies for rapid prototyping, rapid manufacturing and rapid tooling. The project activities will be realized as two-way transfer of knowledge between the industrial and academic partners.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: LCE-07-2014 | Award Amount: 3.87M | Year: 2015

The introduction of the electricity market, the widespread diffusion of distributed generation from renewable and non-programmable energy sources and the need for storage are quickly changing the problems that Transmission and Distribution system operators have to face in their activity and are requiring a smarter grid. A first step in this direction is the development and installation of a flexible smart metering architecture for multiple energy vectors. Up to now the smart meters that in some countries are being installed at the users are nearly only devoted to billing improvements. The new metering systems must go much further to provide their contribution to various objectives such as end-user affordability of electricity, energy and market efficiency improvement, CO2 emissions and pollutants reduction. In the FLEXMETER project a flexible, multi-utility, multi-service metering architecture will be designed and deployed in two demonstrators. Simple off-the-shelf meters will be placed at the users for electric, thermal and gas metering; they will communicate with a building concentrator, where the smartness of the metering system will reside. A central cloud system will collect data from the building concentrators and from MV/LV substation meters. Data collection, fusion and mining algorithms will be adopted. The proposed architecture will allow for innovative services for the prosumers (e.g. analysis of the energy consumption), for the Distribution System Operators (DSOs) (e.g. fault detection, network balancing and storage integration) and for the retail market. Also demand side management devices could be plugged into the system. In the FLEXMETER project two pilot applications in two different countries (Italy and Sweden), on real systems, with the involvement of the local DSOs and volunteer prosumers will be demonstrated. The results on the demonstrators will then be scaled up to the size of the cities in order to evaluate the advantages on a real scale.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: BBI-IA-FLAG | Phase: BBI.VC3.F1 | Award Amount: 25.02M | Year: 2015

FIRST2RUN project aims at demonstrating (TRL8) the techno, economical and environmental sustainability at industrial scale of a first-of-kind value chain where low input and underutilized oil crops (i.e. cardoon) grown in arid and/or marginal lands and not in competition with food or feed, are exploited for the extraction of vegetable oils to be further converted through chemical and biotechnological processes into bio-monomers (mainly pelargonic and azelaic acids) and esters that will be applied in the formulation of bioproducts (biolubricants, cosmetics, bioplastics). By and co-products from the process will be valorised both for energy, feed for animals and added value chemicals productions in order to increase the sustainability of the value chain. Standardization, certification and dissemination activities will support the project in relation to increased marketability as well as social acceptability of developed biobased products in view of their penetration in the market.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.82M | Year: 2015

Depletion of natural resources combined with the extending footprint of mankind has led to a shift in importance of research and development topics. In the 1970s and 1980s process yield was primarily targeted, but emphasis is now focussed on resource efficiency as a primary objective. Routes for resource efficiency have to be identified and implemented to provide a more environmental and resource-oriented technology in near future. MIGRATE is planned as an ETN, gathering top-level research and development capabilities from academia and industry as well as direct application possibilities with the focus set on thermal aspects of gas flows in microstructured systems. Within MIGRATE, a number of ESR projects will cover different aspects of enhanced heat transfer and thermal effects in gases, spanning from modelling of heat transfer processes and devices, development and characterization of sensors and measurement systems for heat transfer in gas flows as well as thermally driven micro gas separators to micro-scale devices for enhanced and efficient heat recovery in automotive, aeronautics and energy generation. This unique combination of university research, SME and world leading industrial stakeholders will contribute in a significant way to the increase of knowledge about micro scale gas flow heat transfer problems as well as to industrial applications of highly efficient miniaturized devices. A characteristic of MIGRATE is the high degree of applicability and the intense training. About 30% of the beneficiaries are from private sector. Thus, ESR projects will be developed in both directions, fundamental academic knowledge as well as direct application in industrial environment. The training of the ESRs is set in the same way to provide a broad variety of skills, reaching from classical academic research to IPR management and all-day-business in a company, being summarized under the aspect of resource efficiency and environmental-friendly technological approaches.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2011.3.1-02 | Award Amount: 3.91M | Year: 2011

OPTIMA will integrate an ambitious biology system approach for perennial grasses such as switchgrass, miscanthus and giant reed in the Mediterranean environment. Moreover the perennial species cardoon, which has been proven to be particularly adapted to the Mediterranean climate, will be used as a control species. The main objective of the OPTIMA project is to identify high-yielding perennial grasses for the Mediterranean area, within optimized production chain that will provide stable source for both biomass and new plant derived bio-products. OPTIMA will explore the potentialities of perennial grasses on underutilized or abandoned marginal lands. An interdisciplinary approach involving physiology, biotechnology, and agronomy, socio-economical and environmental analysis at different scale levels will be undertaken with the aim at tackling specific bottlenecks of perennial grasses in the Mediterranean area and to create alternative end-use chains. OPTIMA approach has been to link the research proposed here by including industrial end-users in the project. This should allow the output of this research to develop in a commercial context as rapidly as possible the new findings. The major goals of this multidisciplinary network are to evaluate the existing genotypes; to characterize and deliver novel species; to deliver sustainable crop management practices (sowing/planting strategies to reduce the use of pesticide and increase biomass on the first year establishment, cultivation under salinity conditions and/or water deficit, reducing losses during harvest); to evaluate the industrial production of bioenergy and added value bio-products; to assess the environmental impact through an integrated assessment of sustainability criteria, to disseminate the achieved findings at different level (local, regional, national, international).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 3.44M | Year: 2012

