University Hospital of Lublin

Lublin, Poland

University Hospital of Lublin

Lublin, Poland
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Kashyap A.,Pomeranian Medical University | Kluzniak W.,Pomeranian Medical University | Wokolorczyk D.,Pomeranian Medical University | Golab A.,Pomeranian Medical University | And 39 more authors.
International Journal of Cancer | Year: 2014

Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been associated with an elevated risk of prostate cancer risk. It is not established if they are useful in predicting the presence of prostate cancer at biopsy or if they can be used to define a low-risk group of men. In this study, 4,548 men underwent a prostate biopsy because of an elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA; ≥4 ng/mL) or an abnormal digital rectal examination (DRE). All men were genotyped for 11 selected SNPs. The effect of each SNP, alone and in combination, on prostate cancer prevalence was studied. Of 4,548 men: 1,834 (40.3%) were found to have cancer. A positive association with prostate cancer was seen for 5 of 11 SNPs studied (rs1800629, rs1859962, rs1447295, rs4430796, rs11228565). The cancer detection rate rose with the number of SNP risk alleles from 29% for men with no variant to 63% for men who carried seven or more risk alleles (OR = 4.2; p = 0.002). The SNP data did not improve the predictive power of clinical factors (age, PSA and DRE) for detecting prostate cancer (AUC: 0.726 vs. 0.735; p = 0.4). We were unable to define a group of men with a sufficiently low prevalence of prostate cancer that a biopsy might have been avoided. In conclusion, our data do not support the routine use of SNP polymorphisms as an adjunct test to be used on the context of prostate biopsy for Polish men with an abnormal screening test. © 2013 UICC.


Kluzniak W.,Pomeranian Medical University | Wokolorczyk D.,Pomeranian Medical University | Kashyap A.,Pomeranian Medical University | Jakubowska A.,Pomeranian Medical University | And 33 more authors.
Prostate | Year: 2013

BACKGROUND The G84E mutation in the HOXB13 gene has been associated with a high lifetime risk of prostate cancer in North America (about 20-fold). The geographical and ethnic extent of this recurrent allele has not yet been determined. METHODS We assayed for the presence of the G84E mutation in 3,515 prostate cancer patients and 2,604 controls from Poland and estimated the odds ratio for prostate cancer associated with the allele. RESULTS The G84E mutation was detected in 3 of 2,604 (0.1%) individuals from the general population in Poland and in 20 of 3,515 (0.6%) men with prostate cancer (Odds ratio [OR] = 5.0; 95% CI: 1.5-16.7; P = 0.008). The allele was present in 4 of 416 (1.0%) men with familial prostate cancer (OR = 8.4, 95% CI: 1.9-37.7; P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS The G84E mutation predisposes to prostate cancer in Poland, but accounts for only a small proportion of cases. We expect that the G84E founder mutation might be present in other Slavic populations. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Cybulski C.,Pomeranian Medical University | Wokolorczyk D.,Pomeranian Medical University | Kluzniak W.,Pomeranian Medical University | Jakubowska A.,Pomeranian Medical University | And 54 more authors.
British Journal of Cancer | Year: 2013

Background:To establish the contribution of eight founder alleles in three DNA damage repair genes (BRCA1, CHEK2 and NBS1) to prostate cancer in Poland, and to measure the impact of these variants on survival among patients.Methods:Three thousand seven hundred fifty men with prostate cancer and 3956 cancer-free controls were genotyped for three founder alleles in BRCA1 (5382insC, 4153delA, C61G), four alleles in CHEK2 (1100delC, IVS2+1G>A, del5395, I157T), and one allele in NBS1 (657del5).Results:The NBS1 mutation was detected in 53 of 3750 unselected cases compared with 23 of 3956 (0.6%) controls (odds ratio (OR)=2.5; P=0.0003). A CHEK2 mutation was seen in 383 (10.2%) unselected cases and in 228 (5.8%) controls (OR=1.9; P<0.0001). Mutation of BRCA1 (three mutations combined) was not associated with the risk of prostate cancer (OR=0.9; P=0.8). In a subgroup analysis, the 4153delA mutation was associated with early-onset (age ≤60 years) prostate cancer (OR=20.3, P=0.004). The mean follow-up was 54 months. Mortality was significantly worse for carriers of a NBS1 mutation than for non-carriers (HR=1.85; P=0.008). The 5-year survival for men with an NBS1 mutation was 49%, compared with 72% for mutation-negative cases.Conclusion:A mutation in NBS1 predisposes to aggressive prostate cancer. These data are relevant to the prospect of adapting personalised medicine to prostate cancer prevention and treatment. © 2013 Cancer Research UK. All rights reserved.


