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News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

CHARLOTTE, N.C. & VIRGINIA BEACH, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Humana Inc. (NYSE: HUM) is teaming up with 11 orthopedic specialty groups in North Carolina and Virginia on an orthopedic value-based care model for Humana Medicare Advantage members undergoing total hip or knee joint replacement procedures. Humana’s Total Joint Replacement Episode-Based Model is designed to improve quality, outcomes and cost across a person’s entire joint replacement episode of care. Humana will provide the orthopedic practices with robust data and analytics needed to better manage all aspects of their patients’ care from diagnosis to recovery. For the patient, this is expected to deliver a more coordinated care experience and to reduce complication rates and unnecessary readmissions after surgery. In North Carolina, Humana will work with EmergeOrtho (Blue Ridge Bone and Joint Clinic, Carolina Orthopaedic Specialists, Triangle Orthopaedic Associates and Wilmington Orthopaedic Group), Carolina Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Center, Raleigh Orthopaedic Clinic, OrthoCarolina and Wake Forest University Health Sciences. In Virginia, Humana will work with Appalachian Orthopaedic Associates, Hampton Roads Orthopedic Center, and Jordan-Young Institute. Humana has 30 years of experience partnering with primary care physicians in value-based care arrangements. By focusing on quality and health, Humana experienced 20 percent lower costs in total in 2015 for members who were treated by doctors and other health care professionals in a value-based reimbursement model setting versus an estimation of original fee-for-service Medicare costs using the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Limited Data Set Files. Humana is now moving to apply the approach to specialties, such as orthopedics, where highly coordinated care supported by population health data has the ability to potentially improve outcomes, lower cost and deliver a better health care experience for patients. The participating North Carolina and Virginia orthopedic groups join the 12 orthopedic groups in Ohio and Tennessee who joined Humana’s orthopedic value-based care model in 2016 and the eight groups in Indiana and Kentucky that were announced by Humana last month. Humana’s model is similar to the State of Tennessee’s Innovation Model (SIM) Grant through the CMS for Medicaid beneficiaries. Through the new agreement, Humana’s population health capabilities, including patient data and analytics as well as chronic disease management and wellness programs, will complement the integrated care approach that each orthopedic group will employ with Humana members. “ Humana has made great strides when it comes to value-based care in the primary care space so it’s exciting to see where we can take value-based care when we apply it to more involved medical procedures like total joint replacement,” said Chip Howard, Humana’s Vice President of Payment Innovation. “ Humana’s approach is to provide orthopedic surgeons the tools they need to coordinate all aspects of their patients’ diagnosis, treatment, recovery and rehabilitation to in turn improve quality, lower cost and create a better experience for our members.” As of March 31, 2017, Humana has 1.8 million individual Medicare Advantage members and 160,000 commercial members who are cared for by 51,300 primary care providers, in more than 900 value-based relationships across 43 states and Puerto Rico. For more information, visit humana.com/accountable-care or www.humana.com/valuebasedcare. About Humana Humana Inc., headquartered in Louisville, Ky., is a leading health and well-being company focused on making it easy for people to achieve their best health with clinical excellence through coordinated care. The company’s strategy integrates care delivery, the member experience, and clinical and consumer insights to encourage engagement, behavior change, proactive clinical outreach and wellness for the millions of people we serve across the country. More information regarding Humana is available to investors via the Investor Relations page of the company’s web site at www.humana.com, including copies of: More Information Humana is a Medicare Advantage HMO, PPO and PFFS plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in any Humana plan depends on contract renewal. This information is not a complete description of benefits. Contact the plan for more information. Limitations, copayments and restrictions may apply. Benefits may change each year. Other providers are available in our network. Humana Inc. and its subsidiaries (“Humana”) do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability or sex. English: ATTENTION: If you do not speak English, language assistance services, free of charge, are available to you. Call 1-800-281-6918 (TTY: 711). Español (Spanish): ATENCIÓN: Si habla español, tiene a su disposición servicios gratuitos de asistencia lingüística. Llame al 1-800-281-6918 (TTY: 711). 繁體中文 (Chinese): 注意:如果您使用繁體中文,您可以免費獲得語言援助服務。請致電 1-800-281-6918 (TTY:711).


