Ludwigshafen am Rhein, Germany
Ludwigshafen am Rhein, Germany

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Kloss M.,University of Heidelberg | Grond-Ginsbach C.,University of Heidelberg | Pezzini A.,University of Brescia | Metso T.M.,University of Helsinki | And 47 more authors.
European Journal of Neurology | Year: 2014

Background and purpose: Patients with ischaemic stroke (IS) caused by a spontaneous cervical artery dissection (CeAD) worry about an increased risk for stroke in their families. The occurrence of stroke in relatives of patients with CeAD and in those with ischaemic stroke attributable to other (non-CeAD) causes were compared. Methods: The frequency of stroke in first-degree relatives (family history of stroke, FHS) was studied in IS patients (CeAD patients and age- and sex-matched non-CeAD patients) from the Cervical Artery Dissection and Ischemic Stroke Patients (CADISP) database. FHS ≤ 50 and FHS > 50 were defined as having relatives who suffered stroke at the age of ≤50 or >50 years. FHS ≤ 50 and FHS > 50 were studied in CeAD and non-CeAD IS patients and related to age, sex, number of siblings, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, smoking and body mass index (BMI). Results: In all, 1225 patients were analyzed. FHS ≤ 50 was less frequent in CeAD patients (15/598 = 2.5%) than in non-CeAD IS patients (38/627 = 6.1%) (P = 0.003; odds ratio 0.40, 95% confidence interval 0.22-0.73), also after adjustment for age, sex and number of siblings (P = 0.005; odds ratio 0.42, 95% confidence interval 0.23-0.77). The frequency of FHS > 50 was similar in both study groups. Vascular risk factors did not differ between patients with positive or negative FHS ≤ 50. However, patients with FHS > 50 were more likely to have hypertension and higher BMI. Conclusion: Relatives of CeAD patients had fewer strokes at a young age than relatives of non-CeAD IS stroke patients. © 2014 EAN.


Grond-Ginsbach C.,University of Heidelberg | Giossi A.,University of Brescia | Aksay S.S.,University of Heidelberg | Engelter S.T.,University of Basel | And 81 more authors.
European Journal of Neurology | Year: 2013

Background and purpose: It has been suggested that inflammation may play a role in the development of cervical artery dissection (CeAD), but evidence remains scarce. Methods: A total of 172 patients were included with acute (< 24 h) CeAD and 348 patients with acute ischaemic stroke (IS) of other (non-CeAD) causes from the Cervical Artery Dissection and Ischemic Stroke Patients (CADISP) study, and 223 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. White blood cell (WBC) counts collected at admission were compared across the three groups. Results: Compared with healthy control subjects, CeAD patients and non-CeAD stroke patients had higher WBC counts (P < 0.001). Patients with CeAD had higher WBC counts and were more likely to have WBC > 10 000/μl than non-CeAD stroke patients (38.4% vs. 23.0%, P < 0.001) and healthy controls (38.4% vs. 8.5%, P < 0.001). WBC counts were higher in CeAD (9.4 ± 3.3) than in IS of other causes (large artery atherosclerosis, 8.7 ± 2.3; cardioembolism, 8.2 ± 2.8; small vessel disease, 8.4 ± 2.4; undetermined cause, 8.8 ± 3.1; P = 0.022). After adjustment for age, sex, stroke severity and vascular risk factors in a multiple regression model, elevated WBC count remained associated with CeAD, as compared with non-CeAD stroke patients [odds ratio (OR) = 2.56; 95% CI 1.60-4.11; P < 0.001) and healthy controls (OR = 6.27; 95% CI 3.39-11.61; P < 0.001). Conclusions: Acute CeAD was associated with particularly high WBC counts. Leukocytosis may reflect a pre-existing inflammatory state, supporting the link between inflammation and CeAD. © 2013 EFNS.

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