Complex decision making in enterprises should involve mathematical optimization methods, because a best choice has to be made out of a huge number of feasible options. A mathematical description of such decision processes typically involves both continuous and discrete decisions. If the latter are present, the customary modelling approach is to use integer variables, which are also used to represent all possible nonlinearities, so that the remaining part of the model is linear. This leads to Mixed-Integer Linear Optimization (MILO) problems, which can be handled nowadays by many packages, but are often very difficult to solve. Difficulty of MILO problems is often due to the fact that objective functions or constraints that are structurally nonlinear (e.g., quadratic) are linearized by introducing new integer variables. In many cases, it was observed that this is not the best way to proceed, as facing the nonlinearity directly without the new variables leads to much better results. Algorithmic technology for the resulting Mixed-Integer Nonlinear Optimization (MINO) problems is still at its early stage. The present situation is that enterprises facing a MINO problem generally give up due to the lack of efficient solvers, or try to convert it to a MILO one often too hard to be solved in practice. On the other hand, in the academia there is now an increasing expertise in MINO, which is however hardly exported outside due to the lack of interaction with the industrial world. It is the purpose of this project to help satisfy the increasing demand for highly qualified researchers receiving, at the same time, a state-of-the-art scientific training from the academia and hands-on experience with real-world applications from the industry. The researchers formed within this project, once recruited by an enterprise at the end of their training, will have the potential to apply all the available knowledge to optimize complex decision making in the real-world.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CP-ARTEMIS | Phase: SP1-JTI-ARTEMIS-2010-7;SP1-JTI-ARTEMIS-2010-3 | Award Amount: 44.56M | Year: 2011

The objective of Internet of Energy (IoE) is to develop hardware, software and middleware for seamless, secure connectivity and interoperability achieved by connecting the Internet with the energy grids. The application of the IoE will be the infrastructure for the electric mobility. The underlying architecture is of distributed Embedded Systems (ESs), combining power electronics, integrated circuits, sensors, processing units, storage technologies, algorithms, and software. The IoE will implement the real time interface between the power network/grid and the Internet. The grid will increasingly rely on smaller, locally distributed electricity generators and storage systems that are based on plug & play principles. Power network devices and loads at the edge (such as electrical vehicles, buildings, electric devices, and home appliances) can be charged or connected on any source of energy being solar, wind, or hydroelectric. Reference designs and ESs architectures for high efficiency innovative smart network systems will be addressed with regard to requirements of compatibility, networking, security, robustness, diagnosis, maintenance, integrated resource management, and self-organization. The future smart grid will converge with the Internet based on standard interfaces, and a physical infrastructure to support electric mobility and the efficient distribution of power and information. IoE will provide a robust, accessible and programmable platform that creates applications and services facilitating an increased use of renewable energy sources as fast as is feasible in a cost effective manner. The project will enable the creation of value added services using both wired and wireless devices with access to the Internet by managing key topics: such as demand response, modelling/simulation, energy efficiency and conservation, usage monitoring, real time energy balance and billing. The project considers vertical integration and horizontal cooperation among energy utilities, OEMs, and hardware/software/silicon providers. TA update approved on 30/04/2013


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2007.3.2 | Award Amount: 3.17M | Year: 2008

The discovery of novel biaxial liquid crystal (LC) phases is a major breakthrough of the last three years in functional materials and presents a challenge to develop the technology for a new generation of faster biaxial LC displays. These expectations are based on the existence of a secondary director that can be controlled by external fields. However, to be put in practice, this new possibility requires rethinking LC displays and materials as we know them now. BIND, a 3-year research project on biaxial nematic electro-optic device systems and materials, aims to provide the basic know-how enabling the production of a new generation of fast LC displays. It comprises - deepening the fundamental understanding of structure-properties relationships in biaxial nematic materials, with a particular view to bring their range of stability down to room temperature, - developing experimental protocols for the identification and quantification of biaxiality and - investigating novel alignment methods and candidate display architectures. The technological objective is to demonstrate the first working device based on nematic biaxiality. To go from basic understanding of materials properties to working devices, an interdisciplinary consortium of leading research teams has been assembled. Expertise in BIND encompasses state-of-the-art chemical synthesis and characterisation, physical measurement, molecular modelling, computer simulation and design of liquid crystal devices. A variety of liquid crystal types will be assessed, ranging from low-molar-mass nematics to oligomers, multipodes, linear polymers and elastomers. Solving a scientific problem by leading European research groups, and taking this through from fundamental studies to applications, presents a unique opportunity for the EU to take a leading role in developing the know-how on biaxial displays and thereby to strengthen its position in a research area that is presently at the edge of emerging technologies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.3.5-02 | Award Amount: 3.93M | Year: 2012

In BIOCLEAN project, novel and robust microorganisms (aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, and fungi) able to extensively degrade polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrol (PS) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) polymers and plastics will be isolated from actual-site aged plastic wastes obtained from several European marine and terrestrial sites, composting facilities and landfills, and obtained via tailored screenings from existing European collections of microbes. Robust enzymes able to fragment the target plastics with the production of valuable chemicals and building blocks will be obtained from the selected microbes and enzyme collections. Untreated and physically/chemically pre-treated PE, PS, PP and PVC polymers and plastics will be employed in such isolation/ screening activities, and an integrated methodology, relying on advanced analytical methods (determining plastics physicochemical changes and breakdown products resulting from biological attack), and tailored enzymatic, microbiological and ecotoxicological methods, will be adopted for the characterization of actual industrial relevance of the obtained microbes and enzymes. Physical and chemical pretreatments improving biodegradability of target plastics will be identified and transferred on the pilot scale. The most promising microbial cultures and enzymes will be exploited in the development of pilot scale, slurry or solid-phase bioprocesses for the bioremediation and controlled depolymerization, respectively, of target pretreated plastics and in the set up of tailored bioaugmentation protocols for enhancing plastic waste biodegradation in marine water systems, composting and anaerobic digestor facilities. The processes developed will be assessed for their economical and environmental sustainability. Field scale validation of the most promising bioaugmentation protocols in a composting and a marine site and attempts to develop a plastic pollution reduction strategy for the Aegean Sea have been planned too


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.6.4 | Award Amount: 4.08M | Year: 2013