News Article | May 31, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Brain changes after stroke may lead to increase in alcohol-seeking behavior, at least in animal models, according to research published in the journal Scientific Reports. Although it is known that excessive alcohol intake (more than two drinks per day) is a risk factor for stroke, there hasn't been much scientific study about how alcohol-related behavior might change after a stroke has occurred. When researchers at the Texas A&M College of Medicine looked into the issue, they found that strokes in a certain part of the brain increase alcohol-seeking behavior and preference for alcohol. "It's important because although stroke is a severe disease, more and more people are surviving and recovering after their first stroke," said Jun Wang, MD, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Neuroscience and Experimental Therapeutics at the College of Medicine and co-principal investigator of this project. "Therefore, it is important to study behavior change after stroke, and how that behavior can affect the chances of having another one, which is often fatal." People who have had one stroke are often advised to limit their consumption of alcohol to help prevent a recurrence, but that may be difficult if damage caused by the stroke itself is encouraging them to actually drink more. That might help explain anecdotal reports that compliance with the instruction not to drink after a stroke is low. "In an ischemic stroke, a blood vessel to the brain is blocked, which deprives the neurons in the brain of glucose and oxygen," said Farida Sohrabji, PhD, presidential impact fellow and professor in the Department of Neuroscience and Experimental Therapeutics at the College of Medicine and co-principal investigator of this project, who studies acute and long-term consequences of strokes, as well as novel stroke therapies. "Neurons are very dependent on these two nutrients, and without them, neurons very rapidly begin to die." After an ischemic stroke in the middle cerebral artery -- one of the most common types of stroke in humans -- the animal models showed much lower overall fluid intake but increased preference for alcohol over water when they did drink. These effects were significant even though the stroke only affected one side of the brain, leaving the other half of the brain without damage. "Their preference for alcohol can be seen five days after stroke and through at least the first month after the stroke," Wang said. "Specifically, when given a choice between water and alcohol, they chose alcohol a higher percentage of the time than they did before the stroke." What the researchers think is happening is that the stroke kills neurons in a part of the brain called the dorsal lateral striatum, and they stop inhibiting certain neurons in the midbrain. These midbrain neurons, which are now far more excitable, send a signal to a particular type of dopamine receptor, called D1. These D1 receptor-containing cells, located in the dorsomedial striatum, were shown in Wang's previous work to compel the individual to perform an action -- like having an alcoholic beverage. "This circuit is interesting because it means that when the dorsal lateral striatum neurons die, the result is increased excitement of the D1 neurons in the dorsomedial striatum," Wang said. "It is this increased excitement that we think is causing alcohol-seeking behavior." However, when the D1 receptor was inhibited, alcohol-seeking behavior in individuals with stroke damage decreased significantly while the control group didn't exhibit much of a change. "This is a hint at how the brain works," Wang said, "and although we're a long way off, something to inhibit this D1 receptor might be a possible therapeutic target for a drug to help people resist the urge to drink after a stroke." "As much as possible, we tried to use a model that would replicate the experience of a human patient," Sohrabji said. "Therefore, we think that these findings, although preliminary, might eventually help people who have experienced any type of brain injury, whether a stroke or an accident that causes traumatic brain injury." This study was a collaboration between the laboratories of Wang, who studies alcohol use disorders, and Sohrabji, who studies ischemic stroke, and funded by a seed grant from the Texas A&M University Health Science Center Division of Research. Other funding for the research was provided by grants from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS).


