Birmingham, United Kingdom
Birmingham, United Kingdom

The University of Birmingham is a red brick university located in the city of Birmingham, United Kingdom. It received its royal charter in 1900 as a successor to Queen's College, Birmingham and Mason Science College . Birmingham was the first red brick university to gain a charter. It is a founding member of both the Russell Group of British research universities and the international network of research universities, Universitas 21.The University of Birmingham was ranked 11th in the UK and 64th in the world by QS World University Rankings. In 2013, Birmingham was named 'University of the Year 2014' in the Times Higher Education awards. Birmingham is also ranked 4th in the UK for Graduate Prospects in The Times and The Sunday Times Good University Guide 2015.The student population includes around 19,000 undergraduate and 9,000 postgraduate students, which is the 11th largest in the UK. The annual income of the institution for 2010–11 was £470.7 million, with an expenditure of £443.7 million.The university is home to the Barber Institute of Fine Arts, housing works by Van Gogh, Picasso and Monet, the Lapworth Museum of Geology, the Cadbury Research Library home to the Mingana Collections of Middle Eastern manuscripts and the Chamberlain Collection, and the Joseph Chamberlain Memorial Clock Tower, which is a prominent landmark visible from many parts of the city. Academics and alumni of the university include former British Prime Ministers Neville Chamberlain, and Stanley Baldwin, and eight Nobel laureates. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

Patent
University of Birmingham | Date: 2015-05-06

The invention provides an emulsion comprising: (a) a continuous phase; (b) a dispersed phase comprising an active compound (1); and (c) colloidal particles located at the interface between the continuous phase and the dispersed phase. These are particularly useful with one or more agrochemicals or food additives as an active compound.


Patent
University of Birmingham and The Secretary Of State For Defence Of The United Kingdom Of Great Britain And Northern Ireland | Date: 2015-02-25

The invention relates to an antimicrobial surface, in particular a surface functionalised with a peptide comprising an antimicrobial moiety. The invention comprises a surface functionalised with a peptide comprising an antimicrobial moiety and a binder moiety, wherein the peptide is immobilized on the surface by electrostatic interactions between the binder moiety and the surface. Further provided is a medical device, a peptide and a method for the immobilization of a peptide.


Patent
University of Birmingham | Date: 2017-03-08

The invention provides an agent for preventing or treating a condition characterised by the presence of unwanted cells, the agent comprising:(i) a targeting moiety that is capable of targeting to the unwanted cells; and(ii) a T cell antigen,wherein the T cell antigen can be released from the targeting moiety by selective cleavage of a cleavage site in the agent in the vicinity of the unwanted cells.


Heal M.R.,University of Edinburgh | Kumar P.,University of Surrey | Harrison R.M.,University of Birmingham | Harrison R.M.,King Abdulaziz University
Chemical Society Reviews | Year: 2012

The diversity of ambient particle size and chemical composition considerably complicates pinpointing the specific causal associations between exposure to particles and adverse human health effects, the contribution of different sources to ambient particles at different locations, and the consequent formulation of policy action to most cost-effectively reduce harm caused by airborne particles. Nevertheless, the coupling of increasingly sophisticated measurements and models of particle composition and epidemiology continue to demonstrate associations between particle components and sources (and at lower concentrations) and a wide range of adverse health outcomes. This article reviews the current approaches to source apportionment of ambient particles and the latest evidence for their health effects, and describes the current metrics, policies and legislation for the protection of public health from ambient particles. A particular focus is placed on particles in the ultrafine fraction. The review concludes with an extended evaluation of emerging challenges and future requirements in methods, metrics and policy for understanding and abating adverse health outcomes from ambient particles. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012.


Lip G.Y.,University of Aalborg | Lane D.A.,University of Birmingham
JAMA | Year: 2015

IMPORTANCE: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an increase in mortality and morbidity, with a substantial increase in stroke and systemic thromboembolism. Strokes related to AF are associated with higher mortality, greater disability, longer hospital stays, and lower chance of being discharged home than strokes unrelated to AF.OBJECTIVE: To provide an overview of current concepts and recent developments in stroke prevention in AF, with suggestions for practical management.EVIDENCE REVIEW: A comprehensive structured literature search was performed using MEDLINE for studies published through March 11, 2015, that reported on AF and stroke, bleeding risk factors, and stroke prevention.FINDINGS: The risk of stroke in AF is reduced by anticoagulant therapy. Thromboprophylaxis can be obtained with vitamin K antagonists (VKA, eg, warfarin) or a non-VKA oral anticoagulant (NOAC). Major guidelines emphasize the important role of oral anticoagulation (OAC) for effective stroke prevention in AF. Initially, clinicians should identify low-risk AF patients who do not require antithrombotic therapy (ie, CHA2DS2-VASc score, 0 for men; 1 for women). Subsequently, patients with at least 1 stroke risk factor (except when the only risk is being a woman) should be offered OAC. A patient's individual risk of bleeding from antithrombotic therapy should be assessed, and modifiable risk factors for bleeding should be addressed (blood pressure control, discontinuing unnecessary medications such as aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). The international normalized ratio should be tightly controlled for patients receiving VKAs.CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Stroke prevention is central to the management of AF, irrespective of a rate or rhythm control strategy. Following the initial focus on identifying low-risk patients, all others with 1 or more stroke risk factors should be offered OAC.


Hirschfield G.M.,University of Birmingham | Gershwin M.E.,University of California at Davis
Annual Review of Pathology: Mechanisms of Disease | Year: 2013

Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is an autoimmune disease characterized by clinical homogeneity among patients, an overwhelming female predominance, production of a multilineage immune response to mitochondrial autoantigens, inflammation of small bile ducts, and in some patients the development of fibrosis and cirrhosis. The targets in this disease are small bile ducts, and the prototypic serologic response includes antimitochondrial antibodies (AMAs). Several key observations have greatly advanced our understanding of PBC. First, the multilineage immune response, including AMAs, is directed at the E2 component of the 2-oxo-dehydrogenase pathway, particularly PDC-E2. Second, such autoantibodies may be identified years before the clinical diagnosis of disease. Third, the autoreactive T cell precursor frequency for both CD4 and CD8 cells is significantly higher in liver and regional lymph node than in blood, so the multilineage antimitochondrial response may be required for the development of this disease. Fourth, the apotope of biliary cells contains intact PDC-E2; this apotope, in a setting that includes granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor-stimulated macrophages and AMAs, produces an intense proinflammatory response. Fifth, several mouse models of PBC highlight the importance of loss of tolerance to PDC-E2 as well as a critical role for the interleukin (IL)-12 signaling pathway. Finally, genome-wide association studies suggest an important role for the IL-12 pathway in disease susceptibility. Taken together, these findings have resulted in a better understanding of the mechanism for selective biliary cell destruction and have also suggested unique pathways for therapeutic intervention. © 2013 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SST.2012.5.2-3. | Award Amount: 4.00M | Year: 2012

The proposal aims to investigate two novel ideas concerning ship structures. First the introduction of High Strength Low Alloyed Steels (HSLA) in specific structural details in order to deal with the major issue of crack initiation and propagation in critical areas of ships and second the replacement of specific structural parts of the ship with composite materials. Regarding the use of HSLA steels, it has been well documented that todays merchant ships are prone to crack initiation and propagation in stress concentration areas mostly due to fatigue loads. In this respect it is envisaged to replace Grade A or AH steels by HSLA steels with high toughness properties in specific areas of the ship structure, thereby reducing the risk of cracks developing in stress concentration areas. Concerning the use of composite materials, it is envisaged that they could replace parts of the steel structure, such as superstructures, piping and other non-critical parts. Composite materials can replace steel in certain parts of the ship thereby reducing weight and corrosion effects, without sacrificing structural integrity.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: FoF.NMP.2012-4 | Award Amount: 18.22M | Year: 2013

The overarching goal of AMAZE is to rapidly produce large defect-free additively-manufactured (AM) metallic components up to 2 metres in size, ideally with close to zero waste, for use in the following high-tech sectors namely: aeronautics, space, automotive, nuclear fusion and tooling. Four pilot-scale industrial AM factories will be established and enhanced, thereby giving EU manufacturers and end-users a world-dominant position with respect to AM production of high-value metallic parts, by 2016. A further aim is to achieve 50% cost reduction for finished parts, compared to traditional processing. The project will design, demonstrate and deliver a modular streamlined work-flow at factory level, offering maximum processing flexibility during AM, a major reduction in non-added-value delays, as well as a 50% reduction in shop-floor space compared with conventional factories. AMAZE will dramatically increase the commercial use of adaptronics, in-situ sensing, process feedback, novel post-processing and clean-rooms in AM, so that (i) overall quality levels are improved, (ii) dimensional accuracy is increased by 25% (iii) build rates are increased by a factor of 10, and (iv) industrial scrap rates are slashed to <5%. Scientifically, the critical links between alloy composition, powder/wire production, additive processing, microstructural evolution, defect formation and the final properties of metallic AM parts will be examined and understood. This knowledge will be used to validate multi-level process models that can predict AM processes, part quality and performance. In order to turn additive manufacturing into a mainstream industrial process, a sharp focus will also be drawn on pre-normative work, standardisation and certification, in collaboration with ISO, ASTM and ECSS. The team comprises 31 partners: 21 from industry, 8 from academia and 2 from intergovernmental agencies. This represent the largest and most ambitious team ever assembled on this topic.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2015 | Award Amount: 706.50K | Year: 2016

NanoMaterials safety is of great societal concern and raises many questions for the general public, governments, industry, scientists and regulators. Identifying and controlling the hazards associated with NMs is required to ensure the safety in parallel to exploiting the technological benefits. NANOGENTOOLS answers this challenge by creating a collaborative excellence-based knowledge exchange network that will: i) push forward knowledge via method development and pre-validation, ii) train scientists in new methodologies to assess long term nanosafety, and iii) support their inclusion in standardization and EU regulations. NANOGENTOOLS combines toxicogenomics, proteomics, biophysics, molecular modeling, chemistry, bio/chemoinformatics to develop fast in vitro high throughput (HTS) assays, with molecular based computational models for nanotoxicity. Its objectives are to: Provide solutions for faster, more reliable assessment of NM toxicity and propose HTS and omics tools for predicting toxicological properties of NMs. Develop new bioinformatics methodologies for analyzing -omics data and create an open database in collaboration with the EU Nanosafety Cluster. Conduct research and training on biophysical techniques and mathematical models for accurate and fast nanotoxicity prediction. Build/improve the safe by design concept, demonstrated using carbon-NMs and nanosensors. Place our new knowledge in the context of regulations and EU roadmaps. NANOGENTOOLS brings together cutting edge research, innovative knowledge-transfer and co-development, and cross-sectoral and cross-disciplinary secondments linking EU academic institutes/networks with industry and policy makers across 8 countries. Expected impacts include pre-validated tools for efficient cost-effective nanosafety assessment applicable to SMEs for incorporation into regulatory frameworks, and translation of knowledge via development of a CNT-based nanosensor based on safe-by-design principles.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 419.99K | Year: 2016

Gas-liquid foams are ubiquitous in our daily life and in industry. Applications range from food, consumer goods, pharmaceuticals, polymers and ceramics to fire-fighting, enhanced oil recovery, and mineral particle transport. Recently, applications have also emerged in the medical field, e.g. foam sclerotherapy of varicose veins, and expanding polymer foam for treating brain aneurysms. Thus, foams are crucial to a wide range of industries and contribute considerably to the world economy. For example, by 2018 the global market will be worth $61.9 billion for polyurethane foam, $7.9 billion for shaving foam, and $74 billion for ice cream. The chocolate market will reach $98.3 billion in 2016, and a considerable part of it is due to aerated products (e.g. mousse). Foams are challenging complex fluids which are used for a variety of reasons including their light weight, complex microstructure, rheology, and transience, many aspects of which are not well understood and, thus, not well predicted by current models. A wide gap therefore exists between the complexity of foam phenomena and the present state of knowledge, which makes foam design and control in commercial applications more art than science. In particular, in many industrial processes foams are forced to flow through intricate passages, into vessels with narrow complex cross-sections or through nozzles. Examples include flow of aerated confectionary in narrow channels and complex moulds, filling of cavities with insulation foam, flow of foamed cement slurries in narrow oil-well annuli, filling of hollow aerofoil sections with polyurethane foam to make aerodynamic tethers for communication and geoengineering applications, and production of pre-insulated pipes for district heating. These flows are typified by contractions and expansions which generate complex phenomena that can have important effects on foam structure and flow, and can lead to dramatic instabilities and morphological transformations with serious practical implications for foam sustainability during flow and processing. Here, the flow characteristics of the foam at bubble scale are important, but the topological changes incurred and their effects on the rheology and flow of the foam are poorly understood. This proposal seeks to address this lack of understanding by studying experimentally, using a range of advanced diagnostic techniques, and via theory and computer simulation a number of fundamental aspects related to the flow, stability and behaviour of three-dimensional foams through narrow channels containing a variety of complex geometries. The flow of aqueous foams as well as setting polymer foams with formulations of varying degrees of complexity will be experimentally studied. We will develop bubble-scale simulations with arbitrary liquid fractions spanning the whole range from dry to wet, to cover foams of industrial relevance. The wide range of experimental information and data to be generated in this project will allow these simulations to be guided and critically tested and, conversely, the simulations will underpin our engineering theory of the behaviour of foam flows in complex geometries. This basic knowledge, from theory, modelling and experiment, will give a step improvement in fundamental science, and will assist designers and manufacturers of foam products, as well as designers and users of foam generating or processing equipment. More specifically, the practical aim of the project is to develop predictive tools as an aid to industrial practitioners, to describe the structural and dynamical properties of foams in terms of formulation properties and flow parameters, based on the knowledge gained from the experimental and modelling work. We will also work with our industrial partners to help them improve their understanding of the fundamental science which underpins their particular foam flow applications and, thus, enable them to enhance them.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: GC.SST.2013-2. | Award Amount: 3.58M | Year: 2013

The future of road transport is electric - within the foreseeable future, pure electric vehicles (EVs) will populate our roads. Vital to the success of this transition is improved, next-generation motors based on improved magnetic materials; which provide high levels of flux at elevated temperatures, while retaining resistance to reverse magnetic fields and the corrosion problems associated with running electric motors in an automotive application. Currently, these magnets are based on the rare-earth elements neodymium and dysprosium, which are predominantly mined in China (>95%). Exports are being restricted as a result of an expanding domestic market and a policy of relocating magnet manufacturing to China, thereby multiplying the costs of raw materials for magnet manufacturers in Europe. The rare-earth crisis is particularly critical for heavy rare earths such as dysprosium that are currently required to assure the high-temperature performance of magnets. MAG-DRIVE will research and develop novel microstructural-engineering strategies that will dramatically improve the properties of magnets based on light rare-earth elements, especially the coercivity, which will enable them to be used for EV applications above 100C. These magnets will also be designed-to-recycle, with an emphasis on reducing conventional rare-earth magnets need for easily oxidising grain boundaries. The project will integrate these magnets into motors that have increased efficiency, with a system developed by VALEO for integration into their next generation of pure EV motor. The MAG-DRIVE project includes leading research groups from Slovenia, Serbia and the UK, together with SMEs from Slovenia and Germany and VALEO, and will deliver materials and systems with increased energy efficiency over a wide range of temperatures and operating conditions as well as reducing costs and dependency on imports for next-generation electric vehicles.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.8.1 | Award Amount: 2.64M | Year: 2012

School and University students studying science and technology often encounter barriers to their understanding of complex concepts. However, unlike in the arts, students are frequently poorly motivated to overcome these barriers. Focusing on performance JuxtaLearn will provoke student curiosity in science and technology through creative film making and editing activities. Computational identification of students barriers to conceptual understanding will be overcome by scaffolded creative application of concepts in activities juxtaposed to traditional understanding. State of the art technologies will support students transferable reflections focusing on two pedagogical approaches: juxtaposition performance and reflective performance.\n\nJuxtaposition performance: JuxtaLearn ICMAs (Interactive Computer Marked Assessments) will support students identification of threshold concepts that are their own personal barriers to understanding. Students understanding will be enhanced by them creating personal performances through application of a theory in a formal activity and then again in a creative juxtaposed activity (e.g. physics used in music DJ-ing, chemistry occurring in kitchens, possible evolution of an alien race). New media and learning analytics of public video resources will facilitate student creative inspiration and further conceptual insight and understanding.\n\nReflective performance: State of the art systems for automated and personalised film making and editing will support curiosity and creative expression. A deeper understanding will be reinforced through scaffolding reflections on essential elements in applying the theory. Students will, for example, be supported in instigating reflective decisions on what to film, how to film it and what and where to edit. Public displays will enable sharing and commenting of these performances thus encouraging public curiosity and a buzz around specific complex concepts.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.3.2-2 | Award Amount: 7.84M | Year: 2013

Extensive clinical and epidemiological data clearly shows that chronic periodontal disease (PD), the most prevalent infectious inflammatory disease of mankind, is strongly linked to systemic inflammatory diseases such as cardiovascular diseases (CVD) , rheumatoid arthritis (RA) , and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) . Taking into account that up to 30% of the adult population worldwide suffers from severe periodontitis , the impact of this disease on human health is immense and has been recognized by World Health Organization . Nevertheless, in many EU countries PD is a neglected disease, both by the population in general and health-care personnel. Often this negligence comes to the point that, like a hair-loss, the tooth-loss due to periodontitis is still considered as a normal inevitable event associated with aging. To combat this misconception and conceive novel approaches to prevent and/or treat CVD, RA, and COPD we will explore highly innovative ideas that these non-communicable diseases are at least aggravated, if not initiated, by periodontal infection. Results emanating from our project will: i) elucidate a relationship between the presence of specific periodontal pathogens and severity of systemic diseases; ii) show that extensive periodontal treatment improves clinical parameters of investigated systemic diseases; iii) reveal the impact of eradication of specific periodontal pathogen on the level of inflammatory markers; iv) develop novel, periodontal-pathogen specific bactericidal compounds based on periodontal glutaminyl cyclase (QC), the enzyme essential for these pathogens vitality. This will reduce mortality and ameliorated quality of life of CVD, RA, and COPD patients. All of these will be possible based on the knowledge of mechanisms beyond the causative links between specific pathogen driven periodontal disease and CVD, RA, and COPD revealed by research program outlined in this project.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: NMP-28-2014 | Award Amount: 11.30M | Year: 2015

Concept: NanoFASE will deliver an integrated Exposure Assessment Framework, including methods, parameter values, model and guidance that will allow Industry to assess the full diversity of industrial nano-enabled products to a standard acceptable in regulatory registrations. Methods to assess how use phases, waste streams and environmental compartments (air, soil, water biota) act as reactors in modifying and transporting ENMs will be developed and used to derive parameter values. Our nanospecific models will be integrated with the existing multi-media fate model SimpleBox4Nano for use in EUSES and also develop into a flexible multi-media model for risk assessment at different scales and complexities. Information on release form, transformation and transport processes for product relevant ENMs will allow grouping into Functional Fate Groups according to their most probable fate pathways as a contribution to safe-by-design based on fate. Methodology: Inventories of material release forms along the product value chain are established. We then study how released ENMs transform from initial reactive states to modified forms with lower energy states in which nanospecific properties may be lost. Transport studies assess material fluxes within/between compartments. The experimental work underpins models describing ENM transformation and transport. Open access is provided to the models suitable for incorporation into existing exposure assessment tools (e.g. SimpleBox4Nano) and for more detailed assessment. Framework completeness is validated by case studies. Impact: Identified links between ENM material properties and fate outcome (e.g. safe-by-design). Improved representation of nanospecific processes in existing key fate and exposure assessment tools (e.g. SimpleBox4Nano in EUSES). Contribution to standardization. GIS framework to support predictive assessment, catchment and point source management of ENM releases.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Collaborative Research & Development | Award Amount: 224.14K | Year: 2013

An applied research project led by GKN Aerospace, supported by Thompson and University of Bimingham, taking an existing joining technique Linear Friction Welding (LFW), and applying it in a novel way to achieve near net shape forming of hard and soft metals, resulting in a step-change in UK manufacturing competitiveness. This approach enables significantly reduced raw material requirement and machining time/cost, delivering a much improved Buy to Fly ratio and environmental sustainabilty. Environmental benefits will be achieved through the whole supply chain from reduced energy used during material supply and part manufacture. This advanced manufacturing technology will enable high value cost efficient environmentally beneficial manuf. to be exploited in the UK in an increasingly competitive global market.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Business, Innovation & Skills Financed | Award Amount: 4.54M | Year: 2014

Within the aerospace sector, aftermarket services account for over fifty percent of revenue generated by aero engine manufacturers. Central to this is the ability to inspect and repair high unit cost components, both on-platform and in repair and overhaul facilities, in order to safely return them to operational service. With the drive towards ever-increasingly complex aero-engine architectures, highly engineered components and advanced material systems, many existing repair processes will not be capable of meeting the new aftemarket need. This project will therefore develop and demonstrate three key advanced repair technologies, including the cost-efficient high-integrity repair of blisks, on-platform repair and structural repair of composite components. These repair processes must be capable of being applied to complex geometries and accommodate component variation resulting from service operation.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Collaborative Research & Development | Award Amount: 1.15M | Year: 2011

The aim of this project is to develop a tumour profiling assay based on targeted multiplexed enrichment and next generation sequencing (NGS) of clinically informative genes and variants. Oxford Gene Technology (OGT) will work closely with its partners in Birmingham and Southampton, and the CR-UK Technology hubs to build the assay into an innovative, integrated workflow, from sample submission to interpretation of the patient tumour profile. As a final step, the data will be transferred into an automated prescription management system, developed by CIS Oncology, which will enable the output of the profiling to be closely coupled to drug prescription, ensuring accuracy and consistency of care and delivering significant cost savings to the NHS. OGT will investigate the potential, not just to commercialise the assay panel, but also to offer a centralised, high-throughput, validated service run from OGTs accredited laboratories.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 3.72M | Year: 2014

The conditions in which materials are required to operate are becoming ever more challenging. Operating temperatures and pressures are increasing in all areas of manufacture, energy generation, transport and environmental clean-up. Often the high temperatures are combined with severe chemical environments and exposure to high energy and, in the nuclear industry, to ionising radiation. The production and processing of next-generation materials capable of operating in these conditions will be non-trivial, especially at the scale required in many of these applications. In some cases, totally new compositions, processing and joining strategies will have to be developed. The need for long-term reliability in many components means that defects introduced during processing will need to be kept to an absolute minimum or defect-tolerant systems developed, e.g. via fibre reinforcement. Modelling techniques that link different length and time scales to define the materials chemistry, microstructure and processing strategy are key to speeding up the development of these next-generation materials. Further, they will not function in isolation but as part of a system. It is the behaviour of the latter that is crucial, so that interactions between different materials, the joining processes, the behaviour of the different parts under extreme conditions and how they can be made to work together, must be understood. Our vision is to develop the required understanding of how the processing, microstructures and properties of materials systems operating in extreme environments interact to the point where materials with the required performance can be designed and then manufactured. Aligned with the Materials Genome Initiative in the USA, we will integrate hierarchical and predictive modelling capability in fields where experiments are extremely difficult and expensive. The team have significant experience of working in this area. Composites based on exotic materials such as zirconium diborides and silicon carbide have been developed for use as leading edges for hypersonic vehicles over a 3 year, DSTL funded collaboration between the 3 universities associated with this proposal. World-leading achievements include densifying them in <10 mins using a relatively new technique known as spark plasma sintering (SPS); measuring their thermal and mechanical properties at up to 2000oC; assessing their oxidation performance at extremely high heat fluxes and producing fibre-reinforced systems that can withstand exceptionally high heating rates, e.g. 1000oC s-1, and temperatures of nearly 3000oC for several minutes. The research planned for this Programme Grant is designed to both spin off this knowledge into materials processing for nuclear fusion and fission, aerospace and other applications where radiation, oxidation and erosion resistance at very high temperatures are essential and to gain a deep understanding of the processing-microstructure-property relations of these materials and how they interact with each other by undertaking one of the most thorough assessments ever, allowing new and revolutionary compositions, microstructures and composite systems to be designed, manufactured and tested. A wide range of potential crystal chemistries will be considered to enable identification of operational mechanisms across a range of materials systems and to achieve paradigm changing developments. The Programme Grant would enable us to put in place the expertise required to produce a chain of knowledge from prediction and synthesis through to processing, characterisation and application that will enable the UK to be world leading in materials for harsh environments.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 534.06K | Year: 2014

The development of implantable prosthetics has revolutionised medicine. Where joint injury or destruction would once have once significantly reduced quality of life, to the detriment of a patients fitness and health, we can now almost fully restore function. The manufacturing methods used for the production of prosthetics are quite crude and often require the casting of metal into a mould before finishing by hand. As a consequence they are usually made to only a few different sizes and the resulting structures must be made to fit by the surgeon. This is acceptable for the majority of patients who require joint replacement, but there are some medical conditions that require very irregularly shaped (customised) structures to enable an adequate repair. For example, bone cancers often require extensive cutting away of the bone and this can leave a very large and irregular defect. Similarly the bone structure of the face and skull is very specific to an individual and when bone must be removed, again due to cancer or following physical damage. To restore physical appearance, it would be best if a clinician were able to generate a plate that could allow them to replace like for like. In this project, we will refine an Additive Layer Manufacturing (ALM) technology called selective laser meeting (SLM) to allow us to produce implants that are individual to a patient. These technologies use lasers to fuse powder and create a three dimensional object in a layer by layer fashion. By taking three dimensional images (MRI and CT) from a patient, operators can design structures that will be able to directly replace tissue with the optimum shaped implant. In this project, we will work with doctors from the Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Queen Elizabeth Hospital and the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine to develop a process that we hope will eventually allow these clinicians to produce implants in their own hospitals or even on the front-line of a conflict and enable better treatment for their patients. As well as allowing the production of complex-shaped parts, ALM has another significant advantage over casting in that it allows the production of very complex porous structures within a material. This means that we can modify the physical properties of the material by incorporating holes or structured porosity into the structure. These holes can be sealed from the surface of the prosthesis, or can be linked to the surface using a network of even narrower holes. We would like to explore the use of this added manufacturing capability to make prosthetics with a very closely defined internal structure that is completely interconnected. A second, cement like, material can then be injected into the pore structure and will harden in place. This second phase can be used to modify mechanical properties or could be used as a carrier for drugs that may stop infection or help the tissue to heal. It is hoped that this modification could help us eliminate implant-based infections, which is the leading cause of failure following prosthetic implantation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 4.13M | Year: 2012

The need for quantitative and fast identification of trace gaseous compounds in complex chemical matrices continuously pushes the limits of analytical chemistry in many areas of relevance to the EU, including food, health, the environment, and security. A relatively new broad-based and rapidly growing analytical technique, proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), combines excellent chemical specification with ultra high detection sensitivity in real-time, but is only partially exploited owing to the lack of a focused research programme in terms of its scientific fundamentals and applications, and owing to a lack of an intersectoral and interdisciplinary based forum for the exchange of ideas and best practice to further develop PTR-MS. The demand for PTR-MS is outstripping the supply of highly qualified chemists who cannot only use the technology, but who also have a broad background in analytical chemistry, and are capable of leading multidisciplinary research/commercial activities. There is an urgent need within Europe for the harmonized training of ESRs in analytical chemistry within many sectors and across many disparate scientific disciplines and applications. The overall goal of this multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary ITN is to train the next generation of analytical scientists in the skills necessary for the development and use of PTR-MS and other analytical technologies (including GC-MS, SIFT-MS and IMS) for the detection of trace gaseous compounds. Our vision is to enhance our understanding of the crucial role these chemicals play in many complex chemical environments and the underpinning science needed to develop techniques to address major analytical challenges. The network is intersectoral in nature combining commercial (both manufacturers and end-users), governmental and academic concerns using a range of state-of-the-art analytical techniques, to address a number of topical analytical issues in an interdisciplinary cooperative.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 3.67M | Year: 2014

The GraWIToN project aims to train 13 ESRs in the gravitational wave search field. This research field is in an impressive expansion period, thank to a new generation of detector under installation in these years, to the promise of the exciting discovery in 5 years from now of this kind of signal, predicted in the General Relativity of Einstein, to the enlarging of the world wide scientific community, with new actors coming from emerging countries and thanks to the boosting action due to the Einstein Telescope project, previously supported by the European Commission with the FP7-Design Study tool. The ESRs will be embedded in this exciting research environment and will be trained in the cutting edge technologies adopted in the Gravitational Wave detectors. Complex optical apparatuses, high power and low noise lasers, high reflective coatings, optical simulation and modelling using parallel computing systems are the crucial technologies used in gravitational wave detectors that are extremely interesting in the industrial sector, as highlighted by the participation of 3 private companies as full participants and one as associated partner. The multidisciplinary aspect is completed by the astrophysics training, fundamental for a future researcher in this field, and by an expressly multidisciplinary module, addressed to the management and outreaching skills. The participation to this project of research institutes and universities will guarantee the possibility for the ESR to achieve to doctorate degree.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.5.4 | Award Amount: 4.83M | Year: 2011

