Aberdeen, United Kingdom
Aberdeen, United Kingdom

The University of Aberdeen is a public research university in the city of Aberdeen, Scotland. It is an ancient university founded in 1495 when William Elphinstone, Bishop of Aberdeen, petitioned Pope Alexander VI on behalf of James IV, King of Scots to create King's College. This makes it Scotland's third-oldest university and fifth-oldest in the English-speaking world. The university as it is today was formed in 1860 by a merger between King's College and Marischal College, a second university founded in 1593 in Aberdeen city centre as a Protestant alternative to King's College. Today, the University of Aberdeen is consistently ranked among the top 150 universities in the world and is one of two universities in Aberdeen, the other being The Robert Gordon University.The university's iconic buildings act as symbols of the City of Aberdeen, particularly Marischal College in the city centre and the spire of King's College in Old Aberdeen. There are two campuses; the main King's College campus is at Old Aberdeen approximately two miles north of the city centre, around the original site of King's College, although most campus buildings were constructed in the 20th century during a period of expansion. The university's Foresterhill campus is located next to Aberdeen Royal Infirmary and houses the School of Medicine and Dentistry and School of Medical science.The University has approximately 13,500 students from undergraduate to doctoral level, including many international students. In addition, the university's Centre for Lifelong Learning acts as an extension college, offering higher education courses to the local community even for those without the usual qualifications for admission to degree-level study. A full range of disciplines are offered and in 2012 the university offered over 650 undergraduate degree programmes.Five Nobel Prize winners are associated with the University. Other academics and graduates of the University include many distinguished figures, including: physicist James Clerk Maxwell; Thomas Reid, the founder of the Scottish School of Common Sense and an important figure in the Scottish Enlightenment; philosopher Robert Adamson; educationalist and philosopher Alexander Bain; and theologian William Robinson Clark. Wikipedia.


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Patent
University of Aberdeen and Lothian Health Board | Date: 2015-05-14

The present invention relates to methods of producing pancreatic endocrine cells and uses of the cells obtained using the methods. The method utilises inhibitors or combinations of factors to provide increased quantities of endocrine material, for example for transplantation purposes.


Patent
University of Aberdeen | Date: 2016-09-22

The present invention provides a single domain specific binding molecule having the structure FW1-CDR1-FW2-HV2-FW3a-HV4-FW3b-CDR3-FW4 in which the Framework Regions FW1, FW2, FW3a, FW3b, and FW4, the Complementarity Determining Regions CDR1 and CDR3, and the Hypervariable Regions HV2, and HV4 have amino acid sequences as defined which provide a high affinity anti-human serum albumin (HSA) binding domain.


Patent
ApaTech Ltd and University of Aberdeen | Date: 2017-01-27

A synthetic calcium phosphate-based biomedical material comprising gadolinium. The material may comprises a compound having the general chemical formula: Ca_(10y)Gd_(y)(PO_(4))_(6x)(SiO_(4))x(OH)_(2c+y )where 0


Patent
University of Aberdeen | Date: 2017-03-22

The present invention relates to methods of producing pancreatic endocrine cells and uses of the cells obtained using the methods. The method utilises inhibitors or combinations of factors to provide increased quantities of endocrine material, for example for transplantation purposes.


Patent
University of Aberdeen | Date: 2017-03-22

The present invention provides methods and materials relating to obtaining or expanding populations of islet cells, and uses of the islet cells obtained by these methods, for example in the treatment of diabetes. The invention uses transcription factors in a process of expansion and de-differention, followed by redifferentiation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: LCE-05-2015 | Award Amount: 51.69M | Year: 2016