DAREED aims at delivering an ICT service platform (and some specific tools) to foster energy efficiency and low carbon activities at neighbourhood, city and district level. Project results will be validated via pilots in three (3) different countries and contexts, thus granting the possibility to generalise results and ensuring replicability throughout Europe and beyond.\nThe key success factor for effective energy efficiency initiatives at community level is to involve all the stakeholders who have active role in decision making and provide them the right information at the right time to take informed decisions; to this extent, user engagement through social networks can foster participation and energy consumption awareness. Stakeholders (i.e. citizens, household landlords, public spaces managers and urban planners) need tools and information to understand and assess alternatives to traditional consumptions patterns and inertial behaviours leading to high consumption levels. Energy providers need information and tools to implement business models oriented to energy service proposition oriented to a sustainable consumption model.\nThere is need to go beyond acting on energy consumptions under direct control to understand ex-ante savings that can be achieved through energy efficiency related measures, management tools, and new services and implement them along with the related cost/benefit ratio. Although regulations about buildings, infrastructures and public spaces are fostering the implementation of important energy efficiency measures, a major driver for the change are the actual economic saving for users obtained from energy efficiency based business models. The service-oriented approach of the platform will allow easy adoption, overcoming technological, financial and knowledge barriers. The involvement of service providers, especially energy ones, ICT companies and public administrations will facilitate the development of the product and its wide acceptability


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.9.6 | Award Amount: 3.88M | Year: 2012

Achievement of ever higher levels of integration in microelectronics will eventually require a radical shift from the field-effect transistor (FET) based paradigm to a revolutionary approach to computing. Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA) is an alternative vision to binary computing since no current flow is required to encode binary information, and has been considered one of the most promising post-Moore alternatives.Implementation and miniaturization of QCA at the molecular level offer important advantages, including the perspective of room temperature operation, an essential step for industrial exploitation. However, the small sizes of the building blocks lead also to severe challenges when addressing the single elementary units.The present proposal specifically addresses the basic requirements to implement molecular QCA-inspired Networks, namely the measurement of the electrostatic interaction between a forced molecule (input) and its neighbour; the investigation of the propagation of a signal in a longer row of molecule (binary line); the implementation and testing of a majority gate.In particular we will address the following topics:\n-Pattern the molecules in controlled positions,\n-Contact the single molecules to force the state (inputs) and apply the clock (outputs)\n-Set up of a sensitive read-out system to discriminate among the two logic states of the molecule.\n-Understand the precise conformation and positioning of the molecules in the built system.\n-Evaluate the impact of non-idealities with respect to classical QCA on computation.\nState of the art research and development of activities in the field of molecular scale architectures for unconventional computation will be undertaken during the research programme, to reach the envisioned projects objectives and to develop a technology for the development of QCA computing in Europe. We expect our results to build a solid starting point for the development of a novel unconventional computational paradigm.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2014 | Award Amount: 621.00K | Year: 2015

The construction sector, currently in crises in some countries due to the economic development model adopted during last decades, can again play an important role for the European economy to be more innovative by using fewer resources (raw materials and energy) and reducing environmental impact (emission of greenhouse gases and dust pollution). Access to raw materials and resource efficiency are at the forefront of the EU political debate and recycling is a main part of the solution of many strategic objectives. It addresses resource scarcity and enhances security of material supply, while contributing to higher energy efficiency and lower environmental impacts. Moreover, recycling offers significant investment, innovation and employment opportunities in the EU. In this context, this RISE programme aims to promote international and inter-sector collaboration through research and innovation staff exchanges, share knowledge and ideas from research to market (and vice-versa) for the advancement of science and the development of innovation within the recycling and valorization of mining and quarrying wastes which represent 27% of the EU total waste generated from economic activities and households, promote utilization of innovative geopolymeric materials in the construction sector, and foster a shared culture of research and innovation that welcomes and rewards creativity and entrepreneurship and helps turn creative ideas into innovative products, services or processes in the materials industry through recycling mining wastes, by taking advantage of the integrated knowledge acquired in the complementary areas of the RISE partners. In this scenario, this RISE action aims at taking advantage of the recent developments in the areas of materials science, processing engineering, structural engineering, infrastructure systems, arts and design and market perspectives, turning mining waste into valuable materials for infrastructure and building products.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.3.6 | Award Amount: 3.54M | Year: 2010

The shift from systems-on-chip (SoC) to manycore architectures brings new hardware and software challenges ranging from seamless integration of processors, memories the design of modular systems and application software to run on massively parallel and scalable platforms. Manycores will benefit tremendously from 3-dimensional (3D) integration technology that enables distribution in space of computational and storage functions to achieve unprecedented performance levels.\nPROD3D is an ambitious high risk and high reward project that builds upon existing European world-class R&D expertise of the partners. PRO3D will innovate in both hardware and software technologies and demonstrate the effectiveness of manycores by an integrated and concerted effort in key aspects of hardware and software design. The uniqueness of this proposal stems from the experience of the partners in various aspects of manycore design that need to be addressed concurrently.\nThe key outcome of PRO3D will be a holistic system design methodology to bring a drastic improvement of productivity to reduce cost development and time to market for future embedded computing. In particular, PROD3D will: i) develop a system software flow that can operate transparently on parallel manycore platforms; ii) develop formal methods for software design guaranteeing the composability and correct operation of both Hardware and software; iii) explore the impact of 3D integration for new computing architectures iv) Extend the software-flow to 3D-stacked manycores.\nThe PRO3D consortium brings together world-class leaders in their own field with competencies to cover software, architecture and 3D integration. One of the key differentiators of the PRO3D consortium is its access to an industrial many core System on Chip, named Platform 2012 and provided by STM. The industrial impact of PRO3D is potentially high since re-search outcomes will be directly exploitatable into STM product roadmaps.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.3.1 | Award Amount: 4.34M | Year: 2013

