University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center

Cleveland, OH, United States

University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center

Cleveland, OH, United States
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News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

CLEVELAND - Results from the DAWN stroke trial presented at the European Stroke Organization Conference (ESOC) provide compelling evidence that selected patients suffering a major ischemic stroke recovered significantly better with mechanical retrieval of the blood clot with medical therapy compared with medical therapy alone when initiated past the current guidelines of within 6 hours and up to 24 hours of the stroke. University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center was one of the top seven recruiting sites in the multi-site study that enrolled a total of 206 patients in the nation. The results showed that patients treated with the retrieval system, known as mechanical thrombectomy, had significantly decreased post-stroke disability and improved functional independence at 90 days compared to medical management alone. "This is incredible," said Cathy Sila, MD, Director of UH's Comprehensive Stroke Center, and principal investigator of the study at the UH site. "Almost half of the patients (48.6 percent) receiving the thrombectomy therapy had a good outcome at 90 days after treatment--defined as the patients being independent in activities of daily living--as opposed to only 13.1 percent of the patients treated medically or with clot-busting drugs alone. This 35 percent difference may be higher than any level of benefit from any stroke trial." "Not only did the patients treated with mechanical thrombectomy dramatically improve during hospitalization, sometimes being able to walk and be discharged to home, but there was also a much lower risk of subsequent neurological worsening because of the poor blood flow to the brain," said Dr. Sila. "The number of patients needed to treat to achieve a good outcome was 2.8. This is a much greater chance of response than what was seen in trials that did not routinely use advanced brain imaging to guide treatment," she said. "We have long believed in the usefulness of MRI scans to define appropriateness of treatment. UH had been using a similar MRI protocol since 2010, five years before the DAWN trial began in 2015." Anthony Furlan, MD, Chairman of the Department of Neurology at UH and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, was on the DAWN study's steering committee and helped write the study protocol. "These results provide physicians who treat stroke with evidence of the benefits of thrombectomy even when administered out as far as 24 hours, and should help to make decisions clearer as to which patients to treat," said Dr. Furlan. "These positive outcomes of the DAWN trial represent a major change in patient selection for endovascular therapy for stroke," he said. In the study, researchers used neuroimaging to determine which patients would likely benefit from the procedure. According to Dr. Sila, they would examine how much brain tissue had suffered irreversible damage and how much might be able to be saved. If the amount of damaged tissue were no bigger than the size of a small apricot, researchers believed the patient could benefit from the therapy. Neuro-interventionists would then use a mechanical stent retriever called the Trevo Retriever to remove the blood clot, followed by treatment with the clot-busting medication. The study had been stopped earlier this year after an FDA-approved planned interim review by the independent Data Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) of data from the first 200 patients enrolled nationally because there was such a dramatic difference between the two arms of the study. The study had been designed to enroll up to a maximum of 500 patients. Dr. Sila said that in Northeast Ohio, we have about 18,000 strokes per year. Stroke survivors commonly experience devastating disabilities and loss of independence due to impaired movement, paralysis, loss of speech and memory. Randomized clinical data has proven the benefit of mechanical thrombectomy with stent retrievers in helping patients with large vessel occlusion strokes, but these devices have only been indicated to reduce disability if used within six hours of stroke onset. "For patients presenting with stroke symptoms beyond six hours, the benefit of clot retrieval using a stent retriever was unknown," said Dr. Furlan. "Now we have evidence that for patients who present to the hospital outside of the six hour time window could have a better chance for an independent life with improved clinical outcomes. Although this is great news, earlier treatment is always better because with stroke 'time is brain.'" The study was supported by Stryker, which produces the Trevo Retriever, a tiny stent-shaped medical device that is attached to a thin wire. The retriever is designed to ensnare the blood clot to remove it from a blood vessel. UH is working with Case Western Reserve University to develop the Cleveland Brain Health Initiative, linking this kind of leading edge neuroscience work from CWRU, UH, Cleveland Clinic, MetroHealth Medical Center and the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center to advance progress therapy and treatment of devastating neurological diseases. A video of a UH patient who was in the DAWN trial at: http://www. The DAWN trial is an international, multi-center, blinded endpoint assessment, randomized study. The purpose of the study is to demonstrate superior clinical outcomes at 90 days with Stryker's Trevo Retriever plus medical management compared to medical management alone in appropriately selected patients treated six to 24 hours after last seen well. The Trevo Retriever indication within the DAWN Trial is currently approved for investigational use only by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in the United States under an Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) study approval. Founded in 1866, University Hospitals serves the needs of patients through an integrated network of 18 hospitals, more than 40 outpatient health centers and 200 physician offices in 15 counties throughout northern Ohio. The system's flagship academic medical center, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, located on a 35-acre campus in Cleveland's University Circle, is affiliated with Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. The main campus also includes University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, ranked among the top children's hospitals in the nation; University Hospitals MacDonald Women's Hospital, Ohio's only hospital for women; and University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, part of the NCI-designated Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. UH is home to some of the most prestigious clinical and research programs in the nation, including cancer, pediatrics, women's health, orthopedics, radiology, neuroscience, cardiology and cardiovascular surgery, digestive health, transplantation and urology. UH Cleveland Medical Center is perennially among the highest performers in national ranking surveys, including "America's Best Hospitals" from U.S. News & World Report. UH is also home to Harrington Discovery Institute at University Hospitals - part of The Harrington Project for Discovery & Development. UH is the second largest employer in northern Ohio with 26,000 employees. For more information, go to UHhospitals.org. The Trevo Retriever is a tiny stent-shaped medical device that is attached to a thin wire. In a minimally invasive procedure that utilizes X-ray, the physician navigates the retriever from the femoral artery (located in the upper leg) to the blocked blood artery in the brain. The retriever is designed to ensnare the blood clot and remove it from the body. Originally cleared by the FDA in 2012 for the revascularization of patients experiencing ischemic stroke, the Trevo Retriever has been used in thousands of patients worldwide. Stryker's Trevo Retriever was the only mechanical thrombectomy device used in this trial. An animation of Stryker's Trevo Retriever is available here: https:/ An ischemic stroke occurs when an artery in the brain becomes blocked by a blood clot or other substance such as plaque, a fatty material. Blood vessels carry blood, oxygen and nutrients throughout the body and to the brain. When the brain is deprived of blood and oxygen, it fails to work properly. Depending on the severity of the stroke and the area of the brain affected, loss of brain function or death may occur. According to the World Heart Federation, ischemic stroke contributes to nearly six million deaths around the globe. Stryker is one of the world's leading medical technology companies and, together with our customers, we are driven to make healthcare better. The Company offers a diverse array of innovative products and services in Orthopedics, Medical and Surgical, and Neurotechnology and Spine that help improve patient and hospital outcomes. Stryker is active in over 100 countries around the world. Please contact us for more information at http://www.


