Time filter

Source Type

Jacques N.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Sarilar V.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Urien C.,CNRS Quantitative Genetics and Evolution - Le Moulon | Lopes M.R.,Federal University of Minas Gerais | And 6 more authors.
International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology | Year: 2016

Five ascosporogenous yeast strains related to the genus Kazachstania were isolated. Two strains (CLIB 1764T and CLIB 1780) were isolated from French sourdoughs; three others (UFMG-CM- Y273T, UFMG-CM-Y451 and UFMG-CM-Y452) were from rotting wood in Brazil. The sequences of the French and Brazilian strains differed by one and three substitutions, respectively, in the D1/D2 large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS). The D1/D2 LSU rRNA sequence of these strains differed by 0.5 and 0.7% from Kazachstania exigua, but their ITS sequences diverged by 8.1 and 8.3%, respectively, from that of the closest described species Kazachstania barnettii. Analysis of protein coding sequences of RPB1, RPB2 and EF-1α distinguished the French from the Brazilian strains, with respectively 3.3, 6 and 11.7% substitutions. Two novel species are described to accommodate these newly isolated strains: Kazachstania saulgeensis sp. nov. (type strain CLIB 1764T=CBS 14374T) and Kazachstania serrabonitensis sp. nov. (type strain UFMG-CM-Y273T=CLIB 1783T=CBS 14236T). Further analysis of culture collections revealed a strain previously assigned to the K. exigua species, but having 3.8% difference (22 substitutions and 2 indels) in its ITS with respect to K. exigua. Hence, we describe a new taxon, Kazachstania australis sp. nov. (type strain CLIB 162T=CBS 2141T), to accommodate this strain. Finally, Candida humilis and Candida pseudohumilis are reassigned to the genus Kazachstania as new combinations. On the basis of sequence analysis, we also propose that Candida milleri and Kazachstania humilis comb. nov. are conspecific. © 2016 IUMS.


Zanine A.M.,Federal University of Mato Grosso | Santos E.M.,Federal University of Paraiba | Dorea J.R.R.,University of Sao Paulo | Dantas P.A.S.,University Estadual Santa Cruz | And 2 more authors.
Revista Brasileira de Zootecnia | Year: 2010

The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effects of adding cassava scrapings on gas and effluent losses, dry matter recovery, pH, contents of N-NH 3, organic acids and volatile fatty acids and the bromatological composition of elephant grass silages. It was used a randomized complete design, with four levels of cassava scrapings (0, 7, 15 or 30% natural matter) each one with four replications per level. The grass was cut at 50 days of regrowth and ensiled in 15-L silos, equipped with a Bunsen valve to allow gas outflow. The gas losses decreased quadratically with the addition of cassava scrapings, whereas effluent losses decreased linearly. Dry matter recovery increased quadratically with the addition of cassava scrapings. Dry matter (DM) concentration increased but crude protein (CP), neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF) and hemicellulose (HEM) decreased linearly with the addition of cassava scrapings. The pH value and lactic acid concentration increased quadratically with the addition of cassava scrapings. Contents of N-NH 3 and butyric acid decreased quadratically with the addition of cassava scrapings, whereas acetic acid content decreased linearly. Addition of cassava scrapings reduced gas and effluent losses and improved the fermentation profile of elephant grass silages and the level of 7% already ensures this improvement. © 2010 Sociedade Brasileira de Zootecnia.


PubMed | University of Western Ontario, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Federal University of Roraima, University Estadual Santa Cruz and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Antonie van Leeuwenhoek | Year: 2016

Sixteen yeast isolates identified as belonging to the genus Sugiyamaella were studied in relation to D-xylose fermentation, xylitol production, and xylanase activities. The yeasts were recovered from rotting wood and sugarcane bagasse samples in different Brazilian regions. Sequence analyses of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the D1/D2 domains of large subunit rRNA gene showed that these isolates belong to seven new species. The species are described here as Sugiyamaella ayubii f.a., sp. nov. (UFMG-CM-Y607


PubMed | University of Western Ontario, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Federal University of Minas Gerais, University Estadual Santa Cruz and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: FEMS yeast research | Year: 2016

