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Bangui, Central African Republic

The University of Bangui is a public university located in Bangui, Central African Republic. Wikipedia.


Favier C.,Montpellier University | Aleman J.,Montpellier University | Aleman J.,CIRAD - Agricultural Research for Development | Bremond L.,Montpellier University | And 3 more authors.
Global Ecology and Biogeography | Year: 2012

Aim To describe patterns of tree cover in savannas over a climatic gradient and a range of spatial scales and test if there are identifiable climate-related mean structures, if tree cover always increases with water availability and if there is a continuous trend or a stepwise trend in tree cover. Location Central Tropical Africa. Methods We compared a new analysis of satellite tree cover data with botanical, phytogeographical and environmental data. Results Along the climatic transect, six vegetation structures were distinguished according to their average tree cover, which can co-occur as mosaics. The resulting abrupt shifts in tree cover were not correlated to any shifts in either environmental variables or in tree species distributions. Main conclusions A strong contrast appears between fine-scale variability in tree cover and coarse-scale structural states that are stable over several degrees of latitude. While climate parameters and species pools display a continuous evolution along the climatic gradient, these stable structural states have discontinuous transitions, resulting in regions containing mosaics of alternative stable states. Soils appear to have little effect inside the climatic stable state domains but a strong action on the location of the transitions. This indicates that savannas are patch dynamics systems, prone to feedbacks stabilizing their coarse-scale structure over wide ranges of environmental conditions. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd. Source


Giles-Vernick T.,Institute Pasteur Paris | Traore A.,Center National Of Recherche Et Of Formation Sur Le Paludisme And Groupe Of Recherche Action En Sante | Bainilago L.,University of Bangui
Medical Anthropology Quarterly | Year: 2016

This comparative study explores incertitude about hepatitis B (HBV) and its implications for childhood vaccination in Bangui, Central African Republic, and the Cascades region, Burkina Faso. Anthropological approaches to vaccination, which counter stereotypes of “ignorant” publics needing education to accept vaccination, excavate alternative ways of knowing about illness and vaccination. We build on these approaches, evaluating different kinds of incertitude (ambiguity, uncertainty, ignorance) about infancy, HBV, health protection, and vaccination. Using interviews and participant observation, we find that Bangui and Cascades publics framed their incertitude differently through stories of infancy, illness, and protection. We locate different forms of incertitude within their historical contexts to illuminate why vaccination practices differ in the Cascades region and Bangui. A more nuanced approach to incomplete knowledge, situated in political, economic, and social histories of the state and vaccination, can contribute to more appropriate global health strategies to improve HBV prevention. © 2016 by the American Anthropological Association Source


Giles-Vernick T.,Institute Pasteur Paris | Traore A.,Center National Of Recherche Et Of Formation Sur Le Paludisme And Groupe Of Recherche Action En Sante Ouagadougou | Bainilago L.,University of Bangui
Medical Anthropology Quarterly | Year: 2016

This comparative study explores incertitude about hepatitis B (HBV) and its implications for childhood vaccination in Bangui, Central African Republic, and the Cascades region, Burkina Faso. Anthropological approaches to vaccination, which counter stereotypes of "ignorant" publics needing education to accept vaccination, excavate alternative ways of knowing about illness and vaccination. We build on these approaches, evaluating different kinds of incertitude (ambiguity, uncertainty, ignorance) about infancy, HBV, health protection, and vaccination. Using interviews and participant observation, we find that Bangui and Cascades publics framed their incertitude differently through stories of infancy, illness, and protection. We locate different forms of incertitude within their historical contexts to illuminate why vaccination practices differ in the Cascades region and Bangui. A more nuanced approach to incomplete knowledge, situated in political, economic, and social histories of the state and vaccination, can contribute to more appropriate global health strategies to improve HBV prevention. © 2016 American Anthropological Association. Source