In order to unlock the full potential of Europes offshore resources, network infrastructure is urgently required, linking off-shore wind parks and on-shore grids in different countries. HVDC technology is envisaged but the deployment of meshed HVDC offshore grids is currently hindered by the high cost of converter technology, lack of experience with protection systems and fault clearance components and immature international regulations and financial instruments. PROMOTioN will overcome these barriers by development and demonstration of three key technologies, a regulatory and financial framework and an offshore grid deployment plan for 2020 and beyond. A first key technology is presented by Diode Rectifier offshore converter. This concept is ground breaking as it challenges the need for complex, bulky and expensive converters, reducing significantly investment and maintenance cost and increasing availability. A fully rated compact diode rectifier converter will be connected to an existing wind farm. The second key technology is an HVDC grid protection system which will be developed and demonstrated utilising multi-vendor methods within the full scale Multi-Terminal Test Environment. The multi-vendor approach will allow DC grid protection to become a plug-and-play solution. The third technology pathway will first time demonstrate performance of existing HVDC circuit breaker prototypes to provide confidence and demonstrate technology readiness of this crucial network component. The additional pathway will develop the international regulatory and financial framework, essential for funding, deployment and operation of meshed offshore HVDC grids. With 35 partners PROMOTioN is ambitious in its scope and advances crucial HVDC grid technologies from medium to high TRL. Consortium includes all major HVDC and wind turbine manufacturers, TSOs linked to the North Sea, offshore wind developers, leading academia and consulting companies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: SGA-RIA | Phase: FETFLAGSHIP | Award Amount: 89.00M | Year: 2016

Understanding the human brain is one of the greatest scientific challenges of our time. Such an understanding can provide profound insights into our humanity, leading to fundamentally new computing technologies, and transforming the diagnosis and treatment of brain disorders. Modern ICT brings this prospect within reach. The HBP Flagship Initiative (HBP) thus proposes a unique strategy that uses ICT to integrate neuroscience data from around the world, to develop a unified multi-level understanding of the brain and diseases, and ultimately to emulate its computational capabilities. The goal is to catalyze a global collaborative effort. During the HBPs first Specific Grant Agreement (SGA1), the HBP Core Project will outline the basis for building and operating a tightly integrated Research Infrastructure, providing HBP researchers and the scientific Community with unique resources and capabilities. Partnering Projects will enable independent research groups to expand the capabilities of the HBP Platforms, in order to use them to address otherwise intractable problems in neuroscience, computing and medicine in the future. In addition, collaborations with other national, European and international initiatives will create synergies, maximizing returns on research investment. SGA1 covers the detailed steps that will be taken to move the HBP closer to achieving its ambitious Flagship Objectives.


Brown G.D.,University of Aberdeen
Annual Review of Immunology | Year: 2011

Fungal diseases have emerged as significant causes of morbidity and mortality, particularly in immune-compromised individuals, prompting greater interest in understanding the mechanisms of host resistance to these pathogens. Consequently, the past few decades have seen a tremendous increase in our knowledge of the innate and adaptive components underlying the protective (and nonprotective) mechanisms of antifungal immunity. What has emerged from these studies is that phagocytic cells are essential for protection and that defects in these cells compromise the host's ability to resist fungal infection. This review covers the functions of phagocytes in innate antifungal immunity, along with selected examples of the strategies that are used by fungal pathogens to subvert these defenses. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Prosser J.I.,University of Aberdeen
Nature Reviews Microbiology | Year: 2015

Technological advances are enabling the sequencing of environmental DNA and RNA at increasing depth and with decreasing costs. Metagenomic and transcriptomic analysis of soil microbial communities and the assembly of 'population genomes' from soil DNA are therefore now feasible. Although the value of such 'omic' approaches is limited by the associated technical and bioinformatic difficulties, even if these obstacles were eliminated and 'perfect' metagenomes and metatranscriptomes were available, important conceptual challenges remain. This Opinion article considers these conceptual challenges in the context of the current use of omics in soil microbiology, but the main arguments presented are also relevant to the application of omics to marine, freshwater, gut or other environments. © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Pennington H.,University of Aberdeen
The Lancet | Year: 2010

Escherichia coli O157 is an uncommon but serious cause of gastroenteritis. This bacterium is noteworthy because a few, but significant, number of infected people develop the haemolytic uraemic syndrome, which is the most frequent cause of acute renal failure in children in the Americas and Europe. Many infections of E coli O157 could be prevented by the more effective application of evidence-based methods, which is especially important because once an infection has been established, no therapeutic interventions are available to lessen the risk of the development of the haemolytic uraemic syndrome. This Review takes into account the evolution and geographical distibution of E coli O157 (and its close pathogenic relatives); the many and varied routes of transmission from its major natural hosts, ruminant farm animals; and other aspects of its epidemiology, its virulence factors, the diagnosis and management of infection and their complications, the repercussions of infection including costs, and prevention. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

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