Antczak A.,Poznan University of Medical Sciences | Wokolorczyk D.,Pomeranian Medical University | Kluzniak W.,Pomeranian Medical University | Kashyap A.,Pomeranian Medical University | And 31 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer Prevention | Year: 2015

A number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human genome have been associated with increased risk of prostate cancer. Recently, a single SNP in the region of chromosome 8q24 (rs188140481) has been associated with a three-fold increased risk of prostate cancer in Europe and North America. To establish whether rs188140481 is associated with the risk of prostate cancer in Poland, we genotyped 3467 men with prostate cancer and 1958 controls. The A allele of rs188140481 was detected in 44 of 3467 (1.3%) men with prostate cancer and in seven of 1958 (0.4%) controls (odds ratio= 3.6; 95% confidence interval 1.6-7.9; P =0.0006). The allele was present in eight of 390 (2.1%) men with familial prostate cancer (odds ratio=5.8; 95% confidence interval 2.1-16.2; P =0.001). A positive family history of cancers at sites other than the prostate was observed in 27% of men who carried the rs188140481 risk allele and in 44% of noncarriers (P= 0.04). No cancer at a site other than the prostate was more common in firstdegree or second-degree relatives of carriers of the rs188140481 risk allele than relatives of noncarriers. The rs188140481 polymorphism in the 8q24 region confers a moderate increase in the risk of prostate cancer in Polish men. The SNP does not appear to be associated with susceptibility to cancers of other types. Copyright © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


Antczak A.,Poznan University of Medical Sciences | Kluzniak W.,Pomeranian Medical University | Wokolorczyk D.,Pomeranian Medical University | Kashyap A.,Pomeranian Medical University | And 33 more authors.
Gene | Year: 2013

Background: Germline mutations of BRCA2 and NBS1 genes cause inherited recessive chromosomal instability syndromes and predispose to prostate cancer of poor prognosis. Mutations of the BLM gene cause another chromosomal instability clinical syndrome, called Bloom syndrome. Recently, a recurrent truncating mutation of BLM (Q548X) has been associated with a 6-fold increased risk of breast cancer in Russia, Belarus and Ukraine, but its role in prostate cancer etiology and survival has not been investigated yet. Methods: To establish whether the Q548X allele of the BLM gene is present in Poland, and whether this allele predisposes to poor prognosis prostate cancer, we genotyped 3337 men with prostate cancer and 2604 controls. Results: Q548X was detected in 13 of 3337 (0.4%) men with prostate cancer compared to 15 of 2604 (0.6%) controls (OR. = 0.7; 95% CI 0.3-1.4). A positive family history of any cancer in a first- or second-degree relative was seen only in 4 of the 13 (30%) mutation positive families, compared to 49% (1485/3001) of the non-carrier families (p. = 0.3). The mean follow-up was 49. months. Survival was similar among carriers of Q548X and non-carriers (HR. = 1.1; p. = 0.9). The 5-year survival for men with a BLM mutation was 83%, compared to 72% for mutation-negative cases. Conclusions: BLM Q548X is a common founder mutation in Poland. We found no evidence that this mutation predisposes one to prostate cancer or affect prostate cancer survival. However, based on the observed 0.6% population frequency of the Q548X allele, we estimate that one in 100,000 children should be affected by Bloom syndrome in Poland. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Laskowska M.,Medical University of Lublin | Laskowska K.,University Hospital of Lublin | Oleszczuk J.,Medical University of Lublin
Research Journal of Pharmaceutical, Biological and Chemical Sciences | Year: 2015

The aim of this study was to determine the maternal serum aVEGF-A and its soluble receptor type 1 (sVEGFR-1, sFlt-1) concentrations in pregnancies with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) in the presence or absence of preeclampsia. The study was performed on 65 normotensive pregnant patients with isolated IUGR, 64 preeclamptic women with IUGR and 51 preeclamptic patients with normal intrauterine foetal growth and 65 healthy normotensive pregnant women with singleton uncomplicated pregnancies. The maternal serum active VEGF and sVEGFR-1 concentrations were determined using a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The study revealed increased levels of aVEGF-A in patients with pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia and/or IUGR. But these differences were not statistically significant. The levels of aVEGF-A were decreased in the patients with HELLP syndrome and in the subgroup of patients with pregnancy complicated by eclampsia. This study revealed the higher serum sFlt-1 levels in both groups of preeclamptic patients and similar levels of sVEGFR-1 in normotensive patients with isolated IUGR to those observed in the control group. Findings presented in this study confirm the importance of aVEGF-A for the physiological course of pregnancy. Increased levels of sVEGFR-1, appear to be an important limitation, which may have a significant impact on the pathogenesis of severe preeclampsia and IUGR in the course of preeclampsia. Importantly, IUGR without preeclampsia does not present significant differences relative to physiological control for sVEGFR-1 levels, suggesting different aetiopathogenetic mechanisms leading to "pure" IUGR.

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