Agostino Gemelli University Hospital

Rome, Italy

Agostino Gemelli University Hospital

Rome, Italy
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Kaminski M.F.,Center of Oncology of Poland | Kaminski M.F.,University of Oslo | Thomas-Gibson S.,Imperial College London | Bugajski M.,Center of Oncology of Poland | And 29 more authors.
Endoscopy | Year: 2017

The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and United European Gastroenterology present a short list of key performance measures for lower gastrointestinal endoscopy. We recommend that endoscopy services across Europe adopt the following seven key performance measures for lower gastrointestinal endoscopy for measurement and evaluation in daily practice at a center and endoscopist level: 1 Rate of adequate bowel preparation (minimum standard 90 %); 2 Cecal intubation rate (minimum standard 90 %); 3 Adenoma detection rate (minimum standard 25 %); 4 Appropriate polypectomy technique (minimum standard 80 %); 5 Complication rate (minimum standard not set); 6 Patient experience (minimum standard not set); 7 Appropriate post-polypectomy surveillance recommendations (minimum standard not set). Other identified performance measures have been listed as less relevant based on an assessment of their importance, scientific acceptability, feasibility, usability, and comparison to competing measures. © Georg Thieme Verlag KGStuttgart · New York.


Snel B.J.,University of Groningen | Visconti G.,Agostino Gemelli University Hospital | Grabietz P.D.,Erasmus Medical Center | Werker P.M.N.,University of Groningen
Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery | Year: 2010

Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is the causal agent of varicella (chickenpox) and herpes zoster (shingles). Primary VZV infection is a common childhood disease, but elderly patients and those having a compromised immune system are also at risk. We present the case of progressive necrosis of the nose skin in a patient with a compromised immune system and a generalised VZV infection. During the course of his hospital stay and follow-up, the lesion gradually improved with conservative treatment. © 2009 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons.


Romagnoli C.,Agostino Gemelli University Hospital | Riccardi R.,Agostino Gemelli University Hospital | Purcaro V.,Agostino Gemelli University Hospital | Villani A.,Bambino Gesu Childrens Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine | Year: 2012

Objective: This study reports on an experience following contact by a large number of newborn babies with a nurse infected by active tuberculosis (TB). Methods: A large number of newborn babies were checked for possible contact with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) using interferon-gamma tests (IGTs) to determine specific treatment. Results: One hundred and seven infants showed a positive IGT positive and were not affected by active TB. All were treated with anti-tubercular drugs and were followed-up for 1 year. None of the infants developed active TB and all infants showed normal tuberculin skin tests and chest-x-rays, as well as IGT results at the end of treatment. Conclusions: Our experience suggests that newborns are at low risk of infection after contact with a nurse with active TB. IGTs can be used to assess possible contact with MTB and to determine a reduced number of infants to treat. © 2012 Informa UK, Ltd.


Coluzzi G.,Agostino Gemelli University Hospital | Coluzzi G.,Santa Maria Goretti Hospital | Navarese E.P.,GVM Hospitals of Care and Research | Andreotti F.,Agostino Gemelli University Hospital
Expert Review of Hematology | Year: 2012

EuroThrombosis is the annual meeting of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Thrombosis. It gathers clinicians and scientists interested in clinical/experimental thrombosis. The 2011 congress was held in Oporto, Portugal, and presented an appealing program with state-of-the-art sessions on new antiplatelet/anticoagulant agents, diabetes, cellular mechanisms of thrombosis and miRNAs. © 2012 Expert Reviews Ltd.


Rabini A.,Agostino Gemelli University Hospital | Piazzini D.B.,Agostino Gemelli University Hospital | Tancredi G.,University of Rome Tor Vergata | Foti C.,University of Rome Tor Vergata | And 10 more authors.
European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine | Year: 2012