In May, an unsuspecting Maysville High School football team traveled to the Browns training facility to watch practice and partake in a tour.  At the end of the day, they were surprised with a new set of top rated helmets by Cleveland Browns players. The Maysville Panthers are the first of many lucky teams over the next five years to be fully outfitted in Xenith helmets. After the reveal, as a part of the next "Browns Give Back" moment, the Cleveland Metropolitan School District was randomly selected to be the next recipient of a $25,000 donation of Xenith helmets. "University Hospitals Sports Medicine is committed to supporting a safe sporting environment for athletes of all ages," said Dr. James E. Voos, University Hospital and Brown's head team physician, "We are proud to continue to support The HELMETS Program." University Hospitals continue to work with the Browns to ensure more than 1,500 high school football coaches become USA Football Heads Up Certified in 2016 and 2017. The USA Football Heads Up Certification is a nationally recognized certification that covers the most important health and safety issues for coaches at any level of football, including tackling, fundamentals, injury prevention, injury recognition, and proper equipment fitting. "We are proud to provide Xenith helmets to all the winners of the Browns HELMETS Program and support the Cleveland community," said Xenith President Ryan Sullivan, "At Xenith, we have a passion for protecting football players with cutting-edge technology and are proud to share that through this partnership." The five-star rated Xenith helmets are a top ranking helmet in the Virginia Tech's helmet ratings and the NFL/NFLPA Helmet Laboratory Testing Performance Results. Developed in Detroit, Xenith is driven by a relentless pursuit to protect athletes everywhere through groundbreaking innovations and product superiority. Xenith is the industry leader in football helmet technology and the company's mission is to develop and distribute the best equipment in the world. Founded in 2006 by a former Harvard University quarterback and Columbia University physician, all Xenith helmets feature Adaptive Head Protection, a system of patented technologies designed to mitigate rotational and linear forces featuring the Shock Bonnet® Suspension System, Fit Seeker System and Shock Absorbers. For more information, please visit www.xenith.com or engage with us on Twitter and Facebook. The Cleveland Browns give back to Northeast Ohio with a commitment to education and youth football while engaging the community through the team's signature First and Ten volunteer movement. For more information, visit www.clevelandbrowns.com/brownsgiveback. Founded in 1866, University Hospitals serves the needs of patients through an integrated network of 18 hospitals, more than 40 outpatient health centers and 200 physician offices in 15 counties throughout northern Ohio. The system's flagship academic medical center, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, located on a 35-acre campus in Cleveland's University Circle, is affiliated with Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. The main campus also includes University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, ranked among the top children's hospitals in the nation; University Hospitals MacDonald Women's Hospital, Ohio's only hospital for women; and University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, part of the NCI-designated Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. UH is home to some of the most prestigious clinical and research programs in the nation, including cancer, pediatrics, women's health, orthopedics, radiology, neuroscience, cardiology and cardiovascular surgery, digestive health, transplantation and urology. UH Cleveland Medical Center is perennially among the highest performers in national ranking surveys, including "America's Best Hospitals" from U.S. News & World Report. UH is also home to Harrington Discovery Institute at University Hospitals – part of The Harrington Project for Discovery & Development. UH is the second largest employer in northern Ohio with 26,000 employees. For more information, go to UHhospitals.org. The Ohio Lottery has contributed more than $23 billion to education since 1974. For more information about the Ohio Lottery and its contribution to education, visit


