Cape Coast, Ghana

West End University College

www.weuc.edu.gh
Cape Coast, Ghana
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Green A.L.,West End University College | Green A.L.,James Cook University | Maypa A.P.,Coastal Conservation and Education Foundation | Almany G.R.,CNRS Insular Research Center and Environment Observatory | And 7 more authors.
Biological Reviews | Year: 2015

Well-designed and effectively managed networks of marine reserves can be effective tools for both fisheries management and biodiversity conservation. Connectivity, the demographic linking of local populations through the dispersal of individuals as larvae, juveniles or adults, is a key ecological factor to consider in marine reserve design, since it has important implications for the persistence of metapopulations and their recovery from disturbance. For marine reserves to protect biodiversity and enhance populations of species in fished areas, they must be able to sustain focal species (particularly fishery species) within their boundaries, and be spaced such that they can function as mutually replenishing networks whilst providing recruitment subsidies to fished areas. Thus the configuration (size, spacing and location) of individual reserves within a network should be informed by larval dispersal and movement patterns of the species for which protection is required. In the past, empirical data regarding larval dispersal and movement patterns of adults and juveniles of many tropical marine species have been unavailable or inaccessible to practitioners responsible for marine reserve design. Recent empirical studies using new technologies have also provided fresh insights into movement patterns of many species and redefined our understanding of connectivity among populations through larval dispersal. Our review of movement patterns of 34 families (210 species) of coral reef fishes demonstrates that movement patterns (home ranges, ontogenetic shifts and spawning migrations) vary among and within species, and are influenced by a range of factors (e.g. size, sex, behaviour, density, habitat characteristics, season, tide and time of day). Some species move <0.1-0.5 km (e.g. damselfishes, butterflyfishes and angelfishes), <0.5-3 km (e.g. most parrotfishes, goatfishes and surgeonfishes) or 3-10 km (e.g. large parrotfishes and wrasses), while others move tens to hundreds (e.g. some groupers, emperors, snappers and jacks) or thousands of kilometres (e.g. some sharks and tuna). Larval dispersal distances tend to be <5-15 km, and self-recruitment is common. Synthesising this information allows us, for the first time, to provide species, specific advice on the size, spacing and location of marine reserves in tropical marine ecosystems to maximise benefits for conservation and fisheries management for a range of taxa. We recommend that: (i) marine reserves should be more than twice the size of the home range of focal species (in all directions), thus marine reserves of various sizes will be required depending on which species require protection, how far they move, and if other effective protection is in place outside reserves; (ii) reserve spacing should be <15 km, with smaller reserves spaced more closely; and (iii) marine reserves should include habitats that are critical to the life history of focal species (e.g. home ranges, nursery grounds, migration corridors and spawning aggregations), and be located to accommodate movement patterns among these. We also provide practical advice for practitioners on how to use this information to design, evaluate and monitor the effectiveness of marine reserve networks within broader ecological, socioeconomic and management contexts. © 2014 The Nature Conservancy.


PubMed | The Nature Conservancy, West End University College, James Cook University, Silliman University and 4 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Biological reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society | Year: 2015

Well-designed and effectively managed networks of marine reserves can be effective tools for both fisheries management and biodiversity conservation. Connectivity, the demographic linking of local populations through the dispersal of individuals as larvae, juveniles or adults, is a key ecological factor to consider in marine reserve design, since it has important implications for the persistence of metapopulations and their recovery from disturbance. For marine reserves to protect biodiversity and enhance populations of species in fished areas, they must be able to sustain focal species (particularly fishery species) within their boundaries, and be spaced such that they can function as mutually replenishing networks whilst providing recruitment subsidies to fished areas. Thus the configuration (size, spacing and location) of individual reserves within a network should be informed by larval dispersal and movement patterns of the species for which protection is required. In the past, empirical data regarding larval dispersal and movement patterns of adults and juveniles of many tropical marine species have been unavailable or inaccessible to practitioners responsible for marine reserve design. Recent empirical studies using new technologies have also provided fresh insights into movement patterns of many species and redefined our understanding of connectivity among populations through larval dispersal. Our review of movement patterns of 34 families (210 species) of coral reef fishes demonstrates that movement patterns (home ranges, ontogenetic shifts and spawning migrations) vary among and within species, and are influenced by a range of factors (e.g. size, sex, behaviour, density, habitat characteristics, season, tide and time of day). Some species move <0.1-0.5 km (e.g. damselfishes, butterflyfishes and angelfishes), <0.5-3 km (e.g. most parrotfishes, goatfishes and surgeonfishes) or 3-10 km (e.g. large parrotfishes and wrasses), while others move tens to hundreds (e.g. some groupers, emperors, snappers and jacks) or thousands of kilometres (e.g. some sharks and tuna). Larval dispersal distances tend to be <5-15 km, and self-recruitment is common. Synthesising this information allows us, for the first time, to provide species, specific advice on the size, spacing and location of marine reserves in tropical marine ecosystems to maximise benefits for conservation and fisheries management for a range of taxa. We recommend that: (i) marine reserves should be more than twice the size of the home range of focal species (in all directions), thus marine reserves of various sizes will be required depending on which species require protection, how far they move, and if other effective protection is in place outside reserves; (ii) reserve spacing should be <15 km, with smaller reserves spaced more closely; and (iii) marine reserves should include habitats that are critical to the life history of focal species (e.g. home ranges, nursery grounds, migration corridors and spawning aggregations), and be located to accommodate movement patterns among these. We also provide practical advice for practitioners on how to use this information to design, evaluate and monitor the effectiveness of marine reserve networks within broader ecological, socioeconomic and management contexts.