WESTPORT, Conn.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Intensity Therapeutics, Inc., a privately held biotechnology company developing proprietary cancer immunotherapy products, today announced that the first patient successfully received treatment with the Company’s lead product, INT230-6 as part of a Phase 1/2 international clinical study. Initiation of the study followed acceptance of an investigational new drug (IND) submission by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Division of Oncology Products 1 (DOP1) and receipt from Health Canada of a No Objection Letter following submission of a clinical trial application (CTA). The clinical trial, IT-01 (NCT#03058289), entitled A Phase 1/2 Safety Study of Intratumorally Administered INT230-6 in Adult Subjects with Advanced Refractory Cancers, aims to enroll approximately 60 patients with several different types of advanced solid tumors. “Bringing our novel product, INT230-6, into human testing is a major milestone for Intensity Therapeutics,” commented President and CEO Lewis H. Bender. “Over the past few years our Company has demonstrated impressive tumor shrinkage in several murine models of cancers. INT230-6 eradicated large tumors, activated a systemic immune response and improved survival. Animals having a complete response acquired the capability to spontaneous clear re-challenges of the same cancer throughout the remainder of their lives, suggesting a protective effect similar to that of a vaccine. We are therefore excited to have initiated human testing. Our staff, investigators and clinical centers are enthusiastic about bringing patients our potentially life-saving product.” This unique Phase 1/2 study will first assess the safety of INT230-6 in tumors treated at the skin surface (e.g. breast, melanoma, head-and-neck and lymphoma). Subsequent patients receiving INT230-6 will include those with deep tumors (e.g. liver, pancreatic, colon, lung and others). Investigators will utilize image guidance to inject the tumors. Additionally, a cohort is planned to explore INT230-6 in combination with anti-PD1 agents. The study’s primary goal is to demonstrate the safety of INT230-6. Secondary analyses will examine the efficacy of INT230-6 treatment via multiple parameters. The trial includes several adaptive components that will allow for adjustments in patient groups, dosing schedule and dose volumes administered. “Our studies with INT230-6 have shown the ability to stimulate a strong T-cell response as a monotherapy. There is considerably enhanced activity using INT230-6 in combination with checkpoint inhibitors such as anti-PD-1 antibodies, while maintaining a favorable safety profile,” said Chief Medical Officer Ian B. Walters, MD. “We are optimistic that our novel trial design can quickly detect evidence of direct tumor killing and immune system activation. Physicians desperately need improved treatments for patients with advanced cancers that are not responding to approved immunotherapies. Intensity Therapeutics is grateful to the volunteers participating in our study and looks forward to collecting data on INT230-6 in different cancer types.” INT230-6 is a novel, anti-cancer drug for direct intratumoral injection. The product contains potent anti-cancer agents that disperse throughout tumors and diffuse into cancer cells. INT230-6 was identified from Intensity’s DfuseRxSM platform and is being evaluated in a clinical trial; IT-01. In preclinical studies INT230-6 administration eradicated tumors by a combination of direct tumor kill coupled with recruitment of dendritic cells to the tumor micro-environment that stimulated anti-cancer T-cell activation. Treatment with INT230-6 in in vivo models of severe cancer resulted in substantial improvement in overall survival compared to standard therapies. Further, INT230-6 provided complete responder animals with long-term, durable protection from multiple re-inoculations of the initial cancer and resistance to other cancers. IT-01 is entitled A Phase 1/2 Safety Study of Intratumorally Administered INT230-6 in Adult Subjects with Advanced Refractory Cancers. The trial aims to enroll approximately 60 patients with different types advanced solid tumor malignancies in a multicycle dosing regimen. The study will be conducted in multiple countries and includes a cohort combining INT230-6 with an anti-PD-1 antibody. Currently the study is recruiting in the U.S. at two hospitals associated with the University of Southern California (USC) and in Canada at the University Health Network (UHN) in Toronto. The principal investigator at USC is Dr. Anthony El-Khoueiry; the principal investigator at UHN is Dr. Lillian Siu. The study’s primary objective is to assess the safety and tolerability of multiple intratumoral doses of INT230-6. Secondary assessments are to understand preliminary efficacy of INT230-6 by measuring the injected and bystander tumor responses. The study will characterize the systemic pharmacokinetic profile of multiple doses of INT230-6’s drug substances after single and then multiple intratumoral injections. Exploratory analysis will characterize patient outcome, as well as evaluate various tumor and anti-tumor immune response biomarkers that may correlate with response. Data will be used to assess the progression free and overall survival in subjects receiving INT230-6. Further information can be found at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT#03058289). Intensity Therapeutics, Inc. is a clinical-stage biotechnology company whose mission is to greatly extend the lives of patients with cancer. Intensity Therapeutics is pioneering a new immune-based approach to treat cancer. The Company uses its DfuseRxSM platform technology to create new drug formulations that disperse throughout a tumor and diffuse into cancer cells. Drug products created using the technology are capable of attenuating (killing) a tumor in a manner that allows for the adaptive immune system to recognize the cancer and attack distal tumors and micrometastases. Further information can be found at www.intensitytherapeutics.com. This press release contains forward-looking statements regarding Intensity Therapeutics’ plans, future operations and objectives. Such statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause actual performance or achievements to be materially different from those currently anticipated. These forward-looking statements include, among other things, statements about the initiation and timing of future clinical trials.