With this collaboration, CancerLinQ subscribers will now have access to a link that will bring them directly to the NCCN Compendium®, where they can subscribe, for a fee. NCCN is able to make available its resources to the growing CancerLinQ network, which includes thousands of oncologists treating millions of patients from a variety of practice types and institutions across the United States. This collaboration represents one of the ways in which NCCN is empowering physicians to access NCCN resources through everyday health information technology (HIT) workflow. "CancerLinQ exists in service to our members to improve quality," said Kevin Fitzpatrick, Chief Executive Officer, CancerLinQ LLC. "As we continue to convene collaborators across the oncology community, we encourage efforts that enable resources to be more easily accessible for providers to make informed and timely decisions in the delivery of care to their patients. This collaboration is just one more positive step in that direction." The NCCN Compendium contains recommendations for the appropriate use of drugs and biologics to support decision-making for patients with cancer. The recommendations are derived directly from relevant NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®), along with their clinical context, route of administration, recommended use, and NCCN category of evidence. In addition to NCCN Guidelines-specific indication and use, NCCN adds relevant information, such as pharmacologic class, relevant classification codes, and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) indication, to the searchable database. All information is reviewed by members of the relevant NCCN Guidelines® panel before publication. The CancerLinQ platform is a big data initiative focused on cancer patient medical information, aimed at improving the quality of patient care and outcomes. It is the only major cancer data initiative being developed and led by physicians. When complete, CancerLinQ will unlock real-world patient care data from millions of electronic health records and securely process and analyze the data to provide immediate quality feedback and clinical decision support to providers. Doctors will receive personalized insights on a scope that was previously unattainable, and patients will benefit by having access to high quality care based on up-to-date insights and findings. The NCCN Guidelines are the recognized standard for clinical policy in cancer care and are the most thorough and most frequently updated clinical practice guidelines available in any area of medicine. For more information, visit NCCN.org. About the National Comprehensive Cancer Network The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®), a not-for-profit alliance of 27 leading cancer centers devoted to patient care, research, and education, is dedicated to improving the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of cancer care so that patients can live better lives. Through the leadership and expertise of clinical professionals at NCCN Member Institutions, NCCN develops resources that present valuable information to the numerous stakeholders in the health care delivery system. As the arbiter of high-quality cancer care, NCCN promotes the importance of continuous quality improvement and recognizes the significance of creating clinical practice guidelines appropriate for use by patients, clinicians, and other health care decision-makers. The NCCN Member Institutions are: Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center, Omaha, NE; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, OH; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center | Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA; Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC; Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Phoenix/Scottsdale, AZ, Jacksonville, FL, and Rochester, MN; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Columbus, OH; Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN; Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center, Birmingham, AL; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA; University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN; and Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, CT. About ASCO Founded in 1964, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Inc. (ASCO®) is committed to making a world of difference in cancer care. As the world's leading organization of its kind, ASCO represents more than 40,000 oncology professionals who care for people living with cancer. Through research, education, and promotion of the highest-quality patient care, ASCO works to conquer cancer and create a world where cancer is prevented or cured, and every survivor is healthy. ASCO is supported by its affiliate organization, the Conquer Cancer Foundation. Learn more at www.ASCO.org, explore patient education resources at www.Cancer.Net, and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and YouTube. About CancerLinQ LLC CancerLinQ LLC is a subsidiary of American Society of Clinical Oncology, Inc. established for the development and operation of the CancerLinQ® initiative. CancerLinQ is a health information technology platform aimed at enhancing and improving the understanding and treatment of cancer. To learn more, visit www.cancerlinq.org. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/nccn-and-cancerlinq-collaborating-to-provide-evidence-based-decision-making-resources-to-physicians-300466207.html


News Article | May 31, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

It may be possible to disrupt harmful blood clots in people at risk for heart attack or stroke without increasing their risk of bleeding, according to a new study published in Nature Communications. The new research out of University Hospitals (UH) Cleveland Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and the Cleveland Clinic reveals a previously unknown cell receptor interaction that, when manipulated with therapeutic molecules, safely prevents blood clots. Approximately 100,000 Americans die annually from blood clots, or thrombosis, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "We have found a new thrombosis target that does not increase bleeding risk," said senior author Daniel I. Simon, MD, President, UH Cleveland Medical Center, Herman K. Hellerstein Chair of Cardiovascular Research, and Professor of Medicine at Case Western Reserve School of Medicine. "Our discovery indicates that you can identify a new pathway and target that mediates blood clotting, but does not affect our body's natural processes to stop bleeding, called hemostasis." The new pathway centers around a pair of protein receptors that help certain cells interact in inflammation and thrombosis. One receptor--Mac-1--is found on the surfaces of white blood cells recruited to sites of blood vessel injury, and the other--GPIbα--resides on the surfaces of platelets that form clots. When the receptors interact, they trigger cascades of signals that amplify both inflammation and clotting. Mac-1 binding to GPIbα also broadly regulates inflammation in laboratory models of kidney disease, vasculitis, and multiple sclerosis. Simon and colleagues discovered the interaction causes large and small artery clots in mice, but can be blocked by an antibody or a new, therapeutic small molecule that binds to the Mac-1 receptor. The researchers showed genetically engineered mice either without the Mac-1 receptor or with a mutant form could not bind GPIbα on platelets. As a result, the mice had delayed blood clot formation in response to artery injury. Mice exposed to the interfering antibody or small molecule were also unable to form the kinds of blood clots that can lead to stroke or heart attack. While the results showed the Mac-1-GPIbα receptor duo is required for harmful clots, the researchers discovered blocking their interaction with the small molecule had no effect on bleeding risk. Mice exposed to the molecule were still able to successfully stop minor bleeding, like tail cuts, and maintain normal blood coagulation and platelet function. The findings could lead to new medications that stave off heart attacks and strokes without harmful side effects, like excessive bleeding. "Current anti-clotting drugs (anticoagulants, such as warfarin, Xarelto/rivaroxaban, Eliquis/apixaban) and antiplatelet agents (aspirin, Plavix/clopdigorel, Brilinta/ticagrelor) are effective in reducing heart attack and stroke, but are associated with increased bleeding and transfusion," said Dr. Simon. "We have learned that bleeding and transfusion complications are equally as bad from a prognosis standpoint as heart attack or stroke." Simon and colleagues are now pursuing pre-clinical studies using antibodies to further test this novel technology, which according to Dr. Simon "is jointly owned by Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals, has been licensed to BioMotiv, and is the basis for NEWCO Sujana Biotech." Simon co-founded Sujana Biotech with the study's lead author Yunmei Wang, PhD, Assistant Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and fellow senior author Edward Plow, PhD, Chair of Molecular Cardiology and The Robert C. Tarazi, MD, Endowed Chair in Heart and Hypertension Research at Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute. This work was supported by National Institutes of Health grants to E.P. (P01HL073311 and R01 HL096062) and D.I.S. (R37 HL57506 and R01 HL126645) and a Harrington Discovery Institute Consortium Scholar Award to D.I.S. Founded in 1866, University Hospitals serves the needs of over 1 million patients per year through an integrated network of 18 hospitals, more than 40 outpatient health centers and 200 physician offices in 15 counties throughout northern Ohio. The system's flagship academic medical center, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, located on a 35-acre campus in Cleveland's University Circle, is affiliated with Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. The main campus also includes University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, ranked among the top children's hospitals in the nation; University Hospitals MacDonald Women's Hospital, Ohio's only hospital for women; and University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, part of the NCI-designated Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. UH is home to some of the most prestigious clinical and research programs in the nation, including cancer, pediatrics, women's health, orthopedics, radiology, neuroscience, cardiology and cardiovascular surgery, digestive health, dermatology, transplantation and urology. UH Cleveland Medical Center is perennially among the highest performers in national ranking surveys, including "America's Best Hospitals" from U.S. News & World Report. UH is also home to Harrington Discovery Institute at University Hospitals - part of The Harrington Project for Discovery & Development. UH is the second largest employer in northern Ohio with 26,000 employees. For more information, go to UHhospitals.org. For more information about Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, please visit: http://case. .