According to ITRS, III-V compound semiconductor n-type MOSFETs will reach production in 2018 as part of a new scaling scenario for high performance at very low voltage. The present lack of dependable TCAD models for the early stages of industrial development is a hindrance to benefit from the cost saves and time to market reduction that TCAD is recognized to deliver. To bridge this gap, III-V-MOS aims to provide to the European Semiconductor Industry accurate device simulation models and methods, integrated into TCAD tools, for successful introduction in CMOS technology of optimized device designs based on III-V MOSFETs at and beyond the 14nm node. III-V-MOS will develop, validate and transfer to industry a new device simulation methodology enabling the use of accurate quantum drift-diffusion and Monte Carlo TCAD tools. The models, calibrated by comparison with measurements on complete devices and ad-hoc test structures, will provide comprehensive descriptions of Ultra Thin Body Semiconductor on Insulator FETs, FinFETs and nanowire FETs at and beyond the 14nm node including device parasitics. A hierarchical approach will be used, starting from atomistic band structure calculations all the way down to customized TCAD simulation setups ready for direct use in an industrial environment.Systematic application of the new methodology under industrial guidance will provide new insight in nanoscale III-V semiconductor device physics and identify the potential of the technology boosters, thus substantially reducing the options to be explored for the device design and the corresponding costs. Future exploitation and high impact of the project results are guaranteed by the TCAD market leader (Synopsys); by a SME specialized in the growing business of atomistic simulations for technology development (QuantumWise); by a research center (IMEC) and an industry lab (IBM) engaged in CMOS fabrication technology development and by the European foundry GLOBALFOUNDRIES Dresden.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.6.7 | Award Amount: 2.91M | Year: 2012

Traffic is time and energy consuming and produces negative effects on the environment. The first pillar of the Green Paper on Urban Mobility: Towards a new culture for urban mobility adopted by the EU commission in 2007, puts a strong emphasis on (1) reducing congestion and its impact in everyday life on urban environments, and (2) developing smarter urban transport systems, whose aim is to spread good practices towards more efficient urban transport.\n\nTraffic control systems should cope with the ever increasing demand by determining the situation on the road network and by controlling traffic flows. Emerging cooperative techniques like vehicle-to-infrastructure communication increase the knowledge about road traffic participants and open new channels for delivering information to these participants. However, most cooperative systems require large penetration rates in order to assure their functionality, making the first steps towards their deployment unattractive.\n\nCOLOMBO will overcome this hurdle by delivering a set of modern, self-organizing traffic management algorithms designed for being applicable even at low penetration rates, asserting their usability from the very first deployment days on. COLOMBO will focus on two traffic management topics: traffic surveillance and advanced traffic light control algorithms. Herein, cost-efficiency and the reduction of vehicular emissions will be the projects key objectives. Both results are assumed to be more than a pure technology step. Rather than that, they lay the foundations for new, cost-effective and comprehensive way to measure and handle traffic. Additional results will include prototypes for incident and emission monitoring at intersections, going far beyond current state of the art.\n\nCOLOMBO will achieve its tasks by bringing together experts and methods in swarm intelligence, optimization, communication, traffic light control, traffic simulation, and vehicular emissions modelling.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: ERC-AG | Phase: ERC-AG-PE4 | Award Amount: 2.49M | Year: 2012

Two-dimensional (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance is a diagnostic technique that has revolutionized structural biology. A wealth of spectroscopic information can be obtained by extrapolating 2D techniques to the optical frequency domain, using ultrashort light pulses. 2D electronic spectroscopy (2DES) allows fundamentally new insights into the structure and dynamics of multi-chromophore systems, by measuring how the electronic states of chromophores interact with one another and transfer electronic excitations. Due to technical difficulties, 2DES has been limited so far to the visible range, while most biomolecules absorb in the ultraviolet (UV). This project aims at extending 2DES to the challenging and still uncharted UV-domain and applying it to the study of the photophysics of genomic systems and of the secondary structure of proteins. Nature has engineered DNA molecules to be photostable, so that harmful photochemical processes are minimized. 2DES will unravel the molecular mechanisms of the photoinduced electronic intra/inter-chromophore events in DNA, exposing the energy dissipation pathways which are responsible for its photoprotection. 2DES will be also established as a new diagnostic tool for structural studies of polypeptides and proteins, relying on the UV absorbing peptide bonds and aromatic residues, the latter acting as native local structural probes. 2DES will provide sensitive information on the misfolding/aggregation processes responsible for a wide class of diseases, with the speed of standard optical techniques but with a much greater information content. This will bridge the experimental gap between crude estimates of protein unfolding and full structure determination, enabling rapid assessment of which variants are worth of deeper structural studies. To realize the full power of 2DES, experiments will be combined with simulations and electronic calculations that are necessary to correlate the data with molecular states and structures.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.2.1 | Award Amount: 3.61M | Year: 2010

The goal of the AIRobots project is to develop a new generation of aerial service robots capable to support human beings in all those activities which require the ability to interact actively and safely with environments not constrained on ground but, indeed, freely in air. The step forward with respect to the classical field of aerial robotics is to realize aerial vehicles able to accomplish a large variety of applications, such as inspection of buildings and large infrastructures, sample picking, aerial remote manipulation, etc.The starting point is an aerial platform whose aeromechanical configuration allows the vehicle to interact with the environment in a non-destructive way and to hover close to operating points. Rotary-wing aerial vehicles with shrouded propellers represent the basic airframes which will be then equipped with appropriate robotic end-effectors and sensors in order to transform the aerial platform into an aerial service robot, a system able to fly and to achieve robotic tasks. Advanced automatic control algorithms will be conceived to govern the aerial platform which will be remotely supervised by the operator with the use of haptic devices. Particular emphasis will be given to develop advanced human-in-the-loop and autonomous navigation control strategies relying upon a cooperative and adaptive interaction between the on-board automatic control and the remote operator. Force and visual feedback strategies will be investigated in order to transform the aerial platform in a flying hand suitable for aerial manipulation.The consortium is composed of four academic groups and an SME with the role of end-user and evaluator of the project outcomes. Prototypes of aerial service robots will be developed and tested on experimental setups which will be constructed in order to reproduce typical industrial scenarios for which aerial inspection robotics can be beneficial (docking, cleaning, inspection and repairing of infrastructures, payload lifting, etc.).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA | Phase: ICT-2007.1.1 | Award Amount: 1.42M | Year: 2008