The proposed ACCOMPANY system will consist of a robotic companion as part of an intelligent environment, providing services to elderly users in a motivating and socially acceptable manner to facilitate independent living at home. The ACCOMPANY system will provide physical, cognitive and social assistance in everyday home tasks, and will contribute to the re-ablement of the user, i.e. assist the user in being able to carry out certain tasks on his/her own. Services to the user will be delivered through socially interactive, acceptable and empathic interaction, building on computational models of robot social cognition and interaction. The envisaged relationship of the user with the robot is that of a co-learner robot and user providing mutual assistance for the user not to be dominated by the technology, but to be empowered, physically, cognitively and socially.The project combines a multidisciplinary consortium to tackle the technological as well as human-centred and ethical challenges of the project. A state of the art service robot platform, Care-O-bot 3 will be used to assess user requirements and user acceptance of the robot. Results from user studies will then be fed back to adapt the technology so that it better suits user demands and preferences. Throughout the project such formative feedback results in different iterations of the ACCOMPANY prototypes.Three test sites in three different European countries (UK, the Netherlands, France), as well as a dedicated showcase, will ensure an extensive evaluation process considering cultural differences.The ACCOMPANY system will be a novel technological solution TOWARDS facilitating independent living at home for elderly users. In addition, ACCOMPANY will specify and benchmark design and ethical guidelines for service robots for the elderly. The novel insights gained in the project will be made publicly available, thereby strengthening the European service robotics research and industry.The project combines a multidisciplinary consortium to tackle the technological as well as human-centred and ethical challenges of the project. A state of the art service robot platform, Care-O-bot 3 will be used to assess user requirements and user acceptance of the robot. Results from user studies will then be fed back to adapt the technology so that it better suits user demands and preferences. Throughout the project such formative feedback results in different iterations of the ACCOMPANY prototypes.Three test sites in three different European countries (UK, the Netherlands, France), as well as a dedicated showcase, will ensure an extensive evaluation process considering cultural differences.The ACCOMPANY system will be a novel technological solution to facilitating independent living at home for elderly users. In addition, ACCOMPANY will specify and benchmark design and ethical guidelines for service robots for the elderly. The novel insights gained in the project will be made publicly available,


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 4.06M | Year: 2013

It is estimated that touch screen module revenues will reach $23.9 billion by 2017. These user interfaces have become one of the most common input devices for digital media, e.g. in mobile phones and computers. Current devices incorporate relatively primitive vibrotactile haptic-feedback. The aim of PROTOTOUCH is to develop tactile displays with high fidelity haptic recognition, so that buttons would press and release like those on a real keyboard, for example, which would considerably enhance the user performance, ease of use and user experience of touch screens. Compared to visual and audio rendering, this is an immense technological challenge, particularly given the practical constraints such as cost, power and size etc. PROTOTOUCH will train 11 Early Stage Researchers (ESRs) and 4 Experienced Researchers (ERs) as a new cohort of researchers that will adopt a radically new approach to overcome the immense development challenges in the design of next generation TDs. The focus of the training will be on (a) the exploitation of the biological processes that evoke the sense of touch, (b) the application of advanced numerical techniques, such as multiscale multiphysics virtual prototyping and information processing, and (c) the translation of innovative technology into commercially viable mass-market and niche products. The ITN will involve a study of the mechanical interactions between a finger pad and a tactile display, the peripheral and central neural response that is evoked and the tactile perception of the subject. The neuromechanical interactions will form the basis of virtual prototyping. The human and virtual data will be analysed using advanced information techniques to delineate the factors that govern the performance of the displays and thus guide the design and optimisation of virtual prototypes prior to fabrication and testing.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.2.1 | Award Amount: 4.49M | Year: 2013

The challenge laid out in this call for proposals is to advance technologies for, and understand the principles of cognition and control in complex systems. We will meet this challenge by advancing methods for object perception, representation and manipulation so that a robot is able to robustly manipulate objects even when those objects are unfamiliar, and even though the robot has unreliable perception and action. The proposal is founded on two assumptions. The first of these is that the representation of the objects shape in particular and of other properties in general will benefit from being compositional (or very loosely hierarchical and part based). The second is that manipulation planning and execution benefits from explicitly reasoning about uncertainty in object pose, shape etcetera; how it changes under the robots actions, and the robot should plan actions that not only achieve the task, but gather information to make task achievement more reliable.\n\nThese two assumptions are mirrored in the structure of the proposed work, as we will develop two main strands of work:\n\ni) a multi-modal compositional, probabilistic representation of object properties to support perception and manipulation, and ii) algorithms for reasoning with this representation, that will estimate object properties from visual and haptic data, and also plan how to actively gather information about shape and other object properties (frictional coefficients, mass) while achieving a task. These two strands will be combined and tested on robots performing aspects of a dishwasher loading task. The outcome will be robust manipulation (i.e. under unreliable perception and action) of unfamiliar objects from familiar categories or with familiar parts.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.2.1 | Award Amount: 4.19M | Year: 2013

The aim of CoDyCo is to advance the current control and cognitive understanding about robust, goaldirected\nwhole-body motion interaction with multiple contacts. CoDyCo will go beyond traditional approaches: (1) proposing methodologies for performing coordinated interaction tasks with complex systems; (2) combining planning and compliance to deal with predictable and unpredictable events and contacts; (3) validating theoretical advances in real-world interaction scenarios.\nFirst, CoDyCo will advance the state-of-the-art in the way robots coordinate physical interaction and\nphysical mobility. Traditional industrial applications involve robots with limited mobility. Consequently,\ninteraction (e.g. manipulation) was treated separately from whole-body posture (e.g. balancing), assuming\nthe robot firmly connected to the ground. Foreseen applications involve robots with augmented autonomy\nand physical mobility. Within this novel context, physical interaction influences stability and balance. To\nallow robots to surpass barriers between interaction and posture control, CoDyCo will be grounded in\nprinciples governing whole-body coordination with contact dynamics.\nSecond, CoDyCo will go beyond traditional approaches in dealing with all perceptual and motor aspects\nof physical interaction, unpredictability included. Recent developments in compliant actuation and touch\nsensing allow safe and robust physical interaction from unexpected contact including humans. The next\nadvancement for cognitive robots, however, is the ability not only to cope with unpredictable contact, but\nalso to exploit predictable contact in ways that will assist in goal achievement.\nThird, the achievement of the project objectives will be validated in real-world scenarios with the iCub\nhumanoid robot engaged in whole-body goal-directed tasks. The evaluations will show the iCub exploiting\nrigid supportive contacts, learning to compensate for compliant contacts, and utilizing assistive physical\ninteraction.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.09M | Year: 2015

Hyporheic zones (HZs) are key compartments for the functioning of aquatic ecosystems. As dynamic and complex transition regions between rivers and aquifers, they are characterized by the simultaneous occurrence of multiple physical, biological and chemical processes. Turnover and degradation of nutrients and pollutants figure among the prominent ecological services the HZ provides. We are facing a significant knowledge gap in the understanding of how hyporheic processes are linked and how they impact on each other. This can be attributed to a lack of truly supra-disciplinary research and harmonized and innovative investigation methods. The concept of HypoTRAIN has been tailored to fill this gap. Collaborative research with state-of-the art technologies from multiple disciplines (hydrology, ecology, microbiology, engineering, environmental physics, contaminant science, modelling) will generate new mechanistic insights into the functioning of HZs. A group of ESRs will be educated using the multi-faceted nature of HZs as the central theme of the training programme. The supra-disciplinary expertise within the network and the high-level training program will generate scientific knowledge that will set the ground for a more holistic design of river management plans and restoration measures. Research excellence as well as scientific and technological innovation is ensured as all partners have world-leading reputations and work at the forefront of their respective discipline areas. Participating in HypoTRAIN will make ESRs highly attractive for employers and open up doors for their successful careers in research, regulation, consulting, and industry. They will be experts for the better assessment of the ecological and chemical status of surface waters and for providing successful river restoration and management strategies. The strong involvement of the non-academic sector will provide the ESRs with a holistic perspective on career opportunities.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2015 | Award Amount: 310.50K | Year: 2016

It is more efficient to maximise the value of food waste and by-products than reducing the cost of its management and disposal. Applications in this direction require intersectoral and intrasectoral synergies for maximising utilisation of complementary waste resources and multidisciplinary approach to research innovation and skills. SYBAWHEY aims a trans-national partnership between Europe and Africa for promoting area-wide sustainable supply network for the generation of innovations in the direction of food waste management and valorisation. The main focus will be on exchange of material (waste and by-products) and non-material based resources (knowledge and transferable skills) via international as well as intersectoral mobility between Africa and Europe. Methodologically, it draws on a case study of high volumes of underused by-products and wastes from banana production in Uganda and the environmentally toxic cheese whey produced by Cyprus dairies. Compared to other regions, whey from Cypriot dairies presents high lactose content and therefore great potential for product-driven biorefining. Moreover, banana flavour is one of the most preferred flavours in dairy products. SYBAWHEY aims a multidisciplinary approach to the network including assessing the feasibility and impact of whey and banana waste and by-product valorisation into useful products with high input to the same or different industrial plants; development of innovative technologies for aroma extraction from banana pulp and peel to be used in dairy products; characterisation of whey and banana pulp and peel and development of bioprocesses for their utilisation in health-promoting fermented whey-based novel foods; assessing the sustainability of banana flour in terms of energy and resource use as well as assessing the sustainability of the proposed valorisation processes by evaluating their economical, environmental and social impact.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: NMP-22-2015 | Award Amount: 9.40M | Year: 2016

Current technological demands are increasingly stretching the properties of advanced materials to expand their applications to more severe or extreme conditions, whilst simultaneously seeking cost-effective production processes and final products. The aim of this project is to demonstrate the influence of different surface enhancing and modification techniques on CF-based materials for high value and high performance applications. These materials are a route to further exploiting advanced materials, using enabling technologies for additional functionalities, without compromising structural integrity. Carbon fibre (CF) based materials have particular advantages due to their lightweight, good mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. Current generation CFs have extensively been used in a multitude of applications, taking advantage of their valuable properties to provide solutions in complex problems of materials science and technology, however the limits of the current capability has now being reached. MODCOMP aims to develop novel fibre-based materials for technical, high value, high performance products for non-clothing applications at realistic cost, with improved safety and functionality. Demonstrators will be designed to fulfil scalability towards industrial needs . End users from a wide range of industrial sectors (transport, construction, leisure and electronics) will adapt the knowledge gained from the project and test the innovative high added value demonstrators. An in-depth and broad analysis of material development, coupled with related modelling studies, recycling and safety will be conducted in parallel for two types of materials (concepts): CF-based structures with increased functionality (enhanced mechanical, electrical, thermal properties). CNF-based structures for flexible electronics applications. Dedicated multiscale modelling, standardisation and production of reference materials are also considered


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: FTIPilot-1-2015 | Award Amount: 1.82M | Year: 2016

There are 215,720km of rail track in Europe, of which 4,300 broken rails are found every year. Broken tracks are the biggest cause of derailments, leading to loss of life and major disruption to services. Maintenance costs for member states of repairing broken rails are around 2bn every year. With the rapid increase in train traffic, train speeds and load carried, there is an urgent need to optimise the maintenance regime and increase reliability of rail infrastructure. Overall integrity and safety maintenance costs in the UK alone are more than 2,276m in 2014, with 20-40% of that spent on tracks (455m - 910m). AutoScan system(TRL6); an autonomous robotic evaluation system that performs rapid NDT inspection of track, accurately detecting defects, their position and size so that accurate assessment and scheduling of repair work can be made by the network operator. Current methods or rail track inspection AUTOSCAN will enable more frequent inspections of rail track which will significantly reduce lifecycle costs by enabling more efficient flaw detection and intervention. Operators will not need personnel to walk the track side, therefore improving safety. Overall inspection costs will reduce by at least 15% and probably significantly more The aim of this project is to enhance the current prototype from TRL 6 to TRL 9 and develop a system proven in an operational environment suitable for commercial exploitation. AutoScan will enable us to become more competitive within our major target market Rail network operators and rail maintenance companies. With project development costs of 1,822,055 partly funded by company revenues, we aim to achieve a 2.3% European market penetration, with estimate sales revenues of 41M over the 5 years, with profits of 34.7M, providing an ROI of 1444%. We also anticipate creating over 50 jobs as a result of project AutoScan


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.61M | Year: 2017

Though Big Data has become common in many domains nowadays, the challenges to develop efficient and automated mining of the ever increasing data sets by new generations of data scientists are eminent. These challenges span wide swathes of society, business and research. Astronomers with their high-tech observatories are historically at the forefront of this field, but obviously, the impact in e.g. commercial applications, security, environmental monitoring and experimental research is immense. We aim to contribute to this general discussion by training a number of young scientists in the fields of computer science and astronomy, focussing on techniques of automated learning from large quantities of data to answer fundamental questions on the evolution of properties of galaxies. While these techniques will lead to major advances in our understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies, we will also promote, in collaboration with industry, much more general applications in society, e.g. in medical imaging or remote sensing. We have put together a team of astronomers and computer scientists, from academic and private sector partners, to develop techniques to detect and classify ultra-faint galaxies and galaxy remnants in a deep survey of the Fornax cluster, and use the results to study how galaxies evolve in the dense environment of galaxy clusters. With a team of young researchers we will develop novel computer science algorithms addressing fundamental topics in galaxy formation, such as the huge dark matter fractions inferred by theory, and the lack of detected angular momentum in galaxies. The collaboration is unique - it will develop a platform for deep symbiosis of two radically different strands of approaches: purely data-driven machine learning and specialist approaches based on techniques developed in astronomy. Young scientists trained with such skills are highly demanded both in research and business.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: NMBP-36-2016 | Award Amount: 1.47M | Year: 2016

FUTURING aims at contributing to define the strategy for the re-industrialization of Europe, by focusing on the role of Research and Innovation within the framework of other dimensions Economy, Society, Environment, Globalization, geopolitics and incoming paradigms such as Circular Economy. It explores 2030 future scenarios, concerning EU Industry, through the use of foresight and other Policy Intelligence tools, to identify critical factors on which action should be taken in order to overcome barriers and to foster opportunities for the EU re-industrialization process. A large variety of experts and stakeholders, both directly as partners and externals, representing the main dimensions of the landscape in which the EU re-industrialization is going to take place, are participating. Given the number of participants, their location in different countries of Europe, it is expected that the output of the project will be widely disseminated among relevant stakeholders throughout Europe. In particular, Recommendations will provide Policy Makers, at European, National and Regional level, guidelines for future Research and Innovation activities.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.91M | Year: 2017

The EU currently is negotiating a controversial Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) agreement with the USA, the main features of which will be the abolition of tariffs, the reduction of non-tariff barriers to trade between the EU and the USA and the introduction of a dispute settlement mechanism. The objective of the proposed TTIP Innovative Training Network (TTIP-ITN) is to foster interdisciplinary research into TTIP with a view to create a significantly increased European knowledge base and research capacity on TTIP, thus helping Europe to reap the benefits of TTIP (wealth, jobs, etc.) while addressing its challenges (democracy, accountability, environmental- and labour standards, etc.).The network is an interdisciplinary, intersectoral collaboration pooling world-leading researchers and practitioners from all relevant disciplines of law - EU constitutional, internal market, and external relations law, international trade law, and international law, as well as political science, international relations, business studies, and economics. TTIP-ITN fully integrates non-academic Beneficiaries and Partner Organisations, including think tanks, lobbyists, regulatory bodies, law firms, US academic institutions, and an international organisation. Furthermore, the network will support and enhance the process of converting research results into policy papers through partnership with high-impact policy research units at the forefront of European policy research and policy making. The work package consists of 3 substantive work packages on (1) transatlantic governance, (2) transatlantic regulation, and (3) multilateralism and regionalism. 15 PhD research projects will be supervised by academics of the 11 Beneficiaries with an interdisciplinary training programme covering the legal, political and economic foundations of TTIP and an interdisciplinary and intersectoral programme of secondments involving 22 Partner Organisations.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.5.2 | Award Amount: 9.76M | Year: 2010

TRANSFoRm will develop rigorous, generic methods for the integration of Primary Care clinical and research activities, to support patient safety and clinical research via:\n1.\tRich capture of clinical data, including symptoms and signs rather than just a single diagnosis. A generic, dynamic interface, integrated with electronic health records (EHR), will facilitate both diagnostic decision support and identification of patients eligible for research, thus enhancing patient safety.\n2.\tDistributed interoperability of EHR data and other data sources that maintains provenance, confidentiality and security. This will enable large-scale phenotype-genotype association studies and follow up of trials.\n3.\tSoftware tools and services to enable use of controlled vocabulary and standardised data elements in clinical research. This will enable integration and reuse of clinical data.\nWhy this is important? Whilst diagnostic error is the commonest cause of litigation in Primary Care, EHR systems do not provide for easy collection of the data required for decision support. At the same time, clinical research is becoming uneconomic due to the costs of recruiting and following study participants, tasks that could be supported by the use of data from EHRs.\nWho will conduct the work? A multi-disciplinary consortium of ICT and clinical researchers from across Europe. These include experts in ontology, integration, distributed systems, security, data mining, user-facing design, evaluation and clinical research domains. Clinical participants include The European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (where the systems will be deployed), The European General Practice Research Network, and a major Contract Research Organisation.\nWhat is the anticipated impact? Improved patient safety by speeding translational research, quicker and more economic recruitment and follow up of RCTs, and enhanced uptake of eHR systems that offer support for clinical care and research.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP.2010.1.3-2 | Award Amount: 1.28M | Year: 2011

ModNanoTox will develop a number of well-documented and technically advanced models describing the behaviour of engineered nanoparticles in organisms and the environment. Background to these models will be a thoroughly documented database, constructed based on: (1) an advanced evaluation of physicochemical properties of nanoparticles and in silico modelling of their reactivity; and (2) assessment of the characterisation methodologies as well as toxicity protocols used to develop biological responses in toxicological studies. At the next level whole datasets will be evaluated for internal consistency and then compared with other relevant sets. The evaluation stage will be followed by development of toxicity models based at the individual organism level, using statistical and mechanistic models, in parallel with models predicting environmental fate. The toxicity and fate models will be integrated in mechanistic models to predict the long term risks of engineered nanoparticles for populations under realistic environmental conditions. The risk assessment models will be developed in close collaboration with appropriate stakeholders and end users to ensure their suitability for practical use in relevant legislative contexts.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP.2010.2.2-1 | Award Amount: 3.98M | Year: 2011

Functional organic molecules and metal and semiconductor nanocrystals represent attractive building blocks due to their composition-, size- and structure-dependent electronic properties, and the ability to design and manipulate these properties via low-cost and established chemical synthesis. Building from the pressing need of the European market to develop novel, scalable and cheaper technologies for sensing applications, the main objective of the HYSENS project is to exploit inexpensive organic functional molecules and inorganic nanocrystals as building blocks to synthesize novel high-knowledge materials for the development of sensors for Group I, II transition metal cations and anions (Cl-, NO3-). The hybrid material intelligence resulting from the engineered combination of individual units will allow the execution of logic functions able to reduce false sensing outputs towards the development of sensors with enhanced selectivity and sensitivity. Our goal is to elucidate the mechanisms governing the optical and electrical response of such engineered hybrid materials arising from the interaction between the organic functional molecule component and the inorganic nanocrystal core component. Establishment of component-function relationships will lead to disruptive new knowledge that will impact on optical and electrical sensors technologies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.4.4-2 | Award Amount: 3.88M | Year: 2012

Disorders of sex development (DSD) are a conglomerate of rare diseases with an estimated incidence of 1: 4500. The causes of DSD are mainly disorders with gonadal dysgenesis, decreased androgen synthesis or function in XY males or disorders with elevated androgen production in XX females. Decision on sex of rearing is difficult in some cases as the prenatal androgen imbalances result in ambiguous genitalia at birth and furthermore they are likely to influence psychosexual development. Genital constructive surgery is needed in most cases. Lifelong cortisone replacement is needed in DSD due to defects of cortisone synthesis. Sex hormone substitution is indicated in many cases of DSD in puberty and adult life. Decision of sex of rearing, genital surgery and hormone therapies have a life-long impact on the affected individuals, which become evident mainly after puberty. In many cases psychological counselling is advised. Interpretation of previous outcome studies of DSD is hampered by small patient numbers and conglomerates of diagnoses and therapies. The study DSD-Life investigates and compares the long-term outcome of different off-label treatments in adequate numbers of adolescents and adults with different known genetic entities of DSD to develop evidence base guidelines for treatment of DSD for which no dedicated treatment is currently approved. To reach this aim, the influences and interrelations of sex assignment, genital surgery, hormone therapy, metabolism, fertility, psychological intervention but also cultural influences and patients and parents views on psychosocial adaption, health related quality of life and psychological well-being and will be investigated. The long-term impact of the study will be improvement of care and subsequently higher quality of life with better integration and participation of individuals with DSD in the society.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: NMP-19-2015 | Award Amount: 8.03M | Year: 2016

There is an increasing demand for advanced materials with temperature capability in highly corrosive environments for aerospace. Rocket nozzles of solid/hybrid rocket motors must survive harsh thermochemical and mechanical environments produced by high performance solid propellants (2700-3500C). Thermal protection systems (TPS) for space vehicles flying at Mach 7 must withstand projected service temperatures up to 2500C associated to convective heat fluxes up to 15 MWm-2 and intense mechanical vibrations at launch and re-entry into Earths atmosphere. The combination of extremely hot temperatures, chemically aggressive environments and rapid heating/cooling is beyond the capabilities of current materials. Main purpose of C3HARME is to design, develop, manufacture, test and validate a new class of out-performing, reliable, cost-effective and scalable Ultra High Temperature Ceramic Matrix Composites (UHTCMCs) based on C or SiC fibres/preforms enriched with ultra-high temperature ceramics (UHTCs) capable of in-situ repairing damage induced during operation in severe aerospace environments. C3HARME will apply to two main applications: near-ZERO erosion rocket nozzles that must maintain dimensional stability during firing in combustion chambers, and near-ZERO ablation thermal protection systems enabling hypersonic space vehicles to maintain flight performance. C3HARME represents a well-balanced mix of innovative and consolidated technologies, mitigating the level of risk intrinsic in top-notch research and innovation development. C3HARME starts from TRL of 3-4 and focuses on TRL 6 thanks to a strong industrial partnership, including SMEs and large companies. To reach TRL 6, rocket nozzles and TPS tiles with realistic dimensions and shape will be fabricated, assembled into a suitable system, and validated in a relevant ambient (environment centered test). Project results could be easily extended to the energy, medical and/or nuclear environments.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SST.2012.2.5-1. | Award Amount: 4.57M | Year: 2012

The axle bearing damage process has safety and economic implications on the exploitation of railways systems, as proved by the selection of this topic for inclusion in the present call for research proposals of the FP7 of the EU. Axle bearing damage has been the object of intense attention by railway operators and transportation authorities, leading to a variety of approaches and systems currently in place to deal with the problem. However in Europe there is some lack of standardisation which justifies R&D work on condition monitoring and early diagnosis of axle bearings by technology integration. Moreover the current European documents do not present any guidelines for the maintenance management of the rolling stocks with regards to axle bearings, which make the association of monitoring, diagnosis and maintenance an interesting approach. The MAXBE project appears in this context and its strategic objective is to provide validated and demonstrated concepts, strategies and guidelines for the interoperable axle bearing monitoring and diagnosis that support the railway operators and managers dealing with the threats imposed by the existence of axle bearing defects. The consortium for the MAXBE project comprises 17 partners (industry, leading universities, end-users and a SME) from 8 member states, representing operators, axle bearing manufactures, key players in the railway community and experts in the field of monitoring, maintenance and rolling stock. The presence in the consortium of one axle bearing manufacturer, market leader in the field, and three operators and railway managers, as end-users, is decisive for the enhancement and optimisation of the axle bearing diagnosis and maintenance strategies and for the definition of the new proposed approaches for the interoperability. The MAXBE project will have impact for the reliability, availability, maintainability and safety (RAMS) of rolling stock and infrastructure, focused on the axle bearings.


To date, three way catalytic converters (TWCs) have been established as the most effective engine exhaust after-treatment system. However, TWCs not only fail to address the issue of particulate matter (PM) emissions but are also the main industrial consumer of Critical Raw Materials (CRMs) mainly Platinum Group Metals (PGMs) and Rare Earth elements (REEs), with the automotive industry accounting for 65%-80% of total EU PGMs demand. The enforcement of new limits on PM emissions (EURO 6c/7) will require higher TWC performance, hence leading to further increase the CRMs content in autocatalysts. Addressing the necessity of CRMs reduction in catalysis, PARTIAL-PGMs proposes an integrated approach for the rational design of innovative nanostructured materials of low/zero PGMs/REEs content for a hybrid TWC/Gasoline Particulate Filter (GPF) for automotive emissions after-treatment with continuous particulates combustion also focusing on identifying and fine-tuning the parameters involved in their preparation, characterization and performance evaluation under realistic conditions. PARTIAL-PGMs approach is broad, covering multiscale modeling, synthesis and nanomaterials characterization, performance evaluation under realistic conditions as well as recyclability, health impact analysis and Life Cycle Assessment. The rational synthesis of nanomaterials to be used in these hybrid systems will allow for a reduction of more than 35% in PGMs and 20% in REEs content, either by increasing performance or by their replacement with transition metals. The compact nature of the new hybrid system not only will allow its accommodation in smaller cars but will also reduce cold start emissions and light-off times with performance aiming to anticipate both future emission control regulations and new advances in engines technology. Such R&D progress in autocatalysts is expected to pave the way to the widespread use of such low CRMs content materials in other catalytic applications.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CS | Phase: JTI-CS-2012-3-SAGE-03-020 | Award Amount: 1.68M | Year: 2013

This response to the call for proposals under the Clean Sky Joint Undertaking to manufacture static engine components from IN718 using Net Shape Hot Isostatic Pressing of powder (NSHIP) involves 3 partners with complementary expertise in the areas required to undertake the work including powder characterisation; NSHIP and modelling; low cost tooling, as well as microstructural and property assessment. The NSHIP of powder has the potential to revolutionise the production of complex high performance aerospace parts enabling significant improved buy-to-fly ratios which give cost savings as well as environmental benefits. To exploit this technology, significant challenges must be addressed including; difficulty in HIPping nickel super alloy powder, high cost of sacrificial tooling, diffused surface layer on components due to interaction with the tool material and finally the lack of credible performance information for IN718 parts produced using the NSHIP process. The partners will use a rigorous and yet innovative approach to address these challenges in this 2 year collaborative project. Trials will be performed to determine the best powder and HIPping conditions to use to produce parts with the desired microstructure and properties. Novel low cost tooling methods will be developed and surface engineering techniques, to eliminate tool/component interaction, will be explored. A computation model of IN718 powder consolidation will be used to calculate the correct tool geometry to enable right-first-time net shape parts to be produced. Finally, demonstration components and test sample will be produced using the most appropriate powder and manufacturing parameters. Test samples will be subjected to NADCAP-approved mechanical property testing. The quality of the demonstration components will be assessed by the partners and subsequently supplied to ITP for long term evaluation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP.2012.1.3-1 | Award Amount: 12.95M | Year: 2013

The NanoMILE project is conceived and led by an international elite of scientists from the EU and US with the aim to establish a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of nanomaterial interactions with living systems and the environment, and uniquely to do so across the entire life cycle of nanomaterials and in a wide range of target species. Identification of critical properties (physico-chemical descriptors) that confer the ability to induce harm in biological systems is key to allowing these features to be avoided in nanomaterial production (safety by design). Major shortfalls in the risk analysis process for nanomaterials are the fundamental lack of data on exposure levels and the environmental fate and transformation of nanomaterials, key issues that this proposal will address, including through the development of novel modelling approaches. A major deliverable of the project will be a framework for classification of nanomaterials according to their impacts, whether biological or environmental, by linking nanomaterial-biomolecule interactions across scales (sub-cellular to ecosystem) and establishing the specific biochemical mechanisms of interference (toxicity pathway).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: MG-1.10-2015 | Award Amount: 2.19M | Year: 2016

This proposal is in response to the call for International Cooperation in Aeronautics with China, MG-1.10-2015 under Horizon 2020 Enhanced Additive Manufacturing of Metal Components and Resource Efficient Manufacturing Processes for Aerospace Applications. The objectives are to develop the manufacturing processes identified in the call: (i) Additive manufacturing (AM); (ii) Near Net Shape Hot Isostatic Pressing (NNSHIPping) and (iii) Investment Casting of Ti alloys. The end-users specify the properties and provide computer-aided design, (CAD) files of components and these components will be manufactured using one or more of the three technologies. During the research programme, experiments will be carried out aimed at optimising the process routes and these technologies will be optimised using process modelling. Components manufactured during process development will be assessed and their dimensional accuracies and properties compared with specifications and any need for further process development identified. The specific areas that will be focussed on include: (a) the slow build rate and the build up of stresses during AM; (b) the reproducibility of products, the characteristics of the powder and the development of reusable and/or low cost tooling for NNSHIP; (c) the scatter in properties caused by inconsistent microstructures; (d) improving the strength of wax patterns and optimising welding of investment cast products. The process development will be finalised in month 30 so that state-of-the-art demonstrators can be manufactured and assessed by partners and end-users, during the final 6 months. The cost of the process route for components will be provided to the end-users and this, together with their assessment of the quality of these products, will allow the end-users to decide whether to transfer the technologies to their supply chain. The innovation will come through application of improved processes to manufacture the demonstrator components.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 2.54M | Year: 2016

Soft chemical-ionization mass-spectrometry (SCIMS) is an exquisitely sensitive analytical technique with applications to health, the environment and security that are vital to the EU. However, the recent, rapid and widespread adoption of this technique has caught Europe unprepared. The resultant shortage in analytical chemical expertise has created an urgent need for highly skilled young researchers to be trained in the wide variety of SCIMS methods. IMPACT addresses this skills shortage by establishing an intersectoral and multidisciplinary SCIMS training network. IMPACT also brings cohesion to the fragmented SCIMS research and development activities within the EU. To date, most SCIMS developments have been driven not by users but by manufacturers, whose main focus has been on increased sensitivity. However, just as crucial is improved selectivity. Indeed, many users consider improved selectivity to be the key to taking SCIMS technology to a whole new level. Instead of private and public sectors working independently, we need a fresh, intersectoral approach. IMPACT will achieve this through intersectoral work packages and multidisciplinary research projects. In place of major and costly changes in instrumental design, IMPACTs projects will focus on developing new methods for improved chemical specificity by manipulating ion chemistry. Hence, IMPACTs fresh approach will produce a step change in SCIMS instrumentation to deliver both economic and societal benefit to the EU. Specifically, IMPACT will train 10 ESRs within an integrated partnership of commercial, governmental and academic organisations, with planned secondments, 5 Advanced Training Courses, 7 interactive Complementary Skills Workshops, and 4 ESR Centred Research Meetings. IMPACT will therefore provide Europe with both a world-class capability in SCIMS technology and a cohort of highly trained researchers who will bring the benefits of that technology to citizens across the EU.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2015 | Award Amount: 936.00K | Year: 2015

Several R&D centres herein undertake the investigation of the reduction of the abnormal combustion phenomena of knock in internal combustion engines. Combustion knock limits the efficiency of the engine and deteriorates engine performance while simultaneously contributing to engine destruction, hence reduces engine reliability. Reducing or eliminating combustion knock increases durability and also engine efficiency, hence reducing CO2 emissions. The inter-sectoral research encompassed in this proposal concerns high-power stationary engines fuelled with gaseous fuels working in combined heat and power (CHP) systems. The proposal intends to apply a multidisciplinary approach to knock investigation encompassing fuel chemistry, combustible mixture preparation, ignition phenomena, flame propagation, knock detection and its prediction. Both modelling studies and experimentation in these fields will be performed. As result of the synergies and breadth of expertise, a resultant acceleration in research finding is expected with complementary investigation conducted within both the companies (Wartsila, AVL, Motortech) and universities involved that finally should result in solving the related challenges. Knowledge exchange will be done by research staff secondments, where experienced scientists will work both as advisors and active researchers in the ongoing projects. Engineers coming to universities will be familiar with original techniques for data acquisition as well as methods for signal processing and theoretical analysis of combustion process in the engine. Young research staff from companies will have opportunities to work with academic mentors. Further academic staff will become familiar with industrial approaches to research extending the knowledge. Knowledge transfer will be also done through regularly scheduled seminars and webinars. This collaboration and staff exchanges between the participants build lasting ties and continued after project termination.