"Addressing safety issues throughout the cancer care continuum must be met with an increased focus on guidelines, awareness, resources, and training," said F. Marc Stewart, MD, Oncologist and Medical Director, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, and Co-Chair of the NCCN Best Practices Committee. "Understanding patient safety issues from patient, provider, and cancer center perspectives and recognizing the innovative approaches to address these gaps are integral components of high-quality cancer care." Clifford Goodman, PhD, of The Lewin Group will moderate the summit, which will consist of short presentations followed by roundtable discussions with lively discourse and ample time for audience questions. An abbreviated agenda is below. As developers of the widely used NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) that set the standard of cancer care in the United States, NCCN is invested in provision of high-quality, safe, value-based cancer care. Moreover, the library of NCCN Chemotherapy Order Templates (NCCN Templates®) include chemotherapy, immunotherapy, supportive care agents, monitoring parameters, and safety instructions based directly on recommendations within the NCCN Guidelines®. The NCCN Templates® were initially published as a result of the first NCCN patient safety policy summit held in 2006, and today NCCN has published more than 1,100 chemotherapy order templates, which have been integrated into various electronic health record (EHR) platforms for use at point of care. Panel Discussion: Safety and Accountability in Cancer Care; Past, Present, and Future Moderated by Clifford Goodman, PhD, The Lewin Group Panelists: Amy P. Abernethy, MD, PhD, Flatiron Jonathan S. Deutsch, MD, Bristol-Myers Squibb Terry Langbaum, MHS, The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins Steven R. Peskin, MD, MBA, FACP, Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey F. Marc Stewart, MD, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance Patient Access to Safe, High-Quality Cancer Care under a New Administration Clifford A. Hudis, MD, FACP, FASCO, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Panel Discussion: Barriers and Opportunities in Ensuring Access to Safe, High-Quality Cancer Care Moderated by Clifford Goodman, PhD, The Lewin Group Panelists: Eliot Fishman, PhD, Families USA Bruce Gould, MD, Northwest Georgia Oncology Centers Clifford A. Hudis, MD, FACP, FASCO, ASCO Lee Newcomer, MD, MHA, UnitedHealthcare  Caroline Pearson, Avalere Rodney L. Whitlock, PhD, ML Strategies *Subject to change. For more information about the NCCN Oncology Policy Program and to register for the event, visit NCCN.org/policy. About the National Comprehensive Cancer Network The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®), a not-for-profit alliance of 27 leading cancer centers devoted to patient care, research, and education, is dedicated to improving the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of cancer care so that patients can live better lives. Through the leadership and expertise of clinical professionals at NCCN Member Institutions, NCCN develops resources that present valuable information to the numerous stakeholders in the health care delivery system. As the arbiter of high-quality cancer care, NCCN promotes the importance of continuous quality improvement and recognizes the significance of creating clinical practice guidelines appropriate for use by patients, clinicians, and other health care decision-makers. The NCCN Member Institutions are: Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center, Omaha, NE; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, OH; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center | Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA; Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC; Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Phoenix/Scottsdale, AZ, Jacksonville, FL, and Rochester, MN; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Columbus, OH; Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN; Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center, Birmingham, AL; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA; University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN; and Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, CT. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/whats-next-nccn-gathers-health-care-policy-experts-to-deliberate-challenges-to-patient-safety-and-access-to-cancer-care-under-the-new-administration-300467297.html