sISI is a support action (SA) intended to stimulate the participation in future Community ICT research of a large number of actors through facilitating their involvement into the Integral Satcom Initiative (ISI), the Technology Platform for Satellite Communications within FP7. To this purpose, sISI will provide all necessary support to ISI to make it an efficient platform, able to provide plenty of opportunities for all of its participants. In particular, support will be provided to:\n\n1)ISI contributions to EU, ESA, and National policies and involvement of all actors and stakeholders (organization of the ISI Mirror Group, involvement of the ICT National Contact Points into ISI, involvement of SMEs, International Cooperation, monitoring of EU policies of interest to ISI, identification of actions in favour of EU policies of interest to ISI, monitoring of ESA policies of interest to ISI, identification of actions in favour of ESA policies of interest to ISI, logistic support in Brussels). \n2)ISI operations (organization of meetings, production of minutes, organization of elections, editing of general documents).\n\n3)ISI promotion (website, mailing list, flyers, newsletter, press releases, monitoring of activities standardization and regulatory, etc.).\n\n4)ISI activities towards end-users (identification of end-user groups of interest to ISI, involvement of end-user groups, end-user requirements identification, support to market studies, etcetera).\n\n5)ISI Technical Activities (support to the update of the Strategic Research Agenda, identification of open calls of interest to ISI, coordination of technical proposals, monitoring of results, exchange of technical information). The results of sISI will be exploited not only and not mainly by the proposing Consortium, but particularly by all ISI participants in Member States and in Cooperating Countries.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.3.2 | Award Amount: 11.00M | Year: 2010

Electronic devices of the latest generations, being those integrated circuits or discrete components, are often required to operate in harsh environmental conditions, where the temperature may reach over hundred degrees centigrade. Obviously, this has negative impact on several parameters of the electronic devices, ranging from slow-down and transient, recoverable errors to permanent failures and device breakdown. To complicate the picture, electronic components tend to get warmer on their own as they operate, due to the fact that the power drawn by the devices from the power supply is dissipated by Joule effect.\n\nAs time passes, heat and temperature management is becoming increasingly problematic, for reasons ranging from economical to technological. Packages that are able to sustain high temperatures are very expensive, and so are heat-sinks and cooling systems. In addition, high operating temperatures tend to cause malfunctioning of circuits and components, thus impacting the reliability of the electronic products which incorporate such devices.\n\nThe development of new, thermal-aware design paradigms can no longer be postponed if the goal is to enable designers to fully exploit the electronic technologies of the future, being those CMOS or alternative to CMOS.\n\nThe thermal problem has several facets, thus it needs to be addressed in a comprehensive manner. The THERMINATOR projects will address the following major challenges: 1) To devise innovative thermal models usable at different levels of abstraction, and to interface/integrate them into existing simulation and design frameworks. 2) To develop new, thermal-aware design solutions, customized for the different technologies and application domains of interest. 3) To enhance existing EDA solutions by means of thermal-aware add-on tools that will enable designers to address temperature issues during their daily work and with their usual design flows.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2013.6.5-3 | Award Amount: 7.73M | Year: 2013

The project SWITCH-ON addresses water concerns to thoroughly explore and exploit the significant and currently untapped potential of open data. Water information is highly sought after by many kinds of end-users, both within government and business as well as within civil society. Water touches virtually all societal and environmental domains and the knowledge domain is largely multidisciplinary. New water information and knowledge can thus lead to more efficient use of environmental services and better handling of environmental problems, including those induced by climate and environmental change. SWITCH-ON will show the benefits achieved through the whole process chain by re-purposing (re-using under different context) open data products into more dedicated and refined water products, which have high value and a broad impact on society. The vision is to improve public services, and to foster business opportunities and growth, by establishing new forms of water research and facilitating the development of new products and services based on principles of sharing. The SWITCH-ON objectives are to use open data for implementing: 1) an innovative spatial information platform with open data tailored for direct water assessments, 2) an entirely new form of collaborative research for water-related sciences, 3) fourteen new operational products and services dedicated to appointed end-users, 4) new business and knowledge to inform individual and collective decisions in line with the Europes smart growth and environmental objectives. While focusing on water, the project is expected to inspire a much broader environmental and societal knowledge domain and many different end-users. The SWITCH-ON project will be one trigger in a contemporary global movement to better address environmental and societal challenges through openness and collaboration.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.72M | Year: 2015

The aim of the GRACE (Gender and Cultures of Equality in Europe) project is to systematically investigate the cultural production of gender equalities within Europe. Extending the success of GEMMA, the Erasmus Mundus Masters of Excellence in Womens and Gender Studies, the central objective of GRACE is to become the programme of reference for innovative interdisciplinary doctoral training for early career researchers. Previous scholarly work focuses on European gender equality policies. GRACE draws on innovative and interdisciplinary methodologies to investigate an under-examined aspect of those processes, namely the production of cultures of equality that underpin, enable and constrain those changing policy and legislative frameworks. Our methodological approach understands culture as neither normative frameworks nor ways of representing the world, but more fundamentally as the process through which people create the worlds they inhabit. The GRACE project will recruit, employ and provide advanced training for 15 ESRs who will research the production of cultures of gender equality across five specific sites where cultures of gender equalities are produced and contested by differently situated social agents. These five sites form the core of our research and training Work Packages, and are focused as follows: mediated cultures of gender equality (WP 1); urban cultures of gender equality (WP 2); intellectual and activist cultures of gender equality (WP 3); textual and artistic cultures of gender equality (WP 4); employing cultures of gender equality (WP 5). In sum, GRACE is designed to: equip the next generation of ESRs to play a leading role in developing advanced techniques for investigating the production of cultures of gender equality; translate creative and critical capacities into innovative cultural practices within and beyond academia; and enable them to take up positions as experts in producing new gender equalities cultures.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: SESAR-RIA | Phase: Sesar-01-2015 | Award Amount: 582.78K | Year: 2016