HarmonicSS vision is to create an International Network and Alliance of partners and cohorts, entrusted with the mission of addressing the unmet needs in primary Sjogren Syndrome; working together to create and maintain a platform with open standards and tools, designed to enable secure storage, governance, analytics, access control and controlled sharing of information at multiple levels along with methods to make results of analyses and outcomes comparable across centers and sustainable through Rheumatology associations. The overall idea of the HarmonicSS project is to bring together the largest well characterized regional, national and international longitudinal cohorts of patients with Primary Sjgrens Syndrome (pSS) including those participating in clinical trials, and after taking into consideration the ethical, legal, privacy and IPR issues for sharing data from different countries, to semantically interlink and harmonize them into an integrative pSS cohort structure on the cloud. Upon this harmonized cohort, services for big data mining, governance and visual analytics will be integrated, to address the identified clinical and health policy pSS unmet needs. In addition, tools for specific diagnostic procedures (e.g. ultrasonography image segmentation), patient selection for clinical trials and training will be also provided. The users of the HarmonicSS platform are researchers (basic/translational), clinicians, health policy makers and pharma companies. pSS is relevant not only due to its clinical impact but also as one of the few model diseases to link autoimmunity, cancer development (lymphoproliferation) and the pathogenetic role of infection. Thus, the study of pSS can facilitate research in many areas of medicine; for this reason, the possibility for sustainability and expandability of the platform is enhanced. Moreover, pSS has a significant impact on the healthcare systems, similar to that of rheumatoid arthritis.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 1.46M | Year: 2017

The joint research in this programme will study important aspectsboth theoretical as well as appliedof computing with infinite objects. A central aim is laying the grounds for the generation of efficient and verified software in engineering applications. A prime example for infinite data is provided by the real numbers, most commonly conceived as infinite sequences of digits. While most applications in science and engineering substitute the reals with floating point numbers of fixed finite precision and thus have to deal with truncation and rounding errors, the approach in this project is different: exact real numbers are taken as first-class citizens and while any computation can only exploit a finite portion of its input in finite time, increased precision is always available by continuing the computation process. This project aims to bring together the expertise of specialists in mathematics, logic, and computer science to push the frontiers of our theoretical and practical understanding of computing with infinite objects. Three overarching motivations drive the proposed collaboration: Representability. Cardinality considerations tell us that it is not possible to represent arbitrary mathematical objects in a way that is accessible to computation. We will enlist expertise in topology, logic, and set theory, to address the question of which objects are representable and how they can be represented most efficiently. Constructivity. Working in a constructive mathematical universe can greatly enhance our understanding of the link between computation and mathematical structure. Not only informs us which are the objects of relevance, it also allows us to devise always correct algorithms from proofs. Efficient implementation. We also aim to make progress on concrete implementations. Theoretical insights from elsewhere will be tested in actual computer systems; obstacles encountered in the latter will inform the direction of mathematical investigation.


The CryoHub innovation project will investigate and extend the potential of large-scale Cryogenic Energy Storage (CES) and will apply the stored energy for both cooling and energy generation. By employing Renewable Energy Sources (RES) to liquefy and store cryogens, CryoHub will balance the power grid, while meeting the cooling demand of a refrigerated food warehouse and recovering the waste heat from its equipment and components. The intermittent supply is a major obstacle to the RES power market. In reality, RES are fickle forces, prone to over-producing when demand is low and failing to meet requirements when demand peaks. Europe is about to generate 20% of its required energy from RES by 2020, so that the proper RES integration poses continent-wide challenges. The Cryogenic Energy Storage (CES), and particularly the Liquid Air Energy Storage (LAES), is a promising technology enabling on-site storage of RES energy during periods of high generation and its use at peak grid demand. Thus, CES acts as Grid Energy Storage (GES), where cryogen is boiled to drive a turbine and to restore electricity to the grid. To date, CES applications have been rather limited by the poor round trip efficiency (ratio between energies spent for and retrieved from energy storage) due to unrecovered energy losses. The CryoHub project is therefore designed to maximise the CES efficiency by recovering energy from cooling and heating in a perfect RES-driven cycle of cryogen liquefaction, storage, distribution and efficient use. Refrigerated warehouses for chilled and frozen food commodities are large electricity consumers, possess powerful installed capacities for cooling and heating and waste substantial amounts of heat. Such facilities provide the ideal industrial environment to advance and demonstrate the LAES benefits. CryoHub will thus resolve most of the above-mentioned problems at one go, thereby paving the way for broader market prospects for CES-based technologies across Europe.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 2.34M | Year: 2016

Regulators and industries are challenged by the difficulty to analyse and predict the impact of nonlinear environmental processes on short-term and long-term responses of ecosystems to environmental change. Until very recently, the development of most conventional monitoring, forecasting and prediction tools has been based on the assumption of stationary environmental systems. In the context of global change these tools are increasingly pushed towards and even beyond their design limits (the latter resulting in the first line from the prevailing limitations in spatial and temporal resolution of environmental observations). For this project, we propose a rationale stating that only novel, high-frequency/high-resolution environmental monitoring and predictive modelling will yield new process understanding of ecosystem functioning. Technological progress offers as many opportunities as it triggers challenges: what is needed now are new strategies to generate, manage and analyse BIG DATA at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. Innovation can only stand as a synonym for significant positive changes if [a] we manage to clearly state the challenges (global change & non-stationarity) and problems (generating and managing high-frequency information) and [b] transform them into solutions, i.e. the quantification and prediction of environmental responses to global change as a prerequisite for designing and implementing adaptation and/or mitigation strategies wherever needed. The timely outcomes of this research project will hence be of great relevance for the scientific community, regulatory agencies, and the private sector.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 1.10M | Year: 2017

We are proposing a 4-year program of knowledge transfer and networking between Aston University, UK (Aston), Cork Institute of Technology, Ireland (CIT), Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Spain (ICN2), University of Birmingham, UK (UoB), Zhejiang University of Technology, China (ZJUT), Nanotechplamsa Ltd, Bulgaria (NPL), B&T composites, Greece (B&T), National Institute for Research and Development in Electrical Engineering, Romania (ICPESA), and Teer Coatings Ltd, UK (TCL). The objective of the proposed joint exchange programme is to establish long-term stable research cooperation between the partners with complimentary expertise and knowledge. The project objectives and challenges present a balanced mix between industrial application focused knowledge transfer and development and more far-looking studies for potentially ground-breaking applications of using diamond-based nanomaterials and nanostructures for advanced electronic and photonic applications (D-SPA), including fabrication of diamond nanostructures using 3D printing technology, development of diamond-plasmon hybrid photonic devices and development of biophotonic imaging technology for sensing applications. No one group in Europe can accomplish each work package alone. We have to collaborate with each other in order to gain their skills and expertise in these specific areas.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2012-1.1.26. | Award Amount: 8.20M | Year: 2013

This project aims at integrating the major European infrastructures in the field of high-resolution solar physics. The following actions will be taken: (i) realise Trans-national Access to external European users; (ii) enhance and spread data acquisition and processing expertise to the Europe-wide community; (iii) increase the impact of high-resolution data by offering science-ready data and facilitating their retrieval and usage; (iv) encourage combination of space and ground-based data by providing unified access to pertinent data repositories; (v) foster synergies between different research communities by organising meetings where each presents state-of-the-art methodologies; (vi) train a new generation of solar researchers through setting up schools and an ambitious mobility programme; (vii) develop prototypes for new-generation post-focus instruments; (vii) study local and non-local atmospheric turbulence, their impact on image quality, and ways to negate their effects; (viii) improve the performance of existing telescopes; (ix) improve designs of future large European ground-and space-based solar telescopes; (x) lay foundations for combined use of facilities around the world and in space; (xi) reinforce partnership with industry to promote technology transfer through existing networks; and (xii) dissemination activities towards society. The project involves all pertinent European research institutions, infrastructures, and data repositories. Together, these represent first-class facilities. The additional participation by private companies and non-European research institutions maximizes the impact on the world-wide scale. In particular, the project achievements will be of principal importance in defining the exploitation of the future 4-meter European Solar Telescope.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 3.66M | Year: 2012

The aim of this ITN is to promote research and training in the field of epigenetics associated with human disease. Expression of imprinted genes is mono-allelic and gamete of origin-dependent. This is due to different epigenetic modifications present on the maternal and paternal chromosomes. Failure in normal establishment, maintenance or erasure of these marks results in gene dosage dysregulation and Imprinting Disorders (IDs). This ITN brings together different expertise from both public and private sectors with the aim of investigating the physiology and pathology of Genomic Imprinting. We propose to define mechanisms, molecular factors and pathways regulating DNA-methylation and chromatin dynamics involved in gene expression control in human health and disease. This concerted approach has the potential to identify new and more effective diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic strategies for IDs, and more generally to elucidate roles and origin of epigenetic mutations in human pathologies, including common diseases. Early stage (ESRs) and experienced researchers (ERs) will have access to a range of cutting-edge methodologies to enable the application of integrated multidisciplinary strategies to analyse epigenetic phenomena. The excellent scientific and educational environment and the intense public-private sector collaboration will promote high-level training of the young researchers. The ESRs and ERs will acquire experience and expertise in a variety of disciplines, including molecular, cellular and developmental biology, genomics, bioinformatics, chromatin dynamics and epigenetics and phenotypic analysis, and state-of-the-art methodologies such as gene targeting, stem cell culture, epigenetic and chromatin technologies, and massively parallel sequencing. Hence, this ITN will generate a new cohort of scientists trained in contemporary post-genomic biology and able to apply advanced technological tools to investigate human disease in both academia and industry.


Nanotechnology is a key enabling technology. Still existing uncertainties concerning EHS need to be addressed to explore the full potential of this new technology. One challenge consists in the development of methods that reliably identify, characterize and quantify nanomaterials (NM) both as substance and in various products and matrices. The European Commission has recently recommended a definition of NM as reference to determine whether an unknown material can be considered as nanomaterial (2011/696/EU). The proposed NanoDefine project will explicitly address this question. A consortium of European top RTD performers, metrology institutes and nanomaterials and instrument manufacturers has been established to mobilize the critical mass of expertise required to support the implementation of the definition. Based on a comprehensive evaluation of existing methodologies and a rigorous intra-lab and inter-lab comparison, validated measurement methods and instruments will be developed that are robust, readily implementable, cost-effective and capable to reliably measure the size of particles in the range of 1100 nm, with different shapes, coatings and for the widest possible range of materials, in various complex media and products. Case studies will assess their applicability for various sectors, including food/feed, cosmetics etc. One major outcome of the project will be the establishment of an integrated tiered approach including validated rapid screening methods (tier 1) and validated in depth methods (tier 2), with a user manual to guide end-users, such as manufacturers, regulatory bodies and contract laboratories, to implement the developed methodology. NanoDefine will be strongly linked to main standardization bodies, such as CEN, ISO and OECD, by actively participating in TCs and WGs, and by proposing specific ISO/CEN work items, to integrate the developed and validated methodology into the current standardization work.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2011.2.4.1-1 | Award Amount: 7.88M | Year: 2011

Sarcomas are rare malignant tumors, with an overall incidence of 6/105/year. Bone and soft tissue connective tissue tumours encompass more than 50 different rare histotypes and more than 150 different molecular subtypes. The incidence of individual rare sarcomas subtypes is often less than 0.5/105/year. Given sarcoma rarity as a group, but even more as individual entities, few prospective clinical trials testing local or systemic treatments have been performed in specific subtypes of sarcomas. Clinical trials in specific histological and molecular subtypes of sarcoma can only be performed through integrated clinical networks, centres of clinical excellence, supported by translational analysis. The drive for EUROSARC comes from the fact that sarcomas should now receive treatment adapted to histological and molecular subtypes and are ideal models to develop rational oncogene-targeted therapies. Trials based on selected molecular subtypes should now represent the standard approach to delineate novel treatments in individual disease subsets. They are also potential proof of concepts for first-in-class targeted treatment. EUROSARC aims at validating 1) novel local and systemic treatment strategies in localized phase, and 2) innovative targeted therapies in advanced phase based on the scientific understanding of molecular alterations driving the tumours thereby developing paradigm changing clinical research. The consortium builds on the successful co-ordination of scientific excellence of Conticanet and EuroBoNeT FP6 NoEs, where most partners were involved. The objective will be achieved through the development and conduct of 9 (2Soft tissues \ 7Bones, 9 phase I/II and III) investigator-driven clinical trials in rare histological and molecular subtypes of sarcoma, through the establishment of an integrated consortium, gathering representatives of most European sarcoma groups, SME, all with proven track records of scientific and clinical excellence.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.4.1-7 | Award Amount: 7.74M | Year: 2011

Over the last 40 years, treatment for childhood and adolescent cancer has improved greatly; 5- year survival after childhood cancer is now 80% in developed countries. Approximately 1 individual in 750 of young adults is now a childhood cancer survivor. Epidemiologic data on the number of European childhood cancer long-term survivors are not available, but estimates suggest a number between 300,000 and 500,000. However, significant differences in both survival and services for long-term follow-up exist across Europe. Recent research from North America has shown that the frequency of late complications continues to rise as the length of follow-up increases with, so far, no evidence of a plateau of incidence. Some late complications of treatment lead to chronic ill health or disability, and thereby constitute a significant burden both on individuals and families, and on health services and society. However, there is considerable opportunity for early identification and appropriate management of complications to improve the survivors health and quality of life, and to maximise efficient use of health services. PanCareSurFup proposes an integrated group of research and service projects to meet these needs. PanCareSurFup will, through cooperation with existing registries and databases, collect data on the risks of complications of cancer treatments to create a retrospective European cohort. Using this cohort research will centre on cardiac toxicity, second cancers and late mortality, with service projects based on a study of models of follow-up and transition to adult care. PanCareSurFup will describe risks of complications of treatment received. Risk prediction and guidelines for care and education will be based on our research and existing evidence, and tailored for each country. The expected benefit is to provide every European childhood cancer survivor with better access to care and better long-term health.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP.2011.4.0-1 | Award Amount: 17.87M | Year: 2012

The ExoMet proposal revolves around innovative liquid metal engineering and the application of external physical fields, in order to significantly influence the microstructures and properties of light alloys, such as aluminium and magnesium. Three types of external fields will be explored, namely: electromagnetic, ultrasonic and intensive mechanical shearing. To meet the future EU challenges of lightweighting and pollution reduction, especially relevant in transportation, it is necessary to improve the castability of light alloys, to enhance grain and eutectic refinement in monolithic alloys, and to develop new high-strength nanocomposites using nano-reinforcers which have only recently become available. Significant mechanical property improvements are foreseen in ExoMet - including 50% increases in tensile strength and ductility, as well as creep resistance up to 300-350 degC (currently limited to about 200 degC in Al and Mg alloys). This applies to both shape castings and wrought products like extruded profiles, bar, cable, sheet and plate. Manufacturing scale-up will be tackled in ExoMet, using a variety of techniques such as low and high-pressure die casting, sand casting, investment casting, differential-presssure casting, twin-roll casting, ultrasound-assisted casting and twin-shear casting. The application of external fields to these industrial techniques is novel and would bring about major savings in energy, scrap and processing cost. Having developed the field-enabled processes and produced high-quality light alloys and nanocomposites, the next stage of ExoMet will be prototypying and the assessment of industrial applications in four selected commercial sectors: (i) automotive powertrain and chassis, (ii) aircraft and aero-engine structures, (iii) space satellite and rockets, and (iv) high-strength high-conductivity Al electrical cabling. Computer modelling, rig-testing, standardisation, life-cycle analysis and patenting will also be undertaken.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2010.3.1.1-1 | Award Amount: 9.27M | Year: 2011

The European project initiative TRUST will produce knowledge and guidance to support TRansitions to Urban Water Services of Tomorrow, enabling communities to achieve sustainable, low-carbon water futures without compromising service quality. We deliver this ambition through close collaboration with problem owners in ten participating pilot city regions under changing and challenging conditions in Europe and Africa. Our work provides research driven innovations in governance, modelling concepts, technologies, decision support tools, and novel approaches to integrated water, energy, and infrastructure asset management. An extended understanding of the performance of contemporary urban water services will allow detailed exploration of transition pathways. Urban water cycle analysis will include use of an innovative systems metabolism model, derivation of key performance indicators, risk assessment, as well as broad stakeholder involvement and an analysis of public perceptions and governance modes. A number of emerging technologies in water supply, waste and storm water treatment and disposal, in water demand management and in the exploitation of alternative water sources will be analysed in terms of their cost-effectiveness, performance, safety and sustainability. Cross-cutting issues include innovations in urban asset management and water-energy nexus strengthening. The most promising interventions will be demonstrated and legitimised in the urban water systems of the ten participating pilot city regions. TRUST outcomes will be incorporated into planning guidelines and decision support tools, will be subject to life-cycle assessment, and be shaped by regulatory considerations as well as potential environmental, economic and social impacts. Outputs from the project will catalyse transformatory change in both the form and management of urban water services and give utilities increased confidence to specify innovative solutions to a range of pressing challenges.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2011.2.2.1-3 | Award Amount: 8.07M | Year: 2011

This project will undertake pre-clinical and cohort studies that address susceptibility factors for paediatric and adolescent tic disorders, with a particular focus on comorbid obsessive-compulsive symptomatology, from clinical, epidemiological, genetic, microbiological and immunological angles. EMTICS aims to elucidate the complex aetiology of the onset and clinical course of chronic tic disorders and associated obsessive-compulsive symptoms, through disentangling the interplay between environmental factors and genetic background; translate research findings into clinical applications by developing disease prediction models and investigation of a treatment strategy; and will establish a Pan-European infrastructure for the study of tic disorders. We hypothesise that the onset and/or exacerbation of tic and comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorders is associated with increased preceding occurrence of Group A beta-haemolytic Streptococcus (GAS) infections of specific molecular subtypes, and that this association is based on genetic susceptibility factors and mediated through immunological mechanisms related to psychosocial stress and immunological factors in host and GAS strains. Large-scale cohort studies will involve affected patients and at-risk first-degree relatives within an integrated, multidisciplinary research strategy. Treatment effects of active surveillance and standardized antibiotic treatment of GAS colonisation, thus addressing one of the main environmental factors involved (GAS infections) will be evaluated. Our approach will result in the identification of genetic and environmental susceptibility factors and will greatly contribute to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of tic disorders, with a focus on elucidating the role of autoimmunity. Our consortium brings together the highest expertise in the field of tic disorders across Europe in academia and industry, including a number of SMEs and a professional management company.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.4.1-5 | Award Amount: 8.12M | Year: 2011

Among patients with adrenal masses Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) and malignant pheochromocytomas (MPH) are found with a low incidence but very unfavorable prognosis. Due to this poor clinical outcome, concomitant hormone dysregulation and limited treatment options the two cancer entities severely impact on affected patients. However, the rarity of the tumors also impedes clinical studies which are affected by fragmentation and low cohort sizes. The European Network for the Study of Adrenal Tumors (ENS@T) has recently implemented a collection of adrenal tumor related databases and defined an associated network of Biological Resource Centers devoted to research on adrenal tumors. The concurrence of recent achievements of this evolving network, the progress in the understanding of molecular mechanisms and increasing availability of specific diagnostic and therapeutic tools for adrenal cancers provides the unique opportunity to achieve unmatched progress in the implementation of both translation and clinical research dedicated to ACC and MPH. Specifically, the newly formed ENS@T-CANCER consortium will address the following topics: 1. Structuring European clinical and translational research through implementation of a virtual research environment, 2. Improving clinical outcome of patients with adrenal cancer by conducting interventional trials carried out by European centers of excellence, 3. Improvement of differential diagnosis and risk stratification of adrenal cancer, 4. Identification and validation of tools for follow-up of patients with adrenal cancer, 5. Identification of novel biomarkers for treatment response. The ultimate aim of the ENS@T-CANCER Consortium is to develop research in the field of adrenal cancers to improve diagnosis and treatment abilities. The Network will allow recruiting sufficient patients in all relevant European centers, to harmonize diagnosis criteria and to use the various technological approaches of a number of laboratories.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: NoE | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.4.1-3 | Award Amount: 14.22M | Year: 2011

ENCCA aims to establish a durable, European Virtual Institute clinical and translational research in childhood and adolescent cancers that will define and implement an integrated research strategy and will facilitate the necessary investigator-driven clinical trials to introduce the new generation of biologically targeted drugs into standard of care for children and adolescents with cancer. This will lead to more efficacious and less toxic therapies that will maximise the quality of life of the increasing number of survivors of cancer at a young age in Europe and allow them to assume their proper place in society. This biologically-driven research agenda will improve training of the clinical investigators and translational scientists of the future to spread excellence, increase capacity to participate in research and monitor outcomes across Europe. Patients and their families will be full partners and will be better informed about the need for and processes of clinical research. They will be in a better situation to care from their long term health risks for children. Drug development will be accelerated in partnership with industry through improved access to young patients with cancer, to academic expertise in care, clinical and biological research. All of this will be achieved with respect for the highest ethical and patient safety standards. ENCCA will bring all stakeholders to the table in a timely and efficacious manner. It will address the needs of all the current multinational clinical trial groups for the benefit of children with cancer. It will provide them with common tools and approaches to solve the bottlenecks in testing new therapeutic strategies for those rare diseases in a vulnerable age group and in running a competitive clinical research agenda. Ongoing efforts to coordinate EU and US clinical research will be reinforced. ENCCA will be led by the most active EU institutes in the field (31), recognised as being at the forefront of excellence.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME | Phase: SME-2012-1 | Award Amount: 1.48M | Year: 2012

Railway operators rely on remote condition monitoring (RCM) of assets to enable continued safety and efficiency. It is not currently cost effective to monitor every asset; some vehicle systems, such as freight trains, use no technology and are therefore difficult to add modern electronic systems to. There are neither the power systems nor the data systems available to link a new monitoring system into. This creates a block to technology uptake as the external stakeholders, such as monitoring system providers, find it difficult to enter the market. Therefore, there is a need for a solution that overcomes these technical barriers and yet is still cost effective. The application of wireless sensor networks addresses the problems faced by SMEs in the sector as it will remove the requirements for data cabling. Appending this technology with energy harvesting would further reduce the need for cabling to be provided to power the equipment. The wireless technology market is rapidly expanding in many sectors and wireless inspection and monitoring is now commonplace. However, there is still a significant opportunity for SMEs to penetrate the European railway market. WiRailCom will develop a wireless condition monitoring solution that will open up a market for European SMEs. The key technological development is the introduction of state of the art concepts such as energy harvesting and wireless data transfer technology. Therefore, a significant part of this work will address safety aspects such as signal interference and will lead to the support of associated European standards. The project output will lead to the development of a supply chain based on RCM equipment, wireless equipment, energy harvesting equipment, condition monitoring software and hardware and systems integration with legacy railway systems. The high level objective is to deliver improvements through the application of advanced technology to the design of assets and the associated maintenance cycle.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 3.79M | Year: 2013

INTERFACES is a supra-disciplinary training and research network that aims (1) to develop conceptual process understanding of the role of ecohydrological interfaces (i.e. system boundaries) for the transport and transformation of fluxes of heat, energy and water and interlinked biogeochemical cycles (C, N, O) at micro- to landscape-scale; and (2) to create the next generation of supra-disciplinary scientist that are able to work beyond traditional disciplinary boundaries, blend cutting-edge field, laboratory and modelling technologies, and understand the practical relevance of their research. Ecohydrological interfaces connect different environmental (sub-) systems and represent important new cross-disciplinary research domains to extend our knowledge horizons. Moreover, these environmental intersections offer an extremely fertile training ground because exploration of interface process dynamics requires novel linkage between traditionally distinct disciplines, and development of a supra-disciplinary research and training philosophy to foster the evolution of a new generation of scientists. Training and research will span novel distributed sensing technologies, innovative tracer methods and integrated numerical models of heat fluxes, metabolism, biogeochemical turnover and ecological functioning to understand how, when (hot moments) and why ecohydrological interfaces (e.g. aquatic-terrestrial, groundwater-surface water, marine-sediment interfaces) act as critical hotspots for water-dependent environmental processes. The urgently improved mechanistic process understanding developed by INTERFACES will not only provide industries, regulators and decision makers with the capacity to predict the complex, non-linear landscape-wide impacts of ecohydrological interfaces in a changing environment but also to understand how important ecosystem services provided by different ecohydrological interfaces can maintain or even enhance resilience to global environmental changes.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.80M | Year: 2015

Hybrid and Full Electric Vehicles ((H)EVs) are essential for the transition towards sustainable e-mobility. The permanent magnets in motors/generators of (H)EVs are either NdFeB or SmCo magnets, which contain large quantities of rare earths, which are critical metals with the highest supply risk for Europe. As highlighted by the European Rare Earths Competency Network, recycling of rare-earth magnets from (H)EVs should receive top priority. Reclaiming of rare-earth magnet motors/generators used in (H)EVs is a major challenge because the magnets are difficult to remove from the assemblies. The conventional hydrometallurgical routes for the recovery of rare earths from End-of-Life permanent magnets have a high environmental impact due to inefficient use of chemicals, whereas the conventional pyrometallurgical routes for the production of magnet master alloys are energy-inefficient. DEMETER, the European Training Network for the Design and Recycling of Rare-Earth Permanent Magnet Motors and Generators in Hybrid and Full Electric Vehicles, concurrently develops (1) innovative, environmentally-friendly direct and indirect recycling strategies for the permanent magnets in the motors and generators of (H)EVs that are currently already on the market and (2) design-for-reuse solutions for motors and generators in the (H)EVs of the future. An intersectoral and interdisciplinary consortium of leading EU universities, research institutes and manufacturers from the automotive and magnet sector trains 15 Early Stage Researchers (ESRs). The research challenges include the development of hydrogen-based grain-refinement technologies to produce nanograin magnets directly from scrap magnets, the recovery of rare earths from SmCo and NdFeB magnets of motors/generators by ionometallurgical methods, and the design of motors/generators with reusable magnets, where the designs are based on 2D and 3D flux paths as well as non-traditional materials.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: EINFRA-1-2014 | Award Amount: 8.02M | Year: 2015

In the coming decade a significant number of the 500.000.000 European (EU/EEA) citizens will have their genome determined routinely. This will be complemented with much cheaper (currently ~20 Euro per measurement) acquisition of the metabolome of biofluids (e.g. urine, saliva, blood plasma) which will link the genotype with metabolome data that captures the highly dynamic phenome and exposome of patients. Having such low cost solutions will enable, for the first time, the development of a truly personalised and evidence-based medicine founded on hard scientific measurements. The exposome includes the metabolic information resulting from all the external influences on the human organism such as age, behavioural factors like exercise and nutrition or other environmental factors. Considering that the amount of data generated by molecular phenotyping exceeds the data volume of personal genomes by at least an order of magnitude, the collection of such information will pose dramatic demands on biomedical data management and compute capabilities in Europe. For example, a single typical National Phenome Centre, managing only around 100,000 human samples per year, can generate more than 2 Petabytes of data during this period alone. A scale-up to sizable portions of the European population over time will require data analysis services capable to work on exabyte-scale amounts of biomedical phenotyping data, for which no viable solution exists at the moment. The PhenoMeNal project will develop and deploy an integrated, secure, permanent, on-demand service-driven, privacy-compliant and sustainable e-infrastructure for the processing, analysis and information-mining of the massive amount of medical molecular phenotyping and genotyping data that will be generated by metabolomics applications now entering research and clinic.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRAIA-1-2014-2015 | Award Amount: 13.00M | Year: 2015

Particle physics is at the forefront of the ERA, attracting a global community of more than 10,000 scientists. With the upgrade of the LHC and the preparation of new experiments, the community will have to overcome unprecedented challenges in order to answer fundamental questions concerning the Higgs boson, neutrinos, and physics beyond the Standard Model. Major developments in detector technology are required to ensure the success of these endeavours. The AIDA-2020 project brings together the leading European infrastructures in detector development and a number of academic institutes, thus assembling the necessary expertise for the ambitious programme of work. In total, 19 countries and CERN are involved in this programme, which follows closely the priorities of the European Strategy for Particle Physics. AIDA-2020 aims to advance detector technologies beyond current limits by offering well-equipped test beam and irradiation facilities for testing detector systems under its Transnational Access programme. Common software tools, micro-electronics and data acquisition systems are also provided. This shared high-quality infrastructure will ensure optimal use and coherent development, thus increasing knowledge exchange between European groups and maximising scientific progress. The project also exploits the innovation potential of detector research by engaging with European industry for large-scale production of detector systems and by developing applications outside of particle physics, e.g. for medical imaging. AIDA-2020 will lead to enhanced coordination within the European detector community, leveraging EU and national resources. The project will explore novel detector technologies and will provide the ERA with world-class infrastructure for detector development, benefiting thousands of researchers participating in future particle physics projects, and contributing to maintaining Europes leadership of the field.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 169.32K | Year: 2015