To uncover the correlation between cancer screening adherence and use of medical services at community and academic cancer centers, researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, led by Brad Zebrack, PhD, MSW, MPH, reviewed electronic health record (EHR) data from 55 cancer centers in the United States and Canada. The results showed that adherence to screening protocols led to 18% fewer ED visits and 19% fewer hospitalizations in the two-month period following the screening. The study, "A Practice-Based Evaluation of Distress Screening Protocol Adherence and Medical Service Utilization," is published in the July 2017 issue of JNCCN—Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Reduced Anxiety and Improved Outcomes According to Dr. Zebrack, utilization of distress screening protocols, such as the National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) Distress Thermometer, have the ability uncover incapacitating conditions that, left untreated, could have an incredibly negative impact on patient outcomes. "Appropriate screening and identification of distress would flag a referral to a social worker, whose clinical assessment would uncover the cause of the patient's distress and lead to clinical engagement and delivery of an appropriate, evidence-based intervention, complementary to clinical treatment," said Zebrack. To illustrate this impact, Zebrack et al use the example of a screening that uncovers a spouse's anxiety related to the responsibility of maintaining the patient's central line at home. In this instance, the authors explain, appropriate response would preempt improper home care, reduce risk of infection, and prevent an ED visit and hospitalization. In many cases, coexisting psychosocial conditions inhibit adherence to therapy, and helping ensure that patients have access to appropriate support breaks down barriers to necessary clinical care and, essentially, better outcomes. "Just as we do not expect blood pressure screening alone to reduce symptoms of cardiovascular disease, we should not expect distress screening alone to improve outcomes," said Zebrack. "There must also be an appropriate clinical response when risk conditions are detected." Challenges to Utilization In 2015, the CoC established accreditation standards for patient-centered care that included a requirement for distress screening for all patients with cancer, as well as appropriate clinical response when warranted. The University of Michigan study is the first to examine adherence among nonexperimental distress screening protocols. Of the 55 centers studied—53 in the United States and two in Canada—EHRs for more than 8,400 patients were examined. Among those reports, 62% of patients received the mandated distress screening and follow up—the highest rates of which were reported by community cancer programs. Among National Cancer Institute (NCI)–designated cancer centers, less than half adhered to the protocol. "Particularly concerning is the finding that documentation of psychosocial screening in one of every three cases in this sample is lacking. The absence of these clinical data can compromise the ability of oncology care providers to know whether patients are receiving the psychosocial care and support they need," said Zebrack. Moreover, regardless of care setting, adherence rates for adolescent and young adult patients (aged 15–39 years) were significantly lower (58%) when compared with other age populations. Researchers identified that the highest adherence rates (70%) were among black/African American patients, while the lowest adherence rates (45%) were found in patients of American Indian/Alaska Native/Native Hawaiian/Pacific Island descent. The efficient use of scarce medical resources and the delivery of cost-effective care depends upon getting the right treatments to the right patients at the right times. Distress management protocols are critical for identifying and responding to the needs of patients. When left unchecked, unmet patient needs for psychosocial support contribute to poor patient outcomes and unnecessary use of costly medical services. Available Resources Among the cancer centers studied, 84% utilized the NCCN Distress Thermometer and Symptom Checklist—or a modified version thereof. This checklist, derived from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Distress Management, is similar to the pain scale used in various areas of medicine. The distress thermometer allows patients to self-identify their stress level from zero to 10, with 10 being an extreme level of distress. Under the guidelines, patients reporting above a "4" should be referred to supportive care that will best serve their needs. The corresponding problem list allows patients to self-identify sources of distress, including practical problems, family problems, emotional problems, spiritual/religious problems, and physical problems. A patient version of this tool is available free-of-charge at NCCN.org/patients. "In patients with cancer, distress encompasses far more than anxiety about treatment and prognosis. Encouraging patients to identify and express the sources of distress in their lives will ultimately improve their psychosocial and physical well-being. My hope is that one day, all oncologists will post the NCCN Distress Thermometer in their examination rooms just as primary care physicians have the eye chart," said Jimmie Holland, MD, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Founding Chair of the NCCN Guidelines Panel for Distress Management. "Discussion of distress should be a routine part of the patient visit. I applaud the efforts of Dr. Zebrack and his fellow researchers and hope these findings will help uncover barriers to appropriate care so that patients will receive the care they need when they need it." Complimentary access to the study, "A Practice-Based Evaluation of Distress Screening Protocol Adherence and Medical Service Utilization," is available until September 30, 2017, at JNCCN.org. About JNCCN—Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network More than 24,000 oncologists and other cancer care professionals across the United States read JNCCN—Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. This peer-reviewed, indexed medical journal provides the latest information about best clinical practices, health services research, and translational medicine. JNCCN features updates on the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®), review articles elaborating on guidelines recommendations, health services research, and case reports highlighting molecular insights in patient care. JNCCN is published by Harborside Press. Visit JNCCN.org. To inquire if you are eligible for a FREE subscription to JNCCN, visit http://www.nccn.org/jnccn/subscribe.asp JNCCN 360 is a new online resource for oncology professionals featuring up-to-date news, literature, trials, clinical perspectives on current therapies, and much more. Visit JNCCN360.org About the National Comprehensive Cancer Network The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®), a not-for-profit alliance of 27 leading cancer centers devoted to patient care, research, and education, is dedicated to improving the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of cancer care so that patients can live better lives. Through the leadership and expertise of clinical professionals at NCCN Member Institutions, NCCN develops resources that present valuable information to the numerous stakeholders in the health care delivery system. As the arbiter of high-quality cancer care, NCCN promotes the importance of continuous quality improvement and recognizes the significance of creating clinical practice guidelines appropriate for use by patients, clinicians, and other health care decision-makers. The NCCN Member Institutions are: Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center, Omaha, NE; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, OH; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center | Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA; Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC; Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Phoenix/Scottsdale, AZ, Jacksonville, FL, and Rochester, MN; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Columbus, OH; Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN; Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center, Birmingham, AL; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA; University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN; and Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, CT.