COIMBRA, Portugal, July 11, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- At the 16th International Photodynamic Association (IPA) World Congress in Coimbra, Professor Brian Wilson was the recipient of the 2017 EXCELLENCE AWARD IN PHOTODIAGNOSTIC RESEARCH. Dr. Brian Wilson is Professor of Medical Biophysics at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada. He is a well-known expert and leader in the field of PDT and Photodiagnostics, internationally recognized for his pioneering research into various optic tools that can be used for minimally-invasive cancer treatment, and early diagnosis and optically-guided cancer therapeutics. He holds several awards in biomedical optics (Mark Award, NIH Translational Research Award, Michael S. Feld Award and Britton Chance Award) and in cancer research (Robert L. Noble Prize). In 1981, Dr. Wilson initiated translational research and collaborative clinical trials of photodynamic therapy for brain, prostate and gastrointestinal cancers. Dr. Wilson leads a world-renowned R&D program in optics-based biomedical applications, with a primary translational/clinical focus. He has driven the development of fluorescence and other endoscopic imaging techniques – particularly in Barrett's esophagus and colon cancer – and more recently has developed optical imaging to guide surgery that is being evaluated in clinical trials for head and neck, prostate and brain cancers. In the last few years, his research has expanded to include development of photonic nanoparticles in cancer treatment, diagnosis and research. Dr. Wilson has published over 350 peer-reviewed papers in basic, translational and clinical research. With several international Visiting Appointments (Harvard, USA; Saõ Paulo, Brazil; Fujian, China; Western Australia), Dr. Wilson is involved in many national and international collaborations. Dr. Wilson has trained more than 50 graduate students, post-doctoral and clinical fellows, many of whom remain in biomedical optics, cancer research and practice worldwide. He also has worked with many companies nationally and internationally in translating optical technologies into clinical practice. The Coimbra World Congress was the 16th conference held by the International Photodynamic Association, marking 32 years of this global meeting. The IPA World Congresses, held every two years, are the leading PDT meetings bringing together members of the global photodynamic community in order to advance scientific and clinical research relating to photodiagnosis and photodynamic therapies.  The next IPA World Congress is to be hosted in Boston, USA and will be led by Dr. Tayyaba Hasan, Professor of Dermatology at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Harvard Medical School (HMS) and a Professor of Health Sciences and Technology (Harvard-MIT). Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is a combination therapy involving light activated photosensitizers to diagnose and treat various types of cancers and pre-cancers, macular degeneration and multidrug resistant biofilm infections involving bacteria, viruses and fungi. For more information, please contact: ipasecretary@internationalphotodynamic.com