Advances in fit for use manufacturing of biopharmaceutical drug delivery and pharmaceutical systems are now required to fit Quality by Design (QbD) models. These current regulations require excellence to be built into the preparation of emerging products (both material and process) thereby leading to product robustness and quality. In addition, industrial needs (economical and reproducible quality enhancement) are driving manufacturing towards continuous processes over batch type processes which also rely on QbD (for integrity and quality). EHDA technology is a robust process that has been utilised in various formats (e.g. electrospinning, electrospraying, bubbling and even 3D printing) and is favourable due to applicability with the development of stable nanomedicines and biopharmaceuticals, the emergence of this technology is clearly evident in the UK and on the global scale. Attempts in scaling up (for suitable pharmaceutical scale) and in tandem with continuous processes (including controlled manufacturing) have been very limited. There also, now, remains a huge void in the adaptation of sensible QbD (multi-variate) for the current methods developed and also those required by industry. While lab scale research continues with the ongoing development of such processes (e.g. nanomedicines, smart and controlled delivery), the transition to industry or the clinic will have to meet these regulations (and scales) for there to be a real impact, which is now, also, an important aspect of grass root research in the UK. The EHDA network brings together specialists from academia and industry to advance this technology through several means. Firstly, initiating developments towards a real-viable scale for Pharmaceutical production. Secondly, to incorporate developments in lean manufacturing and legislation (e.g. continuous manufacturing, online diagnostics, QbD and adaptable scale). Thirdly, to marry optimised lean technologies with novel and emerging macromolecular therapies and actives. The network has a wide range of activities and initiatives which will lead to significant developments (and collaborations) in an area of increasing global interest (EHDA processes) - but currently only on a viable lab scale to date. This network will be the first of its kind and will serve as the central and pioneering hub in this remit.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.57M | Year: 2015

Today, industrial markets demand highly added value products offering new features at a low-cost. To this extent, technologies to modify surfaces instead of creating composites or applying coatings on surfaces can offer new industrial opportunities. Current state of the art identifies short pulsed(SP)/ultra-short pulsed(USP) laser-material processing as a promising technology for structuring surfaces and thus for embedding new functionalities for industrial applications. The LASER4FUN research programme pursues to go far beyond the current state through the development of new surface micro/nano-structuring/patterning methods by using emerging SP/USP laser technologies (LIPSS, DLIP, DLW & hybrid tech). The research will focus on the interaction of laser energy with several materials (metals, semiconductors, polymers, glasses & advanced materials) and on new surface functionalities like tribology, aesthetics and wettability. Moreover, LASER4FUN establishes an innovative training programme that aims at coaching a new generation of creative, entrepreneurial and innovative early stage researchers (ESRs) focused on laser surface engineering. This novel programme will contain both scientific and general skills training activities and it will benefit from training at a network (e.g. secondments). In total, 14ESRs will be enrolled, developing individual research projects within LASER4FUN programme. After 36 months of research and training, the ESRs will be PH Doctors prepared to face EU laser-engineering new challenges. LASER4FUN consortium involves 8 Academic partners (4 Universities one of them as associated partner- and 4 RTD institutions) ensuring the progress beyond the state of the art, and 3 industrial partners guaranteeing that final solutions will be close to the market. They are from 6 different EU countries. The close cooperation among multidisciplinary partners will ensure knowledge transfer to cross the death valley between science and the market.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.3.2-2 | Award Amount: 8.47M | Year: 2011

Early stage Drug Discovery efforts over the last 5 years have resulted in the identification of a number of promising lead compounds in the fight against TB. These leads need to be further progressed and optimised into candidates for pre-clinical development through the Drug Development progression cascade. Three compound families are of particular interest: 1) InhA Inhibitors, 2) New potent whole cell anti-tubercular compounds with unknown mode of action and 3) new Beta-lactam/Beta-lactamase combinations for TB. A preclinical package is already in place for some of them, but further work is necessary for others in order to justify the progression of a single anti-tubercular family to the more resource intensive stages of preclinical and clinical development. The project will encompass the parallel progression of the three compound families through: A) Lead Optimization Chemistry efforts and MoA studies (Genetic and Proteomic) for whole cell inhibitors, B) In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a new orally bioavailable Beta-lactam alone or in combination with a Beta-lactamase inhibitor to evaluate the sterilising potential of the new drug/s and C) the optimization of an InhA inhibitor for later preclinical development. These efforts will yield candidate molecules for new information rich in vitro assays of antimycobacterial activity (artificial granuloma, activity against slow/non growing cells and activity against clinical isolates) as well as for in vivo safety and efficacy evaluation in different animal models of infection (acute and/or chronic). At this stage a single compound family will be prioritized. Further studies will be performed assessing the potential for shortening treatment in stand alone therapy as well as in combination regimens both in vitro and in vivo. Finally a Clinical Development plan will be put in place for the selected candidate molecule.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: FoF.NMP.2013-11 | Award Amount: 5.41M | Year: 2013

Volume production at industrial scale of miniaturised multi-material 3D (polymer-polymer, metal-polymer, metal-metal, polymer-ceramics,...) still face important challenges to be affordable by SMEs. Challenges not only in terms of precision manufacturing (precision engineering <0.01%) but also in the adequate interaction between the different constituent materials. Besides multi-material micro-system manufacturing processes still show to be time and cost consuming mainly from assembling activities and back en processes (35-60% of the total manufacturing costs come only from the assembling), so further research efforts in alternative and more integrated manufacturing concepts(over-moulding of micro-components and in-mould assembly technology would avoid the assembly step) are needed. To answer those problems the development of high-throughput and cost-efficient process chains based on micro injection should consider the following aspects: Improved volume production, not only from the standpoint of the necessary accuracy and performance of the process, but also regarding the interaction/bonding of the different materials which make up the produced parts and the possibility of selective functionality of their surfaces. The integration of the different processes including the feeding and handling systems for automatic operation in order to eliminate human intervention and manufacturing costs. Analyse the most suitable process control, online verification and back-end processes taking into account the features of the multi-material replicated parts represented by five demonstrators. The aim is to reduce manufacturing costs up to 40%. Thus, the HINMICO project final outcome will enable to produce high quality multi-material micro-components through more integrated, efficient and cheaper process chains.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: EINFRA-22-2016 | Award Amount: 3.00M | Year: 2016

Toxicology and risk assessment are undergoing a paradigm shift, from a phenomenological to a mechanistic discipline based on in vitro and in silico approaches that represent an important alternative to classical animal testing applied to the evaluation of chronic and systemic toxicity risks. Large databases and highly sophisticated methods, algorithms and tools are available for different tasks such as hazard prediction, toxicokinetics, and in vitro in vivo extrapolations to support this transition. However, since these services are developed independently and provided by different groups world-wide, there is no standardized way how to access the data or run modelling workflows. To overcome the fragmentation of data and tools, OpenRiskNet will provide open e-Infrastructure resources and services to a variety of communities requiring chemical risk assessment, including chemicals, cosmetic ingredients, therapeutic agents, and nanomaterials. OpenRiskNet will combine the achievements from earlier projects for generating modeling and validation workflows, knowledge integration and data management as well as include all ongoing projects and important stakeholders through an associated partner programme. The main components of the infrastructure will be an interoperability layer added to every service to describe the functionality and guaranteeing technical and semantic interoperability, a discovery service, deployment options based on container technology, and packaging of the infrastructure into virtual instances. This will be complemented by training and support on integration of specific services based on prototype implementation, usage of standard file formats for data sharing including the generation of templates for data and metadata, as well as the harmonized usage of ontologies. Case studies will demonstrate the applicability of the infrastructure in productive settings supporting research and innovation in safer product design and risk assessment.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.2.2.1-3 | Award Amount: 8.21M | Year: 2013

Conduct Disorder (CD) and Oppositional Defiant Disorder with symptoms of Conduct Disorder (which is included among the abbreviation CD throughout the proposal) has a highly negative impact for the affected individual as well as for families and society. Although the number of females exhibiting serious aggressive behaviours is growing, the majority of studies on aetiology and treatment of CD have focused on male subjects only, despite strong evidence for a differential neurobiological basis of female CD. The key aims of the FemNAT-CD consortium are to identify biomarkers and to study disease mechanisms from pre- to postpubertal female CD as well as new psychological and pharmacological treatment options for female adolescent CD targeting emotion processing abilities. With the present proposal, we aim at clarifying the phenomenology and neurobiology of female CD from pre-puberty to post-puberty. We will study the role of genetic and environmental risk factors on female CD, related psychopathology, brain structure and function, HPA axis and autonomic nervous system (ANS) disturbance to elicit CD specific endophenotypes and its biomarkers. We will describe the clinical, neuronal and neurocognitive phenotype of female CD from pre- to postpuberty and related neuroendocrine and ANS function as well as moderating, mediating and direct risk factors to identify distinct homogeneous subtypes to guide targeted future treatment approaches. We translate knowledge of neuropsychological and neurobiological characteristics into targeted intervention by performing a randomised controlled trial of an innovative 16-week DBT-CD-A psychological treatment program focussing on emotion processing. The effect oxytocin and serotonin on neural function underlying emotion processing and aggression will be studied in a female animal model and two proof of concept pharmaco-challenge studies. We also target several societal and education objectives. Our consortium brings together strong clinical and basic science expertise on paediatric CD, including a number of SMEs and a professional management company.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 4.05M | Year: 2013

Finding novel solutions for energy storage is of high societal relevance, since it is a prerequisite for the turnaround from fossil fuels and nuclear power to energy from renewable sources, since these sources mostly are intermittent. Also for providing an ecological friendly mobility, high capacity energy storage solutions are urgently needed. Well trained experts in energy storage are a prerequisite of the necessary technological development. ECOSTORE contributes to these targets by training 12 ESRs and 3 ERs in materials science and use of novel metal hydrides for energy storage chemical, as hydrogen, and electrochemical, in batteries. The fellows will be trained in scientific skills by pursuing own research projects (leading to a PhD in the case of ESR) as well as in complementary skills, important for their future career in academia or industry, like management of scientific and technical projects, science-public communication and development of their own career and personality. ECOSTORE is an international network of partners each with high reputation in the field of hydrogen and electrochemical storage. 9 European research institutions, 3 European industrial companies, and 2 Associated Partners from Japanese Universities form a network of complementary scientific and techno-economical expertise. Novel borohydride- and nitride based materials may allow for high energy storage densities in terms of both hydrogen and electrochemical processes. For commercial introduction, a prerequisite is the cost efficient large scale production from abundant and relatively cheap raw materials, going from extremely pure chemicals and laboratory-scale to less pure raw materials and industrial scale. ECOSTORE aims at the scientific understanding of materials behaviour in hydrogen as well as in electrochemical processes, and, based on this, at scale-up of cost effective materials production, and at prototype testing to perform a techno-economical evaluation of the developments


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SST.2012.2.4-1. | Award Amount: 1.24M | Year: 2012

LivingRAIL will develop scenarios on the state of living style, cultures, mobility and economic activities in Europe by 2050 and explore a vision on the future role of the environmentally friendly, electrified railways within them. LivingRAIL will elaborate prospective and normative scenarios investigating possible evolutions leading to a reduction of the environmental harm of transport and in the same time to increase or at least maintain our quality of life. The scenarios will be detailed by trends in society, policy, economics, spatial planning, urban development, technology and transport sector operations to gain profound understanding of the sector interrelations. With the help of these detailed assessments the project will elaborate a railmap out of alternative pathways to approach the 2050 vision from todays situation. Based on todays best practice the analytical work will investigate how the railways and related transport modes can develop technically and in organisational and operational terms to achieve the 2050 targets and how spatial and urban planning, transport policy and other areas can contribute to achieve the 2050 targets. A broad set of interviews and workshops using visioning and roadmapping techniques will be conducted. LivingRAIL will foster an intensive dialogue between politics, rail sector, spatial planning actors and civil society to develop jointly technology pathways and feasible organisational options to implement the vision 2050. The target groups: political decision makers, railways, rail supply industry, transportation providers, spatial planning authorities, transport associations, passengers organisations and academia will be involved in the dialogue process from the very start. Thus the LivingRAIL results will be checked in the reality and that will substantially increase their practical importance and pave the way towards implementing the finding


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: Fission-2011-3.1.1 | Award Amount: 5.49M | Year: 2011

Epidemiological evidence has established a link between cardiovascular disease and exposure of the heart and major vessels to doses above 500mGy. At lower doses the evidence for a detrimental effect is inconclusive. In part, this is due to the lack of appropriate epidemiological studies, coupled with lack of knowledge of the processes involved that is needed for construction of mathematical models. The ProCardio consortium will study cardiovascular outcomes in childhood cancer survivors where the radiation doses given to the heart are available. These data will be interrogated using new mathematical models developed from the data from our molecular and biological studies. These will use state-of-the-art technologies to map cardiovascular changes after photon irradiation at both low doses and low dose rates. This will be complemented by comparative studies using high LET irradiation. We will apply an integrative approach to combine transcriptional (mRNA and miRNA) and translational (proteomics) studies to understand the disease processes. High throughput proteomics (ICPL, SILAC and label-free analysis) will be used to identify new biomarkers of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease for future molecular epidemiological studies. These will be validated using the archives of cardiovascular tissue samples from the Mayak facility.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.2.4.1-2 | Award Amount: 8.20M | Year: 2013

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver cancer and accounts for about 6% of all new cancer cases worldwide. Given the lack of available effective treatments, the overall prognosis for HCC patients is poor, with a dismal 5-year survival of 5-6%. The main goal of this proposal is to develop a therapeutic cancer vaccine aiming at improving clinical outcome in early-stage HCC patients after loco-regional ablative therapy. HepaVac is an European consortium of academic, SME and pharmaceutical company partners with complementary and substantial expertise in cancer immunotherapy and vaccine development. The main objective of HepaVac is to develop a novel cancer vaccine approach for HCC based on epitopes naturally processed and presented by HLA class I and II (HLA-ligandome), to elicit both CD4\ T helper and CD8\ CTL tumor-specific effector and memory responses. The HCC HLA-ligandome will be identified in primary tumor tissues using a combined and integrated approach, developed and thoroughly validated by Partners #2 and #5. The selected peptide epitopes will constitute the candidate cancer vaccine for HCC, aiming at covering the broadest haplotype diversity with a multi-epitope and multi-TAA strategy. T cell epitopes derived from universal TAA and unique patient-specific mutated antigens will allow the design of a prime-boost vaccine strategy based either on a prime-boost schedule made of an off-the-shelf T cell epitope cocktail or on a schedule where the boost is complemented by a personalized T cell epitope cocktail. Both epitope cocktails will be adjuvanted in a novel and potent immunomodulator developed by Partner #6. Such a vaccination strategy will be tested in a randomized controlled multi-center phase I/II human clinical trial, assessing as primary endpoints safety and induction of specific cellular immune responses and, as secondary endpoints, OS and PFS of patients receiving the vaccine after tumor ablation vs tumor ablation alone.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-13-2014 | Award Amount: 5.99M | Year: 2015

Type 2 diabetes will affect >500 million adults by 2040 and its secondary complications will generate enormous socioeconomic costs - in particular, diabetic kidney disease (DKD), which is already the most common cause of chronic kidney disease. DKD is associated with greatly increased mortality and frequently progresses to end stage renal failure. Pharmacotherapy, dialysis and transplantation represent the mainstay treatments for DKD but are costly and provide only limited protection against adverse outcomes. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell (MSC) therapy is a promising approach to halting the progression of DKD toward end-stage renal failure and may also have ancillary benefits in Type 2 diabetes. In preliminary research, we have demonstrated that a single dose of MSC simultaneously improves kidney function (glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria) as well as hyperglycaemia in animals with DKD. NEPHSTROM will conduct a multi-centre, placebo-controlled clinical trial of a novel MSC therapy for stabilization of progressive DKD, leading to superior clinical outcomes and long-term socioeconomic benefit. A key enabler for this trial is a novel MSC population (CD362\MSC, trade name ORBCEL-M) which delivers higher purity and improved characterisation compared to conventional plastic-adherent MSC. The NEPHSTROM Phase 1b/2a clinical trial will investigate the safety, tolerability and preliminary efficacy of a single intravenous infusion of allogeneic ORBCEL-M versus placebo in adults with progressive DKD. NEPHSTROM investigators will also determine the bio-distribution, mechanisms of action, immunological effects and economic impacts associated with ORBCEL-M therapy for DKD. This research will critically inform the optimal design of subsequent Phase 3 trials of ORBCEL-M. Stabilising progressive DKD through NEPHSTROMs next-generation MSC therapy will reduce the high all-cause mortality and end-stage renal failure risk in people with this chronic non-communicable disease


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FoF-02-2014 | Award Amount: 5.73M | Year: 2015

The overall objective of the REProMag project is to develop and validate an innovative, resource-efficient manufacturing route (SDS process) for Rare Earth magnets that allows for the economically efficient production of net-shape magnetic parts with complex structures and geometries, while being 100% waste-free along the whole manufacturing chain. The new Shaping, Debinding and Sintering (SDS) process for Rare Earth magnets is an innovative automated manufacturing route to realise complex 3D- and multilayered parts; resulting in a significant increase in the material efficiency of at least 30% during manufacturing; while at the same time allowing additional geometrical features such as threads, cooling channels, small laminations/segments (e.g. to increase the efficiency of electrical motors) and structural optimisations such as lightweight-structures or the joint-free realisation. As part of the project, the possibility to produce hybrid parts such as an improved moving-coil transducer for headphones, loudspeakers and microphones will be evaluated. The SDS process allows a new level of sustainability in production, as the energy efficiency along the whole manufacturing chain can be increased by more than 30% when compared to conventional production routes. Moreover, the used raw material is 100% recycled and can be again recycled in the same way at the end of the lifetime of the products. In short, the innovative REProMag SDS process has the potential to manufacture complex structures of high quality and productivity with minimum use of material and energy, resulting in significant economic advantages compared to conventional manufacturing. The REProMag project is a highly innovative combination of applied research, technology development and integration, resulting in small-scale prototypes and a closely connected demonstration activity clearly showing the technical feasibility of the REProMag SDS processing route in a near to operational environment.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: TPT.2012.2-2. | Award Amount: 2.35M | Year: 2012

The MOWE-IT project shall assess factors that prerequisite cross-modal transferability between the air and surface-based European transport systems in order to protect the passengers, shippers, European institutions and citizens against travel delays, cancellations and/or stoppages in freight transfer caused by extreme weather and/or other natural disasters. The on-going WEATHER and EWENT- projects have established how the different extreme weather events harm the safety and security of passengers and drivers, reduce the inter-urban and regional accessibility, disrupt logistics chains, delay cargo delivery, inflate supply costs for operators and consignees, and immobilise public infrastructure. However, there is still a need to find out how the air and surface transport systems may improve operational resilience by substituting each others services when suffering from traffic curtailment, infrastructure shutdowns, and/or capacity shortages caused by emergencies. Therefore, the MOWE-IT project shall assess how the companies in passenger and freight transport comply with the European users rights protection legislation shielding theses parties against travel delays, cancellations and/or disruptions, and in case of gaps in conformity, propose new guidelines for cross-modal alignment of decision-making, capacity planning and reserve-building models at transport service and infrastructure providers in addition to incentive structures and policy instruments for more effective legislation enforcement. Such an assessment will also draw from the possibilities to use weather and other information technologies to aide the transport system and operators. The project will have 9 work packages, which focus on management and dissemination, transport-mode specific issues and cross-modal considerations and finally to short-term and long-term solutions and policy options for reducing the negative impacts of extreme weather and natural disasters.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 65.00K | Year: 2013

The aim of this proposal is to expand the capability base that solid state NMR community has at its disposal so that more materials and chemistry systems can be effectively studied with this technique. Solid state NMR usually confines itself to the study of diamagnetic materials and compounds; i.e. systems that do not possess unpaired electrons in their electronic structure. Many modern materials and chemical systems being developed possess transition metals and/or rare earth species as part of the elemental composition; these introduce unpaired electrons into these systems and thus promote paramagnetic characteristics which are incompatible with the conventional NMR methodology. Our traditional mindset of how we approach the typical NMR measurement needs to be adjusted as our typical drive to higher external magnetic field strengths is counterproductive in this case. The electron polarisation that gives rise to paramagnetic anisotropies and shifts scales linearly with magnetic field, and these effects greatly detract from conventional NMR data thus masking the information that is normally sought. Severe cases of paramagnetism can preclude the NMR measurement of some systems completely. The most direct way to address this solid state NMR challenge is to attempt measurements in a much reduced (rather than increased) magnetic field, and to spin the sample at very high MAS frequencies. This low field/fast MAS methodology maximises the chance for NMR data to be elucidated from these systems, however these types of NMR spectrometers are very rare commodities worldwide. While many thousand NMR instruments exist throughout the world at fields of 7.05 T (300 MHz for 1H) and above, only a handful of operational low field spectrometers exist to undertake these type of measurements; furthermore, the UK is not well catered for in this field of spectroscopy apart from very limited proof-of-concept pilot studies that have demonstrated this idea. This new capability will be as easy to operate as conventional solid state NMR instrumentation and no specific additional training is required to enable its usage for data acquisition. The impact of this methodology is expected to influence the fields of catalysis and energy materials (battery materials, solid oxide and H conduction fuel cells, hydrogen storage materials, supported metal nanoparticles systems, zeolites, nuclear waste glasses etc.), general organometallc and inorganic chemistry, and the emerging field of medical engineering (rare earth doped biomaterials for oncology and blood vessel growth stimulation applications). It is also expected that this methodology will bridge across to established techniques such as EPR, and emerging technologies such as DNP, both of which employ different strategies for the manipulation of the paramagnetic interaction. These relationships are expected to stimulate a more vibrant magnetic resonance community that will be capable of collaboratively tackling the challenging research issues that confront the UK. Academic collaborators at Cambridge, Birmingham, Imperial, Queen Mary, Kent, UCL and Lancaster, and industrial partners such as Johnson Matthey and Unilever are all acutely aware of these new solid state NMR possibilities and flexibility that this methodology offers, and they eagerly await the improvements to the measurement technology that a low field/fast MAS combination can offer. The specific objectives that shape this proposal are: (a) to deliver a shared low-field/fast MAS solid state NMR resource to the UK magnetic resonance community that will augment the current UK suite of solid state NMR instrumentation in existence, (b) to put in place a state-of-the-art solid state NMR console and appropriate fast MAS probe technology capable of delivering the most modern experiments, (c) to align this methodology with established characterisation technologies such as EPR and emerging experimental initiatives such as DNP.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 3.65M | Year: 2013

Global population stands at 7 billion and is predicted to reach 9 billion by 2050. It is anticipated that food production will need to increase by at least 50% to meet the demand arising from this increase in population. This will require a sustained improvement in crop yield. The nature of this challenge is exacerbated by the likely impact of climate change. These factors combine to make Food Security one the key challenges for the 21st century. To deliver improvement and sustainability in crop production it will be necessary to harness a broad spectrum approaches. Crop improvement will be crucial and a major part in the delivery of this will be based on classical breeding. This harnesses the genetic variation that is generated by homologous recombination during meiosis. Meiotic recombination creates new combinations of alleles that confer new phenotypes that can be tested for enhanced performance. It is also crucial in mapping genetic traits and in the introgression of new traits from sources such as wild-crop varieties. Despite the central role played by meiosis in crop production we are remarkably ignorant as to how the process is controlled in these species. For example, it is not known why recombination in cereals and forage grasses is skewed towards the ends of the chromosomes such that an estimated 30-50% of genes rarely, if ever, recombine thereby limiting the genetic variation that is available to plant breeders. Moreover, as many crop species are polyploid a further level of complexity is added to the meiotic process. Over the past 15 years studies in Arabidopsis, many conducted in the laboratories in the COMREC consortium, have provided both insights into the control of meiosis in plants and generated the tools to analyze this process in crop species. It is now timely, to translate this knowledge, training a new generation of young scientists who will gain the expertise to understand and develop strategies to modify recombination in crops.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: SSH.2011.6.2-1 | Award Amount: 1.68M | Year: 2012

Within the framework of the Work Programme 2011 on Socio-economic Science and Humanities e-Frame project builds on the latest political directions of the European Commission, in particular the priorities identified in the Europe 2020 strategy. The project will focus on the following general objectives: stocktaking of available results and of ongoing research activities on progress measurement; foster a European debate over the issue; define guidelines for the use of existing indicators; propose a coherent way of delivering information include advanced ICT tools; identify new research topics for future investigation; harmonize NSIs initiatives in progress measurement area. e-Frame will thus ensure a coordination of Beyond GDP activities putting at the centre of the action the national statisticians so to lead to improved official statistics as suggested by the call. All coordination activities will be supported by a stocktaking of past, recent and ongoing research with special attention to FP and ESSnet projects. The final target of activities will be the European dimension looking at the use of indicators within EU policies and in particular at the Europe 2020 strategy. Guidelines and recommendations will be proposed for future activities within the European Research Area and the European Statistical System. The numerous tasks of the project will lead to identify and develop relevant indicators to be used for the measurement of progress. Guidelines for their use by different stakeholders and future research needs will be disseminated through numerous channels, and in particular through the publication of a handbook on the use of progress indicators. The 19 partners-consortium is formed by major European National Statistical Institutes and, together with universities, research centres and civil society, will see the participation of the International Organization OECD.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE.2010.1.1-03 | Award Amount: 3.65M | Year: 2011

The goal of agrobiodiversity conservation, unlike other forms of conservation, is not only the conservation of species and intra-specific genetic diversity related to agriculture, but also to promote its sustainable use in facilitating agricultural production. Although significant progress has been made in the conservation and management of plant genetic resources for food and agriculture (PGRFA) globally and in Europe, there remain two critical areas where progress has been limited: (a) the use of conserved agrobiodiversity by breeders and (b) the systematic conservation of crop wild relative (CWR) and landrace (LR) diversity. Specifically for breeders and CWR / LR diversity conservationists, the status quo is no longer an option as human-induced climate change is threatening the maintenance of the very diversity breeders require to mitigate the adverse impact of climate change. Conventionally, breeders have used their own lines and stocks to generate novel crop varieties, but these materials are relatively genetically uniform and it is now increased recognition that CWR and LR offer the breadth of genetic diversity required by breeders to meet the novel challenges of climate change and rapidly changing consumer demands. Therefore, the aim of PGR Secure is to research novel characterization techniques and conservation strategies for European crop wild relative and landrace diversity, and further, to enhance crop improvement by breeders, as a means of underpinning European food security in the face of climate change. To achieve these goals PGR Secure has four research themes: 1. Investigation of novel characterization techniques, including: (1a) Genomics, phenotyping and metabolomics, (1b) Transcriptomics, (1c) Focused Identification of Germplasm Strategy; 2. CWR and LR conservation, including: (2a) Europe-wide CWR inventory, (2b) Exemplar national CWR inventories, (2c) European CWR strategy, (2d) Europe-wide LR inventory, (2e) Exemplar national LR inventories, (2f) European LR strategy; 3. Facilitating breeders CWR and LR use, including: (3a) Identifying breeders needs, (3b) Meeting breeders needs, (3c) Integration of conservation and user communities, (3d) Pre-breeding - channelling potential interesting germplasm into commercial breeding programmes; and 4. Informatics development, including: (4a) CWR and LR inventory information web availability, (4b) Novel characterization information web availability, (4c) Inter-information system operability. The research requires the integration and collaboration of European policy, conservation and breeding sectors and the products will be disseminated Europe-wide to all appropriate stakeholders. The project, initiated by the European Cooperative Programme for Plant Genetic Resources In Situ and On-Farm Conservation Network will involve 42 European countries, as well as both large and smaller European plant breeding companies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2010-4.0-3 | Award Amount: 22.10M | Year: 2011

The core concept of Accelerated Metallurgy is to deliver an integrated pilot-scale facility for the combinatorial synthesis and testing of many thousands of unexplored alloy formulations. This facility would be the first of its kind in the world and would represent a significant advance for metallurgy. The novel technology that enables this HTT facility is based on automated, direct laser deposition (DLD). The key feature of this technology is the way in which a mixture of elemental powders is accurately and directly fed into the lasers focal point, heated by the laser beam, and deposited on a substrate in the form of a melt pool, which finally solidifies to create a unique fully-dense alloy button with precise stoichiometry. This robotic alloy synthesis is 1000 times faster than conventional manual methods. Once produced, these discrete mm-sized samples are submitted to a range of automated, standardised tests that will measure chemical, physical and mechanical properties. The vast amount of information will be recorded in a Virtual Alloy Library and coupled with computer codes such as neural network models, in order to extract and map out the key trends linking process, composition, structure and properties. The most promising alloy formulations will be further tested, patented and exploited by the 20 end-users. Industrial interests include: (i) new lightweight fuel-saving alloys (<4.5 g/cm3) for aerospace and automotive applications; (ii) new higher-temperature alloys (stable>1000C) for rockets, gas turbines, jet-engines, nuclear fusion; (iii) new high-Tc superconductor alloys (>30K) that can be wire-drawn for electrical applications; (iv) new high-ZT thermoelectric alloys for converting waste heat directly into electricity; (v) new magnetic and magnetocaloric alloys for motors and refrigeration; and (vi) new phase-change alloys for high-density memory storage. The accelerated discovery of these alloy formulations will have a very high impact on society.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SSH-2010-2.1-1 | Award Amount: 10.11M | Year: 2011

The objective of NEUJOBS is to imagine future, or rather various possible futures, under the conditions of the socioecological transition (and incorporating other key influences), map the implications for employment overall, but also in key sectors and relevant groups and integrate all of this together under a single intellectual framework. It will do so by combining EU-wide studies based on existing datasets with small-N comparative research dealing with one or more countries. Furthermore, the output will be a mix of quantitative and qualitative analysis, foresight activities and policy analysis. The proposal is organised in 23 workpackages that will run over a period of 48 months. The Consortium is composed by a team of 29 partners chosen among top research centres in Europe.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-05-2014 | Award Amount: 8.44M | Year: 2015