CLEVELAND (June 13, 2017) -- A University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center (UH) study shows TempTraq®, a patented, wearable, Bluetooth® continuous temperature monitor in the form of a soft, comfortable patch, can detect a rise in body temperature up to 180 minutes earlier, in a majority of patient cases, than the current standard-of-care (SOC) method. Earlier fever detection empowers clinicians to intervene faster. The promising results were published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology in conjunction with the ASCO Annual Meeting, which took place last week in Chicago. "This temperature monitoring patch has the potential to improve clinical outcomes for patients undergoing stem cell transplant and intensive chemotherapy for hematological malignancies by identifying neutropenic fever and beginning clinical interventions sooner," said Dr. Ehsan Malek, MD, UH Seidman Cancer Center. "We are looking forward to the next step in our research--implementing this temperature patch in the outpatient stem cell transplant setting." Unlike other devices and methods that provide physicians with only one point of data and offer no continuous monitoring or alerts, this patented device is the ideal, non-invasive, solution for doctors and nurses who need a continuous, smarter way to track, log and respond to fevers quickly. "It has been very exciting for our project team, the bedside nursing staff, and our patients to see this device working in real time," said Nina Dambrosio, MSN CNP, UH Seidman Cancer Center. To study this continuous, real-time method of body temperature measurement, UH tested the feasibility of monitoring body temperature for patients specifically undergoing stem cell transplant or intensive chemotherapy for leukemia. The patches were applied every 24 hours on 10 neutropenic patients throughout their hospital stays. Body temperature was recorded remotely with TempTraq in 10 minute intervals totaling 14,342 temperature measurements, vs the current standard SOC of one measurement every 4 hours. Though it wasn't tested in this study, Blue Spark's TempTraq Connect, a secure, HIPAA-compliant service supported by the Google Healthcare Cloud Platform, will allow the patches to integrate directly with hospital central monitoring systems and electronic health records (EHR) to safely and securely store patient health care data. Nurses can then view the temperature in their system as frequently as needed and can receive real-time audible or visual temperature change alerts at patient bedsides and/or through the central nursing station. Plus, no more waking patients to take their temperatures, and the hygienic, single-use, disposable design eliminates the hassle, time and cost of sterilizing the device between uses. The TempTraq system is scalable and can support a single hospital or a multi-hospital/physician group healthcare system. For more information on TempTraq or the results of this study, please visit http://www. . Headquartered in Westlake, Ohio, Blue Spark Technologies, Inc. is the leader in developing thin, flexible, printed power solutions for printed electronic systems, including solutions developed utilizing their thin, flexible proprietary battery technology. Blue Spark Technologies' latest innovation, TempTraq®, is the only Bluetooth®, wearable temperature monitor in the form of a soft, comfortable patch that continuously, safely and comfortably, monitors body temperature for up to 72 hours and sends alerts to Apple® or Android™ compatible mobile devices. The company's TempTraq Connect HIPAA-compliant service supported by Google Healthcare Cloud Platform allows parents and caregivers to monitor body temperature from anywhere. It also allows direct integration with health care provider electronic health records (EHR) systems and central nursing stations, providing a secure method of storing patient health care data. Founded in 1866, University Hospitals serves the needs of patients through an integrated network of 18 hospitals, more than 40 outpatient health centers and 200 physician offices in 15 counties throughout northern Ohio. The system's flagship academic medical center, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, located on a 35-acre campus in Cleveland's University Circle, is affiliated with Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. The main campus also includes University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, ranked among the top children's hospitals in the nation; University Hospitals MacDonald Women's Hospital, Ohio's only hospital for women; and University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, part of the NCI-designated Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. UH is home to some of the most prestigious clinical and research programs in the nation, including cancer, pediatrics, women's health, orthopedics, radiology, neuroscience, cardiology and cardiovascular surgery, digestive health, transplantation and urology. UH Cleveland Medical Center is perennially among the highest performers in national ranking surveys, including "America's Best Hospitals" from U.S. News & World Report. UH is also home to Harrington Discovery Institute at University Hospitals - part of The Harrington Project for Discovery & Development. UH is the second largest employer in northern Ohio with 26,000 employees. For more information, go to UHhospitals.org.