Three novel D-xylose-fermenting yeast species of Spathaspora clade were recovered from rotting wood in regions of the Atlantic Rainforest ecosystem in Brazil. Differentiation of new species was based on analyses of the gene encoding the D1/D2 sequences of large subunit of rRNA and on 642 conserved, single-copy, orthologous genes from genome sequence assemblies from the newly described species and 15 closely-related Debaryomycetaceae/Metschnikowiaceae species. Spathaspora girioi sp. nov. produced unconjugated asci with a single elongated ascospore with curved ends; ascospore formation was not observed for the other two species. The three novel species ferment D-xylose with different efficiencies. Spathaspora hagerdaliae sp. nov. and Sp. girioi sp. nov. showed xylose reductase (XR) activity strictly dependent on NADPH, whereas Sp. gorwiae sp. nov. had XR activity that used both NADH and NADPH as co-factors. The genes that encode enzymes involved in D-xylose metabolism (XR, xylitol dehydrogenase and xylulokinase) were also identified for these novel species. The type strains are Sp. girioi sp. nov. UFMG-CM-Y302(T) (=CBS 13476), Sp. hagerdaliae f.a., sp. nov. UFMG-CM-Y303(T) (=CBS 13475) and Sp. gorwiae f.a., sp. nov. UFMG-CM-Y312(T) (=CBS 13472).


PubMed | Montpellier SupAgro, University Estadual Santa Cruz, French National Institute for Agricultural Research and Federal University of Minas Gerais
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of systematic and evolutionary microbiology | Year: 2016

Five ascosporogenous yeast strains related to the genus Kazachstania were isolated. Two strains (CLIB 1764T and CLIB 1780) were isolated from French sourdoughs; three others (UFMG-CM-Y273T, UFMG-CM-Y451 and UFMG-CM-Y452) were from rotting wood in Brazil. The sequences of the French and Brazilian strains differed by one and three substitutions, respectively, in the D1/D2 large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS). The D1/D2 LSU rRNA sequence of these strains differed by 0.5 and 0.7% from Kazachstania exigua, but their ITS sequences diverged by 8.1 and 8.3%, respectively, from that of the closest described species Kazachstania barnettii. Analysis of protein coding sequences of RPB1, RPB2 and EF-1 distinguished the French from the Brazilian strains, with respectively 3.3, 6 and 11.7% substitutions. Two novel species are described to accommodate these newly isolated strains: Kazachstania saulgeensis sp. nov. (type strain CLIB 1764T=CBS 14374T) and Kazachstania serrabonitensis sp. nov. (type strain UFMG-CM-Y273T=CLIB 1783T=CBS 14236T). Further analysis of culture collections revealed a strain previously assigned to the K. exigua species, but having 3.8% difference (22 substitutions and 2 indels) in its ITS with respect to K. exigua. Hence, we describe a new taxon, Kazachstania australis sp. nov. (type strain CLIB 162T=CBS 2141T), to accommodate this strain. Finally, Candida humilis and Candida pseudohumilis are reassigned to the genus Kazachstania as new combinations. On the basis of sequence analysis, we also propose that Candida milleri and Kazachstania humilis comb. nov. are conspecific.


Temporary wetlands undergo recurrent drought due to the scarcity of water, which disrupts the hydrological connectivity with adjacent aquatic systems. However, some environments retain water for longer periods, allowing greater persistence of the community. The current study evaluated differences in the microcrustacean assemblages and limnological variability between perennial and intermittent pools in a semi-arid region of Brazil. The abiotic features (water temperature, pH, total alkalinity, electrical conductivity and depth) of intermittent pools were affected more than perennial pools due to loss of water volume. This may have contributed to a higher average richness and diversity index in some intermittent pools and differences in the structure of the assemblages. The lowest species richness and diversity were recorded where physical factors, such as a large quantity of suspended solids and variability in the electrical conductivity of the water and pH, make the environment unsuitable for these organisms. These results suggest that community development in intermittent pools is interrupted by the dry season; when the water returns, due to rainfall or rising groundwater, each pond undergoes a different process of colonization. In these circumstances, the biological importance of temporary aquatic environments is clear, since such pools provide shelters and have an important role in the maintenance of the regional diversity of aquatic environments.