News Article | July 10, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

Patients can find multi-specialty care in a recently opened UTHealth-connected office for the Houston area HOUSTON, TX--(Marketwired - July 10, 2017) - Expanding its services and availability to accommodate more patients than ever before, UT Physicians, a part of UTHeath, opened UT Physicians General Surgery-Southeast earlier this year, offering elective general surgery, colon and rectal surgery, surgical oncology, breast surgery, and bariatric surgery options for Houston-area men, women, and children. The general surgery focus is on hernia repair and care for acid reflux and foregut problems. Bariatric surgery is devoted to weight-loss solutions for obese patients seeking a solution after diet, exercise, and other nonsurgical options have proven ineffective. UT Physicians General Surgery-Southeast is staffed by Dr. Amanda Parker, Dr. Michael Trahan, Dr. Obos Ekhaese, Dr. Curtis Wray, Dr. Emily Robinson, and Dr. Tamara Saunders. Dr. Ekhaese, who focuses on general surgery, was certified by the American Osteopathic Board of Surgery after earning his degree from Western University of Health Science, then completing an internship at Franciscan St. James Olympia Fields, a residency at Michigan State University Pontiac Osteopathic Hospital, and a fellowship at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Dr. Trahan graduated medical school at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, completed a residency at University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, then gained board certification in general surgery. He specialized in bariatric surgery and is an assistant professor at the McGovern Medical School, in addition to being an American College of Surgeons fellow. His specialty at UT Physicians General Surgery-Southeast is general surgery and weight management. Dr. Parker is an assistant professor at the Department of Surgery at McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center (UTHealth). She earned her medical degree in 2006 from the UT Southwestern Medical School, then completed her residency at University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and her fellowship at Houston Methodist Hospital. Her board certification is from the American Board of Surgery, and she is an associate fellow of the American College of Surgeons and a member of several groups. Her clinical focus is bariatric surgery and general minimally invasive surgery. Dr. Wray earned a bachelor of science in chemistry from University of Louisville, then his medical degree from the University of Kentucky College of Medicine. His general surgery residency was at University of Cincinnati, and his surgical oncology fellowship was at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. He is currently an associate professor of surgery at UTHealth who belongs a variety of professional societies and associations. He focuses on general surgery and surgical oncology. Dr. Robinson attended University of Texas Medical School at Houston for her medical degree, then University of Alabama at Birmingham and University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston for her residencies and University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for her fellowship. She is certified by the American Board of Surgery and a professor at McGovern Medical School. Her specialties are weight management and general, critical care, plastic, and breast surgery. Board certified by the American Board of Surgery and a fellow of the American College of Surgeons, Dr. Saunders studied medicine at University of Texas School of Medicine at San Antonio and performed her residency at University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. With a focus on general and breast surgery, she also is a professor for McGovern Medical School. UT Physicians General Surgery-Southeast is in Memorial Hermann Southeast Medical Plaza 2 at 11920 Astoria Blvd., suite 460, Houston, TX, 77089. UT Physicians is a part of UTHealth, operating as the John P. and Katherine G. McGovern Medical School's clinical practice. The larger UT Physicians group has a staff of more than 1,000 clinicians who have certification in 80 medical specialties and subspecialties.


News Article | July 10, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Dr. Brian Wilson is Professor of Medical Biophysics at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada. He is a well-known expert and leader in the field of PDT and Photodiagnostics, internationally recognized for his pioneering research into various optic tools that can be used for minimally-invasive cancer treatment, and early diagnosis and optically-guided cancer therapeutics. He holds several awards in biomedical optics (Mark Award, NIH Translational Research Award, Michael S. Feld Award and Britton Chance Award) and in cancer research (Robert L. Noble Prize). In 1981, Dr. Wilson initiated translational research and collaborative clinical trials of photodynamic therapy for brain, prostate and gastrointestinal cancers. Dr. Wilson leads a world-renowned R&D program in optics-based biomedical applications, with a primary translational/clinical focus. He has driven the development of fluorescence and other endoscopic imaging techniques – particularly in Barrett's esophagus and colon cancer – and more recently has developed optical imaging to guide surgery that is being evaluated in clinical trials for head and neck, prostate and brain cancers. In the last few years, his research has expanded to include development of photonic nanoparticles in cancer treatment, diagnosis and research. Dr. Wilson has published over 350 peer-reviewed papers in basic, translational and clinical research. With several international Visiting Appointments (Harvard, USA; Saõ Paulo, Brazil; Fujian, China; Western Australia), Dr. Wilson is involved in many national and international collaborations. Dr. Wilson has trained more than 50 graduate students, post-doctoral and clinical fellows, many of whom remain in biomedical optics, cancer research and practice worldwide. He also has worked with many companies nationally and internationally in translating optical technologies into clinical practice. The Coimbra World Congress was the 16th conference held by the International Photodynamic Association, marking 32 years of this global meeting. The IPA World Congresses, held every two years, are the leading PDT meetings bringing together members of the global photodynamic community in order to advance scientific and clinical research relating to photodiagnosis and photodynamic therapies.  The next IPA World Congress is to be hosted in Boston, USA and will be led by Dr. Tayyaba Hasan, Professor of Dermatology at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Harvard Medical School (HMS) and a Professor of Health Sciences and Technology (Harvard-MIT). Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is a combination therapy involving light activated photosensitizers to diagnose and treat various types of cancers and pre-cancers, macular degeneration and multidrug resistant biofilm infections involving bacteria, viruses and fungi. For more information, please contact: ipasecretary@internationalphotodynamic.com