A recent study conducted by researchers at Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, led by Barbara Dull, MD, further confirmed the recommendations of the NCCN Guidelines panel. The study, "Overuse of Chest CT in Patients with Stage I and II Breast Cancer: An Opportunity to Increase Guidelines Compliance at an NCCN Member Institution," is published in the June issue of JNCCN – Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Using data from a prospective database, Dr. Dull and colleagues studied records of more than 3,300 patients diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer between 1998 and 2012 and found that 11% of patients with stage I and more than 36% of patients with stage II breast cancer underwent chest CT within six months of diagnosis, despite NCCN Guidelines recommendations. Of these 683 patients, only nine were diagnosed with pulmonary metastases. However, benign pulmonary nodules were discovered in 175 patients. "The overwhelming majority of nodules found in this study's patient population classified as false positive results," said Dr. Dull. "Not only do the costs of the chest CT and subsequent imaging and work-up put a cost constraint on the already burdened health care system, but the psychological impact of such results on a patient and their family is enormous." "I hope patients and their physicians are reassured by findings like these," added Amy Cyr, MD, corresponding author of the study. "Chest CT and other staging studies are of extremely low yield for identifying metastases in patients with early-stage breast cancer, and even for the 1.3% of patients in our cohort ultimately diagnosed with pulmonary disease, many were not diagnosed because of that original CT scan, but were instead diagnosed on scans as long as two years after diagnosis, suggesting even lower utility. Unfortunately, for the 26.9% of patients with positive CT scans (the vast majority of which were false positives), the subsequent evaluation needed not only raises health care costs and anxiety, but also has the potential to delay oncologic treatment." The NCCN Guidelines recommendations for patients with early-stage breast cancer are reinforced by other leading organizations in oncology, including the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), and Britain's National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). According to the study, patients who underwent staging chest CT were generally younger and more likely to have unfavorable tumor markers. However, there were no statistical differences between patients diagnosed with metastases and those with false positive results. "Even with numerous guidelines and recommendations, staging studies are routinely performed in patients with stage I and II breast cancer. Despite NCCN recommendations, many patients with asymptomatic early-stage breast cancer continue to undergo chest CT as part of their initial evaluation. Adherence to the NCCN Guidelines and other evidence-based recommendations will spare patients unnecessary testing and, in an era of increasing health care costs, also curb excessive spending," said Dr. Dull. The NCCN Guidelines are the recognized standard for clinical policy in cancer care and are often the most thorough and most frequently updated clinical practice guidelines available in any area of medicine. "Notwithstanding the publicized potential risks of radiation exposure and the disputable value of chest CT in early-stage breast cancer, referring clinicians still order it, not infrequently, based on anecdotal cases, concerns regarding legal ramifications, or to satisfy insistent patients. At all stages of cancer care, including at presentation, during neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy, and with advanced disease, evidence-based guidelines are needed to help direct treating physicians and their patients in selecting appropriate and indicated imaging studies," said Pamela J. DiPiro, MD, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center, in a June JNCCN commentary titled, "Evidence-Based Guidelines: Optimizing Imaging in Cancer Care." The study, "Overuse of Chest CT in Patients with Stage I and II Breast Cancer: An Opportunity to Increase Guidelines Compliance at an NCCN Member Institution," is available free of charge until September 30, 2017 at JNCCN.org. About JNCCN – Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network More than 24,000 oncologists and other cancer care professionals across the United States read JNCCN–Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. This peer-reviewed, indexed medical journal provides the latest information about best clinical practices, health services research, and translational medicine. JNCCN features updates on the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®), review articles elaborating on guidelines recommendations, health services research, and case reports highlighting molecular insights in patient care. JNCCN is published by Harborside Press. Visit JNCCN.org. To inquire if you are eligible for a FREE subscription to JNCCN, visit http://www.nccn.org/jnccn/subscribe.asp JNCCN 360 is a new online resource for oncology professionals featuring up-to-date news, literature, trials, clinical perspectives on current therapies, and much more. Visit JNCCN360.org About the National Comprehensive Cancer Network The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®), a not-for-profit alliance of 27 leading cancer centers devoted to patient care, research, and education, is dedicated to improving the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of cancer care so that patients can live better lives. Through the leadership and expertise of clinical professionals at NCCN Member Institutions, NCCN develops resources that present valuable information to the numerous stakeholders in the health care delivery system. As the arbiter of high-quality cancer care, NCCN promotes the importance of continuous quality improvement and recognizes the significance of creating clinical practice guidelines appropriate for use by patients, clinicians, and other health care decision-makers. The NCCN Member Institutions are: Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center, Omaha, NE; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, OH; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center | Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA; Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC; Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Phoenix/Scottsdale, AZ, Jacksonville, FL, and Rochester, MN; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Columbus, OH; Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN; Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center, Birmingham, AL; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA; University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN; and Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, CT. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/nccn-guidelines-compliance-for-chest-ct-reduces-false-positives-and-decreases-health-care-spending-in-breast-cancer-study-finds-300475325.html