Arterial hypertension affects up to 45% of the general population and is responsible for 7.1 million deaths per year worldwide. Although a large therapeutic arsenal exists, blood pressure control is sub-optimal in up to two thirds of patients. Yet, even small increments in blood pressure are associated with increased cardiovascular risk, with 62% of cerebrovascular disease and 49% of ischemic heart disease being attributable to hypertension. Detection of secondary forms of hypertension is key to targeted management of the underlying disease and prevention of cardiovascular complications. Endocrine forms of hypertension represent major targets for stratified approaches of health promotion. They include a group of adrenal disorders resulting in increased production of hormones affecting blood pressure regulation: primary aldosteronism (PA), pheochromocytoma/functional paraganglioma (PPGL) and Cushings syndrome (CS). These diseases are associated with increased cardiovascular and metabolic risk and with diminished quality of life. This project will develop and evaluate an omics-based stratified health promotion program for patients with endocrine forms of hypertension. We will define specific omics profiles for patients with PA, PPGL and CS by integrating high throughput genetics, genomics and metabolomics data with phenome annotations through bioinformatics modelling. Established profiles will be validated as stratification biomarkers and applied to the screening of referred hypertensive patients for both stratifying primary forms of hypertension for effective and cost efficient therapy as well as improving identification of endocrine causes for curative treatment and prevention of cardiovascular and metabolic complications. Omics-based profiling should allow identification of patients with preclinical phenotypes along with those hypertensives that cluster into specific endocrine groups who may benefit from personalised treatment.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME | Phase: SME-2012-1 | Award Amount: 1.45M | Year: 2012

Cleanward aims to develop a novel, safe, user-friendly anti-microbial cleaning system, using titanium dioxide coated ultra-microfibre fabric that will integrate easily into existing contract cleaning equipment: it will achieve log105 microbial removal and the coating will react with water and UV to produce a highly reactive environment: this will kill all harmful micro-organisms quickly and thoroughly without the need for chemical disinfectant all in an isolated, low water volume unit. The cloths will then be available for re-use without running the risk of microbiological cross contamination.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Collaborative Research & Development | Award Amount: 410.31K | Year: 2013

This project aims to develop a novel elevated pressure sonication process for dairy, food and drink pasteurisation requiring lower temperatures and offering a 20-fold reductions in energy usage compared to HTST and UHT. Pasteurisation is an essential process stage in Dairy, Juice, Brewery processing. Two main techniques are used High Temperature Short Time (HTST) and Ultra High Temperature (UHT). Both are effective in extending Dairy and beverages product shelf-life. However, a by-product from Dairy processing cannot technically or cost effectively be pasteurised using these techniques. This by-product is highly bacterially unstable and is disposed of as waste costing, depending on dairy size, between £100k and £1m per annum. This project aims to offer a new process to effectively pasteurise the Dairy by-product and other food and beverage products generating high value products and significantly reducing energy usage and reducing waste disposal costs.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA | Phase: Fission-2013-2.3.1 | Award Amount: 8.65M | Year: 2013

The European Energy Research Alliance, set-up under the European Strategic Energy Technology Plan, has launched an initiative for a Joint Programme on Nuclear Materials (JPNM). The JPNM aims at establishing key priorities in the area of advanced nuclear materials, identifying funding opportunities and harmonizing this scientific & technical domain at the European level by maximizing complementarities and synergies with the major actors of the field. The JPNM partners propose, through MatISSE, a combination of Collaborative Projects and Coordination and Support Actions to face the challenge of implementing a pan-European integrated research programme with common research activities establishing, at the same time, appropriate strategy and governance structure. Focusing on cross-cutting activities related to materials used in fuel and structural elements of safe and sustainable advanced nuclear systems, the project aims at covering the key priorities identified in the JPNM: pre-normative research in support of ESNII systems, Oxide Dispersed Strengthened steels, refractory composites for the high temperature applications, development of predictive capacities. MatISSE will foster the link between the respective national research programmes through networking and integrating activities on material innovations for advanced nuclear systems, sharing partners best practices and setting-up efficient communication tools. It is expected that, through MatISSE, a real boost toward Joint Programming among the Member States, the European Commission and the main European research actors, will be achieved.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2010-1.3-1 | Award Amount: 13.15M | Year: 2011

The growing development, production and use of engineered nanomaterials and associated products will increase exposure of both humans and ecosystems to these new materials. However, current knowledge is still incomplete and established test methods are as yet inappropriate to reliably assess the extent of exposure and risk of materials at the nano-scale. There is an urgent need to develop methods to overcome the current limitations of existing hazard and risk assessment schemes and to generate the body of reference data needed as the basis for regulative requirements and for measures to safeguard production, application and the disposal of nanomaterials. The proposed project will mobilize the critical mass of international scientific knowledge and technical expertise required to address these questions. Current analytical and toxicity test methods and models will be put to test and subjected to rigorous intercalibration and validation. Where necessary, methods and test materials will be modified, adapted and validated, and new reliable reference methods developed, in cooperation with international standardisation bodies and the concerned industry, to support both pre and co-normative activities and to make the applicability of existing RA and LCA schemes to ENPs more reliable. The feasibility of validated measurement, characterization and test methods will be assessed by selected case studies to help the significant improvement of the performance of existing exposure monitoring systems as well as the development of new risk management and reduction strategies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2010-1.1.8 | Award Amount: 10.93M | Year: 2010

In the past two decades spectacular insight into basic principles of life has been obtained from paradigmatic high-resolution structural investigations providing a rational basis for biological experiments. NMR is an indispensable enabling technology for determining such structures and their interactions in solution, the immobilized state and living cells. The power of NMR to link structural, dynamic, kinetic and thermodynamic information makes it an essential component of cutting edge research in medicine and biology. Bio-NMR pools pan-European resources of the most relevant bio-NMR infrastructures. Eleven partners will provide access to researchers involved in structural biology following the EU-NMR I3 project. This initiative successfully responded to the increasing demand for access since 1994. Seven other excellent partners, including the leading NMR manufacturer Bruker, are included in the new consortium. Jointly, they will develop methods aimed at pushing the frontiers of biological NMR and improving the quality of access to allow users to tackle ever more challenging goals in cellular structural biology. Finally, all nineteen partners, amongst them a company specialized in NMR technology dissemination, are involved in the networking activities. These include (1) knowledge transfer among consortium members, Bio-NMR users and other NMR researchers, (2) the demonstration to biologists of the potential of structural biology with NMR , and lowering the barriers to their becoming users, (3) interactions with industrial and medical communities, and (4) raising awareness of the impact of the results achieved through Bio-NMR among society, financing and governing bodies with the final aim of developing a business plan for self-sustainability. The overall project and its management have been conceived in coordination with INSTRUCT, which will contribute to the cultural frame and networking activities of Bio-NMR.


The aim of the project is to develop a completely new manufacturing system for the volume production of miniaturised components by overcoming the challenges on the manufacturing with a wide range of materials (metallic alloys, composites, ceramics and polymers), through: (i) developing a high-throughput, flexible and cost-efficient process by simultaneous electrical-forming and electric-fast-sintering (Micro-FAST); (ii) scaling up the process to an industrial scale; (iii) further developing it towards an industrial production system for micro-/nano-manufacturing. These will be enabled/supported by developing: (i) a new machine concept: Micro-FAST CNC Machine; (ii) an innovative inline monitoring and quality inspection system; (iii) innovative multiscale modelling techniques for the analysis of the micro-structural behaviours of materials and its interactions with the production processes; (iv) new tooling techniques for high-performance tools, and (v) high-performance nano-material systems. The whole development will take into account energy savings, cost and waste reduction, and recycling issues which will be studied thoroughly through an expertise Life-Cycle Assessment. The development should lead to substantial improvements in the manufacture of components at micro and nanoscale with a good balance on cost and performance. The consortium seeks: reduction of the overall manufacturing cost by 50-100%; energy consumption by more than 30-50%; achieving full-density (100% density) components; direct economic gains for the SME participants of up to 5-25%. The whole development will support the EU-wide product innovations involving use of miniature and micro-components in many manufacturing sectors and, especially with difficult-to-cut and difficult-to-form materials. Adopting the production system in industry should help the EU manufacturing sectors to gain new technological and business competiveness significantly.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2010-1.1.31 | Award Amount: 8.95M | Year: 2011

Nanoscale objects interact with living organisms in a fundamentally new manner, ensuring that a fruitful marriage of nanotechnology and biology will long outlast short term imperatives. Therefore, investment in an infrastructure to drive scientific knowledge of the highest quality will have both immediate benefits of supporting the safety assessment of legacy nanomaterials, as well as pointing towards future (safe) applications with the lasting benefits to society. There are immediate priorities, for few doubt that serious damage to confidence in nanotechnology, unless averted, could result in missed opportunities to benefit society for a generation, or more. QNano will materially affect the outcome, at this pivotal moment of nanotechnology implementation. The overall vision of QNano is the creation of a neutral scientific & technical space in which all stakeholder groups can engage, develop, and share scientific best practice in the field. Initially it will harness resources from across Europe and develop efficient, transparent and effective processes. Thereby it will enable provision of services to its Users, and the broader community, all in the context of a best-practice ethos. This will encourage evidence-based dialogue to prosper between all stakeholders. However, QNano will also pro-actively seek to drive, develop and promote the highest quality research and practices via its JRA, NA and TA functions, with a global perspective and mode of implementation. QNano will also look to the future, beyond the current issues, and promote the growth and development of the science of nanoscale interactions with living organisms. By working with new and emerging scientific research communities from medicine, biology, energy, materials and others, it will seek to forge new directions leading to new (safe, responsible, economically viable) technologies for the benefit of European society.


This project focuses on the object transfer procedure between a robot and a human, considered to be a key aspect to be addressed in order to provide successful and efficient robotic assistance to humans.Current techniques of human-robot object transfer usually consist in following a trajectory completely defined before the motion starts, limiting thus the capacity to adapt the motion plan to the uncontrolled human behavior. Furthermore, the robotic arm motions usually do not rely on characteristics of the human motion dynamics, while the object transfer itself is generally realized without using sensing information as the human does with his hand.CogLaboration proposes to address this challenge by achieving three objectives. First, we will study the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of successful human-human object exchange in realistic task settings and conditions, including typical variations and unplanned and unanticipated situations. This observation aims to characterize the arm and hand trajectories, the force applied onto the object during the exchange, the visual information used to correct the motion, and the way gestures are used to provide information or trigger the exchange procedure. Second, we will develop a hierarchical control architecture based on state-of-the-art concepts from cognitive neurosciences and exploiting the key-characteristics of the human-human exchange to provide the robot with the required cognitive abilities. Third, we will build a vision-driven robotic system comprising a lightweight arm and a hand with tactile sensors and evaluate it against the same metrics that we will have derived from our studies of object exchange between humans. This evaluation will follow a scenario-driven methodology, through the definition of two detailed scenarios considering work and home settings.CogLaboration will thus deliver a complete robotic system with the cognitive capacities needed for successful and safe human-robot collaboration.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CPCSA | Phase: INFRA-2011-1.2.2. | Award Amount: 5.89M | Year: 2011

The ESPAS project will provide the e-Infrastructure necessary to support the access to observations, the modeling and prediction of the Near-Earth Space environment. This includes the plasma and energetic particle environments that surround our planet as well as the neutral atmosphere at altitudes above 60 km. These environments are an important target for future research in areas such as space weather and Sun-climate studies. The ESPAS interface will provide access to a diverse set of databases that have been developed for the needs of different users. Thus a primary goal is to facilitate user access to heterogeneous data from multiple providers, ranging from ground-based observations acquired with multiple instruments and techniques, to data from satellite experiments, using a mixture of in-situ and remotely sensed techniques. The results of searches will be delivered in a scientist-friendly manner based on existing standards and protocols. The infrastructure will also be used as a test-bed for development of methodologies and standards for validation of models of the near-Earth environment. This will lead to validated predictions of conditions in that environment, and thus promote the transfer of space environment science products into commercial and operational applications.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME | Phase: SME-2013-1 | Award Amount: 1.36M | Year: 2014

Railway maintenance is a costly activity that can be improved by faster inspection of assets. If the speed of inspection of the railhead can be increased the potential cost savings are significant. Current NDT solutions implement hand held devices that effectively scan at walking pace. EMAT devices have been utilised to demonstrate that a non-contact solution that can be mounted to a vehicle is feasible. Technical development is therefore required to increase the scanning area and increase the speed of processing to inspect the entire railhead. RIFLEX will develop a system that can inspect the entire contour of the railhead using a multiple, flexible EMAT transducers that conform to the shape of the railhead. Two devices will be used in a complimentary configuration; the first generating an acoustic wave across a short distance on the railhead and the second collecting the resulting signal. An optical focussing system will ensure that a minimum gap between the rail and transducer is maintained to ensure that the transducer remains coupled to the railhead.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 3.76M | Year: 2013

The main research goal of HEXACOMM is to apply scientifically-based modelling and experimental methods to relate concentrations of particulate matter in the indoor domestic environment to its sources and human exposure implications. The second research objective is to determine the human exposure arising from such exposure at both individual and collective (population) scales at modern microenvironments. Contributions from outdoor air will be taken into account. The central idea of HEXACOMM is that a combination of tools and methods will enable us to relate indoor air quality to aerosol contaminants in urban homes, offices, vehicles with human exposure in a quantitative manner. To achieve our goal and objectives we propose to undertake, in parallel, a carefully designed validation programme at the European scale combining specifically targeted indoor air quality measurements, source apportionment studies, micro-environmental modelling, dosimetry modelling and exposure studies. Ultimately, our vision is that such enhanced understanding of the underpinning science will lead to improved indoor air quality in European domestic environments, while facilitating development of strategies to mitigate the impacts of aerosols on human exposure.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP.2013.1.3-3 | Award Amount: 8.92M | Year: 2014

Rapidly developing markets such as green construction, energy harvesting and storage, advanced materials for aerospace, electronics, medical implants and environmental remediation are potential key application targets for nanomaterials. There, nanotechnology has the potential to make qualitative improvements or indeed even to enable the technology. Impacts range from increased efficiency of energy harvesting or storage batteries, to radical improvements in mechanical properties for construction materials. In addition, concerns of these markets such as scarcity of materials, cost, security of supply, and negative environmental impact of older products could also be addressed by new nano-enabled materials (e.g. lighter aircraft use less fuel). FutureNanoNeeds will develop a novel framework to enable naming, classification, hazard and environmental impact assessment of the next generation nanomaterials prior to their widespread industrial use. It will uniquely achieve this by integrating concepts and approaches from several well established contiguous domains, such as phylontology and crystallography to develop a robust, versatile and adaptable naming approach, coupled with a full assessment of all known biological protective responses as the basis for a decision tree for screening potential impacts of nanomaterials at all stages of their lifecycle. Together, these tools will form the basis of a value chain regulatory process which allows a each nanomaterial to be assessed for different applications on the basis of available data and the specific exposure and life cycle concerns for that application. Exemplar materials from emerging nano-industry sectors, such as energy, construction and agriculture will be evaluated via this process as demonstrators. The FutureNanoNeeds consortium is uniquely placed to achieve this, on the basis of expertise, positioning, open mindedness and a belief that new approaches are required.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2013.6.2-2 | Award Amount: 16.30M | Year: 2013

SOLUTIONS will deliver a conceptual framework for the evidence-based development of environmental and water policies. This will integrate innovative chemical and effect-based monitoring tools with a full set of exposure, effect and risk models and assessment options. Uniquely, SOLUTIONS taps (i) expertise of leading European scientists of major FP6/FP7 projects on chemicals in the water cycle, (ii) access to the infrastructure necessary to investigate the large basins of Danube and Rhine as well as relevant Mediterranean basins as case studies, and (iii) innovative approaches for stakeholder dialogue and support. In particular, International River Commissions, EC working groups and water works associations will be directly supported with consistent guidance for the early detection, identification, prioritization, and abatement of chemicals in the water cycle. A user-friendly tool providing access to a set of predictive models will support stakeholders to improve management decisions, benefiting from the wealth of data generated from monitoring and chemical registration. SOLUTIONS will give a specific focus on concepts and tools for the impact and risk assessment of complex mixtures of emerging pollutants, their metabolites and transformation products. Analytical and effect-based screening tools will be applied together with ecological assessment tools for the identification of toxicants and their impacts. Beyond state-of-the-art monitoring and management tools will be elaborated allowing risk identification for aquatic ecosystems and human health. The SOLUTIONS approach will provide transparent and evidence-based lists of River Basin Specific Pollutants for the case study basins and support the review of the list of WFD priority pollutants.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Collaborative Research & Development | Award Amount: 164.02K | Year: 2015

Following the Nobel Prize winning discovery that lasers can cool atoms to extremely low temperatures, where they can occupy a single quantum state, there has been a lot of research into potential applications. Laboratory experiments with cold atoms have shown a 1000 times improvement in inertial navigation accuracy and a 1000 times improvement in timing over conventional atomic clocks. For these breakthroughs to be exploited in real applications the laboratory experiments must be developed into practical devices that could be operated in a satellite, aircraft, ship or hospital The aim of the FreezeRay project is to develop a commercial “all-in-one” system for cooling atoms. This will be the core engine of a cold atom system and will consist of a compact sealed vacuum chamber and a highly stable laser source that will cool the atoms. The technical approach will draw on component technology such as lasers and amplifiers that have been developed for optical communications and are highly reliable with operating lifetime exceeding 25 years in harsh environments.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SST.2010.5.2-1. | Award Amount: 4.08M | Year: 2011

Rail traffic has increased much in the last decade. This development and the need for model shift from road to rail to decrease CO2 emission, creates a challenge for the railway industry to improve capacity in the network while the need of capacity for maintenance also increases. The challenge of the project is to do more effective inspection and maintenance in less time. Therefore the project focus is to optimise and automate maintenance & inspection where possible, also to introduce new planning & scheduling tools and methodology. The project aims to reduce the possession time around 40%. To achieve this five objectives are set: 1: adopting best practice from other industries in maintenance optimisation (e.g. highways, aerospace).2: developing novel track inspection approaches for freight routes with a scope on in-train measuring and self inspecting switch. 3: researching and assessing innovations that can improve the effectiveness and efficiency of large scale inspection & maintenance processes with a scope on track and switch maintenance, track inspection; 4: further developing of key technologies that will drive the development of modular infrastructure design. 5: developing a new maintenance planning and scheduling tool that is able to optimise the maintenance activities, taking account of the benefits brought about by other improvements in this project. To achieve these objectives, the project will be organised into 8 Work Packages (WP): WP1: benchmark & evaluation criteria; WP2: improvement specifications for WP3 : improve inspection; WP4:improve maintenance; WP5:improve planning & scheduling and WP6: demonstration. WP7 manages dissemination, exploitation and training. WP8 manages the project. The Consortiums composition covers the whole railway maintenance and inspection field: infrastructure managers, contractors, train operating companies, railway component industry, research organisations, SMEs and railway industry interest organisations.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2014 | Award Amount: 571.50K | Year: 2015

DiasporaLink is a 4-year exchange program between 24 universities and research institutes representing EU, the Americas, Africa and Australia and will investigate, evaluate and facilitate transnational diaspora entrepreneurship, TDE as driver of development and wealth creation in countries of origin and residence. The partners in DiasporaLink have together a unique possibility to have a substantial impact on a global, European and national level targeting different groups and stakeholders: The international research community Institutions and policy makers in the social, economic and development field Diaspora organizations and communities Media and press This is underlined by the specific network of the partners GEM Global Entrepreneurship Monitor IMISCOE International Migration, Integration, Social Cohesion International Council for Small Businesses Swedish TDE network Core tasks are: Structure research on diaspora cross-border entrepreneurship in migration corridors Create awareness among policy and decision makers of the potential of TDE through publications and a web-site Build a IT-curricula for transnational entrepreneurship within and outside the universities Build an ICT-platform for internal communication and for transnational team building The exchange of staff is built around research in common WPs and around regular and touring workshops both internal and external. The objective is to create a global, extended university network with the mission to monitor the entrepreneurship in migration corridors, define obstacles and support the corridor stakeholders with information and tuition. Essential is close contacts with diaspora entrepreneurs and diaspora organizations are systematically approached through workshops and media, for involving diaspora organizations as active partners.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH.2013.3.2-3 | Award Amount: 3.31M | Year: 2014

The main objective of the proposed research project is to create knowledge that will further advance the contributions that the third sector and volunteering can make to the socio-economic development of Europe. These unique renewable resources for social and economic problem-solving and civic engagement in Europe are needed more than ever at this time of social and economic distress and enormous pressures on governmental budgetsnot as an alternative to government but as a full-fledged partner in the effort to promote European progress. To take full advantage of this resource we need a clearer understanding of the third sectors scope and scale, its existing and potential impacts, and the barriers to its full contributions to the continents common welfare. Building on our previous work, this project seeks to: 1) Clarify the concept of the third sector in its European manifestations; 2) Identify the major contours of the sector so definedits size, structure, composition, sources of support, and recent trends; 3) Identify the impacts of this sector, its contributions to European economic development, innovation, citizen well-being, civic engagement, and human development, and to create capabilities to measure these contributions into the future; 4) Identify barriers both internal to organizations and external to them and suggest ways these barriers might be overcome; and 5) Forge a partnership between the research community and European Third Sector practitioners so that the understanding of the Third Sector generated by this work remains grounded in reality and enjoy sufficient support among key stakeholders to ensure respectful attention from policy makers and sector leaders long after the project is completed. By drawing on the combined strengths of the academic community, government, and the third sector itself. As such, the proposal provides a solid embodiment of the FP7 theme of science in society, of generating knowledge to advance the quality of life.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SSH.2011.1.2-1 | Award Amount: 10.37M | Year: 2012

The objective of this 4-year project is to provide the analytical basis for a socio-ecological transition in Europe: the change to a new growth path with smart, sustainable and inclusive growth as is envisaged in the EU 2020 strategy. In order to support the transition, we analyse the need, the feasibility and best practice for change, specifying the institutional changes needed at all policy levels to implement these options. The old and new challenges Europe is facing define the starting point: globalisation, new technologies and postindustrialisation, demographic change and ecology in the context of welfare systems that have come under stress due to high public deficits. The vision is that Europe will become a role model for a high road growth path which actively incorporates social and ecological goals, employment, gender and cultural aspects in an ambitious, forward looking way while continuing to be competitive in a globalised world. To achieve these objectives, the consortium will carry out and synthesise robust research in research areas covering the challenges to the welfare system, the biophysical dimension of socio-economic development, the identification of drivers towards socio-ecological transition, the role of governance and institutions on the European as well as the regional level. The consortium will benefit from ongoing dialogue with international experts in the form of expert panels and sounding boards, taking into account their views on the direction and feasibility for this new growth path. The project will be carried out by a consortium of 34 partners from universities and research institutes with international and interdisciplinary expertise. It represents 12 member states. High level Scientific and Policy Boards will monitor the analysis and the policy conclusions to guarantee the impact and dissemination of the results.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: Health | Award Amount: 2.25M | Year: 2015

The European Consortium for Communicating Stem Cell Research (EuroStemCell) unites 33 partner institutions, that collectively represent >400 stem cell research groupings across Europe. Our common goal is to provide trusted high quality information on stem cells accessible to citizens and stakeholders across Europe, through support and further development of the multi-lingual European Stem Cell Information Portal www.eurostemcell.org. To achieve our aims, EuroStemCell will adopt the highly structured system for coordinated information management established by the FP7 Coordination and Support Action (CSA) also called EuroStemCell. From this, we will implement an ambitious programme of online and direct stakeholder engagement with stem cell research and regenerative medicine, aimed at European citizens at all educational levels. This will include provision of resources tailored specifically for decision-making on stem cell-related questions and an extensive programme of dissemination and capacity building in science communications and public engagement. The proposed work centres on an information hub team, which will link to all project partners and to stakeholders in the stem cell and regenerative medicine arenas and wider society, working with these groupings to implement the project. All outputs will be delivered in 6 European languages, to ensure broad accessibility, and will be rigorously evaluated against measurable objectives throughout the project duration. The proposed consortium comprises leading stem cell labs across Europe, including new member states, together with experts in ethical and societal concerns and evaluating clinical outcomes. It thus provides unparalleled European expertise across the fields of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine and is uniquely placed to maintain and further develop www.eurostemcell.org as a world-leading stem cell information resource, thus meeting the challenge outlined in Topic HOA-6-2014.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: SST.2013.2-2. | Award Amount: 15.00M | Year: 2013

In 2011, the White Paper on European Transport reasserted how fundamental transport was for society, for the mobility of European citizens and for the growth and vitality of the European economy. CAPACITY4RAIL will deliver research that is innovative, prepares rail for the future and takes into account results from previous research projects and programmes. The project builds on previous useable results and will deliver both technical demonstrations and system wide guidelines and recommendations that will be the basis for future research and investment, increasing the capacities of rail networks in the future. The time used for infrastructure monitoring, maintenance and renewal means down time. New concepts for low maintenance infrastructure, using standardized and plug-and-play concepts will be proposed. Non-intrusive innovative monitoring techniques or self-monitoring infrastructure will be investigated, allowing low or no impact on train operations. The fragility of some key component of the infrastructure system (especially in extreme weather conditions) such as switches may impact the efficiency of the whole system. The resilience of switches to any kind of known failure will be reinforced, as well as the ability of the operation system to recover from incidents. Capacity enhancements will also be achieved by higher speed freight vehicles, allowing an optimized interleaving of freight trains into mixed traffic, and improved planning models for operation. Intermodal integration within the global transport system will be improved through enhanced transhipment of passengers and freight. CAPACITY4RAIL will also look towards 2030/2050, by proposing guidelines for future deployments in the mid-term, recommendations for technologies to de developed and deployed in the long term and investigating the key opportunities for funding these within national and EU funding schemes.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: MG-2.1-2014 | Award Amount: 18.00M | Year: 2015

IN2RAIL is to set the foundations for a resilient, consistent, cost-efficient, high capacity European network by delivering important building blocks that unlock the innovation potential that exists in SHIFT2RAIL: innovative technologies will be explored and resulting concepts embedded in a systems framework where infrastructure, information management, maintenance techniques, energy, and engineering are integrated, optimised, shared and exploited. IN2RAIL will make advances towards SHIFT2RAIL objectives: enhancing the existing capacity fulfilling user demand; increasing the reliability delivering better and consistent quality of service; reducing the LCC increasing competitiveness of the EU rail system. To achieve the above, a holistic approach covering Smart Infrastructures, Intelligent Mobility Management (I2M)and Rail Power Supply and Energy Management will be applied. Smart Infrastructure addresses the fundamental design of critical assets - switches and crossings and tracks. It will research components capable of meeting future railway demands and will utilise modern technologies in the process. Risk and condition-based LEAN approaches to optimise RAMS and LCC in asset maintenance activities will be created to tackle the root causes of degradation. I2M researches automated, interoperable and inter-connected advanced traffic management systems; scalable and upgradable systems, utilising standardised products and interfaces, enabling easy migration from legacy systems; the wealth of data and information on assets and traffic status; information management systems adding the capability of nowcasting and forecasting of critical asset statuses. Rail Power Supply and Energy Management create solutions to improve the energy performance of the railway system. Research on new power systems characterised by reduced losses and capable of balancing energy demands, along with innovative energy management systems enabling accurate and precise estimates of energy flows.


Grimwade D.,King's College London | Freeman S.D.,University of Birmingham
Blood | Year: 2014

The past 40 years have witnessed major advances in defining the cytogenetic aberrations, mutational landscape, epigenetic profiles, and expression changes underlying hematological malignancies. Although it has become apparent that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is highly heterogeneous at the molecular level, the standard framework for risk stratification guiding transplant practice in this disease remains largely based on pretreatment assessment of cytogenetics and a limited panel of molecular genetic markers, coupled with morphological assessment of bone marrow (BM) blast percentage after induction. However, application of more objective methodology such as multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) has highlighted the limitations of morphology for reliable determination of remission status. Moreover, there is a growing body of evidence that detection of subclinical levels of leukemia (ie, minimal residual disease, MRD) using MFC or molecular-based approaches provides powerful independent prognostic information. Consequently, there is increasing interest in the use of MRD detection to provide early end points in clinical trials and to inform patient management. However, implementation of MRD assessment into clinical practice remains a major challenge, hampered by differences in the assays and preferred analytical methods employed between routine laboratories. Although this should be addressed through adoption of standardized assays with external quality control, it is clear that the molecular heterogeneity of AML coupled with increasing understanding of its clonal architecture dictates that a "one size fits all" approach to MRD detection in this disease is not feasible. However, with the range of platforms now available, there is considerable scope to realistically track treatment response in every patient. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.