News Article | July 13, 2017
Site: www.sciencenews.org

Streptococcus gallolyticus spurred growth of some colon cancer cells in lab dishes and in mice, researchers report July 13 in PLOS Pathogens. S. gallolyticus stimulates a biochemical chain reaction that scientists already knew is involved in the development of colon cancer, the researchers discovered. Bacteria had to be in direct contact with tumor cells to speed growth, but exactly how the bacteria do that isn’t yet known. Further investigation could help researchers find ways to block the microbe’s action, leading to better treatments for colorectal cancer, says microbiologist Yi Xu of Texas A&M University Health Science Center in Houston. People who have heart valve or blood infections of S. gallolyticus (previously known as S. bovis) often also have colorectal tumors. The bacterium has also been found growing on tumors in some colorectal cancer patients. But doctors couldn’t tell from association studies whether the bacteria were egging on tumors or were innocent bystanders. Xu and colleagues grew S. gallolyticus in lab dishes with several different types of human cells. Three types of colon cancer cells grew faster, producing about 50 to 60 percent more cells within 24 hours, with the bacteria than they did when cultured with no bacteria or with a harmless, milk-fermenting bacterium called Lactococcus lactis. Normal human colon cells, kidney cells, lung cancer cells and two strains of colon cancer cells didn’t respond to the bacteria. Those results could mean that the bacterium doesn’t spur on all colon cancers, says Cynthia Sears, an infectious disease specialist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine who was not involved in the work. Finding out what makes some cells more vulnerable to the bacteria will be important for future studies, she says. Colon cancer‒prone mice infected with S. gallolyticus had more and bigger tumors than those found in mice inoculated with L. lactis or with a saline solution. Xu and colleagues don’t know all the details of how S. gallolyticus promotes colon cancer growth. But the researchers discovered that when the bacteria glom onto responsive colon cancer cells, the microbes boost a signal sent through a relay chain known as the beta-catenin pathway. That pathway was already known to be involved in generating colorectal tumors. The researchers have some evidence that S. gallolyticus may also work through other chemical signaling pathways to enhance colon cancer growth. Whether the bacterium can initiate colon cancer isn’t clear, Xu says. Researchers will also need to investigate how S. gallolyticus works with or against other microbes that live in the colon, says Ran Blekhman, a geneticist at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. The study is part of a growing trend away from merely associational studies toward discovering how microbes function in the body, he says. “This is basically the next step in microbiome research.”


"The purpose of our study was to gather the perceptions and experiences of patients and their caregivers around symptoms caused by their tumor as well as issues related to the management of their meningioma," said Elizabeth M. Wilson, ABTA president and CEO. "These findings are important as too many meningioma patients lack information regarding the diagnosis, treatment and available clinical trials for this tumor type. It is our hope that this study will begin to open up much needed and long overdue dialogue between patients and caregivers and their health care teams." Preliminary findings were first presented at the 2016 ABTA conference by Gelareh Zadeh, MD, PhD, FRCSC, Clinical Scientist and Head of the Division of Surgical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network in Toronto. After further analysis, Dr. Zadeh will deliver the full results during the session entitled, "Meningiomas and Fatigue". Meningiomas comprise over one third of all diagnosed central nervous system tumors. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies as many as 20 percent of meningiomas as higher grade tumors. Yet, patient experiences and perceptions about the management of meningiomas are poorly understood. The study "A Survey on Disease Experiences of Meningioma Patients" looked into demographics, symptoms, treatment, support systems, involvement in clinical trials and effect on work and school. The ABTA National Patient & Family Conference, Redefining Survivorship through Science, Technology and Clinical Innovation is being held at the Westin O'Hare in Rosemont, Ill., August 4-5. Advance registration is encouraged; walk-in registration will be based upon space availability. To view the conference program and register, visit www.braintumorconference.org or call 800-886-ABTA (2282) or email info@abta.org. ABOUT THE AMERICAN BRAIN TUMOR ASSOCIATION Founded in 1973, the American Brain Tumor Association was the first national patient advocacy organization committed to funding brain tumor research and providing education and information for people of all tumor types and all ages. For more information, visit www.abta.org or call 800-886-ABTA (2282).