Unlike other devices and methods that provide physicians with only one point of data and offer no continuous monitoring or alerts, this patented device is the ideal, non-invasive, solution for doctors and nurses who need a continuous, smarter way to track, log and respond to fevers quickly. "It has been very exciting for our project team, the bedside nursing staff, and our patients to see this device working in real time," said Nina Dambrosio, MSN CNP, UH Seidman Cancer Center. To study this continuous, real-time method of body temperature measurement, UH tested the feasibility of monitoring body temperature for patients specifically undergoing stem cell transplant or intensive chemotherapy for leukemia. The patches were applied every 24 hours on 10 neutropenic patients throughout their hospital stays. Body temperature was recorded remotely with TempTraq in 10 minute intervals totaling 14,342 temperature measurements, vs the current standard SOC of one measurement every 4 hours. Though it wasn't tested in this study, Blue Spark's TempTraq Connect, a secure, HIPAA-compliant service supported by the Google Healthcare Cloud Platform, will allow the patches to integrate directly with hospital central monitoring systems and electronic health records (EHR) to safely and securely store patient health care data. Nurses can then view the temperature in their system as frequently as needed and can receive real-time audible or visual temperature change alerts at patient bedsides and/or through the central nursing station. Plus, no more waking patients to take their temperatures, and the hygienic, single-use, disposable design eliminates the hassle, time and cost of sterilizing the device between uses. The TempTraq system is scalable and can support a single hospital or a multi-hospital/physician group healthcare system. For more information on TempTraq or the results of this study, please visit www.temptraq.healthcare. About Blue Spark Technologies, Inc. Headquartered in Westlake, Ohio, Blue Spark Technologies, Inc. is the leader in developing thin, flexible, printed power solutions for printed electronic systems, including solutions developed utilizing their thin, flexible proprietary battery technology. Blue Spark Technologies' latest innovation, TempTraq®, is the only Bluetooth®, wearable temperature monitor in the form of a soft, comfortable patch that continuously, safely and comfortably, monitors body temperature for up to 72 hours and sends alerts to Apple® or Android™ compatible mobile devices. The company's TempTraq Connect HIPAA-compliant service supported by Google Healthcare Cloud Platform allows parents and caregivers to monitor body temperature from anywhere. It also allows direct integration with health care provider electronic health records (EHR) systems and central nursing stations, providing a secure method of storing patient health care data. About University Hospitals About University Hospitals / Cleveland, Ohio Founded in 1866, University Hospitals serves the needs of patients through an integrated network of 18 hospitals, more than 40 outpatient health centers and 200 physician offices in 15 counties throughout northern Ohio. The system's flagship academic medical center, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, located on a 35-acre campus in Cleveland's University Circle, is affiliated with Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. The main campus also includes University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, ranked among the top children's hospitals in the nation; University Hospitals MacDonald Women's Hospital, Ohio's only hospital for women; and University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, part of the NCI-designated Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. UH is home to some of the most prestigious clinical and research programs in the nation, including cancer, pediatrics, women's health, orthopedics, radiology, neuroscience, cardiology and cardiovascular surgery, digestive health, transplantation and urology. UH Cleveland Medical Center is perennially among the highest performers in national ranking surveys, including "America's Best Hospitals" from U.S. News & World Report. UH is also home to Harrington Discovery Institute at University Hospitals – part of The Harrington Project for Discovery & Development. UH is the second largest employer in northern Ohio with 26,000 employees. For more information, go to UHhospitals.org. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/clinical-study-shows-temptraq-wearable-bluetooth-continuous-temperature-monitor-detects-fevers-quicker-than-the-current-standard-of-care-method-in-hospitals-300473188.html


Letters of Intent are being accepted through July 19, 2017. All applications must be submitted online at HarringtonDiscovery.SmartSimple.com. Harrington Discovery Institute will select up to 10 researchers to receive the Harrington Rare Disease Scholar Award. Scholars will work closely with drug development experts from its Innovation Support Center, which provides hands-on industry guidance not found in traditional academic research settings. Harrington Rare Disease Scholars and their institutions retain the intellectual property rights to their work. The award is open to MD PhD researchers at accredited academic medical centers, research institutions, and universities in the United States. Selection criteria include innovation, creativity and potential for impact on human health. Award recipients will be selected by Harrington Discovery Institute's Scientific Advisory Board for Rare Diseases and announced in early 2018. Harrington Discovery Institute The Harrington Discovery Institute at University Hospitals in Cleveland, Ohio – part of The Harrington Project for Discovery & Development – aims to advance medicine and society by enabling our nation's most inventive physician-scientists to turn their discoveries into medicines that improve human health. The institute was created in 2012 with a $50 million founding gift from the Harrington family and instantiates the commitment they share with University Hospitals to a Vision for a 'Better World'. The Harrington Project for Discovery & Development The Harrington Project for Discovery & Development (The Harrington Project), founded in late February 2012 by the Harrington Family and University Hospitals of Cleveland, is a $300 million national initiative built to bridge the translational valley of death. It includes the Harrington Discovery Institute and BioMotiv, a for-profit, mission-aligned drug development company that accelerates early discoveries into medicines for benefit of society. For more information about The Harrington Project and Harrington Discovery Institute, visit: HarringtonDiscovery.org. About University Hospitals Founded in 1866, University Hospitals serves the needs of over 1 million patients per year through an integrated network of 18 hospitals, more than 40 outpatient health centers and 200 physician offices in 15 counties throughout northern Ohio. The system's flagship academic medical center, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, located on a 35-acre campus in Cleveland's University Circle, is affiliated with Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. The main campus also includes University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, ranked among the top children's hospitals in the nation; University Hospitals MacDonald Women's Hospital, Ohio's only hospital for women; and University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, part of the NCI-designated Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. UH is home to some of the most prestigious clinical and research programs in the nation, including cancer, pediatrics, women's health, orthopedics, radiology, neuroscience, cardiology and cardiovascular surgery, digestive health, dermatology, transplantation and urology. UH Cleveland Medical Center is perennially among the highest performers in national ranking surveys, including "America's Best Hospitals" from U.S. News & World Report. UH is also home to Harrington Discovery Institute at University Hospitals – part of The Harrington Project for Discovery & Development. UH is the second largest employer in northern Ohio with 26,000 employees. For more information, go to UHhospitals.org. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/harrington-discovery-institute-at-university-hospitals-opens-call-for-harrington-rare-disease-scholar-award-300463164.html

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