Loman N.J.,University of Birmingham | Pallen M.J.,University of Warwick
Nature Reviews Microbiology | Year: 2015

Twenty years ago, the publication of the first bacterial genome sequence, from Haemophilus influenzae, shook the world of bacteriology. In this Timeline, we review the first two decades of bacterial genome sequencing, which have been marked by three revolutions: whole-genome shotgun sequencing, high-throughput sequencing and single-molecule long-read sequencing. We summarize the social history of sequencing and its impact on our understanding of the biology, diversity and evolution of bacteria, while also highlighting spin-offs and translational impact in the clinic. We look forward to a 'sequencing singularity', where sequencing becomes the method of choice for as-yet unthinkable applications in bacteriology and beyond. © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: FoF.NMP.2012-4 | Award Amount: 4.02M | Year: 2012

The general objective of Hyproline is to strengthen the competitiveness of the European industry by introducing manufacturing methods, which will allow companies to 1) reduce time-to-market and number of rejects, 2) make more customized and innovative products with a higher market value, and 3) make products > 20% more accurate with considerable savings (>30%) in consump-tion of waste metal, fluids and services, with an equivalent reduction of CO2 emission. By further developing the manufacturing process itself as well as by research and application work on materials, pre and post treatment of the parts produced and supporting software Hyproline adds capabilities to commercially available manufacturing systems, in terms of speed, product quality and versatility. By keeping focus on the entire process from conceptual outline of the product via product design, engineering and production planning to actual manufacturing and control of quality, the project contributes to the development of a versatile manufacturing process, suited for industrial produc-tion by SMEs of complex custom made metal (meso scale = order 10 mm) parts in small batches or even in one-of-a-kind production mode. The Hyproline manufacturing concept will be demonstrated by its pilot implementation for serial production of customized high quality meso parts for two different industrial sectors of (1) electronics and (2) aerospace.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP.2013.2.1-1 | Award Amount: 8.12M | Year: 2014

Innovative processes with streamlining and improved control will be conducted in FIBRALSPEC, through Unit for Continuous PAN-based Carbon Fiber Pilot Production. Testing of laminates and prepregs production based the new developed carbon fibres followed by manufacturing of laminates/coupons and high-performance filament wound tubes are also foreseen (equipment for delivering precise volumes the matrix (resin) in high and low-capacity to impregnate the fibres and bundles will be developed). The project also efforts on functionalization will be mainly focused on cost reduction, mechanical and chemical property improvement. Novel CF precursors will be developed (silicon carbide, textile-grade PAN, polyolefins, and lignin); in parallel, the suitability of a new environmentally friendly pitch will be assessed, obtained from anthracene oil, for the preparation of isotropic carbon fibres. The projects carbon fiber conversion technology will pyrolysis process to convert PAN precursor fiber into PAN-based carbon fiber and activated carbon fiber. Innovative surface treatment will improve the step of treatment of the carbon fiber surface being indispensable for productions in series. As for recycling and used of recycled CFs, new techniques will be used to provide commercially-relevant products that are manufactured from waste carbon fibres. Mathematical modeling will be conducted so as to determine properties of CFs and composites, together with cost modeling; life cycle assessment will assist in possible commercial risks that will be continuously estimated during the project and quantify/assess the environmental impact of the materials that will be used. Industrial partnership will ensure the impact of the research efforts, convincingly proving scalability towards industrial needs of two high demanding applications, namely medium technology large scale (Rapid Deployment Secure Emergency Shelter (RDSES)) and high technology small scale (supercapacitor).


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Fellowship | Award Amount: 1.24M | Year: 2013

The main aim of this project is to explore novel emergent phenomena in far from equilibrium quantum systems across different fields of research: from solid-state light-matter systems such as superconducting circuits, semiconductor micro-structures and quantum spins to ultra-cold atomic gases. Such cross-fertilisation between traditionally distinct areas is an essential ingredient in successful approach to understanding far from equilibrium collective processes together with the development of new efficient theoretical tools. EPSRC Physics Grand Challenge Survey has identified that compared with that of equilibrium states, our understanding of states far from equilibrium is in its infancy and that on the theory front, there are significant gaps in knowledge, especially in quantum theory. At the same time the problem is of considerable scientific and technological importance and with unforeseeable potential for applications. We shall study exotic quantum orders, bistabilities, pattern formation and other collective phenomena in state-of-the art light-matter systems. An important aspect of our project is to focus on systems, or their features, which in the longer run could lead to potential device applications: from polariton lasers and LEDs, low threshold optical switches, optical transistors, logic gates and finally polariton integrated circuits to quantum computers. Our theoretical analysis will be linked directly to the experiments of our project partners worldwide.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 389.56K | Year: 2012

This research applies methods and tools from mathematical knowledge management and theorem proving to theoretical economics, by working with a class of cooperative games called pillage games. Pillage games, introduced by Jordan in 2006, provide a formal way of thinking about the ability of powerful coalitions to take resources from less powerful ones. While their name suggests primitive, violent interactions, pillage games are more applicable to advanced democracies, in which coalitions seek to form governments to alter the distribution of societys resources in their favour. If, for some allocation of societys resources, the coalition preferring another allocation is stronger than that preferring the status quo, the other allocation `dominates the status quo. The most conceptually intriguing, and the most computationally intractable solution concept for cooperative games is the `stable set. A stable set, has two features: no allocation in the set dominates another; each allocation outside the set is dominated by an allocation in the set. For pillage games with three agents under a few additional conditions, we have determined when stable sets exist, that they are unique and contain no more than 15 allocations, and how to determine them for a given power function. In this research, we first formally represent the mathematical knowledge developed in Jordans and our work using sTeX, a mathematical knowledge management tool. This allows, e.g., automatic identification of how various results depend on each other. We then use two modern automated theorem provers (ATPs), Isabelle and Theorema, to formally prove these results. Theorem proving is a hard task and if not provided with domain specific knowledge ATPs have to search through big search spaces in order to find proofs. To increase their reasoning power, we shall seek to identify recurring patterns in proofs, and extract proof tactics, reducing the interactions necessary to prove the theorems interactively. As important results in pillage games can be summarised in pseudo-algorithms, containing both computational and non-computational steps, we shall study such pseudo-algorithms, seeking to push them towards the much more efficient computational steps. Finally, we shall use the identified proof tactics to help the ATPs prove new results in order evaluate their true value. The research seeks to make a number of contributions. For theorem proving, pillage games form a new set of challenge problems. As the study of pillage games is new, and the canon of applicable knowledge small, this gives an unprecedented opportunity to encode most of it. The research will expand the tractable problem domain for ATPs; and - by identifying successful tactics - increase both the efficiency with which ATPs search for proofs, and - ideally - their ability to establish new results. For economics, this is the first major application of formal knowledge management and theorem proving techniques. The few previous applications of ATP to economics have formalised isolated results without engaging economists and have thus largely gone unnoticed by the discipline. As cooperative games are a known hard class of economic problems, and pillage games known to be tractable, this research therefore presents a strong `proof of concept for the use of ATP within economics. Cooperative game theory is formally similar to graph theory, the techniques and insights developed may be applicable to matching problems, network economics, operations research, and combinatorial optimisation more generally. Additionally, the researchers will introduce ATP techniques to the leading PhD summer school in computational economics, and are working in collaboration with economic theorists with strong computational backgrounds. Thus, the research seeks to form a focal point for formal knowledge management and theorem proving efforts in economics.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.8.1 | Award Amount: 3.75M | Year: 2012

Significant work has been devoted to the design of artificial tutors with human capabilities with the aim of helping increase the efficiency achieved with a human instructor. Yet, these systems still lack the personal, empathic and human elements that characterise a traditional teacher and fail to engage and motivate students in the same way a human teacher does. The EMOTE project will design, develop and evaluate a new generation of artificial embodied tutors that have perceptive capabilities to engage in empathic interactions with learners in a shared physical space. Overall, the EMOTE project aims to (1) research the role of pedagogical and empathic interventions in the process of engaging the learner and facilitating their learning progress and (2) explore if and how the exchange of socio-emotional cues with an embodied tutor in a shared physical space can create a sense of connection and social bonding and act as a facilitator of the learning experience. This will be done across different embodiments (both virtual and robotic), allowing for the effect that such embodiment will have on engagement and empathy to be explored. Further, the project will support the migration of the artificial tutors across different embodiments, to support students learning in both formal and informal settings. To ground the research in a concrete classroom scenario, the EMOTE project will develop a showcase in the area of geography, focusing on environmental issues. This will enable tutors to be tested in real world school environments in different European countries. In order to achieve these objectives, the EMOTE consortium will bring together experts to carry out interdisciplinary research on affect recognition, learner models, adaptive behaviour and embodiment for human-robot interaction in learning environments, grounded in psychological theories of emotion in social interaction and pedagogical models for learning facilitation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-03-2015 | Award Amount: 5.70M | Year: 2016

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common liver malignancy, with an estimated 750,000 new cases and 695,000 deaths per year, rating third in incidence and mortality in the world. Whilst incidence and mortality for other cancers are declining, HCC represents an increasing public health problem in Europe with men having a higher incidence than women. Several liver diseases lead to HCC and become per definition co-morbidities, such as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) or hepatitis B and C virus infection. Most patients die within one year of diagnosis and treatment failure reflects the heterogeneous nature of this tumour, highlighting the need to identify common and co-morbidity specific disease pathways for individualized therapy. HEP-CAR will focus on three leading HCC associated co-morbidities, specifically NASH and hepatitis B and C infection. Non-biased genetic and lipidomic screens will define cellular pathways that are deregulated in HCC and the impact of co-morbidities and gender. Next to established patient cohorts, several in vitro and in vivo models are available to evaluate the role of co-morbidities as drivers of host oncogenic pathways and to provide much needed pre-clinical models for mechanistic studies and future drug screening. We will develop new approaches to study the impact of co-morbidities on HCC immunobiology, ranging from state-of-art tissue explant models to novel humanized mouse models. The aim of HEP-CAR is to define host pathways that impact HCC pathogenesis and to assess their role in different co-morbidities and treatment responses. The research and clinical excellence will be combined with the knowledge transfer and communication competence of leading organizations such as the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) and the European Liver Patients Association (ELPA). Thus, HEP-CAR will generate tangible and sustained improvements in the understanding, prevention and management of HCC for all European citizens.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH-2009-2.1.1-1 | Award Amount: 15.31M | Year: 2010

In recent years, the zebrafish has emerged as a new vertebrate model organism for biomedical research which offers a unique combination of traits: a short generation time, small size and efficient breeding procedures make it the best choice among vertebrates for forward genetic screening and small-molecule screens, including toxicology, while the transparent embryo and larva offers unique opportunities for imaging of cell movement and gene expression in a developing organism. Building on recent advances in the zebrafish field, we will conduct high-throughput phenotyping of at least a thousand regulatory genes relevant for common human diseases, by behavioural assays (for viable mutants), 3D / 4D imaging and expression profiling (including high-throughput sequencing). We will include mutants generated by TILLING and by the new zinc finger nuclease method, as well as mutants from earlier forward-genetics screens. A phenotyping effort of this scale has never been undertaken before in any vertebrate organism. Complementing the study of mutants relevant for neurological disorders, we will produce an atlas of gene expression in the brain, the most comprehensive one in a vertebrate. We will further perform a genome-wide characterisation of regulatory elements of potential disease genes by a combination of bioinformatics and transgenics. Small-molecule screening for mutant rescue or disease-relevant processes will identify candidate drugs and provide insights into gene function. Our increasing knowledge on the regulators and their interactions with regulatory targets will be integrated with knowledge at cellular and organismic level. By capitalising on the virtues of the zebrafish system, this systems biology approach to the regulome will gain unique knowledge complementing ongoing work in mammalian systems, and provide important new stimuli for biomedical research.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SPA.2012.2.1-01 | Award Amount: 3.22M | Year: 2013

Observations of oscillations on the solar and stellar surfaces have emerged as a unique and extremely powerful tool to gain information on, and understanding of, the processes in the Sun and stars, and the origin of the variability in the solar and stellar output. Through helio- and asteroseismology detailed inferences of the internal structure and rotation of the Sun, and extensive information on the properties of a broad range of stars can be obtained. Space-based observations play a leading role in helio- and asteroseismology, in close synergy with ground-based observations as well as theoretical modelling. Long observing sequences are essential for measuring the oscillation frequencies with the precision required, and to extract the lowest mode frequencies involved. The enormous value of long-term space-based observations has been demonstrated in the solar case by the joint ESA/NASA SOHO mission (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. This is now being followed by instruments on the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission.Large volumes of exquisite data on stellar oscillations of stars with a broad range of masses and ages are being collected by the CNES space mission CoRoT (Convection, Rotation and Transit) and the NASA Kepler mission. Extensive Earth-based observations of solar oscillations have been undertaken with the GONG network (Global Oscillations Network Group) and the Birmingham Oscillation Network (BiSON) to ensure continuous monitoring. A asteroseismic network, SONG (Stellar Observations Network Group) is being established under Danish leadership. Equally important for asteroseismology is the availability of supplementary data on the stars from more traditional observations, to determine their surface temperature, composition, radius, etc. Only through a coordinated use of the space- and ground-based data can the full potential of helio- and asteroseismology be realized.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2010-1.3-1 | Award Amount: 12.48M | Year: 2011

While there are standard procedures for product life cycle analysis, exposure, hazard, and risk assessment for traditional chemicals, is not yet clear how these procedures need to be modified to address all the novel properties of nanomaterials. There is a need to develop specific reference methods for all the main steps in managing the potential risk of ENM. The aim of MARINA is to develop such methods. MARINA will address the four central themes in the risk management paradigm for ENM: Materials, Exposure, Hazard and Risk. The methods developed by MARINA will be (i) based on beyond-state-of-the-art understanding of the properties, interaction and fate of ENM in relation to human health and the quality of the environment and will either (ii) be newly developed or adapted from existing ones but ultimately, they will be compared/validated and harmonised/standardised as reference methods for managing the risk of ENM. MARINA will develop a strategy for Risk Management including monitoring systems and measures for minimising massive exposure via explosion or environmental spillage.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 3.81M | Year: 2012

Adaptive interactions with the environment depend on sophisticated brain plasticity mechanisms at multiple levels: from single neurons to large-scale brain networks. Traditionally, the study of plasticity has been fragmented into sensory, motor or decision-related circuits. However, translating brain plasticity findings to brain repair requires an understanding of the interactions between these circuits. Our aim is to integrate this study of learning and plasticity to promote wellbeing and advance healthcare interventions. We take a multidisciplinary approach, synthesising methods from physiology, cellular neurobiology, pharmacology, brain imaging, behavioural science and computational modelling to reveal plasticity at multiple scales (cellular, structural and functional). We will test how learning modifies sensory representations, perceptual decisions and motor outputs. Further, we will examine brain reorganisation and long-term plasticity in cases of congenital or acquired sensory and motor deficits. Our approach requires the coordinated efforts of international research leaders who work in top Universities and market-leading companies. This research training environment will deliver a cohort of young researchers experienced in transcending traditional disciplinary boundaries to deliver deeper insight into brain plasticity. Further, ABCs approach of cementing interactions between sectors into the training programme means that our ESRs will have the skills necessary to move between sectors and can maximise the translation of their findings for human health and wellbeing. The work has impact in assistive technology, education and rehabilitation and expert recognition systems. The involvement of private sector companies, and a pronounced focus on translational aspects within the networks activities (i.e. at all training events), will enhance European capacities for brain plasticity research and its applications.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: NMBP-26-2016 | Award Amount: 10.76M | Year: 2016

An increasing number of nanomaterials (NMs) are entering the market in every day products spanning from health care and leisure to electronics, cosmetics and foodstuff. Nanotechnology is a truly enabling technology, with unlimited potential for innovation. However, the novelty in properties and forms of NMs makes the development of a well-founded and robust legislative framework to ensure safe development of nano-enabled products particularly challenging. At the heart of the challenge lies the difficulty in the reliable and reproducible characterisation of NMs given their extreme diversity and dynamic nature, particularly in complex environments, such as within different biological, environmental and technological compartments. Two key steps can resolve this: 1) the development of a holistic framework for reproducible NM characterisation, spanning from initial needs assessment through method selection to data interpretation and storage; and 2) the embedding of this framework in an operational, linked-up ontological regime to allow identification of causal relationships between NMs properties, be they intrinsic, extrinsic or calculated, and biological, (eco)toxicological and health impacts fully embedded in a mechanistic risk assessment framework. ACEnano was conceived in response to the NMBP 26 call with the aim to comprehensively address these two steps. More specifically ACEnano will introduce confidence, adaptability and clarity into NM risk assessment by developing a widely implementable and robust tiered approach to NM physico-chemical characterisation that will simplify and facilitate contextual (hazard or exposure) description and its transcription into a reliable NMs grouping framework. This will be achieved by the creation of a conceptual toolbox that will facilitate decision-making in choice of techniques and SOPs, linked to a characterisation ontology framework for grouping and risk assessment and a supporting data management system.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.2.4.1-1 | Award Amount: 7.56M | Year: 2013

Ewing Sarcomas (ES) are fatal, rare bone cancers particularly affecting young people. About 60% of patients achieve long term survival with current treatment but there has been no improvement in this proportion for 25 years. Treatment is unsuccessful because chemotherapy fails to prevent the development of, or to effectively treat established, metastases. In addition, of the 600 new cases of ES occurring in the EU each year, less than half will receive treatment appropriate to deliver the most favourable outcome. The EUROEWING Consortium (EEC) is a coalition of clinical study groups bringing together the most active clinicians and scientists in Europe dedicated to improving survival from ES. This initiative can achieve this through an integrated programme of investigator-driven, inclusive clinical trials that are rigorously designed, conducted, analysed and reported, and underpinned by complementary embedded translational research. These include i) a first line randomised study in patients of all ages with ES which defines standards of care to prevent development of metastases and serves as a backbone for implementation of new agents, and ii) a randomised study of current second line chemotherapy in patients of all ages with ES which will serve as a platform for testing of new agents. Companion studies in association with these trials will be performed investigating tumour biology, underlying causes of differential response and toxicity, and other biomarkers. The programme will be supported by new initiatives for the involvement of patients in research planning and operation. Through collaborative working, the EEC will provide ES patients with greater access to clinical trials, allow efficient acquisition of knowledge and deliver clinically meaningful results within the lifetime of the grant, thereby contributing to improved survival from ES.


The only lands on Earth that have not been explored in any depth by science are those that have been lost to the oceans. Global warming at the end of the last Ice Age led to the inundation of vast landscapes that had once been home to thousands of people. These lost lands hold a unique and largely unexplored record of settlement and colonisation linked to climate change over millennia. Amongst the most significant is Doggerland. Occupying much of the North Sea basin between continental Europe and Britain it would have been a heartland of human occupation and central to the process of re-settlement and colonisation of north Western Europe during the Mesolithic and the Neolithic. Within this submerged landscape lies fragmentary yet valuable evidence for the lifestyles of its inhabitants including the changes resulting from both the encroaching sea and the introduction of Neolithic technologies. This inundated landscape cannot be explored conventionally, however pioneering work by the applicants research group has led to the rediscovery of Doggerland through the creation of the first detailed topographic maps relating to human occupation in the Early Holocene. Within this project world-leading innovators in the fields of archaeo-geophysics, molecular biology and computer simulation will develop a ground-breaking new paradigm for the study of past environments, ecological change and the transition between hunter gathering societies and farming in north west Europe. It will: 1) use the latest seismic reflectance data available to generate topographical maps of the whole of early Holocene Doggerland that are as accurate and complete as possible. 2) reconstruct and simulate the palaeo-environments of Doggerland using ancient DNA extracted directly from sediment cores. 3) explore the Mesolithic landscapes and also identify incipient Neolithic signals indicating early contact and development within the region of Doggerland.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.4.5-2 | Award Amount: 7.59M | Year: 2010

Autoimmunity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterised by an antibody response to citrullinated proteins. Periodontitis (PD) is largely caused by infection, in which Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major pathogen. The two diseases combine specific HLA-DRB1alleles and smoking as risk factors, and have a similar pathophysiology characterised by destructive inflammation. A possible causative link between RA and PD is based on the ability of P. gingivalis to citrullinate proteins and thereby generate autoantigens that drive autoimmunity in RA. We hypothesise that anti-citrullinated protein antibodies can be generated, in genetically susceptible individuals, as a consequence of P. Gingivalis-induced citrullination in the gingiva. In the context of genetic risk factors, during chronic exposure to danger signals, such as bacterial lipopolysacharides and DNA, tolerance to citrullinated proteins may be broken, with production of a pathogenic antibody response, which at a later time point cross-reacts with joint proteins and causes chronic RA. We will use a multidisciplinary approach (genetics, epidemiology, molecular immunology and animal models) to study susceptibility factors and immune responses in RA and PD, with an aim to identify novel etiological and pathogenic pathways, forming the basis for new therapies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.3.2-1 | Award Amount: 7.82M | Year: 2012

Acquired immune deficiency (AIDS), tuberculosis (TB) and malaria are the primary infectious diseases causing death world wide. In addition to these pathogens, 170 million people are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), which leads to chronic liver disease. Because of shared routes of transmission, HCV co-infection is recognized as a major cause of morbidity and mortality among HIV-1 infected persons. The epidemiology and clinical features of co-infected subjects are well documented, however, there is a paucity of basic scientific studies addressing the interactions between these pathogens. There is undoubtedly a complex interplay between pathogens and the host immune response. This was highlighted when the Merck HIV-1 vaccine trial was halted due to increased HIV-1 transmission amongst vaccine recipients with previous adenovirus infection, suggesting that immune responses specific for adenovirus vector antigens were detrimental. We propose that pathogen evasion and dysregulation of host immune responses plays a key role in co-infection associated morbidity. We will test this hypothesis by establishing in vitro and ex vivo co-infection model systems to study pathogen interactions and assess the effect(s) of co-infection on innate signalling and adaptive immune responses. We will develop new approaches to dissect pathogen interactions, ranging from the genesis of fluorescent labelled viruses to state-of-the-art tissue explant models and novel humanised mouse models. Translational studies of co-infected patients will ascertain pathogen-specific effects on innate and adaptive immune responses and the consequences for disease progression. It is imperative that such interactions are elucidated before proceeding with new prophylactic or therapeutic strategies aimed at curtailing pathogen transmission or disease progression in co-infected individuals. We specifically address the call of understanding the basic biology of co-pathogen interactions and immunity.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2014 | Award Amount: 967.50K | Year: 2015

The project Design and Fabrication of Functional Surfaces with Controllable Wettability, Adhesion and Reflectivity (FabSurfWAR) focuses on the staff exchange between the partners of EU and Asia, and the development of key enabling techniques of designing and generating micro/nano surface topology with better control of bacterial growth, adhesion, friction and other tribological properties for potential applications from surgical tools, biomedical devices, to turbine blades and agricultural machines. It meets the objectives and requirements of the Marie Skodowska-Curie Actions: Research and Innovation Staff Exchange (RISE), by establishing multiple bridges between European and Asian institutions. The ultimate goal of FabSurfWar is to set up a long-term international and inter-sector collaboration consortium through research and innovation staff exchanges between nine world-recognised institutions in the cutting-edge research area of micro/nano surface engineering with promising applications in scientific and engineering sectors. The synergistic methodologies achieved by FabsurfWAR will serve as the building blocks of the micro/nano functional surface design, fabrication, measurement, characterisation and scale up application, and thus enhance the leading position of the consortium for the scientific and technological progresses in functional surfaces and potential applications. This project is divided into six inter-related work packages: (1) Setup of knowledge base and road mapping; (2) Surface metrology and modelling; (3) Fabrication and characterisation of functional surfaces; (4) Functional surface devices and applications; (5) Dissemination and exploitation, and (6) Project management. The work packages integrate all activities that will lead to the accomplishment of all the project objectives within 48 months.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IIF | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-IIF | Award Amount: 165.48K | Year: 2012

For most of the twentieth century, Anglophone philosophers and historians held that early modern philosophy was dominated by the contrast between Descartes, Spinozas, and Leibnizs rationalism and Lockes, Berkeleys, and Humes empiricism. In the light of growing scepticism surrounding this narrative, the proposed research will shed light on its history. It will determine when the narrative entered into English histories of philosophy; how it came to shape the university curriculum in Great Britain and Australasia; what roles the programmes of British Idealists and American Pragmatists played in this process; and how the standard narrative was appropriated by Anglophone philosophers in the twentieth and early twenty-first century. Unfolding at the intersection between philosophy and the history of ideas, universities, and philosophical historiography, the project will shed light on how philosophy shapes its past. The project builds on innovative research done by the Fellow, Dr Alberto Vanzo; the convergence of interests and complementarity of expertise between the Fellow and the Scientist in Charge, Prof. Tom Sorell; and the strengths of the Host Institution, the Department of Philosophy of the University of Birmingham. The project will result in five journal articles; an online work-in-progress workshop; a symposium and associated publication; a workshop and guide for philosophy teachers in universities and high schools; and 35 blog posts. The project will catalyze long-term collaborations by promoting the constitution of an international network of scholars, with a strong European participation. The project will achieve a wide, early dissemination of results within and beyond the scholarly community, using the blog to reach out to educated laypeople and the teachers workshop and guide to bring the teaching of early modern philosophy in line with current scholarship. Thus, the project will consolidate and expand European excellence in research and education.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INT-08-2015 | Award Amount: 2.67M | Year: 2016

Ten years after its inception, the European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP) has fallen short of accomplishing its mission. The war in Ukraine and the rising tensions with Russia have made a re-assessment of the ENP both more urgent and more challenging. EU-STRAT will address two questions: First, why has the EU fallen short of creating peace, prosperity and stability in its Eastern neighbourhood? Second, what can be done to strengthen the EUs transformative power in supporting political and economic change in the six Eastern Partnership (EaP) countries? Adopting an inside-out perspective on the challenges of transformation the EaP countries and the EU face, EU-STRAT will develop a conceptual framework for the varieties of social orders in EaP countries to explain the propensity of domestic actors to engage in change; investigate how bilateral, regional and global interdependencies shape the scope of action and the preferences of domestic actors in the EaP countries; de-centre the EU by studying the role of selected member states and other external actors active in the region; evaluate the effectiveness of the Association Agreements and alternative EU instruments, including scientific cooperation, in supporting change in the EaP countries; analyse normative discourses used by the EU and Russia to enhance their influence over the shared neighbourhood. formulate policy recommendations to strengthen the EUs capacity to support change in the EaP countries by advancing different scenarios for developmental pathways. EU-STRAT features an eleven-partner consortium including six universities, three think-tanks, one civil society organization and one consultancy. This consortium will achieve the research and policy relevant objectives of the project by bringing together various disciplinary perspectives and methodologies and strengthening links with academics and policy makers across six EU member states, Switzerland and three of the EaP countries.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2015 | Award Amount: 1.06M | Year: 2016

MAKERS will bring together leaders from business, academia and policy to study issues related to the drivers and dynamics of sustaining the competitiveness of EU manufacturing sectors. The projects innovative research, training and mobility activities will address key concerns related to the historic opportunity for the EU to lead a manufacturing renaissance that not only upgrades existing manufacturing competences but, more importantly, develops new technological capabilities across EU regions to support regional industrial resilience for more distributed and sustainable socio-economic growth and prosperity. MAKERS will create a multi-stakeholder platform to discuss the current understanding of issues related to manufacturing renaissance, including (1) the role of small, medium and large manufacturing firms and local production systems plugged into local-global value chains; (2) what are the drivers and processes for innovation, technological capabilities and technology transfer from research intuitions to firms; (3) trends in reshoring and nearshoring and the potentials for re-industrialisation and shorter value chains; (4) the impact of the socio-economic-environmental sustainability agenda on EU competitiveness; (5) skills requirements and training; and finally (6) how policy can ensure the competitiveness of EU manufacturing sectors for more distributed and sustainable socio-economic growth and prosperity. MAKERS training programme comprises: 1) annual summer schools that will cover the breadth of the issues above and address methodological requirements; 2) work package-specific Business/Academia/Policy (BAP) workshops; 3) dissemination activities within the network in conjunction with mobility, such as presentations at faculty seminar series, and doctoral level guest lectures; 4) dissemination activities at events outside the network, such as presentations at international conferences, policy fora and multi-media engagement.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: Shift2Rail-RIA | Phase: S2R-OC-IP3-01-2016 | Award Amount: 5.00M | Year: 2016

The overall aim of the S-CODE project is to investigate, develop, validate and initially integrate radically new concepts for switches and crossings that have the potential to lead to increases in capacity, reliability and safety while reducing investment and operating costs. The S-CODE project will identify radically different technology concepts that can be integrated together to achieve significantly improved performance for S&C based around new operating concepts (e.g. super-fast switching, self-healing switch). The project will build on existing European and national research projects (in particular, the lighthouse project In2Rail, Capacity4Rail and Innotrack) to bring together technologies and concepts that will significantly reduce the constraints associated with existing switch technologies and develop a radically different solution. The project will be divided into three phases: Phase 1: Requirements and initial design - focusing on understanding constraints and critical requirements, and developing a radically different architecture and operation that makes use of technologies from other domains; Phase 2: Technical development - undertaking detailed modelling and simulation to identify an optimal configuration to maximise performance; Phase 3: Validation and evaluation - testing (to TRL4) the design concepts and formally evaluating their performance in order that an integrated design can be presented for further development.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: NMP.2013.4.0-5 | Award Amount: 631.96K | Year: 2013

NANOMAT-EPC aims to support the deployment of societally beneficial nano- and materials technologies in European Partnership countries (EPC), in order to increase exploitation of their scientific results and contribute to the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. Consequently, NANOMAT-EPC aims to develop knowledge and technology transfer in nano- and materials technologies for healthcare, clean energy and environment applications. The project will be implemented by a well-balanced consortium of nine partners four EPC partners and five EU partners. In order to stimulate the knowledge and technology transfer, NANOMAT-EPCs mission is the following: i. Map and promote organisations involved with nano- and materials technologies in EPC; ii. Organise brokerage events in the EPC to facilitate knowledge and technology transfer in nano- and materials technologies; iii. Organise workshops in the EPC to identify nano- and materials knowledge and technology transfer opportunities; iv. Implement pilot nano- and materials technologies deployment projects. The pilot projects will be bilateral between the EPC and European partners and based on education, training and exchange of scientists as follows: a. Deployment of high conductivity zirconia anodes in solid oxide fuel cells (IPMS and UB) b. Deployment of hybrid CNT/graphene electrodes for supercapacitors (BSUIR and Cleancarb) c. Deployment of nanosensory devices for environmental monitoring using picosecond laser technology (GTU and PSUD) d. Deployment of magnetic nanoparticles for medical applications (IPR-NAS and LZH) v. Produce report with recommendations on how to exploit to nano- and materials knowledge and technology transfer opportunities in EPC.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CP-FCH | Phase: SP1-JTI-FCH.2011.3.4 | Award Amount: 2.73M | Year: 2012

The project (TriSOFC) aims to develop and evaluate the performance of the first-of-its-kind LT-SOFC tri-generation system for low carbon buildings. The system is based on the integration of LT-SOFC stack and a novel liquid desiccant unit. A 1.5kW low-cost durable LT-SOFC tri-generation prototype system will be designed optimised, constructed and tested. The tri-generation system incorporates additional components including a fuel processor, to generate reformate gas if natural-gas used as fuel, and equipment for the electrical, mechanical and control balance of plant (BoP). With high efficiency, low-cost and longterm duration in mind, all these components will be first tested in the laboratory for further optimisation and miniaturisation. The performance of the tri-generation system will be tested using the Creative Energy Homes (low/zero carbon homes) at the University of Nottingham, UK. The tri-generation system will be used primarily in the low carbon homes/buildings. The system will be tested using natural-gas but it could be modified for use with other clean/renewable energy fuels (e.g. alcohol, biomass liquid fuel and biodiesel). The system has the potential to reduce CO2 emission by 70% compared to a traditional energy production system comprising of separate condensate power plant, boiler and compressor-driven cooling units. The successful development of the proposed project will promote LT-SOFC applications for provision of power, heat and cooling. The commercialisation of the system will bring economic and environmental benefits to the EU.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 1.27M | Year: 2017