News Article | December 12, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

Event co-sponsored with George Washington University Health Workforce Institute brings together leading voices on GME, health workforce, and health policy issues WASHINGTON, DC--(Marketwired - December 12, 2016) - At an event held today, entitled GME - Where Do We Go From Here?, health workforce thought leaders discussed possible policy developments for graduate medical education (GME) in the new political environment in addition to other challenges facing residents in training and those who administer residency programs. The event was co-sponsored by the Association of Academic Health Centers (AAHC) and George Washington University's Health Workforce Institute and held on the George Washington University campus. The event can be viewed at: http://bit.ly/2hbe6iY. The event is a capstone of nationwide discussions led by AAHC. Throughout 2015-16, the association, whose members educate the next generation of health professionals, served as a neutral convener hosting roundtable sessions in response to the release of the 2014 IOM report, Graduate Medical Education That Meets the Nation's Health Needs. "Through a series of seven round table sessions held across the US, we learned about improving the alignment between teaching hospitals who receive GME Medicare funding and medical schools who are responsible for teaching and program accreditation; issues surrounding the mental health and well-being of the residents; and the needs of rural and underserved communities, among other issues," noted Dr. Steven Wartman, AAHC president and CEO. Today's meeting underscored the importance of reviewing GME's future with a panel that included Donald Berwick, former administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services CMS, past president of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, and co-chair of the IOM report; Victor Dzau, president, National Academy of Medicine; Karen Fisher, chief public policy officer, Association of American Medical Colleges; Steven Wartman, president and CEO of the Association of Academic Health Centers; Gail Wilensky, senior fellow at project hope, and co-chair of the IOM report, and the panel moderator: Fitzhugh Mullan, co-director of the GW University Health Workforce Institute. AAHC believes that any reforms to the GME system must be considered as part of a larger national health workforce strategy. Wartman adds, "As a nation, we need to be thinking strategically about how to improve health workforce market efficiency by ensuring that major stakeholders are working together. We must transform how we educate medical students -- as well as other health professionals -- and what we train them to do." AAHC is a non-profit association dedicated to advancing health and well-being through the vigorous leadership of academic health centers.


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Horace Mitchell, MD, FAANS, Neurological Surgeon, to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. Horace Mitchell is a highly trained and qualified neurological surgeon with an extensive expertise in all facets of his work, especially complex spine-cervical and lumbar, scoliosis, cranial surgery, carpal tunnel, and ulnar nerve. Dr. Mitchell has been in practice for more than 21 years and is currently serving patients within The NeuroMedical Center Clinic in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. He is also affiliated with The Spine Hospital of Louisiana. Dr. Horace Mitchell attended Tulane University in New Orleans, where he graduated with his Medical Degree. He subsequently completed his General Surgery internship at Tulane-affiliated hospitals, before undertaking his residency training in Neurosurgery at St. Louis University Health Sciences Center. While at St. Louis University, Dr. Mitchell served as both an instructor and clinical professor in neurosurgery. Dr. Mitchell is certified by the American Board of Neurological Surgery, and has earned the coveted title of Fellow of the American Association of Neurological Surgery and the North American Spine Society. He currently serves as Department Chief for The NeuroMedical Center Clinic’s Neurosurgery Department. Dr. Mitchell keeps up to date with the latest advances and developments in his field by maintaining a membership with several professional organizations. He attributes his success to his hard work, as well as his willingness to listen and learn. Learn more about Dr. Mitchell here: http://www.theneuromedicalcenter.com/physician/horace-l-mitchell/ and be sure to read his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com

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