Background. Deep heating therapy (DHT) has shown to improve pain and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in the short term. Benefits of superficial heating therapy (SHT) are controversial. Longterm effects of both heating modalities have not yet been investigated. Aim. To compare the effects of DHT and SHT in patients with symptomatic knee OA, and to determine the long-term effects of heat therapy. Design. Double-blind randomized clinical trial. Setting. Outpatient clinic of Geriatrics and Physiatrics, University Hospital. Population. Fifty-four patients with radiologically established diagnosis of moderate knee OA (KellgrenLawrence grade II or III) and pain lasting for at least three weeks. Methods. DHT: local microwave diathermy (three 30min sessions a week for four weeks); SHT: application of hot packs (three 30-min sessions a week for four weeks). Primary outcome measure: Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) index for the assessment of joint pain, stiffness and physical function limitations. Secondary outcome measures: British Medical Research Council (BMRC) rating scale for the evaluation of muscle strength, and a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain assessment. Follow up: 24 weeks for all outcome measures; 12 months for the primary outcome. Results. Intention-to-treat analyses showed a treatment effect in favor of DHT for all outcome measures. No clinically relevant changes were observed in the SHT group. Benefits of DHT were maintained over 12 months of follow-up. Conclusions. DHT via localized microwave diathermy improves pain, muscle strength and physical function in patients affected by knee OA, with benefits maintained over the long term. No clinically relevant improvements were observed in patients who underwent SHT. Clinical Rehabilitation Impact. DHT via microwave diathermy delivered three times a week for four weeks significantly improves pain and function in patients affected by moderate knee OA, with benefits retained for at least 12 months. No clinically relevant changes are observed in knee OA patients treated with SHT.


Ianiro G.,Agostino Gemelli University Hospital | Tilg H.,Innsbruck Medical University | Gasbarrini A.,Agostino Gemelli University Hospital
Gut | Year: 2016

The recent increase in our knowledge of human gut microbiota has changed our view on antibiotics. Antibiotics are, indeed, no longer considered only beneficial, but also potentially harmful drugs, as their abuse appears to play a role in the pathogenesis of several disorders associated with microbiota impairment (eg, Clostridium difficile infection or metabolic disorders). Both drug-related factors (such as antibiotic class, timing of exposure or route of administration) and host-related factors appear to influence the alterations of human gut microbiota produced by antibiotics. Nevertheless, antibiotics are nowadays considered a reliable therapy for some non-communicable disorders, including IBS or hepatic encephalopathy. Moreover, some antibiotics can also act positively on gut microbiota, providing a so-called 'eubiotic' effect, by increasing abundance of beneficial bacteria. Therefore, antibiotics appear to change, for better or worse, the nature of several disorders, including IBS, IBD, metabolic disorders or liver disease. This reviews aims to address the potential of antibiotics in the development of major non-communicable disorders associated with the alteration of gut microbiota and on newly discovered therapeutic avenues of antibiotics beyond the cure of infectious diseases. © 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd & British Society of Gastroenterology.


PubMed | Agostino Gemelli University Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: European journal of physical and rehabilitation medicine | Year: 2012

Deep heating therapy (DHT) has shown to improve pain and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in the short term. Benefits of superficial heating therapy (SHT) are controversial. Long-term effects of both heating modalities have not yet been investigated.To compare the effects of DHT and SHT in patients with symptomatic knee OA, and to determine the long-term effects of heat therapy.Double-blind randomized clinical trial.Outpatient clinic of Geriatrics and Physiatrics, University Hospital.Fifty-four patients with radiologically established diagnosis of moderate knee OA (Kellgren-Lawrence grade II or III) and pain lasting for at least three weeks.DHT: local microwave diathermy (three 30-min sessions a week for four weeks); SHT: application of hot packs (three 30-min sessions a week for four weeks).Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) index for the assessment of joint pain, stiffness and physical function limitations.British Medical Research Council (BMRC) rating scale for the evaluation of muscle strength, and a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain assessment. Follow up: 24 weeks for all outcome measures; 12 months for the primary outcome.Intention-to-treat analyses showed a treatment effect in favor of DHT for all outcome measures. No clinically relevant changes were observed in the SHT group. Benefits of DHT were maintained over 12 months of follow-up.DHT via localized microwave diathermy improves pain, muscle strength and physical function in patients affected by knee OA, with benefits maintained over the long term. No clinically relevant improvements were observed in patients who underwent SHT.DHT via microwave diathermy delivered three times a week for four weeks significantly improves pain and function in patients affected by moderate knee OA, with benefits retained for at least 12 months. No clinically relevant changes are observed in knee OA patients treated with SHT.

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