Assigning tasks, formerly executed by human operators, to automation can increase the performance in many aspects of ATM. However, the absence of automation errors can often not be guaranteed. Consequently a human operator is required to monitor the automation and to intervene in the rare cases of automation errors. It has been shown that this monitoring role of human operators results in negative effects like lack of attention, loss of situation awareness and in the long term skill degradation. This project will develop solutions to mitigate these effects. As an example a highly automated arrival management task in which the aircraft follow their predefined 4D-trajectories will be investigated. As neither the automatic detection and resolution of all conflicts nor the ability of all aircraft to follow their trajectories with the required precision can be guaranteed all the time, a human operator is needed to monitor and handle situations in which automation fails. New human-automation interaction design concepts for this task will be developed from scratch in three steps in this project: First, the task environment will be analyzed to identify all the necessary tasks that can be assigned either to the human operator or the automation. Secondly, concept for different solutions will be developed considering the human performance envelope. This includes adaptive or adaptable automation with dynamic task distributions, tools to direct the operator attention, and suitable human-machine interfaces. In a third step, different human-automation design concepts will be evaluated. Identifying how to apply higher automation to complex systems while mitigating the negative effects of monitoring tasks will allow benefiting from performance increases of higher levels of automation while keeping the human operator performance on a high level to ensure safe operations.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2007.1.1 | Award Amount: 21.00M | Year: 2008

Key objectives of EUWB are i) to explore the enormous economic potential of the ground-breaking Ultra-Wideband (UWB) radio technology, ii) to extend the UWB concept with advanced cognitive radio, multiband/multimode networking, and multiple antenna system concepts, iii) to enable the introduction of advanced services and competitive applications using the radio spectrum in a sophisticated manner.\nThe advanced scientific and technical project work will be accompanied by activities in European and world wide regulation and standardisation bodies in which EUWB partners are highly committed. As a key for economic success of UWB, the project partners will continue to devote significant efforts to participation in CEPT ECC, IEEE, ITU, ETSI, and ECMA working towards consensus building and iterative improvement of the initial European and world-wide UWB regulation and standardisation.\nUWB technology enables gigabits per second short range communications and inherent precise real-time location tracking. Prominent examples to be implemented in the EUWB project are the Intelligent Home environment, the Public Transport environment, the Automotive environment and the Next Generation of Heterogeneous Public Access Network environment, following a strong demand from the mentioned industry sectors.\nEUWB is an industry-led initiative of 22 highly regarded industrial, consulting, and academic organisations. It builds on previous projects, such as PULSERS, and take into account stakeholders of the whole value chain. Major aim is to consolidate the technology advances in scientific areas related to UWB and to define system concepts for the envisaged four application areas. The results will be materialised in four application platforms built on the open UWB technology developed in EUWB. Besides integration in the AIRBUS plane, the DAIMLER car, the PHILIPS future home, and the TELEFNICA access network, scientific studies will guide industry to gain competitiveness with their UWB system.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2009-NIGHT | Award Amount: 234.30K | Year: 2010

The project Everyday Science 2010 represents the second edition of Researchers Night initiative in Emilia-Romagna after the first successful experience of 2009. The 24th September 2010 public events dedicate to researchers take place in Bologna and in other 7 towns: Cesena, Faenza, Ferrara, Modena, Parma, Ravenna and Reggio Emilia. All universities, main research centres and local public authorities compose a significant partnership coordinated by ASTER, the regional Consortium between the Emilia-Romagna Region, the universities, research organisations and professional associations. Within a mix of continuity and novelty, the project intends to make of Researchers Night an annual edutainment appointment on science for the regional context. In 2010, experiments, open lessons, guided tours, exhibitions, talk shows, information and interactive services are planned to be performed by researchers themselves, combined with music and entertainment. A central event, hosting researchers from all the region, and several satellite events ensure the regional coverage of the project. Such events will be accompanied and supported by the awareness campaign aiming at informing and promoting public events and the contents related through a variety of tools and media. Impact assessment activities are also foreseen in order to measure and evaluate the perception that general public has of researchers profession and role of research in everyday life. After the experience of 2009, the project can count on a large consensus by public local authorities (region, municipalities and provinces) and private sponsors, supporting the organisation of events and the awareness campaign through patronage, sponsorship and in-kind services. A more intense involvement of young people is planned with special programmes and activities.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-SICA | Phase: HEALTH-2007-2.3.3-8 | Award Amount: 2.97M | Year: 2008

Despite widespread immunization, influenza still kills thousand of people, and costs to US, Europe and Asia enormous amount of money in term of healthcare expenses and productivity losses. While immunization remains an important approach to prevent influenza, small-molecule antiviral agents represent a novel opportunity for effective prevention and therapy of flu. Inhibitors of neuraminidase, essential enzyme for viral replication in all three classes of influenza viruses, has been recently found. Two of these inhibitors have reached the market, namely, zanamivir (GSKBs Relenza (1) in July 1999, and oseltamivir phosphate (Gilead Bs Tamiflu (2), also marketed by Roche) in October 1999. The recent healthy problem related to avian flu, has increase the public demand for stockpiles of Tamiflu, both as a reasonable frontline therapy against a possible flu pandemic and as a preventive agent. However, natural sources of drug (Shikimic acid) are scarcely, and increasing demand for oseltamivir phosphate has placed further pressure on Roche and the chemical community in general to develop new routes to the drug that do not involve complex natural products. In addition, the described synthesis are expensive and difficult. Moreover, in this synthesis use of hazardous azide-based reagents was necessary. New routes to Tamiflu have been recently described, but more than 12 steps in one case and 17 in another are needed. In order to find new drug candidates, cut the drug costs and improving availability as well as efficiency, new chemical synthesis are necessary. We propose a new domino reaction based on an organocatalytic approach to the synthesis of new Tamiflu derivatives. The chemistry involved in this project is easy to perform, and well adapt to industrial contest. Moreover, new chemical structures will be prepared and evaluated as potential drug against virulent and mutated flu viruses.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-NIGHT | Award Amount: 481.59K | Year: 2011