The Visual Genetics (VISGEN) consortium brings together eight academic and five commercial scientifically leading teams to address the unique challenge of visualizing nuclear processes in intact brain in real-time. By exchanging knowledge between academic and commercial sectors in Europe, as well as undertaking training secondments at leading Universities in China the team will grow its European and global competitiveness in a world-leading forefront of neuroscience and genetic technology. Visualisation of transcription in living systems has not been witnessed directly, this multidisciplinary and international project will herald a new era where this idea becomes a regular research tool and translates to a clinical and diagnostic technology in the future. The team will use a unique biotagging platform to develop the technology that is required to interrogate transcription. The intersectoral effort requires the amalgamation of knowledge from neuroscientists, synthetic chemists, engineers, physicists, analytical chemists, nanobiologists, behavioural scientists, laser technology and image processing experts. The consortium combines expertise from thirteen organisations from seven countries to build the multidisciplinary team and share the knowledge that addresses and will overcome the task of realising real-time and spatially resolved genetic studies. Once developed, the technology can be utilized for other medical-based research and development projects aimed at early stage disease diagnosis, cancer detection, and toxicity studies. Real-time visual genetics will transform our understanding of the state-of-the-art and herald transformative changes in the field of neuroscience, and in general life science.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CP-FCH | Phase: SP1-JTI-FCH.2010.3.1;SP1-JTI-FCH.2010.3.2 | Award Amount: 4.73M | Year: 2012

Lightweight SOFC stacks are currently being developed for stationary applications such as residential CHP units, for automotive applications such as APU and for portable devices. They supply electrical efficiencies of up to 60%, a high fuel flexibility, being able to operate on syn-gas from Diesel reforming as well as LPG, methane or hydrogen, and promising costs due to greatly reduced amounts of steel interconnect material. The project proposal addresses a novel design solution for lightweight SOFC stacks that decouples the thermal stresses within the stack and at the same time allows optimal sealing and contacting. In this way the capability for thermal cycling is enhanced and degradation of contacting reduced. Performance is increased since the force needed for secure contacting is now independent of the force required to secure gas tightness of the sealing joints. The design is highly suitable for industrial manufacturing and automated assembly. The industrial partners will build up the necessary tools and appliances for low cost production of repeating units and the automated quality control, stacking and assembly of stacks. In mobile and portable applications the requirements for thermal cycling are high. It is therefore essential that lightweight stacks have excellent thermal cycling and rapid start-up capabilities. The stack design supplies a compensation of thermo-mechanical stresses between cell and cell frame / repeating unit. Thin steel sheets with protective coating are used for the sake of cost reduction and sufficient stack lifetime, also for stationary applications. The latter will also benefit from improved start-up times, since this allows a more flexible and load-oriented operation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-23-2014 | Award Amount: 6.38M | Year: 2015

The RoMaNS (Robotic Manipulation for Nuclear Sort and Segregation) project will advance the state of the art in mixed autonomy for tele-manipulation, to solve a challenging and safety-critical sort and segregate industrial problem, driven by urgent market and societal needs. Cleaning up the past half century of nuclear waste, in the UK alone (mostly at the Sellafield site), represents the largest environmental remediation project in the whole of Europe. Most EU countries face related challenges. Nuclear waste must be sorted and segregated, so that low-level waste is placed in low-level storage containers, rather than occupying extremely expensive and resource intensive high-level storage containers and facilities. Many older nuclear sites (>60 years in UK) contain large numbers of legacy storage containers, some of which have contents of mixed contamination levels, and sometimes unknown contents. Several million of these legacy waste containers must now be cut open, investigated, and their contents sorted. This can only be done remotely using robots, because of the high levels of radioactive material. Current state-of-the-art practice in the industry, consists of simple tele-operation (e.g. by joystick or teach-pendant). Such an approach is not viable in the long-term, because it is prohibitively slow for processing the vast quantity of material required. The project will: 1) Develop novel hardware and software solutions for advanced bi-lateral master-slave tele-operation. 2) Develop advanced autonomy methods for highly adaptive automatic grasping and manipulation actions. 3) Combine autonomy and tele-operation methods using state-of-the-art understanding of mixed initiative planning, variable autonomy and shared control approaches. 4) Deliver a TRL 6 demonstration in an industrial plant-representative environment at the UK National Nuclear Lab Workington test facility.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: SEC-2010.2.3-1 | Award Amount: 4.11M | Year: 2011

The DESURBS project makes significant and novel advances with the following developments: 1) An urban space security event database that includes incidents or near misses that have (or might have) resulted in injury or loss of life, damage to urban spaces, the auxiliary infrastructures supporting those spaces, or the surrounding natural environment 2) An integrated security and resilience (ISR) design framework that engages local stakeholders for identifying vulnerabilities and improving urban spaces with respect to security threats. 3) Comprehensive and generic supporting tools and methodologies including urban resilient design guidelines and quantitative risk and vulnerability assessment models, tools and technologies to facilitate the qualitative ISR assessment process. 4) A web-based Decision Support System Portal integrating the projects outputs and including tailored visualization and mapping tools to help end users better understand the vulnerabilities and design possibilities. An objective rating scale for quantifying safety of different urban space designs is developed and used to show that DESURBS solutions result in urban spaces less prone for and less affected by security threats. Primary case studies with end users in Jerusalem in Israel, Nottingham in the UK and Barcelona in Spain inform the development process. The consortium consists of eight partners from five countries, and includes academic and research institutions as well as an SME for exploiting the projects outputs among end-users and stakeholders. The SME partner is committed to maintaining, updating and hosting the DESURBS Decision Support System Portal and associated databases and tools after the lifetime of the project. An Advisory Board with members from governmental and municipal urban planning and preparedness organizations ensures that the DESURBS advances are relevant, exploitable and will have the desired impact for end users.


Metabolomics is an important phenotyping technique for molecular biology and medicine. It assesses the molecular state of an organism or collections of organisms through the comprehensive quantitative and qualitative analysis of all small molecules in cells, tissues, and body fluids. Metabolic processes are at the core of physiology. Consequently, metabolomics is ideally suited as a medical tool to characterise disease states in organisms, as a tool to assessment of organism for their suitability in, for example, renewable energy production or for biotechnological applications in general.\nWe now see the emergence of metabolomics databases and repositories in various subareas of metabolomics and the emergence of large general e-infrastructures in the life sciences. In particular the BioMedBridges project is set to link a variety of European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI)s projects, such as ELIXIR and BBMRI.\nMetabolomics generates large and diverse sets of analytical data and therefore impose significant challenges for the above mentioned e-infrastructures.\nWe will therefore develop policies to ensure that Metabolomics data is\n\n1.\tEncoded in open standards to allow barrier-free and wide-spread analysis.\n2.\tTagged with a community-agreed, complete set of metadata (minimum information standard).\n3.\tSupported by a communally developed set of open source data management and capturing tools.\n4.\tDisseminated in open-access databases adhering to the above standards.\n5.\tSupported by vendors and publishers, who require deposition upon publication\n6.\tProperly interfaced with data in other biomedical and life-science e-infrastructures (such as ELIXIR, BioMedBridges, EU-Openscreen).\n\nIn order to achieve this, we have assembled the COSMOS (CCOordination of Standards in MetabOlomicS) consortium of leading European groups in Metabolomics and we will interface with all interested players in Metabolomics world-wide in the Metabolomics community and beyond.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CP-FCH | Phase: SP1-JTI-FCH.2011.1.7 | Award Amount: 5.22M | Year: 2012

One key component in the PEMFC which contributes significantly to cost, weight, volume of the stacks and still needs to be improved to ensure cell lifetime is the BiPolar Plate (BPP). Metal based bipolar plates are very attractive, but a protective coating is needed to avoid corrosion and keep the interfacial contact resistance low. The STAMPEM-consortium has been established acknowledging that further development of BPPs require Europes best available resources, with respect to both human competence and infrastructure (laboratories). The objective in STAMPEM is to develop a new generation coating for low cost metallic bipolar plates for PEMFCs, with robust and durable properties for assembly and manufacturing, showing high performance after more than 10000 hours of operation. The concept of STAMPEM is to combine world leading industrial actors capable of volume manufacturing with research institutions with the required generic competence capable of providing breakthrough solutions with respect to a new generation coating for low cost metallic BPPs. By involving an end user of the BPPs developed in the STAMPEM project, the results will be thoroughly verified under realistic operating conditions in a PEMFC stack. The initial phase of the project will be used to establish a testing protocol for BPP materials. In order to screen materials basic corrosion experiments will be performed with contact resistance measurements before and after the testing. Promising materials will further be tested in fuel cells and even further in stacks. The BPP materials go through a real mass production cycle, and also the real production cost will be analyzed. Also the possible detrimental contamination of the membrane will carefully be investigated. The most promising materials will in the end be fully integrated into a system. and that also can be produced in series to provide the building blocks in other fuel cell vehicles.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 294.01K | Year: 2015

Computational Discrete Mathematics applied computers to a number of areas within pure mathematics, including abstract algebra, combinatorics and number theory and their applications in, for instance, cryptography, network routing, experimental design and others. Although less visible than the use of numerical methods in solving continuous problems such as differential equations, computation in discrete mathematics has an equally long history. The project is aimed at the community-building activities centred around the two main open-source software systems, GAP and Sage. GAP (www.gap-system.org) is a 25 year old software package widely used for computations in important areas of pure mathematics, especially in abstract algebra, the mathematics of structure and symmetry. The Sage project is a free open-source general mathematics software system, started in 2005 with the ambitious aim of providing an open-source alternative to such well-established closed systems. Sage builds on the Python and incorporates dozens of open-source mathematical packages, in particular GAP, Singular, PARI/GP and others. GAP and Sage both have quite well established user communities in the UK and internationally. However these communities are limited in a two ways, which the CCP is designed to address. Firstly they are limited by discipline -- while finite group theorists are well aware of GAP, for instance, few physicists or computer scientists are; while Sage is well known in number theory research, it is still not much used in the UK for mixed symbolic-numeric work; etc. Secondly the level of involvement of users is limited. Users need support to become programmers; programmers to become package authors and package authors to become contributors to the core system and all need support to best use parallel programming. The proposed software management and user support activity underpins the whole project. The CCP will provide baseline support in these areas which will have a direct impact on GAPs sustainability. It will support the rollout of its next mainstream version, GAP 5, which supports shared memory parallelism, and will facilitate the transition to GAP 5 in the user and developer communities. For the Sage system, of which GAP is an essential component, the CCP funding will facilitate tighter Sage-GAP integration, in particular regarding memory management and parallelisation, and incorporating into Sage as many GAP packages as possible; the latter currently is done on an ad hoc basis, is hard to maintain and error-prone. Last but not the least, closer GAP-Sage collaboration will allow GAP to learn from the newer Sage project which has been very successful in using modern tools and software development workflows and in being exceptionally welcoming to new developers.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA | Phase: INFRA-2011-3.4. | Award Amount: 1.16M | Year: 2011

The Discover the COSMOS coordination action aims to demonstrate innovative ways to involve teachers and students in eScience through the use of existing e-infrastructures in order to spark young peoples interest in science and in following scientific careers. It aims to support policy development by a) demonstrating effective community building between researchers, teachers and students and empowering the latter to use, share and exploit the collective power of unique scientific resources (research facilities, scientific instruments, advanced ICT tools, simulation and visualisation applications and scientific databases) in meaningful educational activities, that promote inquiry-based learning and appreciation of how science works, b) demonstrating effective integration of science education with e-infrastructures through a monitored-for-impact use of eScience activities, which will provide feedback for the take-up of such interventions at large scale in Europe and c) documenting the whole process through the development of a roadmap that will include guidelines for the design and implementation of effective educational and outreach activities that could act as a reference to be adapted for stakeholders in both scientific research outreach and science education policy.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.4.2 | Award Amount: 8.03M | Year: 2010

NEXT-TELL will provide, through research and development, computational and methodological support to teachers and students so that they have available nuanced information about learning when it is needed and in a format that is supportive of pedagogical decision making, thus optimizing the level of stimulation, challenge, and feedback density. Methods and software will be developed that cover the modelling of all stages of ICT-embedded classroom assessment design, thus empowering teachers to contribute to the development of formative e-assessment for 21st Century learning skills. Integration of e-assessment methods into classroom ICT will be partially automatized by modelling lesson design and access to innovative computer-based learning and assessment services. NEXT-TELL will provide methods to capture process and product aspects of students` learning as it takes place in the classroom and at home and will make this information available various formats for reflection, appraisal, and negotiation, based on methods for data-mining, process visualisation, e-portfolio appraisal, and (open) student modelling. In order to foster participation in particular of parents, a managed communication and negotiation framework will be implemented that connects all stakeholders. Further, NEXT-TELL will support teachers` research into student learning with a team-oriented inquiry methodology and with access to computational data analysis services. To connect this form of knowledge creation and professional development to school leadership and strategic planning, a strategic planning method and corresponding software support will be provided for principals. The NEXT-TELL set of integrated methods and tools will be developed in an incremental, participatory manner in a large-scale pilot studies program involving 60-80 classrooms across Europe. Both researcher-led and teacher-led design-based research will be employed to allow for intensive, yet scalable classroom research.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CP-FCH | Phase: SP1-JTI-FCH.2010.4.5 | Award Amount: 3.80M | Year: 2011

SUAV aims to design, optimise and build a 100-200W mSOFC stack, and to integrate it into a hybrid power system comprising the mSOFC stack and a battery. Additional components of the system are a fuel processor to generate reformate gas from propane and other electrical, mechanical and control balance of plant (BoP). All these components will be constituents of an entire fuel cell power generator which will first be tested in the lab and, after further optimisation and miniaturisation, in a mini UAV platform. SUAV is primarily aiming at platforms like the CopterCity UAV platform from Survey Copter (France) but will consider other options (in particular fixed wing vehicles) too. Propane was chosen as the fuel due to its superior energy density compared to hydrogen, whichever storage technique is used. The SOFC was chosen since it can convert reformate (i.e. CO/H2-mixtures) to electricity, as compared to other types of fuel cell that require very pure hydrogen, which significantly reduces fuel processing. The design of the mSOFC power generator will be primarily driven by the weight and volume available in the mini-UAV. The project intends to optimise mission duration, while efficiency is of less concern. It will open opportunities for exploitation in other light-weight man-portable applications.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2011-1.1.3. | Award Amount: 8.84M | Year: 2012

The Collaborative EuropeaN Digital Archive Infrastructure (CENDARI) will provide and facilitate access to existing archives and resources in Europe for the study of medieval and modern European history through the development of an enquiry environment. This environment will increase access to records of historic importance across the European Research Area, creating a powerful new platform for accessing and investigating historical data in a transnational fashion overcoming the national and institutional data silos that now exist. It will leverage the power of the European infrastructure for Digital Humanities (DARIAH) bringing these technical experts together with leading historians and existing research infrastructures (archives, libraries and individual digital projects) within a programme of technical research informed by cutting edge reflection on the impact of the digital age on scholarly practice. The enquiry environment that is at the heart of this proposal will create new ways to discover meaning, a methodology not just of scale but of kind. It will create tools and workspaces that allow researchers to engage with large data sets via federated multilingual searches across heterogeneous resources while defining workflows enabling the creation of personalized research environments, shared research and teaching spaces, and annotation trails, amongst other features. This will be facilitated by multilingual authority lists of named entities (people, places, events) that will harness user involvement to add intelligence to the system. Moreover, it will develop new visual paradigms for the exploration of patterns generated by the system, from knowledge transfer and dissemination, to language usage and shifts, to the advancement and diffusion of ideas.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: NMP.2013.4.0-3 | Award Amount: 5.97M | Year: 2013

Environmental wellbeing backed by increasingly severe legislation dictates that pollution and energy consumption by automobiles must be reduced significantly. The outcomes of this project will enable both these imperatives to be achieved simultaneously. The project aim is to establish production lines in Europe that manufacture components for lightweight complex-shaped automobile body structures that are significantly lighter and of comparable strength and stiffness to those currently available. This will be achieved by exploiting a new patented thermo-mechanical processing technology (HFQ) for sheet aluminium alloy that enables, for the first time, parts in heat treatable alloys to be produced to net-shape with maximum attainable mechanical properties. The life-cycle energy consumption of automobiles will be reduced; in the production stage, by the low energy requirements of HFQ, which is enhanced by the potential use of low cost recycled raw material and in the driving stage, by the reduced fuel consumption associated with lightweight vehicles. Reduced pollution is a natural corollary of low energy consumption. Exploitation of this groundbreaking technology will be achieved through refinement of its laboratory scale development by university, research institution and manufacturing SME collaboration, leading to production lines being established in Tier 1 companies. Two such lines are anticipated as an outcome of the project. In 8 year period, over 30 production lines will be established in Europe and over 1000 jobs could be created. It is expected that new Al-alloy body and chassis structures will be produced in a mass-production scale, with weight saving of over 40% for the Classes C&D and above segment vehicles (which are currently made of steel). Thus, 60% of cars could be made with Al-body and chassis structures, and the resultant fuel saving in car usage would be up to 23% on average.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CP-FCH | Phase: SP1-JTI-FCH.2011.1.1 | Award Amount: 15.66M | Year: 2012

This project will establish a demonstration fleet of small passenger vehicles that builds on and expands existing hydrogen refuelling infrastructure. Three European regions will be participating in this effort: the UK (the Midlands and Plymouth), the Brussels area and Wallonia, and the Weser-Ems region in NorthWest Germany. Each of these regions will deploy a new hydrogen refuelling site to close the gaps in a continuous hydrogen highways that leads from Scotland via the Midlands to London, connecting to Brussels and on to Cologne and Hamburg/Scandinavia/Berlin via Bremen. The vehicles employed are low-cost, high fuel-efficiency, hybridised, light-weight passenger cars specifically designed for city and regional transport. These vehicles provide a complementary pathway to commercialisation to the large Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) of hydrogen fuel cell options, by allowing near-term rollout on a commercial basis to a wide range of users in parallel with the planned rollouts for large OEM vehicles from 2015. Their deployment regions will gain the infrastructure, public exposure and technological understanding to act as seed locations for future large scale OEM vehicle rollout. In view of the lower vehicle costs, this project will deploy an unprecedented number of road vehicles for a demonstration project, with three OEMs contributing 20, 10 and 20 vehicles respectively to the project. These will be put in the hands of users in a variety of real-life operating environments. An extensive data monitoring exercise will run throughout the demonstration phase, allowing the reliability of the vehicles tested by different users to be evaluated and leading to recommendations for the improvement of future, fully commercial vehicle designs. The three European regions will deploy several hydrogen refuelling stations, adding a total of 3 new stations to existing supply sites, contributing to some of the first regional hydrogen refuelling clusters in Europe. Each region will as a consequence either own a high-standard filling station with = high capacity (200 kg/day) and high performance (70 MPa) refuelling technology (Wallonia, Weser-Ems), or build on existing smaller stations of lower capacity and pressure (UK, Midlands and Plymouth). The project will be a near-commercial stepping stone and will include a reach-out activity timed to coincide with OEMs commercialisation plans in the post-2015 period, to attract further vehicles to the newly developed infrastructures - by offering cost effective and readily available focal points for additional hydrogen fleets developing around these regions. Therefore supplementing the SWARM fleet and infrastructure by more vehicles and hydrogen filling stations supplied through other projects and separate funding.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: NMP.2013.4.0-4 | Award Amount: 928.84K | Year: 2013

4M2020 is focused on building upon the durable integration mechanisms/structures and innovation chains created within three levels of project clusters in the field of multifunctional miniaturised products and their applications in energy, medical, optoelectronics and microoptics, printed electronics and ultra precision engineering industrial sectors that led to the creation of long term R&D\I partnerships. 4M2020 will facilitate cross fertilisation of product centred advanced manufacturing platforms along five R&D\I streams and thus create alliances based on interrelated technological research and product demonstration activities and add value to its stakeholders by establishing R&D\I environment for combining KETs heterogeneously in the context of specific technology and product requirements. The four main objectives of 4M2020 are the: Cross fertilisation of product centred advanced manufacturing platforms Formation and development of new networks and alliances Advancement of innovation chains Assessment of the maturity of application/product focused advanced manufacturing


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.2.1 | Award Amount: 4.00M | Year: 2011

The emergence of networked embedded systems and sensor/actuator networks has made possible the collection of large amount of real-time data about a monitored environment. Depending on the application, such data may have different characteristics: multidimensional, multi-scale, spatially distributed, time series. Moreover, the data values may be influenced by controlled variables, as well as by external environmental factors. However, in many cases the collected data may be incomplete, or it may not make sense for various reasons, thus compromising the sensor-environment interaction and possibly affecting the ability to manage and control key variables of the environment. Such problems are generally the result of some fault in the sensor/actuator system itself or an abnormality in the monitored environment, which may be either permanent or temporary, developing abruptly or incipiently. These problems become more pronounced as sensing/actuation systems get older. The main objective of this project is to develop intelligent methods for analyzing and interpreting the data such that faults are detected, isolated and identified as soon as possible, and accommodated for in future decisions or actuator actions. The problem becomes more challenging when these sensing/actuation systems are used in a wide range of environments which are not known a priori and, as a result, it is unrealistic to assume the existence of an accurate model for the behavior of various components in the monitored environment. Therefore, this project will focus on cognitive system approaches that can learn characteristics or system dynamics of the monitored environment and can adapt their behavior and predict missing or inconsistent data to achieve fault tolerant monitoring and control.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Collaborative Research & Development | Award Amount: 1.22M | Year: 2013

Chronic liver disease has been termed “the silent killer”: It usually does not cause symtoms until it is too late and most of the liver has been destroyed, at which point life expectancy is short. Furthermore, unlike heart disease or cancer, chronic liver disease will become much more frequent over the next 20 years, mainly because many more people are becoming obese and diabetic, two illnesses which damage the liver. We therefore need better diagnostic tools to recognise patients with liver disease early, to accurately measure the degree of liver damage, and measure both, the progression of liver damage over time, and its improvement with treatment. Currently, the only reliable diagnostic method is biopsy, where liver tissue is obtained by inserting a needle and is then assessed under a microscope. Liver biopsy has serious limitations, is unwelcomed by patients, as it can be painful, and there is a risk of serious complications. Perspectum Diagnostics is a company founded by members of Oxford University, who have developed new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology, LiverMultiscan™, to quickly, accurately and safely measure the degree and extent of liver damage without needles. We believe that our test could replace liver biopsy and become the best way to assess patients over time. We propose to develop our prototype technology into a robust diagnostic product, to be used routinely in patients within 2-3 years. Our vision is to fundamentally change the way liver disease is diagnosed and treated, because our new imaging method will provide risk-free, instant, and accurate assessment of the liver.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: NMP-23-2015 | Award Amount: 4.37M | Year: 2016

The CritCat proposal aims to provide solutions for the substitution of critical metals, especially rare platinum group metals (PGMs), used in heterogeneous and electrochemical catalysis. CritCat will explore the properties of ultra-small transition metal (TM) nanoparticles in order achieve optimal catalytic performance with earth-abundant materials. The emphasis will be on industrially-relevant chemical reactions and emerging energy conversion technologies in which PGMs play an instrumental role, particularly in the context of hydrogen and synthesis gas (syngas) fuels. The CritCat proposal includes all the aspects for rational catalyst design including novel catalyst synthesis, characterization, and performance testing by a range of academic and industry partners together with large-scale computational simulations of the relevant catalysts, substrates and model reactions using the latest computational methods. Particular attention is given to a strong feedback-loop mechanism where theory is an integral part of the experimental work packages. The experimental and theoretical data will be collected (descriptor database) and used for materials screening via machine learning techniques and new algorithms. The goal is to improve size, shape and surface structure control of the tailored nanoparticle catalysts via novel cluster/nanoparticle synthesis techniques that can produce samples of unrivalled quality. The research includes up-scaling of the size-selected catalyst nanoparticle samples up to macroscopic quantities, which will enable them to be included as basic technological components for realistic catalyst systems. The performance of the catalyst prototypes will be demonstrated for selected basic electrochemical reactions relevant to fuel cells and storage of renewable energy. The industrial partners bring their expertise in prototypes development and commercial deployment (TRL 3-4). The project involves cooperation with external research groups in USA and Japan.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.96M | Year: 2015

NMR and MRI play unique roles in contemporary Science, from Physics, Chemistry and Biology, to clinical research and diagnosis. Despite its irreplaceable role, further progress in NMR and MRI is hampered by sensitivities that are much lower than those of alternatives such as mass-spec, or PET. The prospects of solving this problem by bigger machines are uncertain and of poor return, given the high maturity already achieved by NMR/MRI. This ETN challenges this status from an untapped perspective, combining NMR/MRI with nuclear hyperpolarization eliciting signals that surpass those currently available by up to 50,000x. Focus is placed on two particular approaches, dynamic nuclear polarization and para-hydrogen-driven polarization, exhibiting the highest potential for biophysical, metabolomic, pre-clinical and clinical research. To maximize these supersignals we assembled leading experts in the physics and engineering of magnetic resonance, in the synthetic chemistry essential for the success of these methods, in the uses of NMR to structural/cell biology, and in preclinical and clinical MRI applications. Guiding this assembling is the conception that only by teaming together key areas of expertise, can hyperpolarisations promises be realized. In addition to fostering synergies among experts from academia and industry, EUROPOL will provide frontier training for ESRs in all the topics underlying the advancement of MR. This will include advanced physics, new instruments and forms of exploiting NMR/MRIs hyperpolarisation, biophysical NMR, screening of healthy and diseased metabolomes, expanded portfolios of substrates to be targeted by in vivo MR, ancillary in cell and system biology explorations clarifying the nature of the metabolic phenomena, and in vivo hyperpolarisation strategies in MRI. This ETN is unparalleled in scope, breadth and potential for synergies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.95M | Year: 2015

The recent explosion of next generation sequencing (NGS) data has caught Europe unprepared and led to a critical shortage of computational biology expertise. As NGS methods are expected to become pervasive from basic science to personalised medicine there is an urgent need for highly skilled young scientists trained in both computational biology and experimental wet lab biology. Our network addresses this important problem of the postgenomic era. We aim to provide multi-disciplinary skills for a solid foundation in computational biology and developmental genomics. Developmental genomics is central to understanding of ontogeny and many genetic and congenital anomalies, but was outside the scope of the landmark ENCODE and FANTOM projects. ENCODE highlighted the need for an in vivo vertebrate model that enables high throughput in vivo functional testing of hypotheses generated from genome scale annotation. Zebrafish is an ideal model for extending the scope of genomics to vertebrate development. We aim to comprehensively annotate functional elements, decipher genomic codes of transcription, as well as coding and non-coding gene function during development and enhance zebrafish as an attractive developmental, comparative and disease model. The participants include 7 non-academic members (2 of which are beneficiaries), major zebrafish genomics laboratories, eminent computational biologists and world class genomics technology experts active in FANTOM and ENCODE. The training program involves 15 ESRs, more than 40 intersectoral and interdisciplinary secondments totalling 19 months, 7 training courses and 2 workshops/conferences. The main outcome of this programme is a cohort of researchers with computational, experimental laboratory and transferable skills ready to further their career in academia, public health and the private sector.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 2.87M | Year: 2016

Life expectancy is increasing dramatically, but the period of good health (healthspan) enjoyed by most is not keeping pace, with implications for health, social care, and pensions resulting in estimated costs more than doubling by 2050. Thus, understanding the many factors that contribute to healthy ageing versus frailty, and validating interventions and influencing policy to promote healthy ageing is a cross-cutting research priority in Europe. Given the considerable impact of lifestyle factors on healthy ageing and disease, there is a surprising lack of innovative multi-disciplinary training and research examining the influence of physical activity and nutrition on age-related changes at gene to societal level. PANINI will address this gap by coordinating research laboratories across Europe to focus on cutting-edge ageing and health research through training 11 ESRs across scientific disciplines to create a holistic approach to the challenge of ageing in the 21st Century. PANINI is a European Training Network with 8 world-leading beneficiaries working on Healthy Ageing and 10 non-academic partners carefully selected for quality and range of sectors. These vary in size including 1 large nutrition company, 5 SMEs, 2 charities, 1 healthcare partnership and 1 EU Joint Research Centre. PANINIs vision is to implement multidisciplinary cross-sectoral research and training of a new cohort of researchers taking a radically innovative approach to overcome the challenge of unhealthy ageing. The main goals of PANINI are to: integrate expertise from basic biomedical science and technology to applied clinical practice; standardise measurements across the network to create a toolkit and shared dataset; provide multidisciplinary training secondments to expose ESRs to healthcare and industry research settings and other laboratories; disseminate widely the shared and individual project findings; and use these to develop a policy document to promote healthy ageing in Europe.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.73M | Year: 2015

The physical and psychosocial impact of armed conflict on children is immense and particularly so, if these children are associated with the enemy. Overwhelming evidence suggests that children born of war (CBOW), i.e. children fathered by foreign soldiers and born to local mothers have been and continue to be a major obstacle to successful integration of both their mothers and themselves into post-conflict societies. At a global level, previous UN studies have further emphasized the lack of research on children born out of forced pregnancies in armed conflict. The proposed network addresses the described shortcomings by advancing the knowledge base through systematic analysis of lived experiences of CBOW in a variety of 20th century conflict and post-conflict situations. The main research goal is to further our understanding of how (if at all) CBOW in conflict and post-conflict situations are integrated into society; how (if at all) militaries, governments, and nongovernmental policy makers assist this integration process; and how the childrens lived experiences reflect broader societal attitudes to memories of war and vice versa. Our vision is to promote scientific excellence by exploiting the specific research expertise and infrastructure of the co-ordinating partner and all participants in order to advance the research competencies and employability of early career researchers. Their enhanced understanding of the challenges of CBOW in volatile societies will inform the normative debates and, ultimately, policies on the reintegration of CBOW into post-conflict societies. By combining historical, social empirical, psychiatric, political, legal, memory, public health and development studies with the discourse surrounding currently enacted humanitarian intervention, insights gained from this network will surpass existing knowledge and will help improve on current integration efforts.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: NMP.2012.4.1-2 | Award Amount: 4.97M | Year: 2013

