University of Veterinary Medicine and Agriculture Science

Cluj-Napoca, Romania

University of Veterinary Medicine and Agriculture Science

Cluj-Napoca, Romania
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Cioban C.,University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca | Zaganescu R.,University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca | Roman A.,University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca | Muste A.,University of Veterinary Medicine and Agriculture Science | And 2 more authors.
Romanian Journal of Morphology and Embryology | Year: 2013

The aim of the present animal study was to investigate the early healing processes developing in the post-extraction sockets preserved with a new-marketed collagen matrix as, to our knowledge, such investigations have not been reported so far. In both quadrants of the mandible of a mongrel dog, the distal sockets of the second premolars served as experimental sites for ridge preservation. The experimental site 1 was protected with a resorbable membrane and then with the collagen matrix. The experimental site 2 was filled with a xenograft and then covered with the collagen matrix. The samples were harvested after one month of healing. In both experimental sites, the bundle bone lining the inner surface of the alveolus was replaced with trabecular bone containing areas of woven bone. A continuous layer of osteoblasts could be observed on the surface of woven bone areas. Osteoclasts encased within resorptive lacunae lined the outer portions of bone walls for the experimental site 1. The trabecular bone occupied only the apical third of the socket in experimental site 1, but it was obviously more abundant in the experimental site 2, occupying also the central compartment of the socket. Moreover, the trabeculae of the bone occupying the inner area of the alveolus were thicker for the experiment site 2 than for experiment site 1, suggesting an increased osseous deposition in the latter situation. Our preliminary results suggest that the association collagen matrix plus xenograft may be a valuable method for ridge preservation.


Roman A.,University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca | Cioban C.,University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca | Stratul S.-I.,Victor Babes University of Medicine and Pharmacy Timisoara | Schwarz F.,Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf | And 4 more authors.
Clinical Oral Investigations | Year: 2015

Objectives: The success of ridge preservation techniques in reducing bone resorption is well documented, but no clear guidelines have been provided regarding the type of the biomaterial or technique to be used. This experimental animal study aimed at comparing the effectiveness of two ridge preservation techniques. Materials and methods: Following the extraction of the distal roots of the mandibular second and fourth premolars of four dogs, the sockets were preserved using a combination of a collagen membrane intimately covering the socket plus a collagen matrix or a collagen membrane alone. The mandibular quadrants were randomly assigned to one of the treatment groups. Histomorphometrical analyses as well as microscopic observations were performed. Results: After 5 months of healing, the histological analysis revealed a similar picture of bone formation in both groups. No significant differences between the buccal and lingual dimensions were calculated between the two treatment groups. The mucosa covering the alveolar ridges is significantly more abundant in post-extraction sockets preserved with the double-layered approach. Conclusions: The double-layered approach used to treat post-extraction sockets may result in a better preservation of the mucosal seal than the single-layered approach. Clinical relevance: The use of the new collagen matrix associated with a collagen membrane could be a clinical option to preserve post-extraction ridges, especially when an improvement in soft tissue dimension and quality is desired. However, the cost-benefit ratio of this approach should be thoroughly evaluated in further studies. © 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

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