Curcio F.F.,University of Sao Paulo | Sales Nunes P.M.,University of Sao Paulo | Argolo A.J.S.,University Estadual Santa Cruz | Skuk G.,Federal University of Alagoas | Rodrigues M.T.,University of Sao Paulo
Herpetological Monographs | Year: 2012

A taxonomic study on the South American dwarf boas of the genus Tropidophis revealed the existence of two new species in the Atlantic Forest biome. As a result, we recognize five mainland species, three in the Atlantic Forest and two in northwestern South America. Based on general distribution and morphological orientation, the type locality of T. paucisquamis is restricted to Estação Biológica de Boracéia (EBB), municipality of Salesópolis, state of São Paulo, Brazil; furthermore, a lectotype for T. taczanowskyi is designated. We provide data on the hemipenial morphology of two South American Tropidophis, showing that the quadrifurcate condition described for West Indian taxa also occurs in mainland congeners. The distributions of the three Atlantic Forest species are congruent with patterns of diversification of other vertebrate taxa associated with cold climates prevalent at high elevations. Refugial isolation and riverine barriers may account for such speciation events. © The Herpetologists' League, Inc.


Da Silva D.G.,Federal University of Bahia | Scarminio I.S.,Federal University of Bahia | Scarminio I.S.,State University Londrina | Anunciacao D.S.,Federal University of Bahia | And 3 more authors.
Analytical Methods | Year: 2013

The mineral composition of Brazilian rice samples was determined and the data obtained were evaluated using principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). Nineteen commercial rice samples were analyzed, six being brown, seven parboiled and six white. The elements were determined employing inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES), and the accuracy was confirmed using a certified reference material of rice flour. The PCA showed the formation of three clusters: a group with the brown rice samples, other with the parboiled rice samples and another of the white rice samples. PCA also showed that the brown rice samples are richer in minerals than the white and parboiled rice samples. Calcium, sodium, zinc and manganese in white rice samples are higher than in parboiled rice samples, while the parboiled rice has higher contents of iron, magnesium, strontium, potassium and phosphor. HCA also demonstrated formation of three major groups, confirming the results obtained by PCA. Application of HCA in the subgroups of rice samples clearly showed separation of rice brands and also separation between the raw and cooked samples. The mineral composition in the rice samples analyzed agrees with data reported by other authors. This paper revealed that the mineral compositions for white, brown and parboiled rice are significantly different. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Morais C.G.,Federal University of Minas Gerais | Cadete R.M.,Federal University of Minas Gerais | Uetanabaro A.P.T.,University Estadual Santa Cruz | Rosa L.H.,Federal University of Minas Gerais | And 2 more authors.
Fungal Genetics and Biology | Year: 2013

This study investigated the yeast species associated with rotting wood in Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest ecosystems focusing on the identification of D-xylose-fermenting and/or xylanase-producing species. A total of 321 yeast strains were isolated from rotting wood samples collected in two Atlantic Rainforest areas. These samples were cultured in yeast nitrogen base (YNB)-D-xylose or YNB-xylan media. Schwanniomyces polymorphus, Scheffersomyces queiroziae, Barnettozyma californica, and Candida (Ogataea) boidinii were the most frequently isolated yeasts. The rarefaction curves for the yeast communities isolated in YNB-D-xylose and YNB-xylan from both areas continued to rise and did not reach an asymptote, indicating that not all yeast diversity had been recovered. Additionally, the yeast composition was variable among the samples and areas, which was confirmed by the values of the Sorensen index. Among the 69 species identified, only 12 were found in both areas sampled. Fifteen possible new species were obtained. Among them, two species (Sugiyamaella sp. 1 and Sugiyamaella xylanicola) showed the ability to ferment D-xylose into ethanol, and three species (Spencermartinsiella sp. 1, Su. xylanicola and Tremella sp.) were able to produce extracellular xylanases. Indeed, most of the xylanase-producing isolates belong to the new species Su. xylanicola, which was also positive for D-xylose fermentation. S. queiroziae and S. stipitis were the main D-xylose-fermenting yeasts identified. The results of this work showed that rotting wood collected from the Atlantic Rainforests is a huge source of yeasts, including new species, with promising biotechnological properties. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.


Do Sacramento C.K.,University Estadual Santa Cruz | Do Sacramento C.K.,University Estadual Julio Mesquita
Revista Brasileira de Fruticultura | Year: 2014

The cultivation of rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.) is a recent activity in Brazil and many of the technical recommendations are extrapolated from other producing countries. In Brazil, the commercial plantation of rambutan, are restricted to the states of Bahia, Pará and São Paulo and are formed by plants propagated sexually, and so presents a high genetic variability. This variability rambuteiras has allowed the selection of genotypes that produce fruit with the features required for export. Some pests and diseases have been reported in rambuteiras in Brazil. The production is sold domestically as fresh fruit. © 2014, Sociedade Brasileira de Fruticultura. All rights reserved.

Loading University Estadual Santa Cruz collaborators
Loading University Estadual Santa Cruz collaborators