PubMed | West End University College, University of Queensland, World Wildlife Fund, James Cook University and University of Melbourne
Type: | Journal: Ecological applications : a publication of the Ecological Society of America | Year: 2016

Larval dispersal by ocean currents is a critical component of systematic marine protected area (MPA) design. However, there is a lack of quantitative methods to incorporate larval dispersal in support of increasingly diverse management objectives, including local population persistence under multiple types of threats (primarily focused on larval retention within and dispersal between protected locations) and benefits to unprotected populations and fisheries (primarily focused on larval export from protected locations to fishing grounds). Here, we present a flexible MPA design approach that can reconcile multiple such potentially conflicting management objectives by balancing various associated treatments of larval dispersal information. We demonstrate our approach based on alternative dispersal patterns, combinations of threats to populations, management objectives, and two different optimization strategies (site vs. network-based). Our outcomes highlight a consistently high efficiency in selecting priority locations that are self-replenishing, inter-connected, and/or important larval sources. We find that the opportunity to balance these three dispersal attributes flexibly can help not only to prevent meta-population collapse, but also to ensure effective fisheries recovery, with average increases in the number of recruits at fishing grounds at least two-times higher than achieved by standard habitat-based or ad-hoc MPA designs. Future applications of our MPA design approach should therefore be encouraged, specifically where management tools other than MPAs are not feasible. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.


Broad G.R.,Natural History Museum in London | Davis A.M.,West End University College
Entomologist's Gazette | Year: 2015

Based on a single specimen collected in Broadwater Forest, East Sussex, Lymantrichneumon disparis (Poda, 1761) is reliably recorded for the first time in Britain. As a large and distinctive icheumonid parasitoid of Lymantria pupae, this probably represents a recent colonisation of southern England. © 2015, Pemberley Books Publishing. All rights reserved.


West End University College | Entity website

Matured ApplicantsMature Applicants must satisfy the following requirements for admission into the BBA programme: The applicant must be at least 25 years old, and show proof of age with birth certificate or any legitimate documentary proof of date of birth which is at least 25 years old at the time of application. Applicants must pass an entrance examination conducted by the West End University College under supervision of mentor institution, Cape Coast University ...


West End University College | Entity website

B.Sc ...


West End University College | Entity website

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS ASSISTANCE WEUC, is aware of challenges international students face from the period of entering a new university, to exit from the University. The challenges identified relate to students feeling as part of the University community, level of interaction with other students, networking, career planning and development ...


West End University College | Entity website

Matured ApplicantsMature Applicants must satisfy the following requirements for admission into the BBA programme: The applicant must be at least 25 years old, and show proof of age with birth certificate or any legitimate documentary proof of date of birth which is at least 25 years old at the time of application. Applicants must pass an entrance examination conducted by the West End University College under supervision of mentor institution, Cape Coast University ...


West End University College | Entity website

Matured ApplicantsMature Applicants must satisfy the following requirements for admission into the BBA programme: The applicant must be at least 25 years old, and show proof of age with birth certificate or any legitimate documentary proof of date of birth which is at least 25 years old at the time of application. Applicants must pass an entrance examination conducted by the West End University College under supervision of mentor institution, Cape Coast University ...


News Article | November 28, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.com

WEST END, Bahamas, Nov. 28, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- On December 19, 2016, Old Bahama Bay Resort & Yacht Harbour will reopen its hotel, marina, and Dockside Grille restaurant to our guests after being closed since October 6th 2016 due to the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew.   Photo - h...

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