Ouedraogo D.-Y.,CIRAD - Agricultural Research for Development | Beina D.,University of Bangui | Picard N.,British Petroleum | Mortier F.,CIRAD - Agricultural Research for Development | And 2 more authors.
Forest Ecology and Management | Year: 2011

In the Congo Basin where most timber species are light-demanding, the low logging intensities commonly implemented (1-2 trees harvested ha -1) do not provide sufficient canopy gaps to ensure species regeneration. The regeneration of light-demanding timber species may therefore benefit from more intensive logging, or from post-harvest treatments such as thinning by poison girdling that increases light penetration. Little is known of the impact of post-harvest treatments on the floristic composition of tropical moist forests. This study therefore aimed to assess the effects of low and high selective logging (≃2.33 and 4.73 trees harvested ha -1, and ≃4.96 and 9.16m 2ha -1 of basal area removed (logging+damage), respectively) - followed or not by thinning (≃21.14 trees thinned ha -1, and ≃6.57m 2ha -1 of basal area removed) - on the floristic composition of a tropical moist forest in the Central African Republic, from 7 to 23 years after logging.We analyzed abundance data for 110 tree genera recorded every year for 14 years in 25 one-hectare permanent subplots. We used multivariate analysis to detect floristic variations between treatments and we assessed changes in floristic composition throughout the period. We compared floristic composition recovery between thinned and unthinned subplots, using unlogged subplots as a reference characterizing the pre-logging floristic composition.Logging and thinning had little impact on the floristic composition of the subplots as quantified 7 to 23 years later, though they did increase the proportion of pioneer species. Surprisingly, additional thinning at both logging levels failed to further distance floristic composition from that of the unlogged subplots, though it did increase disturbance intensity. Floristic composition recovery appeared to be facilitated when thinning was associated with logging. Thinning seemed to favor the growth and survival of non-pioneer species, to the detriment of pioneer species. These non-pioneer species could either be non-pioneer light demanders or shade-bearers. One explanation for this is that thinning by tree-poison girdling increased light availability without causing major damage to the forest, and thus increased the growth and survival of advance regeneration. The resulting enhanced competition then reduced the survival of pioneer species. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. Source


Saka B.,University of Lome | Barro-Traore F.,University of Ouagadougou | Atadokpede F.A.,University of Benin | Kobangue L.,University of Bangui | And 5 more authors.
International Journal of Dermatology | Year: 2013

Objective: The purpose of this study was to document the clinical profile, etiologies, and outcomes of Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) in hospitals in four sub-Saharan African countries. Patients and methods: A retrospective study on cases of SJS/TEN treated in dermatology departments and/or intensive care units in four sub-Saharan African countries (Benin, Burkina Faso, Central African Republic, and Togo) from 2000 to 2010. The study focuses on variables such as age, sex, type of SJS/TEN, epidermal detachment of the skin surface, HIV status, drug(s) involved, and outcomes (death and sequelae). Results: This study identified 177 cases of SJS/TEN from 2000 to 2010: 129 with SJS; 37 TEN; and 11 overlapping SJS/TEN. The average age of patients was 32.3 ± 15.4 years, and the sex ratio (M/F) was 0.6. HIV serology was positive in 69 (54.8%) of the 126 patients tested. Antibacterial sulfonamides (38.4%) were the most commonly used drugs followed by nevirapine (19.8%) and tuberculosis drugs (5.6%). We recorded 22 deaths (i.e. six cases of SJS, 15 of TEN, and one of overlapping SJS/TEN). Of the 22 patients who died, 16 were infected with HIV; among them, seven had an opportunistic infection (four cases of cerebral toxoplasmosis and three of pulmonary tuberculosis). Twenty-seven cases of sequelae were noted with a large part of eye complications. Conclusion: This study has highlighted: (i) the high proportion of patients infected with HIV among patients who had SJS/TEN in sub-Saharan Africa; (ii) the high frequency of antiretroviral drugs as new SJS/TEN causes in sub-Saharan Africa; and (iii) the impact of HIV infection on morbidity and mortality of these affections. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology. Source

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