The 23rd of September 2011 the Everyday Science 2011. Italy plays Science project organises RN events in 15 Italian towns distributed in 10 regions from North to South of the nation: Bologna, Ferrara, Piacenza, Faenza (EMILIA-ROMAGNA), Pavia (LOMBARDIA), Lerici-La Spezia (LIGURIA), Padova, Verona (VENETO), Pisa (TOSCANA), Napoli Capodimonte, Salerno (CAMPANIA), Cosenza (CALABRIA), Catania (Sicilia), Cagliari (Sardegna). The aim is to make researchers work and experience closer to general public and offer an unusual amusement alternative for the Friday night by playing with science thought different perspectives. Researchers are involved in live hands-on, short labs, games, music and talk shows, together with artists and musicians. In 2011 events are more focused on presenting researchers work and experience thought art performances, amusing challenges and games. Synergy with national celebrations of 150 anniversary of the Italian Unity is foreseen, by organizing ad hoc initiatives with researchers and scientists. Live web-tv and web-radio broadcast from Bologna, with links with all project events and with other Researchers Night in Italy. National communication campaign is mainly based on web social media (blog, facebook, twitter) and channels (web tv and radio). Synergies on communication strategies are planned with other Italian funded projects. After the two successful editions in Emilia-Romagna (2009, 2010), Everyday Science 2011 project enlarges its capacity to involve research centres, universities and media partners at national level. Italy plays Science is the new subtitle which underlines this wider geographical approach. 7 universities, 4 national research institutes and 2 national media partners compose the partnership, coordinated by ASTER (consortium of universities, research institutes and entrepreneurial associations). The project can count on the large consensus of local authorities and the support private sponsors


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IRSES | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2010-IRSES | Award Amount: 606.90K | Year: 2011

The main aim of the R & D in Sustainable Building Energy Systems and Retrofitting (R-D-SBES-R) joint exchange programme is to develop and maintain long term partnerships between European and Chinese participant organisations by undertaking joint researches into the development of several zero (low) carbon cooling, heating and power generation technologies for buildings and promoting best practice and strategy for retrofitting existing buildings, by individual mobility of researchers between Europe and China. Its objectives are: (1) to develop a novel dew point air cooler; (2) to develop a solar driven ejector cooling system; (3) to develop a solar driven desiccant cooling system; (4) to develop a solar PV heat/power system using direct expansion evaporator/heat pipes; (5) to develop a solar balcony hot water heating system; (6) to develop a hybrid solar/biomass CHP system; (7) to develop micro-channel heat exchangers for building air conditioning; and (8) to develop best practice and strategy for building retrofitting. The R-D-SBES-R consortium will include twelve partners, six being universities from European Member States and six being universities from the Peoples Republic of China - an ICPC country which has signed a S&T Agreement with the EU. Eight industrial organisations from the EU and China are also involved in the project but receive no funding from the EU, as according to the regulations set by IRSES programme. Strong participation by enterprises will enhance industry-academia cooperation in terms of research training, career development, knowledge sharing and technology transfer. It will also result in fertilisation of a number of your researchers and PhD students through the joint supervision between the partners. Moreover, the programme will help identify more research initiatives that will formulate future cooperation between the EU and China partners. The project will be 4 years in duration with a suggested start date of 1 December 2010.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: AAT.2008.6.3.3. | Award Amount: 4.40M | Year: 2009

The PPlane project is a direct follow up study to Out-of-the-Box project that aimed to identify potential new concepts and technologies for future air transport and focused on a number of radical changes to the system rather than taking incremental steps. As a result of the Out-of-the-Box project, PPlane implements a systematic approach to radical and novel ideas for Personal Air Transport System (PATS). The project starts with the definition of several operational concepts and implements an optimisation model and several selection criteria to suggest and analyse new concepts for the personal air transport system of the future. The main selection criteria include: Security and safety, Automation and Control, Environment, and Human Factors. Horizontal areas such as technologies, regulation and affordability are considered in each of the above criteria. The resulting concepts are analysed and compared resulting in recommendations for implementation across Europe. The PPlane team is led by ONERA and comprises well known organisations in the field of aviation from different domains including industry, research and academic institutes. Additional external experts will be invited to the advisory board. PPlanes objectives and methodology are an excellent match with the objectives of AAT.2008.6.3.3. Personal air transport systems and in particular with AREA: 7.1.6.3 Promising Pioneering Ideas in Air Transport matching the expected impact of assessing the viability or paving the way towards the realisation of the new ideas and concepts identified by ACARE. Moreover, the definition of the PATS concepts will be built according to the ATM structure planned in SESAR.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-SICA | Phase: KBBE-2008-3-1-02 | Award Amount: 5.12M | Year: 2009