The REMANENCE concept is to develop new and innovative processes for the recovery and recycling of rare earth (RE) containing neodymium iron boron magnets (NdFeB) from a range of waste electronic and electrical equipment (WEEE). Advanced sensing and mechanical separation techniques combined with innovative processes based on hydrogen decrepitation will recover the rare earth magnets in the WEEE. Significantly with the REMANENCE concept, the aim will be to recover material in a form that can easily re-enter the primary magnet manufacturing production route, so providing large energy savings and production costs. There is no existing process for the recovery of NdFeB magnets from waste streams and this highly valuable material is lost to land fill with no prospect of commercial recovery. The material recovered in the REMANENCE concept will have a substantial economic value, which considering current virgin material costs, is estimated to be 80-120 per kg. If fully implemented REMANENCE will provide a secondary source of materials for the EU, large enough to supply the entire EU bonded magnet manufacturing industry and a significant proportion of the EUs high value sintered magnet production. REMANENCE brings together Europes leading experts in; sensing, disassembly, recycling technology and materials processing with a group of innovative SMEs in a multi-disciplinary project able to deliver significant technical advances. The key technical roles of the SMEs as either equipment manufacturers (CTECH, OPTI, ABI) or direct end users of the recovered materials (MAG) will focus the project towards commercial outputs that will result in excellent exploitation opportunities for the developed processes.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SEC-2011.6.1-5 | Award Amount: 4.38M | Year: 2012

SURVEILLE systematically reviews the impacts of different surveillance systems, and also helps manufacturers and end-users better to develop and deploy these systems. It is a multidisciplinary project combining law, ethics, sociology and technology analysis in a small number of highly collaborative, cross-cutting work packages. SURVEILLE will assess surveillance technology for its actual effectiveness in fighting crime and terrorism, for its social and economic costs, and will survey perceptions of surveillance in the general public and certain identified target groups. The investigation of societal and ethical aspects will focus on undesired side effects of surveillance systems. SURVEILLE will address legal limitations on the use of surveillance technologies as well as ethical constraints. SURVEILLE will include analysis of the potential of privacy by design and privacy-enhancing technologies in the context of surveillance systems. It will interact with technology developers and manufacturers through a systematically delivered advisory service. The issues raised in the advisory service will in turn inform emphases in research deliverables. SURVEILLE will provide an interface with law enforcement officials to seek their feedback as results emerge from the research. The project aims at wide dissemination, including amongst European and national decision-makers. It will also contribute in the field of training of judges, prosecutors and the police. Partners within the SURVEILLE consortium strongly represent academic, commercial, law-enforcement and community actors connected with surveillance.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: NMBP-08-2016 | Award Amount: 8.00M | Year: 2016

The overall aim of LoCoMaTech is, in the first place, to enable the novel HFQ process, (patented by ICL) in its latest most advanced form, which includes 10 recently patented refining technologies (TRL4), to be used for the manufacture of lightweight, high strength body and chassis structures and components for low-cost vehicles, by establishing a prototype, full scale pilot production line (TRL6), supported by a supply chain ranging from raw material to end of life. This will be the first low-cost technology in the world enabling manufacture of high-strength lightweight complex-shaped aluminium parts and low environmental impact. The 1st generation of HFQ technology has already been commercially used in manufacturing 4 types of niche vehicles. This project aims at bringing the materials and manufacturing cost significantly down, through introducing newly patented technological measures, by which the technology could be used for producing low-cost vehicles. The low-cost HFQ technology will be used first for mass production of aluminium car body and chassis structures (eventually for all vehicles), which will lead to substantial improvement in energy efficiency, performance and travel range of low-end vehicles. LoCoMaTech will construct a world first low-cost HFQ aluminium production line (prototype), targeting reduction of energy consumption per vehicle by 15.3-22%, and cost-effective weight savings from 8.55 to 2.16 /kg-saved and improvement of LCA environmental impact by 15.39-26.8%. LoCoMaTech plans to assist in creating 53 commercial production lines and 1700 jobs, in year 6 from the completion of the project. The potential market for low-cost HFQ technology for passenger cars alone is over 160 billion pa, and double this, if buses, trucks, trains and aircraft are considered. This will create huge wealth for Europe and place European automotive industry in a world leading position for lightweight manufacturing technologies for low-end vehicle production.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: SSH-2010-4.1-3 | Award Amount: 3.36M | Year: 2011

Sustainable Urbanisation in China : Historical and Comparative Perspectives, Mega-trends towards 2050 (URBACHINA) combines the knowledge and expertise from a number of different disciplines to provide new and innovative insights and scenarios that can be used guide urbanization in China over the next 40 years. A key strength of the proposal is the use of thematic pairs of European and Chinese researchers who will lead and deliver the research and dissemination associated with work packages organized around the key themes identified in the Call. Each work package team comprises leading experts who will utilize state-of-the-art knowledge, methods and techniques from economic geography, to anthropology and history to test a suite of hypotheses founded on historical and comparative perspectives on urbanisation trends and process in the EU and China. While each of the four core research teams will deliver significant added value through the work packages, there is also provision in the proposal for extensive cross-project collaboration based on the four defined topics identified in the Call: 1.The institutional foundations and policies for urbanisation; 2.The issue of land property in urbanisation and the development of real estate markets in cities; 3.The need for environmental infrastructures delivering connectivity and services for the urban population; 4.The relationships between urban development, traditions, and modern lifestyles in cities. These four topics will be treated as different layers within a comprehensive analysis of a single process -urbanisation in China- that links historical experiences, comparative dimensions and possible future scenarios. This framework will provide a firm foundation for multi-faceted interactions between scholars, officials and business in Europe and China. It will also provide the basis for extensive dissemination of URBACHINA outputs using a variety of media designed to engage policy makers and ordinary citizens.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: SPA.2010.2.2-01 | Award Amount: 2.72M | Year: 2011

A range of new applications will be enabled by ultra-precise optical clocks, some of which by using them in space, near or far distant from Earth. They cover the fields of fundamental physics (tests of General Relativity), time and frequency metrology (comparison of distant terrestrial clocks, operation of a master clock in space), geophysics (mapping of the gravitational potential of the Earth), and potential applications in astronomy (local oscillators for radio ranging and interferometry in space). We propose to (1) develop two engineering confidence ultra-precise transportable lattice optical clock demonstrators with relative frequency instability < 110-15/root(tau)1/2, inaccuracy < 510-17, one of which as a breadboard. They will be based on trapped neutral Ytterbium and Strontium atoms. Goal performance is about 1 and 2 orders better than todays best transportable clocks, in inaccuracy and instability, respectively. The two systems will be validated in a laboratory environment (TRL 4) and performance will be established by comparison with laboratory optical clocks and primary frequency standards. (2) We will develop the necessary laser systems (adapted in terms of power, linewidth, frequency stability, long-term reliability, and accuracy), atomic packages with control of systematic (magnetic fields, black-body radiation, atom number), where novel solutions with reduced space, power and mass requirements will be implemented. Some of the laser systems will be developed towards particularly high compactness and robustness. Also, crucial laser components will be tested at TRL 5 level (validation in relevant environment). The work will build on the expertise of the proposers with laboratory optical clocks, and the successful development of breadboard and transportable cold Sr and Yb atomic sources and ultrastable lasers during the ELIPS-3 ESA development project Space Optical Clocks (SOC).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.4.2-3 | Award Amount: 15.68M | Year: 2010

The initiation and perpetuation of atrial fibrillation (AF) can be regarded as a complication of a progressive transformation of the structure and functional properties of the atria. This transformation is the result of complex and multiple changes at the molecular, cellular and organ levels which interact to form the basis for proarrhythmic mechanisms in AF. Numerous individual and environmental factors are probably involved in this profound transformation process in the atria. Therefore, we believe that progress in the diagnostics, prevention and treatment of AF requires highly integrative research from the molecule to bedside and from specific signaling pathways and electrophysiological mechanisms to population based studies. A consortium was formed providing this variety of expertises and has identified central research objectives for improvements in AF prevention and therapy. In 5 work packages focusing on basic research, new biomarkers for AF and therapeutic targets will be identified. We will study mechanisms of conduction disturbances in the atria, explore new ion channel targets for treatment of AF, identify specific alterations in the atria depending on the underlying heart disease, and evaluate beneficial effects of organ-protective compounds. Within two clinically oriented work packages the clinical application of these findings will be tested. The predictive value of diagnostic tools like serum biomarkers, 3D reconstruction of atrial conduction patterns based on high resolution body surface ECGs, and echocardiographic markers will be studied in large scale population studies. The new therapeutic targets will be explored in smaller prove-of-principle clinical trials (substrate oriented ablation, new pharmacological targets, and local gene delivery).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-18-2015 | Award Amount: 8.19M | Year: 2016

Liver cancer in the paediatric population is rare with an incidence approximately 1-1.5 per million population. The commonest tumour seen in the childhood population is hepatoblastoma (HB), usually seen in young children and infants. Much rarer (about 10% of paediatric liver cancers) is hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), usually seen in the teenage population and sometimes associated with underlying cirrhotic liver diseases. The ChiLTERN project relates to topic PHC 18 establishing effectiveness of health care interventions in the paediatric population. The ChiLTERN project builds on a unique opportunity to undertake a comprehensive research programme linked to an ambitious global partnership which will see the single largest clinical trial (the Paediatric Hepatic International Tumour Trial - PHITT) ever undertaken in this population of patients, with several randomised questions in six subgroups of patients. ChiLTERN will allow us to move towards an era of personalised therapy in which each patient will receive the correct amount of chemotherapy and will undergo has the best surgical operation (surgical resection or liver transplant). By using both clinical and biological information, we can assign patients more accurately to risk groups based on their survival. Using genetic tests and biomarkers, we will determine those children who may be at risk of developing long term side effects (deafness, heart failure, kidney damage). In addition, biomarkers will allow us to monitor during therapy and detect toxicities early before serious damage is done so that we can adapt treatment and prevent these problems. Finally, we will be using imaging technology tools which will help our surgeons plan liver operations more safely and effectively. Ultimately ChiLTERN will allow us to cure more children with liver cancer, expose fewer children to toxic chemotherapy and ensure their surgery is both effective and safe.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.81M | Year: 2015

As wind energy is considered one of the most promising renewable energy resources, energy production technologies relying on wind energy are currently flourishing under the EU ambitious plan for 2020. Market demands to prepare a generation of researchers within the EU that are able to face the challenge of fulfilling the EU ambitious plan, to sustain the production of wind energy and to innovate and promote wind energy systems (WES) for the future needs, are clearly met in AEOLUS4FUTURE. The primary research aim is to develop a sustainable WES for a variety of EU needs. There are a number of detailed scientific and technical issues that will be addressed by the project starting from identifying the wind energy potential (off-shore and on-shore, including the built environment) to the design of a sustainable and highly efficient WES. Also the new challenging load conditions imposed on wind farms located on places where existing type of wind turbine towers are not suitable require the development of new type of support structures for wind energy converters. This fosters new structural concepts taking advantage of high performance materials e.g. high strength steel and novel maintenance free fasteners. In addition, while most research efforts and practical applications of wind energy have focused on large-scale wind installations in remote offshore or onshore areas, much less attention has been given to wind energy installations near buildings. The project has a major training aim to create technical experts who will be able to lead the necessary industrial developments in the WES, and have a broad overview of a new and emerging multi-disciplinary field. The project will thus enable a number of young scientists and engineers to obtain high level training in various technical aspects of the problem, to gain an overall understanding of how this work fits into the wider EU Directives and plans for the future and in doing so to improve their career prospects.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: FCH2-RIA | Phase: FCH-02.6-2015 | Award Amount: 2.90M | Year: 2016

Fuel cells have shown great promise for residential micro-Combined Heat and Power (mCHP) generation due to their high electrical efficiency and ability to run on conventional heating fuels. Technology leaders in this sector are nearing commercial deployment following extensive field trials but high capital costs remain a key challenge to the advancement of this sector and mass market introduction in Europe. The HEATSTACK project focuses on reducing the cost of the two most expensive components within the fuel cell system; the fuel cell stack and heat exchanger, which together represent the majority of total system CAPEX. Cost reductions of up to 60% for each component technology will be achieved by: - Advancing proven component technologies through the optimisation of design, materials and production processes for improved performance and quality; - Developing and applying novel tooling for laser welding and automated production lines to remove manual processing steps; - Improving cycle times and reducing time to market; - Demonstrating design flexibility and production scalability for mass manufacturing (10.000 units per annum); and - Developing core supply chain relationships to allow for competitive sourcing strategies. The HEATSTACK project represents a key step towards achieving commercial cost targets for fuel cell mCHP appliances, bringing together leading technology providers in the fuel cell mCHP supply chain with extensive industrial expertise to accelerate the development towards volume production of the fuel cell stacks and heat exchangers. Cost reductions will be achieved through advanced design, development and industrialisation of core manufacturing processes. Improvements to component performance with advanced materials will reduce system degradation and improve overall system efficiency and lifetime.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: ICT-28-2015 | Award Amount: 4.03M | Year: 2016

This is a trans-disciplinary project that joins endocrinologists (end-users), radiologists (end-users), physicists who are experts in medical photonics, engineers who are experts in photonics and ultrasonics and the industry to work towards a concentrated goal - to produce a novel, point-of-care, low-cost, screening device that combines two photonics systems (near-infrared diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) and time-resolved spectroscopy (TRS)) with a multi-modal ultrasound (US) system and a probe that enables multi-modal data acquisition for the screening of thyroid nodules (TN) for thyroid cancer (TC). TN are a common pathology having a prevalence of palpable nodules around 5% in women and 1% in men, that increases to 19-76% with the use of neck US. In screening thyroid nodules, to exclude thyroid cancer which occurs in 5-15% of TN, the first step is the US followed by fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) of suspicious nodules. The sensitivity and specificity of this process in thyroid cancer are limited, with a large number of non-diagnostic and false positive results that lead to unnecessary surgeries. A reduction in the number of surgeries with a point-of-care diagnostic procedure would have an important socio-economic impact, diminishing the number of thyroidectomies and the associated comorbidities. This implies savings of millions of euros per year. Evidence shows that multi-modal approaches that include hemodynamic information leads to better specificity while each modality on its own fails. We hypothesize that a new optical-ultrasound probe and integrated system enabled by the development of novel, key enabling photonic components and sub-systems to provide synergetic information on tissue morphology, composition and function will have a large impact in this field. Our action is directed by end-users who participate in the proposal and will be exploited by the industrial partners who cover the whole value-chain.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2015 | Award Amount: 1.17M | Year: 2016

Social and economic growth, security and sustainability in Europe are at risk of being compromised due to aging and failing railway infrastructure systems. This partly reflects a recognised skill shortage in railway infrastructure engineering. This project, RISEN, aims to enhance knowledge creation and transfer using both international and intersectoral secondment mechanisms among European Advanced Rail Research Universities/SMEs and Non-EU, world-class rail universities including the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (USA), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (USA), Southwest Jiaotong University (China) and University of Wollongong (Australia). This project adds research skill mobility and innovation dimension to existing bilateral collaborations between universities through research exchange, joint research supervision, summer courses, international training and workshops, and joint development of innovative inventions. It spans over 4 years from April 2016 to March 2020. RISEN aims to produce the next generation of engineers and scientists needed to meet the challenge of providing sustainable, smart and resilient railway infrastructure systems critical for maintaining European competitiveness. The emphasis will be placed on the resilience and adaptation of railway and urban transport infrastructures using integrated smart systems. Such critical areas of the research theme will thus be synergised to improve response and resilience of rail infrastructure systems to climate change, extreme events from natural and human-made hazards, and future operational demands. In addition, researchers will benefit from the co-location of engineering education, training and research alongside world-class scientists and industry users through this initiative. Lessons learnt from rail infrastructure management will be shared and utilised to assure integrated and sustainable rail transport planning for future cities and communities.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 1.11M | Year: 2017

The overall objective of the project is to establish a top-level scientific network of several institutions and research groups from Europe and Africa on the field of slavery studies. It aims at focusing mutual efforts of 13 partners with extended and complementary competences in their respective research fields and at gathering multidisciplinary expertise in slavery-related issues by encouraging the exchange of young and senior researchers from both continents. This network will be the first of its kind in the world. Our goal is to conduct research on both historical and contemporary slavery and forced labour and to emphasize its international dimension. One of the main goals of this project is to bridge disciplinary and regional area studies or initiatives, to encourage dialogue and to engage in collaborative research. It will involve African and European researchers from various disciplines from different parts of the world with complementary skills. It will enrich the analysis of the underlying local situations and address the impact of slavery and slave trade on population histories in Europe and Africa. This project is composed of three components (training, research, diffusion) and aims to address the main objectives of the RISE programme such as: - The promotion and support scientific and technological cooperation between African and European researchers working in research institutions and universities; - The development of new collaborative linkages that will result in innovative ideas; - The building of the capacities of junior researchers; - The encouragement of exchanges and synergy between researchers, by supporting their mobility and establishing a sustainable network and reach out various communities within and outside academia.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.84M | Year: 2016

Our vision is to develop a suite of standardised non-invasive devices that will provide essential information about brain health in neurocritical care and neuromonitoring, with a particular emphasis on 1. traumatic brain injury: the silent epidemic of the third millennium and 2. hypoxia in newborn children. Survivors present permanent neurological conditions that have a profound impact on the quality of life of individuals and their families, and hence a large socio-economic impact. The key factors influencing these conditions and their treatment are the avoidance of brain hypoxia and metabolic disturbances and this is driving the transfer of new neuromonitoring systems to the bedside where they are being shown to have a transformative effect on patient care. BitMap will develop non-invasive photonics-based monitoring techniques and data analysis methods to provide biomarkers that could guide patient management. A cohort of multi-disciplinary Early Stage Researchers (ESRs), embedded in leading laboratories across Europe, will work together on an programme designed to address the key technological and clinical challenges in neurocritical care. The ESRs will benefit from the diverse range of expertise in advanced photonics and clinical application which will substantially enhance their research competitiveness and employability, and will together form a critical mass of skilled people working together towards new technologies for improved neuroclinical care. The challenges involved are fundamentally multi-disciplinary and therefore ESRs trained in a multi-disciplinary environment are essential if progress and clinical impact is to be made. There is currently no graduate programme producing researchers with these attributes, but there is a significant market for such PhDs in the rapidly developing area of biomedical optics and in general in medical imaging technology development. The BitMap project therefore addresses both a clinical and economic need.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.1.4-1 | Award Amount: 7.03M | Year: 2014

Prevalence of liver disease is c6% (29 million people) in the EU with mortality rates from chronic liver diseases estimated at 14.3 per 100.000 in the EU-25 in 2004. Most liver diseases have a significant inflammatory component that underpins liver damage and fibrogenesis, yet current therapies have limited effectiveness. Safe novel anti-inflammatory therapies would satisfy a large unmet need for inflammatory liver conditions such as primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSC) are a mixed population of plastic-adherent (PA) cells isolated from bone marrow, umbilical cord and adipose tissue. Preclinical studies show that intravenous administration of PA-MSC reduces liver inflammation/damage, however only one MSC-based clinical study has been reported to date. MERLIN will examine if MSC can safely reduce biliary damage in mouse models followed by a clinical study in patients with PSC. We have identified an antibody (S2) that isolates comparable MSC from human & mouse marrow, enabling testing of pure functionally distinct cell S2\ & S2- and PA-MSC populations. We will use the worlds first GMP-compliant non-bead-based cell sorter to select S2\ MSC to comply with future therapeutic regulatory requirements. MERLIN partners will use novel methods to enhance MSC efficacy in PSC - by reducing immune clearance of MSC & by promoting MSC functionality & localisation in vivo. We will assess if MSC sub-sets exert differing levels of control upon liver inflammation in pre-clinical models, as well as defining their proliferation and mechanism of action. We will develop entirely novel biomarkers for PSC within the disease pathway pre and post cell infusion. The optimal combination of MSC sub-set and efficacy enhancement, will be selected for progression to a Phase 2 clinical safety study in patients with PSC. MERLIN will deliver a comprehensive data-set on optimised purified MSC and their efficacy/safety in pre-clinical models prior to a clinical trial in patients with PSC.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CSA-FCH | Phase: SP1-JTI-FCH.2013.5.2 | Award Amount: 1.44M | Year: 2014

KnowHY aims to provide the FC&H2 sector with a training offer for technicians and workers featuring quality in contents, accessibility in format and language, practicality for the targeted audience, ease of scalability and update, and at competitive costs which make the training offer economically sustainable after project completion. Thanks to this project both OEMs as well as professionals can rely on third parties to provide a sound and effective first training, covering the understanding of the technology, safety and regulatory aspects and the practical theoretical as well as hands on contents. The Consortium consists of partners from European countries covering 7 of the most usual languages, as English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese and Dutch. Most of the partners combine a large experience in FC&H2 technologies and training or education, whereas FSV features an exceptional experience in developing e-learning training contents and courses. The targeted audience technicians, workers and professionals in general with a practical knowledge in installation, maintenance and operation of hydrogen and fuel cell applications. Customized courses and modules will target individual applications as residential CHP, FCEV, HRS, distributed generation, or back-up systems, adapted from country to country and form sector to sector but preserving homogeneity. KnowHy will take into consideration the findings of previous projects as HyProfessionals, TrainHy and H2-training. The following actions are planned: - Developing an online tool for accessing to the training contents via web. - Developing specific courses adapted to the different applications addressed and translating them in the required languages. There will be different levels of knowledge. - Carrying out practical seminars in existing facilities, such as demo projects, or labs adapted to the training. - Dissemination among FCH-JU stakeholders, OEMS, education authorities, and the potential users.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.2.2.1-2 | Award Amount: 9.24M | Year: 2013

Affective and non-affective psychoses have a major negative impact on human society. They account for 6.3% of the global burden of disease and cost 207 billion per year in Europe alone, making them the most expensive brain-related disorders and even more expensive than cardiovascular diseases. This socioeconomic burden is largely caused by two core disease features: onset in adolescence and early adulthood and long-term disabling disease courses. Both factors lead to enduring social and vocational exclusion and contribute to 8-20 times higher suicide rates in affected patients. Reliable and accessible prognostic tools will alleviate this burden by enabling individualised risk prediction, thus facilitating the targeted prevention of psychoses. Thus, we will first use routine brain imaging and complementary data to optimise our candidate biomarkers for the prediction and staging of psychoses and generate a prognostic system that generalises well across mental health services. Secondly, we will implement new multi-modal risk quantification tools to predict mental health-related disability in young help-seekers. The fusion of these tools with clinical knowledge will produce cybernetic prognostic services that accurately identify help-seekers at the highest risk of psychosis, poor functioning and suicide-related mortality. During this project we will secure our intellectual property rights and transform into a European company to commercially exploit these prognostic services through internet-based telemedicine applications. This will provide psychosis risk profiling tools to diverse target groups in the healthcare markets, including care-givers, the pharmaceutical industry and research institutions. By disseminating objective risk quantification, these products will provide firm diagnostic grounds for preventive therapy, improving outcomes and reducing costs. Thus, they will offer a unique selling proposition to the mental health sectors in Europe and beyond.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FOF-13-2016 | Award Amount: 4.00M | Year: 2016

MAESTRO aims to develop and combine with existing Selective Laser Melting (SLM) techniques five innovations that will constitute the basis of a highly competitive manufacturing value chain: (1) a single pre-process software for a numerical chain combining all mandatory steps and configurations of SLM together with its related pre- and post-processes, (2) Hybridization of SLM with MIM, (3) Adaptive process control of SLM, (4) system level integration of a modular platform, (5) open access to an easy-to-use demonstration platform to reinforce to EU leadership in AM. These innovations will enable SLM to overcome the current limitations (speed, productivity, costs) to address large scale markets: productivity will be improved by 30%, cost reduced by 30% with quality towards zero defect. The performances of the MAESTRO platform will be assessed through a substantial number of demonstrators (7 in total: 4 brought by project partners, 3 selected through a EU-wide dissemination event). The MAESTRO consortium is composed of 10 complementary partners from 5 European countries. It is a well-balanced consortium with relevant expertise in SLM for tooling and aerospace applications (PEP), Materials and processes (CEA), Manufacturing technologies (UoB), Software Development (ALTAIR), MIM (OBE), SLM machine manufacturer (EOS). It is completed by 4 end-users from key sectors: Semiconductors and their packaging (III-V LAB), Automotive (CRF), Space (GEMMATE), Railway (ALSTOM).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: REGIONS-2012-2013-1 | Award Amount: 2.94M | Year: 2012

The SmartCulture project aims to provide a sustainable access to cultural heritage to a wider range of users by the use of digital technologies. Digital technologies will help to transform passive audiences into active practitioners of culture. The consortium will promote the creation of engaging digital experiences for access to cultural resources by the cross fertilization between ICT enterprises, Creative and Cultural Industries (especially SMEs) and research stakeholders across Europe. This cross fertilization will lead to new opportunities and good practices for innovative digital access to cultural resources and digital cultural mediation. These challenges fully comply with the objectives of the Work Program for ICT of the FP7 and the EU Work Plan for Culture 2011-2014 and with the conclusions of the green paper on Cultural and Creative Industries. Most of the eight regions involved in the SmartCulture project have a very high population, a very rich cultural heritage (e.g. Louvre-Lens, Museo Guggenheim, Museo del Prado), as well as a dynamic contents production. Some regions are European leaders for Information & Communication and Creative and Cultural Industries. All of the participants in the SmartCulture project have a strong relationship to European Capitals of Culture (ECoC) as winners or candidates. The consortium has the potentialities to develop innovative and efficient ways to provide access to cultural resources to a wider range of citizens, and it is obvious that there is a market for this. We have strong networks for ICT enterprises and CCI (especially SMEs), but we need to strengthen cross fertilization between technological and creative industries, by encouraging for example mobility for professionals and researchers, and the emergence of common data exchange formats for digital experiences. International competition with big players is forcing us to build a common international strategy, for gaining new markets, especially emerging ones.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CP-FCH | Phase: SP1-JTI-FCH.2012.3.4 | Award Amount: 3.66M | Year: 2013

The economic viability and market place entry of SOFC power systems is directly dependent on their longevity and production costs. Adequate operational life spans can only be achieved, if the performance degradation of the SOFC stacks and Balance of Plant components over time can be considerably reduced. At the same time, manufacturing costs have to be lowered dramatically for the specifically necessary components securing the long component service life. As of now, chromium deactivation of the cathode is considered one of the major contributions to the degradation of SOFC stacks. Since chromium steels, on the other hand, are an essential material in reducing stack costs, methods have to be found to make best use of their advantages whilst avoiding chromium transport to the cathode. Balance of Plant components upstream of the cathode also contribute to the chromium immission, a fact that is often overseen and requires protective coatings also for any components situated in the air flow pathway to the cathode. Finally, the build-up of oxide scales will influence the electrical resistance and contact resistance thus requiring coatings for the stabilisation of the contacts on both cathode and anode side of the SOFC cell. Within the project Real-SOFC first steps have been made towards developing suitable combinations of steels and coatings. It has become apparent that any steel will require a coating in order to sufficiently reduce chromium evaporation and oxide layer build-up, and also sustain a low surface resistivity. More recently, a variety of new coating techniques have been reported that require further evaluation under SOFC relevant operating conditions. The project proposed here aims to further elaborate on the production of coated steel components showing markedly improved properties with regard to chromium release, electrical resistivity and scale growth. The focus of ScoReD 2:0 will be on choosing optimised combinations of protective layer materials with different steel qualities (including low-cost options) and analysing the influence, practicality and cost of different methods of coating. Also in understanding which factors influence the efficacy of such coatings.


Patent
University of Pennsylvania and University of Birmingham | Date: 2013-03-15

Methods and cells or cell lines for identifying antibodies or fragments thereof that activate heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) are described. The methods comprise contacting a hematopoietic cell or cell line that comprises, in operative association, the platelet receptor FcyRIIA under the control of a suitable promoter, and a reporter construct comprising a reporter gene under the control of a promoter and transcription factor, which transcription factor is regulated downstream of the signaling cascade of activated FcyRIIA, with a test sample from a mammalian subject; a platelet factor 4 (PF4), a wild-type or variant of PF4 or a fragment thereof; and heparin; and detecting or measuring the level of reporter gene expression.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2011.2.4-01 | Award Amount: 3.81M | Year: 2012

The SOPHY project aims to develop a web-based software tool for prediction of product safety, quality and shelf life of ready-to-eat products. Fresh cut salads, fruit salads and deli salads were chosen as model food system. Food producers will be able to optimise their raw material selection, product formulation and processing steps virtually. The software estimates the effect of each production step on the safety (growth or survival of relevant pathogens) and shelf life (growth of specific spoilage organisms and/or formation of undesirable by-products) while considering quality (organoleptic characteristics and other quality parameters). The predictive and probabilistic models are based on existing data sets of bacterial growth and quality changes under various conditions generated during previous studies (where available) and data generated during the project. Users will also have the possibility to insert own data, e.g. initial bacterial contamination. The web-based software can be continuously expanded even after project end - by inserting new data sets (e.g. other food products, different environmental conditions, etc.). Furthermore, the project aims not only to develop predictive and probabilistic models, but also to compile information about different processing techniques, product formulations (e.g. clean label), environmental conditions (e.g. modified atmosphere packaging) as well as hygiene, quality and safety management. These information sheets aim to educate food producers, as they should not only see the effect of different factors on shelf life and pathogen growth calculated by the models, but also understand why. This increased awareness is crucial in improving overall food safety and quality. Information of this nature is essential for small businesses with limited technical resources.

Loading University of Birmingham collaborators
Loading University of Birmingham collaborators