Increasing world market prices for fossil fuels, driven by limited reserves, growing demand and instability in producing regions, now render renewable fuels economical. Such fuels are also a pathway to reducing GHG emissions and mitigating climate change. Bio-ethanol from crop plants is a promising, partial solution to sustainably satisfy the energy demand for road transport. The success of bio-ethanol from sugarcane in Brazil demonstrates proof of concept but cannot be transferred to water-limited or temperate environments. Sweet sorghum, as a source of either fermentable free sugars or lignocellulosics, has many potential advantages, including: high water, nitrogen and radiation use efficiency; broad agro-ecological adaptation; rich genetic diversity for useful traits; and the potential to produce fuel feedstock, food and feed in various combinations. Fuel-food crops can thereby help reconciling energy and food security issues. This project will breed for improved cultivars and hybrids of sorghum for temperate, tropical semi-arid and tropical acid-soil environments by pyramiding in various combinations, depending on region and ideotype, tolerance to cold, drought and acid (Al-toxic) soils; and high production of stalk sugars, easily digestible biomass and grain (WP 1-3). Molecular-genetic and physiological breeding support is given by WP4, and agro-ecological adaptation and sustainable practices are developed by WP5. Other WPs (6, 7, 8) provide for integrated technology and impact assessments including economics, dissemination and coordination. The Consortium is composed of 10 members from France (leader), Italy, Germany, Brazil, India, Mexico and South Africa, including a seed company. Research involves structured participation of stake holders, including policy makers. Project outcomes will be new germplasm, sustainable practices and commodity chain concepts adapted to each target region. The duration of the project is 5 years.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: PEOPLE-2007-1-1-ITN | Award Amount: 3.94M | Year: 2008

Gas flows in microsystems are of great interest for various applications that touch almost every industrial field. This diversity is typified through the following examples: fluidic microactuators for active control of aerodynamic flows, vacuum generators for extracting biological samples, mass flow and temperature micro-sensors, pressure gauges, micro heat-exchangers for the cooling of electronic components or for chemical applications, micropumps and microsystems for mixing or separation for local gas analysis, mass spectrometers, vacuum and dosing valves. The main characteristic of gas microflows is their rarefaction, the level of which often requires a modelling both by continuous and molecular approaches. The role played by the interaction between the gas and the wall becomes essential and is generally badly known. Numerous models of boundary conditions are currently in confrontation and require an empirical adjustment strongly dependent on the micro manufacturing techniques. On the other hand, the experimental data are fragmentary and difficult to confront. Most of them do not address heat transfer and gas mixtures issues. The proposed network has been built from several existing collaborations within bilateral programmes, from scientific collaborations and national networks. However, there was no global coordination of the research efforts in the field of gas microflows at the European level. Thus, the two primary objectives of this ITN project are: (i) to structure research in Europe in the field of micro gas flows to improve global fundamental knowledge and enable technological applications to an industrial and commercial level; (ii) to train ESR and ER at a pan-European level, with the aim to providing both a global overview on problems linked to gas flow and heat transfer in microsystems, and advanced skills in specific domains of this research field.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-13-2014 | Award Amount: 6.23M | Year: 2015

Chronic liver disease affects about 29-million Europeans accounting for about 170,000 deaths at a cost of around 15.8bn. This chronic non-communicable disease is increasing at an alarming rate due to increasing European obesity, alcohol use and ageing. The three main causes of the disease; alcohol, fatty liver and viral hepatitis are amenable to prevention and treatment. Gut-derived endotoxins and bacterial translocation are central factors implicated in the pathogenesis of fatty liver disease and, the development and progression of cirrhosis. In cirrhosis, current state-of-the-art therapy to prevent recurrent complications of advanced cirrhosis is to use poorly absorbed antibiotics but long-term antibiotic therapy has problems associated with bacterial resistance, infection with resistant organisms and the cost. Treatment of fatty liver and modulation of bacterial translocation in early cirrhosis to prevent complications is an unmet need. Our academic-industrial consortium has developed a novel, patented, safe and cheap nanoporous carbon that modulates the effects of bacterial translocation in animal models of liver disease. Our feasibility studies demonstrate that this product advances the current state-of-the-art, is a TRL 4/5 and is now ready for validation through clinical trials. We propose to investigate the safety and efficacy of this novel nanoporous carbon in patients with fatty liver disease and cirrhosis. If successful, we will be able to confirm an innovative, cost-effective and novel strategy for the management of this chronic disease in a European population. Exploitation of the results of the CARBALIVE project will support the continued development of this carbon through additional private and public sector investment. The use of this innovative therapy is expected to reduce the economic burden of the disease in Europe, allow patients to achieve enhanced quality of life, improve survival, and allow many patients to return to economic productivity.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP-2007-1.1-2;NMP-2007-1.1-1 | Award Amount: 4.63M | Year: 2008

Advanced nanofabrication can produce now nano-structures similar in size with single biomolecules or their self-assembled architectures. Capitalising on this strategic opportunity, BISNES focuses on the design, fabrication and implementation of biomimetic nanostructures which complement biomolecular surfaces and modulate the biomolecular activity. The BISNES project will (i) develop software products for the representation and quantification of bimolecular surfaces, especially those that self-assemble in long-range nano-aggregates, interacting with artificial nanostructures; (ii) design and fabricate nanostructured surfaces and objects that complementary replicate biomolecular surfaces; and (iii) design, fabricate and implement novel hybrid bio-devices which exhibit quantum-leap increase in capabilities (e.g., sensitivity, response time, cost) or entirely new ones. The project will deliver demonstrated technical solutions with impact on a wide range of applications and products: ultra-sensitive bio-diagnostics and drug discovery devices; inherently bactericidal surfaces, medical devices for the in vitro study of amyloid and cytoskeleton proteins central to critical disease (e.g., neurodegenerative diseases, cancer); and hybrid nanodevices that exhibit new electromagnetic properties useful for future IT devices. The research consortium has the critical mass of knowledge and experimental capabilities, as well as the right combination of activities (academia and industry, both SMEs and industry end-user), which allows us to follow the complete innovation path from fundamental science to its implementation in demonstration devices. BISNES cross-disciplinary approach of will synergise the European first-class position in nanofabrication and biomolecular engineering, through cross-field applications and will contribute to the consolidation of the high added-value of European biomedical, advanced manufacturing and IT industry.